Searching for "briggs"

for or against Myers-Briggs

Myers-Briggs personality tests: what kind of person are you?

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator is used by firms worldwide to test their employees. In her new book, Merve Emre looks at the system’s curious origins

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/sep/15/myers-briggs-not-sure-youre-really-our-type-merve-emre-author-origins-validity-personality-tests

a career counsellor told them to work through an “instrument” – decidedly not a “test” – called the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. The MBTI is the world’s dominant personality questionnaire: more than 50 million people around the globe are estimated to have taken it. It has been administered since the 1940s (though its origins date to 1917) and now consists of 93 questions to which you answer A or B. At the end, you are assigned one of 16 different types. Many consider this “score” to be meaningless, no more scientifically valid than your star sign. But others – including companies such as Bain, the BBC and many universities – clearly do not.

No one type is better than another. The creators of the MBTI – two American women, Katharine Cook Briggs and her daughter, Isabel Briggs Myers – imagined it as primarily a tool for self-discovery. But that doesn’t mean all types are equal.

Comments under the article:
It is not, as some commenters have suggested, that psychology and psychological testing is “half baked.” It is that everyone is an expert at functional psychology at some level already — one has to be to live in a social world — just not an expert at the science of psychology; and it seems, to the lay-person, that psychological testing tools are pretty obvious and should be usable by anyone.

 

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more on Myers-Briggs in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/04/21/1599/

https://www.personalitypage.com/

library and Generation Y

this article was written in 2004

Weiler, A. (2005). Information-Seeking Behavior in Generation Y Students: Motivation, Critical Thinking, and Learning Theory. Journal Of Academic Librarianship, 31(1), 46-53.

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0099133304001521

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3daph%26AN%3d16348908%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

The research indicates that only a very small percentage of the general population prefer to learn by reading.

members of “Generation Y,” the generation born between 1980 and 1994.

The first model for study of information-seeking behavior in the general population was developed by James Krikelas in 1983. This model suggested that the steps of information seeking were as follows: (1) perceiving a need, (2) the search itself, (3) finding the information, and (4) using the information, which results in either satisfaction or dissatisfaction.
A second model developed by Carol C. Kuhlthau of Rutgers University stresses a process approach with an emphasis placed on cognitive skills; as they increase, so does information-seeking effectiveness. This model is one of the few that was developed based on actual research and not simply on practical experience.
Eisenberg and Berkowitz proposed a model based on the “Big Six Skills”—task definition, information seeking, implementation, use, synthesis, and evaluation. Their model is flexible and nonlinear in the same way that hypertext is, allowing for different areas and avenues to be explored out of sequence. In addition, seekers can go back to refine and reidentify the information need, implementing new strategies.

Critical thinking is a process that is widely acknowledged in the literature to be crucial to the learning process, to cognitive development, and to effective information seeking.

A more effective lesson on Internet information then, rather than specifically dwelling on “good” and “bad” Web sites, would be to present actual examples and to raise questions rather than giving answers, opening the student up to the next level intellectual development, “multiplicity.” Multiplicity is the ability to acknowledge that the world contains knowledge that the student cannot yet classify as right or wrong, knowledge which requires further study and thought (the so-called “gray area”).

Behavior Theory, first developed by B. F. Skinner in the 1950s, uses the concepts of “positive” and “negative” reinforcement to control behavior. This theory explains learning behavior very simply: Reward students who perform well, and punish students who do not.

The “Control Theory” of behavior was developed by William Glasser. The theory states that, rather than being a response to outside stimulus, behavior is determined by what a person wants or needs at any given time, and any given behavior is an attempt to address basic human needs such as love, freedom, power, etc.

The Myers–Briggs Personality Analysis test, developed by Isabel Myers and Katherine Briggs, was developed using Jung’s theory of personality types in an effort to determine what type any given individual is. The personality type then determines the learning style of a given individual.

Multiple Intelligences

Gardner’s theory relates more directly to intelligence rather than to personality. Gardner states that intelligence is comprised of a group of different abilities, which originate in the stages of development each person passes through as they grow to adulthood. He identifies seven such intelligences—verbal–linguistic, logical–mathematical, visual–spatial, body–kinesthetic, musical–rhythmic, interpersonal, and intrapersonal—but he suggests that there are probably more.

