Searching for "cardboard"

museums worth visiting in VR

10 Museums We Recommend You Visit (Using Virtual Reality)

https://ph.asiatatler.com/life/10-museums-we-recommend-you-visit-using-virtual-reality

please contact pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu, if you need Google Cardboard set for your classes.
please contact mcgill@stcloudstate.edu for Oculus Go set for your classes.

Directions:
– Open YouTube
– Type / Voice Command: e.g. Smithsonian 360 or British Museum 360 or Ufizzi 360 and choose 360 video files suitable for the content of your course.
– e.g., Smithsonian has an excellent 360 degree tour of the Space Shuttle + narrative about the deployment of the Hubble Telescope: https://youtu.be/o3XS_5L–Qg, which can be an excellent intro to Astronomy class
– e.g., Smithsonian offers a 360 degree tour of the Museum of American History: https://youtu.be/TkUPzRB7p5g
– e.g., Ufizzi Gallery, British Museum present 360 degree tours of artifacts for Ancient History, Art, History of Art: https://youtu.be/SPeW0YWLVvE

If you need 360 degree resources for classes in the discipline you are teaching, please contact pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu

Need further assistance? please do not hesitate to contact us

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more on VR in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=vr+virtual+reality

IM 690 VR and AR lab

IM 690 Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality. short link: http://bit.ly/IM690lab

IM 690 lab plan for Feb. 18, MC 205:  Experience VR and AR

What is an “avatar” and why do we need to know how it works?

How does the book (and the movie) “Ready Player One” project the education of the future

Peter Rubin “Future Present” pictures XR beyond education. How would such changes in the society and our behavior influence education.

Readings:

each group selected one article of this selection: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2020/02/11/immersive-reality-and-instructional-design/
to discuss the approach of an Instructional Designer to XR

Announcements:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2020/02/07/educators-in-vr/

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2020/01/30/realities360-conference/

Translating Training Requirements into Immersive Experience

Virtual Reality Technologies for Learning Designers

Virtual Reality Technologies for Learning Designers

Inter

Inter-cognitive and Intra-cognitive communication in VR: https://slides.com/michaelvallance/deck-25c189#/

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCGHRSovY-KvlbJHkYnIC-aA

People with dementia

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/e/2PACX-1vSVNHSXWlcLzWZXObifZfhrL8SEeYA59IBdatR1kI7Q-Hry20AHtvLVTWQyH3XxBQ/pub?start=false&loop=false&delayms=60000&slide=id.p1

Free resources:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=free+audio, free sound, free multimedia

Lab work:

  1. Video 360 as VR entry level
    1. During Lab work on Jan 28, we experienced Video 360 cardboard movies
      let’s take 5-10 min and check out the following videos (select and watch at least three of them)

      1. F2F students, please Google Cardboard
      2. Online students, please view on your computer or mobile devices, if you don’t have googles at your house (you can purchase now goggles for $5-7 from second-hand stores such as Goodwill)
      3. Both F2F and online students. Here directions how to easily open the movies on your mobile devices:
        1. Copy the URL and email it to yourself.
          Open the email on your phone and click on the link
          If you have goggles, click on the appropriate icon lower right corner and insert the phone in the goggles
        2. Open your D2L course on your phone (you can use the mobile app).
          Go to the D2L Content Module with these directions and click on the link.
          After the link opens, insert phone in the goggles to watch the video
      4. Videos:
        While watching the videos, consider the following objectives:
        – Does this particular technology fit in the instructional design (ID) frames and theories covered, e.g. PBL, CBL, Activity Theory, ADDIE Model, TIM etc. (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2020/01/29/im-690-id-theory-and-practice/ ). Can you connect the current state, but also the potential of this technology with the any of these frameworks and theories, e.g., how would Google Tour Creator or any of these videos fits in the Analysis – Design – Development – Implementation – Evaluation process? Or, how do you envision your Google Tour Creator project or any of these videos to fit in the Entry – Adoption – Adaptation – Infusion – Transformation process?

– how does this particular technology fit in the instructional design (ID) frames and theories covered so far?
– what models and ideas from the videos you will see seem possible to be replicated by you?

