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audio recording and editing

5 Audio Recording Tools Compared – 2018 Chart-13pizlw

Anchor.fm

vocaroo.com  (creates QR code to the recording session)

audacityteam.org

apple.com/mac/garageband/

twistedwave.com

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more on audio recording in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=audio+recording

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=audio+edit

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=podcast

 

audio recording

TwistedWave for Education

TwistedWave is an audio recording and editing tool that is included in Next Vista’s list of recommended tools. Through TwistedWave you can create and edit spoken audio recordings from scratch. Your completed tracks can be exported to Google Drive and SoundCloud.

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more on audio recordings in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=audio+record

5 Tips for eLearning Voice Recording

5 Tips for eLearning Voice Recording

http://elearningindustry.com/5-tips-for-elearning-voice-recording

These are the top 5 frequent e-Learning voice recording situations that I’ve come across:

  1. A.C.R.O.N.Y.M.S.
    Is this pronounced A-C-R-O-N-Y-M-S or ‘acronyms’? Is it read as letters or read as a word? A lot of scripts do have acronyms related to company or industry jargon. Define this in the script to avoid confusion and save re-records! You can use ALL CAPS but that may not be enough. Periods or dashes between letters (A-C-R-O-N-Y-M-S) generally indicate the word to be read as individual letters. But to be safe, put explanation notes in the margin or at the top of the script defining correct pronunciation, to reduce risk.
  2. Audio file – technical specifications
    If you hire a voice talent to record for you, usually you ask for either mp3 or wav audio files back from her. But are you also specifying the bit rate? 16 bit resolution is the gold standard. If you get 24 bit, your audio may sound garbled but only after it’s embedded into your program. Save time and trouble upfront by stating your audio tech specs!
  3. Attitude or Point Of View
    What kind of attitude do you want to hear in the voice recording? Think about the end listener. What will peak their interest and attentiveness more? By taking the small amount of time to define the “who is talking” and “to whom”, you can help the person recording to provide a POV (point of view) with the right attitude. Plus, it’s a great way to provide impact and underscore the project for the client. This is a gem – often unused! For example, is this a co-worker talking to her peers or (differently) is she showing a new person the ropes? Is this an SME (subject matter expert) sharing expert information? To whom – Top management or research engineers? If your project is required information, like an annual safety review or similar, it can often be very dry material. Taking a couple minutes to think about the role of who delivers such information can energize dry material. Some more general examples of attitude can be: Strong and Authoritative. Caring and Conversational. Casual like a co-worker. Blue collar vs white collar.
  4. Proximity
    Another gem of a different color! A voice recording can be done further or closer to the microphone. We call that ‘proximity’. This can change or impact the way a listener responds. Compare whispering vs talking at a cubicle vs presenting to a room of people. Changing ‘proximity’ can create poignant moments that listeners will notice. Let your clients know about this technique as well. Used sparingly = high impact!
  5. Script Writing flow – or Writing with listening in mind
    After all the information is written, review the script for a flow of words that, when read aloud, are easy to comprehend and will engage the listener. This may be hard to find time for, depending on your client’s budget – but it is one of those quality elements that can win you a client’s loyalty. When I see a line or two in a script that I think can be phrased to flow more conversationally, I might offer it as an alternate.

public domain video clips

Library of Congress launched the National Screening Room. The National Screening Room currently offers about 300 videos. The videos are digital copies of films made in the 19th and 20th centuries. You can browse the collection by date, location of the filming, and subject. You can also search for videos that are parts of other LOC collections. All of the videos in the National Screening Room can be viewed online and or downloaded as MP4 files.

Flickr is known for hosting millions of images, but it also hosts lots of videos. how to find public domain videos on Flickr

Pixabay has been one of my go-to sites for public domain images for years. Pixabay also offers public domain video clips that you can download for free.

The Public Domain Review is a website that features collections of images, books, essays, audio recordings, and films that are in the public domain

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more on free images in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=stock

places to find public domain images online.

prison time for fake news?