Information seeking is a highly subjective process, one which students approach with prior knowledge, strongly held opinions, and differing levels of cognitive development. From the research it is apparent that, aside from personal preconceptions, issues of time and levels of difficulty in obtaining information are usually of more concern to students than issues of accuracy. It is still unclear, however, whether this is because they are not concerned about the accuracy unless their instructor is, or because they are assuming most information is by nature accurate.

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More on Generation Z and Generation Y in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=generation

tech curriculum design

Dell and Microsoft sponsored.

Register for this complimentary webcast on July 19th to learn how your school or district can design a tech curriculum that matches the future needs of your students today.

During this interactive presentation, you’ll hear how Kennewick School District is giving its students a head start with access to modern tech tools they are likely to use in the real world. Find out how the right tech plan can enable innovative teaching and learning at your school.

Join us as Ron Cone, Kennewick School District CIO, shares:

  • How to design a tech curriculum that matches your students’ future career needs
  • Tips for selecting the right tech to support that curriculum
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Thank you,

Linda Briggs
Senior Contributing Editor
THE Journal

password management

LITA listsrev has an excellent discussion on password management.
I personally am using LastPass for two years: great free option, paid one can be used on mobiles.

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From: lita-l-request@lists.ala.org [mailto:lita-l-request@lists.ala.org] On Behalf Of Michael J. Paulmeno
Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2016 1:36 PM
To: lita-l@lists.ala.org
Subject: RE: [lita-l] Question on password management

 

I second Keepass.  Not only is it free, open source, and multi-OS, but it lives on your computer, not in the cloud (although the database can be put on a shared drive or in DropBox for access across devices).  Personally that makes me feel much safer.  There are clients available for Windows, Mac, Linux, IPhone, Android and even Blackberry.

 

Cheers,

Mike

 

From: lita-l-request@lists.ala.org [mailto:lita-l-request@lists.ala.org] On Behalf Of Ronald Houk
Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2016 12:38 PM
To: lita-l@lists.ala.org
Subject: Re: [lita-l] Question on password management

 

I use lastpass as well.  However, LastPass was just bought by LogMeIn, so lots of people are holding their breath hoping that things stay good.  Another open source, multi-os, alternative is keepass (keepass.info)

 

On Wed, Jan 6, 2016 at 11:43 AM, Yvonne Reed <yvonner@ranchomiragelibrary.org> wrote:

Hi Everyone,

I would like offer or recommend a password management tool to my library staff that’s reliable and easy to use. Do any of you have one you can recommend?

 

 

Thank you,

 

Yvonne Reed

Technology Librarian

Rancho Mirage Public Library

71-100 Hwy 111

Rancho Mirage, CA 92270

(760)341-7323 x770
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From: lita-l-request@lists.ala.org [mailto:lita-l-request@lists.ala.org] On Behalf Of O’English, Lorena
Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2016 12:51 PM
To: lita-l@lists.ala.org
Subject: RE: [lita-l] Question on password management

 

I really like Dashlane (dashlane.com) – it has a lot of options, including the ability to give someone else access to your passwords in certain situations (plus, they support Firefox financially via low-impact ads). I think of this sometimes when I think about what would happen if a piano fell on me tomorrow – what a mess it would be for my spouse to cope with my digital life! That said, although I use Dashlane, I still have not quite managed to get myself to use all its functionality.

 

Lorena

***

Washington State University Libraries

oenglish@wsu.edu

wsulorena: Twitter, Skype, GTalk, Yahoo IM

———–

—–Original Message—–
From: lita-l-request@lists.ala.org [mailto:lita-l-request@lists.ala.org] On Behalf Of Cary Gordon
Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2016 12:37 PM
To: lita-l@lists.ala.org
Subject: Re: [lita-l] Question on password management

 

1Password ++

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—–Original Message—–
From: lita-l-request@lists.ala.org [mailto:lita-l-request@lists.ala.org] On Behalf Of COLLINS, MATTHEW
Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2016 12:35 PM
To: lita-l@lists.ala.org
Subject: RE: [lita-l] Question on password management

 

I have used Roboform for at least 10 years and never had a problem.  It manages passwords for logins and bookmarks on my PCs, my iPhone and iPad.  It synchs online so work, home, tablet and phone all have the same info.  It also stores personal info (name & multiple addresses) and confidential notes and other info.