Assignment: Use Google Cardboard to watch at least three of the following options
YouTube:
Elephants (think how it can be used for education)
https://youtu.be/2bpICIClAIg
Sharks (think how it can be used for education)
https://youtu.be/aQd41nbQM-U
Solar system
https://youtu.be/0ytyMKa8aps
Dementia
https://youtu.be/R-Rcbj_qR4g
Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/EgyptVR/photos/a.1185857428100641/1185856994767351/

From Peter Rubin’s Future Presence: here is a link http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2019/03/25/peter-rubin-future-presence/ if you want to learn more
Empathy, Chris Milk, https://youtu.be/iXHil1TPxvA
Clouds Over Sidra, https://youtu.be/mUosdCQsMkM

  1. Assignment: Group work
    1. Find one F2F and one online peer to form a group.
      Based on the questions/directions before you started watching the videos:
      – Does this particular technology fit in the instructional design (ID) frames and theories covered. e.g. PBL, CBL, Activity Theory, ADDIE Model, TIM etc. (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2020/01/29/im-690-id-theory-and-practice/ ). Can you connect the current state, but also the potential of this technology with the any of these frameworks and theories, e.g., how would Google Tour Creator or any of these videos fits in the Analysis – Design – Development – Implementation – Evaluation process? Or, how do you envision your Google Tour Creator project or any of these videos to fit in the Entry – Adoption – Adaptation – Infusion – Transformation process?
      – how does this particular technology fit in the instructional design (ID) frames and theories covered so far?
      – what models and ideas from the videos you will see seem possible to be replicated by you?
      exchange thoughts with your peers and make a plan to create similar educational product
    1. Post your writing in the following D2L Discussions thread: https://stcloudstate.learn.minnstate.edu/d2l/le/4819732/discussions/threads/43483637/View
  1. Lenovo DayDream as VR advanced level
    1. Recording in DayDream
      https://skarredghost.com/2018/08/17/how-to-shoot-cool-screenshots-videos-lenovo-mirage-solo-and-save-them-on-pc/
    2. Using the controller
      https://support.google.com/daydream/answer/7184597?hl=en
    3. Using the menu
    4. Watching 360 video in YouTube
      1. Using keyboard to search
      2. Using voice command to search
    5. Using Labster. https://www.labster.com/
      1. Record how far in the lab you managed to proceed
    6. Playing the games
      1. Evaluate the ability of the game you watched to be incorporated in the educational process

Assignment: In 10-15 min (mind your peers, since we have only headset), do your best to evaluate one educational app (e.g., Labster) and one leisure app (games).
Use the same questions to evaluate Lenovo DayDream:
– Does this particular technology fit in the instructional design (ID) frames and theories covered, e.g. PBL, CBL, Activity Theory, ADDIE Model, TIM etc. (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2020/01/29/im-690-id-theory-and-practice/ ). Can you connect the current state, but also the potential of this technology with the any of these frameworks and theories, e.g., how would Google Tour Creator or any of these videos fits in the Analysis – Design – Development – Implementation – Evaluation process? Or, how do you envision your Google Tour Creator project or any of these videos to fit in the Entry – Adoption – Adaptation – Infusion – Transformation process?
– how does this particular technology fit in the instructional design (ID) frames and theories covered so far?
– what models and ideas from the videos you will see seem possible to be replicated by you?

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Plamen Miltenoff, Ph.D., MLIS
Professor
320-308-3072
pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/
schedule a meeting: https://doodle.com/digitalliteracy
find my office: https://youtu.be/QAng6b_FJqs

IM 690 ID theory and practice

Tutorial from Jan. 21: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2020/01/14/im-690-gear-360-tutorial/

Notes to Jan 28 session:

Ritz, L. (2016). A Framework for Aligning Instructional Design Strategies with Affordances of CAVE Immersive Virtual Reality Systems (Vol. 60, pp. 549–556). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11528-016-0085-9 https://mnpals-scs.primo.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/01MNPALS_SCS/hb33bq/cdi_proquest_journals_1828255573

When you prepare for the Analysis of Design Strategies for Immersive Virtual Reality (IVR): https://docs.google.com/document/d/1PjYRCBTIrkb_Xdm5ImaSjK_AO-6uyqCogpr01RCoMVo/edit

please consider the following video:

it will help you visualize better the issues discussed in the article, if you haven’t visited the CAVE lab with Mark Gill yet.

What is the difference between the CAVE, Oculust Quest (the black goggles from the Jan 21 lab) and Google Cardboard? Please let me know, if you would like to discuss.

