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Deploying Lecture Capture

7 Best Practices for Deploying Lecture Capture Campuswide

Technology leaders from universities with large lecture capture implementations share their advice for rolling out the technology at scale.

By Leila Meyer 08/03/16

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/08/03/7-best-practices-for-deploying-lecture-capture-campuswide.aspx

1) Automate the Recording Process to Make It Effortless

The Department of Instructional Technology

Echo360 lecture capture appliances and some Sonic Foundry Mediasite appliances. While lecture capture appliances are “not cheap,” according to Lucas, they reduce the complexity for faculty and staff.

Sonic Foundry Mediasite appliances with CollegeNET 25Live scheduling software to automate the lecture capture process.

2) Focus on Implementation in Large-Capacity Classrooms

installing lecture capture appliances and high-definition cameras in the large lecture halls at UMass Lowell has helped reduce DFWs (drop, fail, withdrawal rate) in high-enrollment classes such as Calculus 1.

3) Establish Relationships with Leadership and Early Adopters

4) Ensure High-Quality Audio Recording

“You might be able to get by if you don’t see the instructor, of if they step outside the viewing angle of the camera, but if you can’t hear them, the capture is wasted. It’s critical that they pay attention to audio.”

5) Offer Flexibility for Instructors to Record Lectures Anywhere/Anytime

6) Ensure Adequate Storage and Processing on Servers

7) Engage with Other Colleges and Universities

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more on lecture capture in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=lecture+capture

MN eSummit 2015

#MNsummit2015

Main speaker

Aaron Doering

aaron doening

aaron doening

Engagement not completion

Design experience not product

Create change, not simply respond to it

He was a geography teacher : Dimitrina

Experience explore expand. Adventure based how to collaborate in ways we have not collaborated before pedagogical guidelines internet driven

Instructor – content – design

Today: first think is design, content, instructor. So how do we design learning environments is the most important one

Guide learners as designers. Constructivism. Design for meaning. Through the power of the story.

Geotetic  design a learning environment learn geography using GIS

Situated movies (student-centered learning)

Grant Earthducation go to the most remote parts of the world to align their education with their culture, instead of what the government is downing as culture

Use of phone: whoever answers instructor’s question first, gets to pose the next question to the rest of the audience.

Design based research

Self-narrative, referencing the experience real world issues in real time

  1. reference knowledge . knowledge overlap. Technological pedagogical content knowledge.

Geotetic not only how prepare teachers, but desing learning environmwer of the story.

we explore: https://www.we-explore.com/

9.5 design as a learner.

the U Media Lab.
The Changing Earth. App GoX (instagram on steroids.  tell their story through the app). How is this different from Google Earth
Raptor Lab (rehabilitate a raptor).

  1. design experiences
  2. build trust
  3. guide learners as designers
  4. recognize learners as experts
  5. encourage collaboration
  6. inspire self narrative
  7. reference the knowledge domains
  8. teach for change
  9. design as learner

adoering@umn.edi     chasingseals.com   @chasingseals

 

podcast pontification (audio version of blog self reflections)

 Greg Steinke The U
A Digital Story Assignment using WeVideo

wevideo

WeVideo is the Google response to iMovie cloud

The U is on Google email and thus google drive and all other google tools

The Center for Digital Storytelling. short videos, 3-5 min incorporate photographs with the author narration, reflection

Assignment (verbal directions). process (write a 2 page script, every page is about a minute of video), gather images that support the story; edit the script (rewrite); record audio to the script (use an app on the phone instead of WeVideo), WeVideo can edit the audio recording; edit the story, edit the photos to match the story; YourTube and/or Google+

working with faculty: is the digital story a good fit for your course? two questions: does the course have many writing assignments? does everyone have to do the same type of assignment? do you want to offer choices? do you want your students to share their work outside of the class? to you want to explore opportunities for students to develop 21 century skills?

google communities for sharing

wewideo has a tutorial at Center for Digital Storytelling

students can use the digital story for their eportfolio

the entire exercise is entirely based on mobile devices

time frame: scaffolding options

3d printing products were the tangible result of the project and the digital storytelling just the format to present

Google Drive master folder for the phone images and video; iOS apps: MoviePro, FiLMc Pro, VoiceRecord Pro (including mp3); Android: WeVideo