 

–Matthew

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Has anyone mentioned Password Safe? http://passwordsafe.sourceforge.net/

 

It’s worked well for organizing and managing usernames/passwords.

 

 

Angela Stangl

 

Digital Services Coordinator

Rodney A. Briggs Library

University of Minnesota, Morris

(320) 589-6164

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FEATURES

http://keepass.info/features.html

 

PLUGINS

http://keepass.info/plugins.html

Note: CAPS is used here and there to call attention without extra Gmail formatting, not to shout at anyone. Still…I know I look like I yell here. I have flogged myself, I will now bathe in the River Salt.

 

MWoT

Ok, check it out.

Plugins, macros, group/profile/source/target/timing locks, separate DBs and separate metadata for these if you like, INTERNALLY-ROTATING SUPERKEYS via REGULAR KEY TRANSORMATIONS and TWO-CHANNEL AUTO-TYPE OBFUSCATION (for obfuscating your auto-typed passwords or keys, if you select Auto)….!!!…

…and well-reasoned, well-EXPLAINED approaches to certain critical areas of password management in general and to KeePass in particular.

 

For instance: In the FAQ, read the logic breakdown (thought-by-thought explanation) of why Keepass does NOT lock itself when a SUB-dialogue box is open in Keepass whle the user then LOCKS the workstation. =)

Why doesn’t KeePass lock when Windows locks and a KeePass sub-dialog is open?

http://keepass.info/help/base/faq_tech.html#noautolock

My support of Keepass as a primary, then a close alternative, comes from four of my six years in IT being in direct computer and network security roles. Sure, not the most trench years out there, but they are all engineering and tiered-analyst roles for several major US corporations.

I’m proud of that…and in terms of relevance, I worked – and still work – with and around many engineers, analysts, and scientists (data, algorithmic). I look up to these people a great deal, and many of these coworkers come fully assembled having forgotten more than I’ll ever know and still learning faster than I could ever talk about… and even THEY use Keepass and they use it powerfully.

Detection of each site’s contact (HTTP GET, form forcus, etc) or “touch” can be different with each browser it integrates into, and that’s just for starters. One can also script up a different timing to use before the credentials are passed….;)….one can also relegate references to a central database, or one can refer only to the local system or even just a specific profile that can access said .kdbx file (KeePass database), or one can limit the data source to just one .kdbx single-instance database file, or one can use the .kdbx as a secondary for some other central repository failure, if that happens.

One can make several .kdbx files for different uses…no requirement to have just one! Each a diffferent base of unique data keys, each wtih a different direction administered on when it is referenced, how it is run, and where it lives on a system.

Aaaaaand it can integrate with other DBMs, it’s not an island!

Keepass is not the end-all be-all, but it IS FOSS (Free and Open-Source Software, great for investigating its machinery). Also it is:

Programmable (via the Plugins model, you can write some yourself if you like!)

Modularizable (again, via the Plugins model)

Profile lockable, (<— really neat!)

– SMM (Secure Memory Manageable, for Windows Clipboard and the like)

– and more!

Anyway, Keepass is rad for its cost, but, like the others on this thread, I will second LastPass as well. LastPass  is a an alternative to Keepass. =)

Daniel Strickland
linkedin.com/in/dwstrickland

 

 

Matthew Collins

Director of the Ernest Miller White Library Associate Professor of Research and Bibliography Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary

1044 Alta Vista Road

Louisville, KY 40205

mcollins@lpts.edu| 502.992.5420

 

technology trends in education

My college’s data network is on fleek! Supporting devices, connectivity, and coverage for the ultimate compliment.

We wanted to provide you with access to watch the virtual presentation on-demand so you have the chance to get the same valuable information our attendees received.