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During the Jan 28 lecture, you discussed numerous methods, frameworks and theories. This blog has plenty of materials regarding those topics. You scroll up to the search box in the upper right corner and search using the following key words:

  • instructional design
  • Problem Based Learning
  • Competency Based Learning
  • Activity Theory
  • ADDIE model
  • The TIM (Technology Integration Matrix)

Here some links, you might find useful

IM 690 Gear 360 tutorial

IM 690 Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality

https://stcloudstate.learn.minnstate.edu/d2l/home/4819732

Jan. 21, MC 205 (how to get to the PDR room:

Plan: learn to create, edit and use still 360 degrees images and videos.

#scalability

  1. What is 360 degrees video and how does it fit in the Virtual Reality concept?
    https://www.academia.edu/41628237/Chapter_12_VR_AR_and_Video_360_A_Case_Study_Towards_New_Realities_in_Education_by_Plamen_Miltenoff
  2. Video 360: existing materials versus materials we create
    1. how to find existing materials
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nOHM8gnin8Y
      https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=360+videos+education
    2. how to decide if we need to create materials
      https://poly.google.com/u/1/view/epydAlXlJSw
      https://poly.google.com/u/1/view/elo1OtpgzHP
      https://poly.google.com/view/8HB4l4zGSbv
  3. Tools and apps for Video 360
    1. Cameras:
      1. Samsung Gear 360: https://www.samsung.com/global/galaxy/gear-360/
        1. 2016
        2. 2017
      2. alternatives: https://filmora.wondershare.com/virtual-reality/samsung-gear-360-camera-alternatives.html
      3. Vuze: https://vuze.camera/
        https://youtu.be/peu-OavRcd8 
        Video 360 3D
    2. Samsung Android (Galaxy) phones app
      https://youtu.be/AKhfoJjcZBM?t=66
    3. Editing
      1. Gear 360 Action Director
        https://youtu.be/c2bcz77y3UY
      2. Photoshop CC

https://www.digitaltrends.com/photography/how-to-edit-360-photos-in-photoshop/

https://tonyredhead.com/adobe/360-photoshop-advanced-editing

Phot

 

      1. Premiere CC
        https://youtu.be/8g4DhBEWvak
      2. Others
  1. Issues and solutions
    1. issues connected to Windows and Apple
      https://youtu.be/2Fok2YcyNSw
      (explains all the quirks between the 2016 & 2017 cameras)
    2. issues connected to Gear 360 camera
    3. issues connected to Gear 360 ActionDirector
      in version 2.0, drag and drop, export etc.
      https://youtu.be/c2bcz77y3UY
  2. Upload
    1. local
    2. social media
      1. Facebook
      2. YouTube
        1. resolution
        2. live stream
  3. Viewing, goggles
    1. Google Cardboard
      1. why do we still consider it?
    2. Low-end goggles (examples)
      1. Pansonite 3D VR Headset
      2. Gearsone G1 VR Headset
      3. Utopia 360 VR Headset
      4. TaoTronics 3D VR Headset
      5. Destek V4 VR Headset
    3. Hi-end goggles
      1. Oculus https://www.oculus.com/
        1. Go
        2. Rift
        3. Quest
          1. haptic devices https://youtu.be/6IhQnWb44zk
      2. HTC Vive: https://www.vive.com/us/comparison/
      3. Daydream Lenovo: https://www.lenovo.com/us/en/daydreamvr/
  4. Creating content
    1. Polly Google Tour Creator: https://poly.google.com/creator/tours/
      https://poly.google.com/view/8HB4l4zGSbv
      (turn ambient audio on)

Error messages working with Action Director

Gear 360 Action Director Error Msg

Gear 360 Action Director Error MsgNVIDIA error msg

 

 

More on VR in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/11/01/vendors-for-vr/

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1efFVsOIwxlTO2Qy-onKbG0dgr8qum3onq3bgFkaVfec/edit?usp=sharing

VR Education Apps

7 Best VR Education Apps

Lauren Barack  June 19 2018 Visit Mars, swim with sea otters and trek to Mt. Everest’s Base Camp

https://www.gearbrain.com/7-best-vr-education-apps-2579317090.html

Victory VR is known for its science curriculum which is aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards.

The BBC Earth: Life in VR app works on Google Daydream devices, like the new Lenovo Mirage Solo

Google Expeditions Android and iOS app is a virtual field trip that uses a Google Cardboard viewer.