Storyboard template

Faculty Development Programs: Digital Storytelling Community of Practice

http://it.umn.edu/faculty-development-programs-digital-0

Poster sessions:

Brad Hokanson

http://dha.design.umn.edu/faculty/BHokanson.html

iPAD video kit:

ipad video kit

Laurie Conzemius
Critical Thinking

laurie

ISTE: http://conference.iste.org/2016/
Joe Lau critical thinking

apps: Popplet  blog.popplet.com  http://www.popplet.com/ (mindmapping)

into the book: http://reading.ecb.org/

Kahoot – the token system. Polleverywhere  http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/05/21/polls-and-surveys-tools-for-education/

Symbaloo https://www.symbaloo.com/home/mix/13eOcK1fiV zotero, easybib, delicious, diigo depending on the grade

youth voices; http://youthvoices.net/ replace social media like teachertube is trying to replace youtube

quandary games in education. https://www.quandarygame.org/ sim city

citizen science alliance http://www.citizensciencealliance.org/

Toontastic https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/toontastic/id404693282?mt=8 now free  storytelling

coding and programming: https://www.makewonder.com/robots/dashanddot  scratch

Osmo : https://www.playosmo.com/en/ $79.99 + give a set for free Stride principle as a parental involvement

chainlink;

kickword; https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.makario.wordkick

red herring (four categories) https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.BlueOxTech.RedHerring&hl=en

http://www.mathplayground.com/logicgames.html

http://www.mathplayground.com/thinkingblocks.html

evaluation:

telestory  https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/telestory/id915378506?mt=8

explain everything http://explaineverything.com/

 

Exploring and Connecting 3D Printing to Teaching and Learning Jason Spartz, Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota

http://pubs.lib.umn.edu/minnesota-elearning-summit/2015/program/23/

http://pubs.lib.umn.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1023&context=minnesota-elearning-summit

3db 3da 3d lisa

Jason Spartz, Saint Mary’s University of MinnesotaFollow
Lisa Truax, Saint Mary’s University of MinnesotaFollow
Karen Sorvaag, Saint Mary’s University of MinnesotaFollow
Brett Bodsgard, Saint Mary’s University of MinnesotaFollow

chemistry professor. 3D printing with different materials.
what else can be made (e.g. reaction vessel)

printing of atoms

crystalography dbase

Karen: pre-service teachers professor: how to use 3d printers and be comfortable with them. Steve Hoover. Thinkercad and Autodesk123D>
3D academy http://www.team3dacademy.com/index2.html
. Pinterest board for3d Printing with resources

Lisa: graphic design. not intuitive.  Rhinoceros (not free anymore). 123D strong learning curve. 3d printing will be incorporated in the curriculum.  sculpture students and others don’t like fudging on the computer, but Adobe people love it. Some items takes up to 4 hours to print out. when working on the computer is difficult for some students to visualize the dimensionality.

collaborative learning opportunities.

no makerspace or fab lab. additional interest from the theater and business dept. 3d printing is connected to future work skills. new media ecology or media literacy set of skills.

the main presenter: build excitement and interest and gradually step back. how much material goes through and should we charge back. clean and maintenance involved; not too bad. better then a copier. plastic inexpensive. sizes with plastic – $25 and $50. how many project of a spool: depending on the size of the projects but considerable amount. two printers one art dept and one in the faculty dev area.

non profit visually impaired students.  how 3d can make difference in special ed.

3d printing lab with access for everybody. ownership brings policy. where housed: neutral place.

only one printer is barely sufficient for faculty to figure out how to use it. purchasing two more if students and curricula to be involved.

 

3dc 3d lisa 3da 3db

 

The Balancing Act: Team-Creating an eBook as an Alternative Method for Content Delivery Tom Nechodomu, University of Minnesota

ebook

tnecho@umn.edu
Susan Andre sandre@umn.edu
Linda Buturian butur001@umn.edu
Faculty Created digital stories – google “cultivaitng change series”
student created digital stories –
http://www.cehd.umn.edu/academics/online/
http://www.cehd.umn.edu/PSTL/water/
http://www.cehd.umn.edu/The-Changing-story/
Susan Andre uses a slide titled “trust” to elucidate how the entire project was enabled. “trust” and “transparency” are sparse currency in the environment I work in. if she is right an ebook ain’t happening anytime soon at my place.
inclining habitat.
students involvement. use stipends. student artists. food for the video interviews. create a community, student centered.
people able to change the book.
copyright process; did you find it cumbersome. copyright permission center.
time span and amount of hours spent: 3-4 months per chapter.