Malaysia accused of muzzling critics with jail term for fake news

Move to impose 10-year sentence seen as attempt to silence talk of corruption before election

More on fake news in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=fake+news

The anti-fake news bill, which must be approved by parliament, calls for penalising those who create, offer, circulate, print or publish fake news – or publications containing fake news – with a 10-year jail term, a fine of up to 500,000 ringgit (£90,000) or both.

The bill defines fake news as “any news, information, data and reports which is, or are, wholly or partly false whether in the form of features, visuals or audio recordings or in any other form capable of suggesting words or ideas”.

It covers all media and extends to foreigners outside Malaysia if Malaysia or its citizens are affected.

 

free tool dictate

Quickly Dictate Notes in Multiple Languages on Dictation.io

http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2016/03/quickly-dictate-notes-in-multiple.html#.WW-stnqHqzB

Dictation.io is a good tool to add to yesterday’s list of free tools for dictating notes.

Dictation.io doesn’t require students to register in order to use it. It also supports more than two dozen languages. Those two aspects of Dictation.io make it accessible to students who don’t have Google Docs accounts and to those who don’t speak English as their first language.

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http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2016/02/three-free-tools-students-can-use-to.html

Mic Note is a free Chrome and Android app that allows you to create voice recordings, text notes, and image-based notes

Evernote users can make audio recordings on iOS and Android devices. Follow Evernote’s directions available here to learn how to dictate a note on an iOS device.

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more on voice recognition in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=voice+recognition

Deploying Lecture Capture

7 Best Practices for Deploying Lecture Capture Campuswide

Technology leaders from universities with large lecture capture implementations share their advice for rolling out the technology at scale.

By Leila Meyer 08/03/16

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/08/03/7-best-practices-for-deploying-lecture-capture-campuswide.aspx

1) Automate the Recording Process to Make It Effortless

The Department of Instructional Technology

Echo360 lecture capture appliances and some Sonic Foundry Mediasite appliances. While lecture capture appliances are “not cheap,” according to Lucas, they reduce the complexity for faculty and staff.

Sonic Foundry Mediasite appliances with CollegeNET 25Live scheduling software to automate the lecture capture process.

2) Focus on Implementation in Large-Capacity Classrooms

installing lecture capture appliances and high-definition cameras in the large lecture halls at UMass Lowell has helped reduce DFWs (drop, fail, withdrawal rate) in high-enrollment classes such as Calculus 1.

3) Establish Relationships with Leadership and Early Adopters

4) Ensure High-Quality Audio Recording

“You might be able to get by if you don’t see the instructor, of if they step outside the viewing angle of the camera, but if you can’t hear them, the capture is wasted. It’s critical that they pay attention to audio.”

5) Offer Flexibility for Instructors to Record Lectures Anywhere/Anytime

6) Ensure Adequate Storage and Processing on Servers

7) Engage with Other Colleges and Universities

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more on lecture capture in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=lecture+capture

MN eSummit 2015

#MNsummit2015

Main speaker

Aaron Doering

aaron doening

aaron doening

Engagement not completion

Design experience not product

Create change, not simply respond to it

He was a geography teacher : Dimitrina

Experience explore expand. Adventure based how to collaborate in ways we have not collaborated before pedagogical guidelines internet driven

Instructor – content – design

Today: first think is design, content, instructor. So how do we design learning environments is the most important one

Guide learners as designers. Constructivism. Design for meaning. Through the power of the story.

Geotetic  design a learning environment learn geography using GIS

Situated movies (student-centered learning)

Grant Earthducation go to the most remote parts of the world to align their education with their culture, instead of what the government is downing as culture

Use of phone: whoever answers instructor’s question first, gets to pose the next question to the rest of the audience.

Design based research

Self-narrative, referencing the experience real world issues in real time

  1. reference knowledge . knowledge overlap. Technological pedagogical content knowledge.

Geotetic not only how prepare teachers, but desing learning environmwer of the story.

we explore: https://www.we-explore.com/

9.5 design as a learner.

the U Media Lab.
The Changing Earth. App GoX (instagram on steroids.  tell their story through the app). How is this different from Google Earth
Raptor Lab (rehabilitate a raptor).