Unimersiv is in the business of educational experiences — works on both Samsung Gear VR and the Oculus Rift, and takes viewers underwater to explore the Titanic and to one of our closest planets through the “Mars: Curiosity Rover,” app

Discovery VR app. The app works on nearly every single VR platform: Google Daydream, Samsung Gear VR, HTC Vive, Oculus Rift and Google Cardboard viewers using both iOS and Android devices.

Merge Cube is a $15 foam block

The Apollo 11 VR app. work with HTC Vive, Oculus Rift and PlayStation VR, and also Oculus Go

 

Sites in VR

Sites in VR is a free Android and iOS app that provides a 1700 virtual reality views of significant landmarks around the world.

http://www.sitesinvr.com/

Contact us if you need for your class to view the information above with:

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more on VR in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality

Hololens in academic library

Blurred Lines—between virtual reality games, research, and education

http://library.ifla.org/2133/

p. 5 a LibGuide was created that provided a better description of the available software for both the Microsoft Hololens and the HTC Vive and also discussed potential applications for the technology.

Both the HTC Vive and the Hololens were made bookable through the library’s LibCalendar booking system, streamlining the booking process and creating a better user experience.

When the decision was made to bring virtual and augmented reality into the McGill University Library, an important aspect of this project was to develop a collection of related software to be used alongside the technology. In building this software collection a priority was placed on acquiring software that could be demonstrated as having educational value, or that could potentially be used in relation to, or in support of, university courses.

For the Microsoft Hololens, all software was acquired through Microsoft’s Online Store. The store has a number of educationally relevant HoloLens apps available for purchase. The app ARchitect, for example, gives a basic sense of how augmented reality could be used for viewing new building designs. The app Robotics BIW allows user to simulate robotic functions. A select number of apps, such as Land of the Dinosaurs and Boulevard, provide applications for natural history and art. There were a select number of apps related to science, mathematics and medicine, and others with artistic applications. All of the HoloLens applications were free but, compared to what is available for virtual reality, the experiences were much smaller in size and scope.

For the HoloLens, a generic user account was created and shared with person who booked the HoloLens at the time of their booking. After logging into this account – which could sometimes prove to be a challenge because typing is done using the headset’s gesture controls – the user could select a floating tile which would reveal a list of available software. An unresolved problem was that users would then need to refer to the HoloLens LibGuide for a detailed description of the software, or else choose software based on name alone, and the names were not always helpful.

For the Microsoft HoloLens, the three most popular software programs were Land of the Dinosaurs, Palmyra and Insight Heart. Insight Heart allow users to view and manipulate a 3D rendering of a high-resolution human heart, Land of the Dinosaurs provided an augment reality experience featuring 3D renderings of dinosaurs, and Palmyra gave an augmented reality tour of the ancient city of Palmyra.

p. 7 Though many students had ideas for research projects that could make use of the technology, there was no available software that would have allowed them to use augmented reality in the way they wanted. There were no students interested in developing their own software to be used with the technology either.

p. 8 we found that the Microsoft HoloLens received significant use from our patrons, we would recommend the purchase of one only for libraries serving researchers and developers.

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Getting Real in the Library: A Case Study at the University of Florida

Samuel R. Putnam and Sara Russell GonzalezIssue 39, 2018-02-05

Getting Real in the Library: A Case Study at the University of Florida

As an alternative, Microsoft offers a Hololens with enterprise options geared toward multiple users for $5000.

The transition from mobile app development to VR/AR technology also reflected the increased investment in VR/AR by some of the largest technology companies in the world. In the past four years, Facebook purchased the virtual reality company Oculus, Apple released the ARKit for developing augmented reality applications on iOS devices, Google developed Google Cardboard as an affordable VR option, and Sony released Playstation VR to accompany their gaming platform, just to name a few notable examples. This increase of VR/AR development was mirrored by a rise in student interest and faculty research in using and creating new VR/AR content at UF.