Main speaker
David Wiley. Making Teaching and Learning Awesome with Open

MN Learning Commons
open educational resources
LUMEN
lumen
education – sharing feedback, encouragement with students passion about the discipline, yourself
open is not the same as free.  free + permissions + copyright permission: 5 r = retain (make and own copies), reuse (use in a wide range of ways), revise (adapt, modify, and improve), remix (combine two or more), redistribute (share with others)
open:
free and unfettered access
perpetual, irrevocable copyright permissions
(look but don’t touch is not open)
tech enables OER permits
traditionally copyright materials on the Internet – not so good ; jet on the road
openly copyright materials on the internet _ yes: jet in the air
permission-less innovation. relatively inexpensive and broad permissions.
intellectual infrastructure of education: learning outcomes/objectives; assessments; textbooks. they are relatively expensive and narrow permissions.
disappearing ink strategies: buyback, rental, ebooks, online subscription
 mad, glad, sad, rad: the grumpy cat. student success per dollar
opennetgroup.org/review
change in student learning: replace commercial with open books – small. realign, bigger change. rethink is the large change.
responsibilities:
attribution and meeting other license requirements
thin common cartridge: a way to bring the content to the CMS, but the content remains on the creative commons
github.com/lumenlearning https://github.com/lumenlearning
disposable assignment: students hate doing them, instructors hate grading them. waste of time and energy
renewable assignment: students see value in doing them; instructor sees value grading them
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AsFU3sAlPx4
so what?
open education infrastructure: open outcomes, objectives, activities, educational resources
the culture of glued legos must be eradicated. open pedagogy. open credentialing model
summary: don’t settle for “affordable.” improve student outcomes. improve affordability. improve design / academic freedom

links generated from the discussion at my presentation:

https://www.google.com/search?q=tin+can&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8

http://www.uwosh.edu/library/quizsmith

http://glickconsulting.com/resouce_brainegames

https://www.google.com/search?q=techers+skills&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8

http://www.northeastern.edu/camd/gamedesign/people/sebastian-deterding/

https://www.duolingo.com/  Duolingo. App to learn languages using games

http://www.gamification.co/gabe-zichermann/

https://zebrazapps.com/  ZebraZapps

grading

Game-Changing Grading Changes

http://www.techlearning.com/blogentry/9149

Grade the Product AND the Process

With Revision History, I’ve seen students work just two hours on a paper the night before it’s due and others spend considerable time and effort on a paper. Whatever the case may be, I can identify and address what I see in Revision History with a student to help them grow. My note: use wiki or Google Apps to be able to track changes in revision

Use Kaizena for Effective Feedback – Many teachers have discovered the awesome benefits of filming themselves and their lessons, but what about recording feedback? My note: use audio recording for feedback. a more positive place to learn because my students could now hear the intonation and inflection in my voice when I delivered feedback, not have their hearts broken by red ink. They could hear the positivity with which I reviewed their work and provided feedback.

Rethinking How We Grade Group Work

I had students submit group contracts which clearly stated when and where they would meet and who was responsible for completing what, when. This contract was used in our post-project meetings. By having clearly defined tasks and roles, each student was held accountable. Make them be specific. Instead of Tina will do research by Friday get them as close  to Tina will find five usable sources for the project and get them to Tom on the shared planning Doc by 3pm Friday.