  1. design experiences
  2. build trust
  3. guide learners as designers
  4. recognize learners as experts
  5. encourage collaboration
  6. inspire self narrative
  7. reference the knowledge domains
  8. teach for change
  9. design as learner

adoering@umn.edi     chasingseals.com   @chasingseals

 

podcast pontification (audio version of blog self reflections)

 Greg Steinke The U
A Digital Story Assignment using WeVideo

wevideo

WeVideo is the Google response to iMovie cloud

The U is on Google email and thus google drive and all other google tools

The Center for Digital Storytelling. short videos, 3-5 min incorporate photographs with the author narration, reflection

Assignment (verbal directions). process (write a 2 page script, every page is about a minute of video), gather images that support the story; edit the script (rewrite); record audio to the script (use an app on the phone instead of WeVideo), WeVideo can edit the audio recording; edit the story, edit the photos to match the story; YourTube and/or Google+

working with faculty: is the digital story a good fit for your course? two questions: does the course have many writing assignments? does everyone have to do the same type of assignment? do you want to offer choices? do you want your students to share their work outside of the class? to you want to explore opportunities for students to develop 21 century skills?

google communities for sharing

wewideo has a tutorial at Center for Digital Storytelling

students can use the digital story for their eportfolio

the entire exercise is entirely based on mobile devices

time frame: scaffolding options

3d printing products were the tangible result of the project and the digital storytelling just the format to present

Google Drive master folder for the phone images and video; iOS apps: MoviePro, FiLMc Pro, VoiceRecord Pro (including mp3); Android: WeVideo

Storyboard template

Faculty Development Programs: Digital Storytelling Community of Practice

http://it.umn.edu/faculty-development-programs-digital-0

Poster sessions:

Brad Hokanson

http://dha.design.umn.edu/faculty/BHokanson.html

iPAD video kit:

ipad video kit

Laurie Conzemius
Critical Thinking

laurie

ISTE: http://conference.iste.org/2016/
Joe Lau critical thinking

apps: Popplet  blog.popplet.com  http://www.popplet.com/ (mindmapping)

into the book: http://reading.ecb.org/

Kahoot – the token system. Polleverywhere  http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/05/21/polls-and-surveys-tools-for-education/

Symbaloo https://www.symbaloo.com/home/mix/13eOcK1fiV zotero, easybib, delicious, diigo depending on the grade

youth voices; http://youthvoices.net/ replace social media like teachertube is trying to replace youtube

quandary games in education. https://www.quandarygame.org/ sim city

citizen science alliance http://www.citizensciencealliance.org/

Toontastic https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/toontastic/id404693282?mt=8 now free  storytelling

coding and programming: https://www.makewonder.com/robots/dashanddot  scratch

Osmo : https://www.playosmo.com/en/ $79.99 + give a set for free Stride principle as a parental involvement

chainlink;

kickword; https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.makario.wordkick

red herring (four categories) https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.BlueOxTech.RedHerring&hl=en

http://www.mathplayground.com/logicgames.html

http://www.mathplayground.com/thinkingblocks.html

evaluation:

telestory  https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/telestory/id915378506?mt=8

explain everything http://explaineverything.com/

 

Exploring and Connecting 3D Printing to Teaching and Learning Jason Spartz, Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota

http://pubs.lib.umn.edu/minnesota-elearning-summit/2015/program/23/

http://pubs.lib.umn.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1023&context=minnesota-elearning-summit

3db 3da 3d lisa

Jason Spartz, Saint Mary’s University of MinnesotaFollow
Lisa Truax, Saint Mary’s University of MinnesotaFollow
Karen Sorvaag, Saint Mary’s University of MinnesotaFollow
Brett Bodsgard, Saint Mary’s University of MinnesotaFollow

chemistry professor. 3D printing with different materials.
what else can be made (e.g. reaction vessel)

printing of atoms

crystalography dbase

Karen: pre-service teachers professor: how to use 3d printers and be comfortable with them. Steve Hoover. Thinkercad and Autodesk123D>
3D academy http://www.team3dacademy.com/index2.html
. Pinterest board for3d Printing with resources