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Arnhem, J.-P. van, Elliott, C., & Rose, M. (2018). Augmented and Virtual Reality in Libraries. Rowman & Littlefield.
https://books.google.com/books?id=PslaDwAAQBAJ&lpg=PA205&ots=HT7qTY-16o&dq=hololens%20academic%20library&lr&pg=PA214#v=onepage&q=hololens%20academic%20library&f=false
360 degree video in library instruction
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Hammady, R., & Ma, M. (2018). Designing Spatial UI as a Solution of the Narrow FOV of Microsoft HoloLens: Prototype of Virtual Museum Guide. In Proceedings of the 4th International AR & VR Conference 2018. Springer. Retrieved from https://eprints.staffs.ac.uk/4799/
‘HoloMuse’ that engage users with archaeological artefacts through gesture-based interactions (Pollalis, Fahnbulleh, Tynes, & Shaer, 2017). Another research utilised HoloLens to provide in-situ assistant for users (Blattgerste, Strenge, Renner, Pfeiffer, & Essig, 2017). HoloLens also used to provide magnification for low vision users by complementary finger-worn camera alongside with the HMD (Stearns, DeSouza, Yin, Findlater, & Froehlich, 2017). Even in the medical applications, HoloLens contributed in 3D visualisation purposes using AR techniques (Syed, Zakaria, & Lozanoff, 2017) and provide optimised measurements in medical surgeries(Pratt et al., 2018) (Adabi et al., 2017). Application of HoloLens extended to visualise prototype designs (DeLaOsa, 2017) and showed its potential in gaming industry (Volpe, 2015) (Alvarez, 2015) and engaging cultural visitors with gaming activities (Raptis, Fidas, & Avouris, 2017).
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van Arnhem, J.-P., & Spiller, J. M. (2014). Augmented Reality for Discovery and Instruction. Journal of Web Librarianship, 8(2), 214–230. https://doi.org/10.1080/19322909.2014.904208

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Evaluating the Microsoft HoloLens through an augmented reality assembly application
Proceedings Volume 10197, Degraded Environments: Sensing, Processing, and Display 2017; 101970V (2017) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2262626
Event: SPIE Defense + Security, 2017, Anaheim, California, United States
To assess the HoloLens’ potential for delivering AR assembly instructions, the cross-platform Unity 3D game engine was used to build a proof of concept application. Features focused upon when building the prototype were: user interfaces, dynamic 3D assembly instructions, and spatially registered content placement. The research showed that while the HoloLens is a promising system, there are still areas that require improvement, such as tracking accuracy, before the device is ready for deployment in a factory assembly setting.
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Pollalis, C., Fahnbulleh, W., Tynes, J., & Shaer, O. (2017). HoloMuse: Enhancing Engagement with Archaeological Artifacts Through Gesture-Based Interaction with Holograms. In Proceedings of the Eleventh International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction (pp. 565–570). New York, NY, USA: ACM. https://doi.org/10.1145/3024969.3025094
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/315472858_HoloMuse_Enhancing_Engagement_with_Archaeological_Artifacts_through_Gesture-Based_Interaction_with_Holograms
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Gračanin, D., Ciambrone, A., Tasooji, R., & Handosa, M. (2017). Mixed Library — Bridging Real and Virtual Libraries. In S. Lackey & J. Chen (Eds.), Virtual, Augmented and Mixed Reality (pp. 227–238). Springer International Publishing.
We use Microsoft HoloLens device to augment the user’s experience in the real library and to provide a rich set of affordances for embodied and social interactions.We describe a mixed reality based system, a prototype mixed library, that provides a variety of affordances to support embodied interactions and improve the user experience.

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Dourish, P. (n.d.). Where the Action Is. Retrieved November 23, 2018, from https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/where-action
embodied interactions
Computer science as an engineering discipline has been spectacularly successful. Yet it is also a philosophical enterprise in the way it represents the world and creates and manipulates models of reality, people, and action. In this book, Paul Dourish addresses the philosophical bases of human-computer interaction. He looks at how what he calls “embodied interaction”—an approach to interacting with software systems that emphasizes skilled, engaged practice rather than disembodied rationality—reflects the phenomenological approaches of Martin Heidegger, Ludwig Wittgenstein, and other twentieth-century philosophers. The phenomenological tradition emphasizes the primacy of natural practice over abstract cognition in everyday activity. Dourish shows how this perspective can shed light on the foundational underpinnings of current research on embodied interaction. He looks in particular at how tangible and social approaches to interaction are related, how they can be used to analyze and understand embodied interaction, and how they could affect the design of future interactive systems.