Remember Revision History? It’s great for group projects because a Revision History is created for every person the Doc is shared with. Revision History can help a teacher see who contributed to group work and when because on any shared item in Google Drive, each individual is assigned their own color and timestamp. We can now better see how much each group member has contributed to an assignment. We can take this into consideration when grading, or, better yet, be proactive and intervene when a group’s shared planning Doc looks like one person is doing all the work

1) After a project, I gave students a Google Form where they could provide anonymous feedback on their peers efforts during the project. The Form also allowed students to grade these efforts using a rubric. I would then average the grades for each individual student and share the anonymous feedback at the post-group meetings. I would give them an opportunity to reflect on the feedback as a group and speak to the fairness of their averaged grade. Through this process we would come to an agreement on an individual grade for the project and a list of takeaways the could use to improve for next time.

feedback w technology

How to Give Your Students Better Feedback With Technology ADVICE GUIDE

y Holly Fiock and Heather Garcia

https://www.chronicle.com/interactives/20191108-Advice-Feedback

students continue to report dissatisfaction with the feedback they get on assignments and tests — calling it vague, discouraging, and/or late.

The use of technology in the classroom (both in face-to-face and online environments)

  • Rubrics: online scoring guides to evaluate students’ work.
  • Annotations: notes or comments added digitally to essays and other assignments.
  • Audio: a sound file of your voice giving feedback on students’ work.
  • Video: a recorded file of you offering feedback either as a “talking head,” a screencast, or a mix of both.
  • Peer review: online systems in which students review one another’s work.

Two main types of feedback — formative and summative — work together in that process but have different purposes. Formative feedback occurs during the learning process and is used to monitor progress. Summative feedback happens at the end of a lesson or a unit and is used to evaluate the achievement of the learning outcomes.

Good feedback should be: Frequent, Specific, Balanced, Timely

guide on inclusive teaching, frequent, low-stakes assessments are an inclusive teaching practice.

Time-Saving Approaches: rubrics and peer-reviews.

When to Use Audio or Video Tools for Feedback: personalize your feedback, convey nuance, demonstrate a process, avoid miscommunication

Faculty interest in classroom innovation is on the rise. Professors are trying all sorts of new techniques to improve the first few minutes of class, to make their teaching more engaging, to hold better class discussions. Buzzwords like active learningauthentic assessmenttechnology integration, and case-based learning are more and more a part of faculty discussions.

Don’t assume technology will solve every problem.

Avoid making long videos

Video and audio feedback doesn’t have to be perfect.

There is such a thing as too much information.

Have a plan.

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more on feedback in education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=feedback

Bryan Alexander EdTech class

Follow Along With a Grad Seminar About Edtech: Part 1, Picking the Best Tech

By Bryan Alexander     Mar 12, 2019

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2019-03-12-follow-along-with-a-grad-seminar-about-edtech-part-1-picking-the-best-tech

a tech catalog for students to explore and choose from, partially based on Georgetown’s enterprise suite, including a learning management system (Canvas), blogging (WordPress or other), student-run web domains, web annotation (Hypothesis) https://web.hypothes.is/, collaborative writing (Google Suite), discussion boards (Discourse), and videoconferencing (Zoom).

Neil Selwyn’s excellent Education and Technology: Key Issues and Debates.

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How Can Digital Audio Enhance Teaching and Learning?

By Bryan Alexander     Mar 28, 2019

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2019-03-28-grad-seminar-on-edtech-part-2-how-can-digital-audio-enhance-teaching-and-learning

Before there were podcasts, there was pirate radio, rogue broadcasters flinging unusual sounds over borders and adding new music to cultures. And before that there was the “theater of the mind,” harnessing radio’s deep power to inspire listeners’ imaginations.

Then we advanced to podcasting’s second wave—the one we’re enjoying now—the one sparked by Serial’s massive success in 2014. When you consider audiobooks in the mix, it’s clear how varied and mainstream portable digital audio is today.

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https://www.edsurge.com/news/2019-04-18-video-assignments-are-the-new-term-paper-how-does-that-change-teaching-and-learning

Digital video has taken the world by storm. Netflix is busy changing television and movies. YouTube may be humanity’s largest collaborative cultural project, aggregating an astonishing amount of user-generated content. The Google-owned service is widely used that it may already soak up more than a third of all mobile traffic.

Unsurprisingly, we increasingly learn from digital video. The realm of informal learning is well represented on YouTube—from DIY instruction to guerrilla recordings of public speakers. Traditional colleges now rely on digital video, too, as campuses have established official channels and faculty regularly turn to YouTube for content. And new kinds of educational institutions have emerged, like the nonprofit Khan Academy,

We also explored the rise of teaching via live video. More colleges are using it for online learning, since it can make students and instructors more present to each other than most other media. We also saw videoconferencing’s usefulness in connecting students and faculty when separated by travel, illness or scheduling challenges.