Lisa: graphic design. not intuitive.  Rhinoceros (not free anymore). 123D strong learning curve. 3d printing will be incorporated in the curriculum.  sculpture students and others don’t like fudging on the computer, but Adobe people love it. Some items takes up to 4 hours to print out. when working on the computer is difficult for some students to visualize the dimensionality.

collaborative learning opportunities.

no makerspace or fab lab. additional interest from the theater and business dept. 3d printing is connected to future work skills. new media ecology or media literacy set of skills.

the main presenter: build excitement and interest and gradually step back. how much material goes through and should we charge back. clean and maintenance involved; not too bad. better then a copier. plastic inexpensive. sizes with plastic – $25 and $50. how many project of a spool: depending on the size of the projects but considerable amount. two printers one art dept and one in the faculty dev area.

non profit visually impaired students.  how 3d can make difference in special ed.

3d printing lab with access for everybody. ownership brings policy. where housed: neutral place.

only one printer is barely sufficient for faculty to figure out how to use it. purchasing two more if students and curricula to be involved.

 

3dc 3d lisa 3da 3db

 

The Balancing Act: Team-Creating an eBook as an Alternative Method for Content Delivery Tom Nechodomu, University of Minnesota

ebook

tnecho@umn.edu
Susan Andre sandre@umn.edu
Linda Buturian butur001@umn.edu
Faculty Created digital stories – google “cultivaitng change series”
student created digital stories –
http://www.cehd.umn.edu/academics/online/
http://www.cehd.umn.edu/PSTL/water/
http://www.cehd.umn.edu/The-Changing-story/
Susan Andre uses a slide titled “trust” to elucidate how the entire project was enabled. “trust” and “transparency” are sparse currency in the environment I work in. if she is right an ebook ain’t happening anytime soon at my place.
inclining habitat.
students involvement. use stipends. student artists. food for the video interviews. create a community, student centered.
people able to change the book.
copyright process; did you find it cumbersome. copyright permission center.
time span and amount of hours spent: 3-4 months per chapter.

Main speaker
David Wiley. Making Teaching and Learning Awesome with Open

MN Learning Commons
open educational resources
LUMEN
lumen
education – sharing feedback, encouragement with students passion about the discipline, yourself
open is not the same as free.  free + permissions + copyright permission: 5 r = retain (make and own copies), reuse (use in a wide range of ways), revise (adapt, modify, and improve), remix (combine two or more), redistribute (share with others)
open:
free and unfettered access
perpetual, irrevocable copyright permissions
(look but don’t touch is not open)
tech enables OER permits
traditionally copyright materials on the Internet – not so good ; jet on the road
openly copyright materials on the internet _ yes: jet in the air
permission-less innovation. relatively inexpensive and broad permissions.
intellectual infrastructure of education: learning outcomes/objectives; assessments; textbooks. they are relatively expensive and narrow permissions.
disappearing ink strategies: buyback, rental, ebooks, online subscription
 mad, glad, sad, rad: the grumpy cat. student success per dollar
opennetgroup.org/review
change in student learning: replace commercial with open books – small. realign, bigger change. rethink is the large change.
responsibilities:
attribution and meeting other license requirements
thin common cartridge: a way to bring the content to the CMS, but the content remains on the creative commons
github.com/lumenlearning https://github.com/lumenlearning
disposable assignment: students hate doing them, instructors hate grading them. waste of time and energy
renewable assignment: students see value in doing them; instructor sees value grading them
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AsFU3sAlPx4
so what?
open education infrastructure: open outcomes, objectives, activities, educational resources
the culture of glued legos must be eradicated. open pedagogy. open credentialing model
summary: don’t settle for “affordable.” improve student outcomes. improve affordability. improve design / academic freedom

links generated from the discussion at my presentation:

https://www.google.com/search?q=tin+can&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8

http://www.uwosh.edu/library/quizsmith

http://glickconsulting.com/resouce_brainegames

https://www.google.com/search?q=techers+skills&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8

http://www.northeastern.edu/camd/gamedesign/people/sebastian-deterding/

https://www.duolingo.com/  Duolingo. App to learn languages using games

http://www.gamification.co/gabe-zichermann/

https://zebrazapps.com/  ZebraZapps

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