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Pollalis, C., Fahnbulleh, W., Tynes, J., & Shaer, O. (2017). HoloMuse: Enhancing Engagement with Archaeological Artifacts Through Gesture-Based Interaction with Holograms. In Proceedings of the Eleventh International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction (pp. 565–570). New York, NY, USA: ACM. https://doi.org/10.1145/3024969.3025094
HoloMuse, an AR application for the HoloLens wearable device, which allows users to actively engage with archaeological artifacts from a museum collection
pick up, rotate, scale, and alter a hologram of an original archeological artifact using in-air gestures. Users can also curate their own exhibit or customize an existing one by selecting artifacts from a virtual gallery and placing them within the physical world so that they are viewable only using the device. We intend to study the impact of HoloMuse on learning and engagement with college-level art history and archeology students.
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Dugas, Z., & Kerne Andruld. (2007). Location-Aware Augmented Reality Gaming for Emergency Response Education: Concepts and Development. ResearchGate. Retrieved from https://www.researchgate.net/publication/242295040_Location-Aware_Augmented_Reality_Gaming_for_Emergency_Response_Education_Concepts_and_Development

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Library Spaces II: The IDEA Lab at the Grainger Engineering Library Information Center

https://prism.ucalgary.ca/bitstream/handle/1880/52190/DL5_mischo_IDEA_Lab2.pdf

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more on Hololens in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=hololens

Google Expeditions Higher Ed

VR packs a powerful punch in learning

November 8th, 2018 Jeanne Ingle

Tech-enriched teaching can make all the difference

VR packs a powerful punch in learning

Google Expeditions can be a fairly inexpensive way to present content. Students who have smartphones (Android or iOS) can download the Google Cardboard app and Google Expeditions for free. VR glasses can improve the experience but are not required.

Ideas for using VR in class

  • Do you teach biology? Take them on a tour of a virus or a cell.
  • Are you a professor in the arts? Visit street art around the world or the Royal Shakespeare Company.
  • Are you a guidance or career counselor? Bring your students to Berklee College of Music or meet a robotics engineer or female firefighter in NYC.
  • Astronomy professor? Send your students on the Juno mission to Jupiter or to experience the aurora borealis.
  • Professors of education can build lessons with your students so they can teach elementary students about animal camouflage or take children on a tour of the Aztec and Mayan pyramids.

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more on Google Expeditions in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=google+expeditions

can XR help students learn

Giving Classroom Experiences (Like VR) More … Dimension

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/article/2018/11/02/virtual-reality-other-3-d-tools-enhance-classroom-experiences

at a session on the umbrella concept of “mixed reality” (abbreviated XR) here Thursday, attendees had some questions for the panel’s VR/AR/XR evangelists: Can these tools help students learn? Can institutions with limited budgets pull off ambitious projects? Can skeptical faculty members be convinced to experiment with unfamiliar technology?

All four — one each from Florida International UniversityHamilton CollegeSyracuse University and Yale University — have just finished the first year of a joint research project commissioned by Educause and sponsored by Hewlett-Packard to investigate the potential for immersive technology to supplement and even transform classroom experiences.

Campus of the Future” report, written by Jeffrey Pomerantz

Yale has landed on a “hub model” for project development — instructors propose projects and partner with students with technological capabilities to tap into a centralized pool of equipment and funding. (My note: this is what I suggest in my Chapter 2 of Arnheim, Eliot & Rose (2012) Lib Guides)

Several panelists said they had already been getting started on mixed reality initiatives prior to the infusion of support from Educause and HP, which helped them settle on a direction

While 3-D printing might seem to lend itself more naturally to the hard sciences, Yale’s humanities departments have cottoned to the technology as a portal to answering tough philosophical questions.

institutions would be better served forgoing an early investment in hardware and instead gravitating toward free online products like UnityOrganon and You by Sharecare, all of which allow users to create 3-D experiences from their desktop computers.

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Campus of the Future” report, written by Jeffrey Pomerantz

https://library.educause.edu/~/media/files/library/2018/8/ers1805.pdf?la=en

XR technologies encompassing 3D simulations, modeling, and production.

This project sought to identify

  • current innovative uses of these 3D technologies,
  • how these uses are currently impacting teaching and learning, and
  • what this information can tell us about possible future uses for these technologies in higher education.

p. 5 Extended reality (XR) technologies, which encompass virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR), are already having a dramatic impact on pedagogy in higher education. XR is a general term that covers a wide range of technologies along a continuum, with the real world at one end and fully immersive simulations at the other.

p. 6The Campus of the Future project was an exploratory evaluation of 3D technologies for instruction and research in higher education: VR, AR, 3D scanning, and 3D printing. The project sought to identify interesting and novel uses of 3D technology

p. 7 HP would provide the hardware, and EDUCAUSE would provide the methodological expertise to conduct an evaluation research project investigating the potential uses of 3D technologies in higher education learning and research.