Our readings—Zac Woolfitt’s “The effective use of video in higher education,” and Michelle Kosalka’s “Using Synchronous Tools to Build Community in the Asynchronous Online Classroom”—and discussion identified a range of limitations to video’s utility. Videoconferencing requires robust internet connection that not all students have access to, and even downloading video clips can be challenging on some connections. People are not always comfortable appearing on camera. And some content is not well suited to video, such as mostly audio conversations or still images.

virtual reality book tours

Virtual Reality Book Tours

SEPTEMBER 6, 2018

https://www.freetech4teachers.com/2018/09/virtual-reality-book-tours.html

Google’s VR Tour Creator

Vocaroo provides an easy way to record and download spoken audio.

This video provides an overview of the basic steps needed to make a VR tour. To add audio to the tour, follow the steps outlined in this video. And watch this video to learn how to layer-in pictures

VR Book Tour With Patches. is a free online tool for creating virtual reality scenes.

Teaching history with technology

Teaching history with technology

http://www.edteck.com/dbq/more/analyzing.htm

http://teachingprimarysources.illinoisstate.edu/MCTPS/PD_Guide/Section_4.pdf

https://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/worksheets

https://www.loc.gov/teachers/usingprimarysources/

Analysis worksheets, evidence, and primary documents

https://conference.iste.org/uploads/ISTE2017/HANDOUTS/KEY_108132637/29732_flyer_CP_DocAnaly.pdf

https://www.iste.org/explore/articleDetail?articleid=15&category=Set-the-standard&article=
(see rubric)

https://www.iste.org/docs/excerpts/MEDLIT-excerpt.pdf
(see rubric)

  • Using technology to help students analyze historical/ primary source documents.
  • Making artifacts interactive.
  • Hosting online history discussions
  • The importance of structure and expectations.
  • Using audio in history lessons
  • Recording history with students
  • Hearing history
  • Creating multimedia timelines with students.
  • Simple to complex options for every grade level.
  • Creating multimedia maps
  • Search Strategies for History Students
  • Saving and sharing search results.
  • Google Maps and Earth are not your only options.
  • Creating videos and teaching with video.
  • Making and using virtual tours.
  • Virtual Reality tours.
  • Augmented Reality tours.

Thinglink, Google Expeditions, Poly, 3D printing

sound and the brain

What Types of Sound Experiences Enable Children to Learn Best?

https://www.kqed.org/mindshift/46824/what-types-of-sound-experiences-enable-children-to-learn-best
At Northwestern’s Auditory Neuroscience Lab, Kraus and colleagues measure how the brain responds when various sounds enter the ear. They’ve found that the brain reacts to sound in microseconds, and that brain waves closely resemble the sound waves.
Making sense of sound is one of the most “computationally complex” functions of the brain, Kraus said, which explains why so many language and other disorders, including autism, reveal themselves in the way the brain processes sound. The way the brain responds to the “ingredients” of sound—pitching, timing and timbre—is a window into brain health and learning ability.

practical suggestions for creating space “activities that promote sound-to-meaning development,” whether at home or in school:
Reduce noise. Chronic background noise is associated with several auditory and learning problems: it contributes to “neural noise,” wherein brain neurons fire spontaneously in the absence of sound; it reduces the brain’s sensitivity to sound; and it slows auditory growth.
Read aloud. Even before kids are able to read themselves, hearing stories told by others develops vocabulary and builds working memory; to understand how a story unfolds, listeners, need to remember what was said before.
Encourage children to play a musical instrument. “There is an explicit link between making music and strengthening language skills, so that keeping music education at the center of curricula can pay big dividends for children’s cognitive, emotional, and educational health.Two years of music instruction in elementary and even secondary school can trigger biological changes in how the brain processes sound, which in turn affects language development.
Listen to audiobooks and podcasts. Well-told stories can draw kids in and build attention skills and working memory. The number and quality of these recordings has exploded in recent years, making it that much easier to find a good fit for individuals and classes.
Support learning a second language. Growing up in a bilingual environment causes a child’s brain to manage two languages at once.
Avoid white noise machines. In an effort to soothe children to sleep, some parents set up sound machines in bedrooms. These devices, which emit “meaningless sound,” as Kraus put it, can interfere with how the brain develops sound-processing circuitry.
Use the spread of technology to your advantage. Rather than bemoan the constant bleeping and chirping of everyday life, much of it the result of technological advances, welcome the new sound opportunities these developments provide. Technologies that shrink the globalized world enable second-language learning.