Link to the presentation: ct_corning_webcast_slidedeck briggs devices wifi

Click here to watch this special presentation to get a strategic view of how your institution can best support educational technology imperatives today and into the future.

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Sponsored By: Corning and Vision This presentation will be available to audience members until Wednesday, February 17, 2016 at 11:00 AM Pacific Standard Time. The challenge is supporting device needs, and anticipating future demand. Network infrastructure is a simple way to solve for today and tomorrow. This webinar will review mobility trends, connectivity requirements and converged fiber networks for cellular, Ethernet and Wi-Fi needs.

Rick Baldasare from Vision Technologies Rick.baldasarre@visiontech.biz (240) 319-1700

graphs with data from universities. Global IP will increase threefold over the next five years.
QoS (Quality of Service)
Mobile as the Norm of User Access> Cloud asa the Norm of Back Access

Ron Wells: Corning  wellsrw@corning.com (913) 706-4135

PON: Passive Optical Networks

Optical DAS

Educational Technology Engaging Students: bookstores, ebooks and cost for students

From Books to Bytes: How Educational Technology is Engaging Students and Enhancing Learning

Sponsored By: VitalSource
This presentation will begin on Tuesday, August 18, 2015 at 11:00 AM Pacific Daylight Time.

http://event.on24.com/eventRegistration/EventLobbyServlet?target=lobby.jsp&eventid=1030139&sessionid=1&key=65FED8F873D5F1BF695F2E0D8A27ADCF&eventuserid=123437779

moderated by Linda Briggs

David Kent Director VOLSHOP (official bookstore) U of Tennessee, Knoxville
Lisa Kiefer, Managing Director Wakefield ResearchCindy Clarke Vice President Marketing, Vital Source Technologies

stats from presentation available here: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/informedia/blog/bytes_books.pdf or http://wcc.on24.com/event/10/30/13/9/rt/1/documents/slidepdf/vitalsource_campustechnologywebcast_finalslidedeck.pdf

methodology: 519 students from 4 years college and u/s

close to what keynote speaker at MN eSummit 2015 shared http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/07/29/mn-esummit-2015/ David Wiley, MN Learning Commons

students want formally taught life skills: interview for a job, balance checkbook and do taxes, how to take out and pay for student loans

Tennessee:
traditional 4 year school. cost is part of the program, not charged as a course fee. all materials avaiable first day of school and available in perpetuity. way below rental books prices. via LMS (BB). no printed textbooks. few books through websites, for books, which do not subscribe for the program. ebooks offered at the store. increasing titles selection. cost, learning outcomes. the outlook for digital in the future: already digital, but open for further development. expand courses offered, launching more programs with materials bundled and online course.
digital is easier to work with, deliver to customer,
business partnership (this is different now from http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/07/29/mn-esummit-2015/ David Wiley, MN Learning Commons). working closely with provost, cio, vital source. working with publishers to make sure that content is available>
business model: program bundle all the content and deliver to students and advertise periodically to students
the course fee model: charged to student account semester by semester bases. also student-paid method. all access model is better for everyone.

ebooks are important for the interactivity, collaboration

Q and As:
what was the students’ reaction moving to digital books. how traditional faculty are accepting the change. A: pilot group of several faculty and gradual roll out. early adopters influencing others.
does the content open on all devices? A: yes, device-agnostic. dedicated apps for iOS, Android, and Windows
disability? A: enhanced apps, migrate all PDF format to proprietory platform. epub and PDF content. user added epub content. Center for accessible material innovation, American Foundation for the blind, Tech for All etc
libraries do not provide course materials for students. clean division between campus store and library
BB admin is loading the codes in the LMS, but the idea is to load the information straight into BB. cio in charge. helpdesk support for vital provided by the cio department.
cost savings in percent for students digital to print. student pay model, ebooks can vary to new book price. ebooks even more expensive. with the course fee, 70% off rental. 3rd party operator may add 30%.  all parties must be looking for reasonable margin. greater digital adoption results in lower costs for students.

digital alleviates dropout rate.

what course which don’t fit digital materials. life sciences and mathematics, science and engineering is landing itself well

how much interactive content and links to social media is incorporated.