The institutions that participated in the Campus of the Future project were selected because they were already on the cutting edge of integrating 3D technology into pedagogy. These institutions were therefore not representative, nor were they intended to be representative, of the state of higher education in the United States. These institutions were selected precisely because they already had a set of use cases for 3D technology available for study

p. 9  At some institutions, the group participating in the project was an academic unit (e.g., the Newhouse School of Communications at Syracuse University; the Graduate School of Education at Harvard University). At these institutions, the 3D technology provided by HP was deployed for use more or less exclusively by students and faculty affiliated with the particular academic unit.

p. 10 definitions
there is not universal agreement on the definitions of these
terms or on the scope of these technologies. Also, all of these technologies
currently exist in an active marketplace and, as in many rapidly changing markets, there is a tendency for companies to invent neologisms around 3D technology.

A 3D scanner is not a single device but rather a combination of hardware and
software. There are generally two pieces of hardware: a laser scanner and a digital
camera. The laser scanner bounces laser beams off the surface of an object to
determine its shape and contours.

p. 11 definitions

Virtual reality means that the wearer is completely immersed in a computer
simulation. Several types of VR headsets are currently available, but all involve
a lightweight helmet with a display in front of the eyes (see figure 2). In some
cases, this display may simply be a smartphone (e.g., Google Cardboard); in other
cases, two displays—one for each eye—are integrated into the headset (e.g., HTC
Vive). Most commercially available VR rigs also include handheld controllers
that enable the user to interact with the simulation by moving the controllers
in space and clicking on finger triggers or buttons.

p. 12 definitions

Augmented reality provides an “overlay” of some type over the real world through
the use of a headset or even a smartphone.

In an active technology marketplace, there is a tendency for new terms to be
invented rapidly and for existing terms to be used loosely. This is currently
happening in the VR and AR market space. The HP VR rig and the HTC Vive
unit are marketed as being immersive, meaning that the user is fully immersed in
a simulation—virtual reality. Many currently available AR headsets, however, are
marketed not as AR but rather as MR (mixed reality). These MR headsets have a
display in front of the eyes as well as a pair of front-mounted cameras; they are
therefore capable of supporting both VR and AR functionality.

p. 13 Implementation

Technical difficulties.
Technical issues can generally be divided into two broad categories: hardware
problems and software problems. There is, of course, a common third category:
human error.

p. 15 the technology learning curve

The well-known diffusion of innovations theoretical framework articulates five
adopter categories: innovators, early adopters, early majority, late majority, and
laggards. Everett M. Rogers, Diffusion of Innovations, 5th ed. (New York: Simon and Schuster, 2003).

It is also likely that staff in the campus IT unit or center for teaching and learning already know who (at least some of) these individuals are, since such faculty members are likely to already have had contact with these campus units.
Students may of course also be innovators and early adopters, and in fact
several participating institutions found that some of the most creative uses of 3D technology arose from student projects

p. 30  Zeynep Tufekci, in her book Twitter and Tear Gas

definition: There is no necessary distinction between AR and VR; indeed, much research
on the subject is based on a conception of a “virtuality continuum” from entirely
real to entirely virtual, where AR lies somewhere between those ends of the
spectrum.  Paul Milgram and Fumio Kishino, “A Taxonomy of Mixed Reality Visual Displays,” IEICE Transactions on Information Systems, vol. E77-D, no. 12 (1994); Steve Mann, “Through the Glass, Lightly,” IEEE Technology and Society Magazine 31, no. 3 (2012): 10–14.