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More on the brain in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=brain

Data Privacy Lessons in Alternative Reality Games

How Data Privacy Lessons in Alternative Reality Games Can Help Kids In Real Life

https://www.kqed.org/mindshift/51772/how-data-privacy-lessons-in-alternative-reality-games-can-help-kids-in-real-life

Ubiquitous social media platforms—including Facebook, Twitter and Instagram—have created a venue for people to share and connect with others. We use these services by clicking “I Agree” on Terms of Service screens, trading off some of our private and personal data for seemingly free services. While these services say data collection helps create a better user experience, that data is also potentially exploitable.

The news about how third parties obtain and use Facebook users’ data to wage political campaigns and the mounting evidence of election interference have shined a spotlight on just how secure our data is when we share online. Educating youth about data security can fall under the larger umbrella of digital citizenship, such as social media uses and misuses and learning how not to embarrass or endanger oneself while using the internet.

Darvasi’s students in Toronto can pool together 55 faux bitcoins to purchase and launch the BOTTING protocol against an opponent. The student targeted at Fallon’s school in Connecticut would then have 48 hours to record audio of 10 words of Darvasi’s students choosing and send it back to them through an intermediary (Darvasi or Fallon). For a higher price of 65 faux bitcoins, students can launch MORPHLING, which would give the opponent 48 hours to record a one-minute video explaining three ways to stay safe while using Facebook, while making their school mascot (or a close approximation of) appear in the video in some way during the entire minute.

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more on digital citizenship in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+citizenship

Use of Academic Library Information Technology Lending Programs

Primary Research Group has published the: Survey of American College Students:
Use of Academic Library Information Technology Lending Programs, ISBN 978-
157440-510-1
This study looks at which devices and technologies students check out for loan
from college libraries, presenting detailed statistics on their use of
laptops, tablets, smartphones, cameras and camcorders, mics and audio
recorders, tripods, external hard drives, calculators, headphones and
headsets, student response systems or “clickers”, mobile device chargers,
presentation technology and other devices and technologies.
The study also presents results of an open-ended question through which
students make known their wish lists for technologies and devices that they
would like to see available, or more available, from their academic libraries.
Data in the report is presented in the aggregate and then broken out
separately for fifteen different variables including but not limited to:
college grades, gender, income level, year of college standing, SAT/ACT
scores, regional origin, age, sexual orientation, race & ethnicity, college
major and other personal variables, and by Carnegie class, enrollment size and
public/private status of the survey participants institutions of higher
education.
Just a few of this 110-page report’s many findings are that:
By a ratio of nearly 2:1 females were much more ardent borrowers than men of
student response systems or “tickers” technology: 3.46% of women vs. 1.72% of
men had borrowed them.  Gay students were also more than twice as likely as
straight students to borrow this technology; 6.93% vs. 2.35%. Use also tends
to correlate with high ACT or SAT scores, the higher the score, the greater
the likelihood that a student has borrowed a clicker from their college
library.
The tendency to borrow calculators was lowest among students specializing in
mathematics, computer science, statistics and engineering.
Private college students were four times more likely than those at public
colleges to borrow tripods.
For a table of contents and an excerpt view the product page for this report
on our website at:  https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.primaryresearch.com%2FAddCart.aspx%3FReportID%3D493&data=01%7C01%7Cpmiltenoff%40stcloudstate.edu%7C441e49daa0414c423d7f08d5ab861e17%7C5e40e2ed600b4eeaa9851d0c9dcca629%7C0&sdata=QEdbJmUmy%2BPvdEZYXOZU82a16bZXF52Peo%2BBuIumMT4%3D&reserved=0

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