For the future of 3D technology in higher education to be realized, that
technology must become as much a part of higher education as any technology:
the learning management system (LMS), the projector, the classroom. New
technologies and practices generally enter institutions of higher education as
initiatives. Several active learning classroom initiatives are currently under
way,36 for example, as well as a multi-institution open educational resources
(OER) degree initiative.37

p. 32 Storytelling

Some scholars have argued that all human communication
is based on storytelling;41 certainly advertisers have long recognized that
storytelling makes for effective persuasion,42 and a growing body of research
shows that narrative is effective for teaching even topics that are not generally
thought of as having a natural story, for example, in the sciences.43

p. 33 accessibility

The experience of Gallaudet University highlights one of the most important
areas for development in 3D technology: accessibility for users with disabilities.

p. 34 instructional design

For that to be the case, 3D technologies must be incorporated into the
instructional design process for building and redesigning courses. And for that
to be the case, it is necessary for faculty and instructional designers to be familiar
with the capabilities of 3D technologies. And for that to be the case, it may
not be necessary but would certainly be helpful for instructional designers to
collaborate closely with the staff in campus IT units who support and maintain
this hardware.

Every institution of higher
education has a slightly different organizational structure, of course, but these
two campus units are often siloed. This siloing may lead to considerable friction
in conducting the most basic organizational tasks, such as setting up meetings
and apportioning responsibilities for shared tasks. Nevertheless, IT units and
centers for teaching and learning are almost compelled to collaborate in order
to support faculty who want to integrate 3D technology into their teaching. It
is necessary to bring the instructional design expertise of a center for teaching
and learning to bear on integrating 3D technology into an instructor’s teaching (My note: and where does this place SCSU?) Therefore,
one of the most critical areas in which IT units and centers for teaching and
learning can collaborate is in assisting instructors to develop this integration
and to develop learning objects that use 3D technology. p. 35 For 3D technology to really gain traction in higher education, it will need to be easier for instructors to deploy without such a large support team.

p. 35 Sites such as Thingiverse, Sketchfab, and Google Poly are libraries of freely
available, user-created 3D models.

ClassVR is a tool that enables the simultaneous delivery of a simulation to
multiple headsets, though the simulation itself may still be single-user.

p. 37 data management:

An institutional repository is a collection of an institution’s intellectual output, often consisting of preprint journal articles and conference papers and the data sets behind them.49 An
institutional repository is often maintained by either the library or a partnership
between the library and the campus IT unit. An institutional repository therefore has the advantage of the long-term curatorial approach of librarianship combined with the systematic backup management of the IT unit. (My note: leaves me wonder where does this put SCSU)

Sharing data sets is critical for collaboration and increasingly the default for
scholarship. Data is as much a product of scholarship as publications, and there
is a growing sentiment among scholars that it should therefore be made public.50

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more on VR in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality+definition

multi-user reference support experiences

https://www.emeraldinsight.com/eprint/AU2Q4SJGYQG5YTQ5A9RU/full

Hahn, J. (2018). Virtual reality learning environments | Development of multi-user reference support experiences | Information and Learning Science | Ahead of Print. EmeraldInsight. Retrieved from https://www.emeraldinsight.com/eprint/AU2Q4SJGYQG5YTQ5A9RU/full
case study: an undergraduate senior projects computer science course collaboration whose aim was to develop textual browsing experiences, among other library reference functionality, within the HTC Vive virtual reality (VR) headset. In this case study, readers are introduced to applied uses of VR in service to library-based learning through the research and development of a VR reading room app with multi-user support. Within the VR reading room prototype, users are able to collaboratively explore the digital collections of HathiTrust, highlight text for further searching and discovery and receive consultative research support from a reference specialist through VR.
Library staff met with the project team weekly over the 16 weeks of both semesters to first scope out the functionality of the system and vet requirements.
The library research team further hypothesized that incorporating reference-like support in the VR environment can support library learning. There is ample evidence in the library literature which underscores the importance of reference interactions as learning and instructional experiences for university students
Educational benefits to immersive worlds include offering a deeper presence in engagement with rare or non-accessible artifacts. Sequeira and Morgado (2013, p. 2) describe their Virtual Archeology project as using “a blend of techniques and methods employed by historians and archaeologists using computer models for visualizing cultural artefacts and heritage sites”.
The higher-end graphics cards include devices such as the NVIDIA GeForceTM GTX 1060 or AMD RadeonTM RX 480, equivalent or better. The desktop system that was built for this project used the GeForce GTX 1070, which was slightly above the required minimum specifications.

Collaboration: Library as client.

Specific to this course collaboration, computer science students in their final year of study are given the option of several client projects on which to work. The Undergraduate Library has been a collaborator with senior computer science course projects for several years, beginning in 2012-2013 with mobile application design and chat reference software re-engineering (Hahn, 2015). (My note: Mark Gill, this is where and how Mehdi Mekni, you and I can collaborate)

The hurdles the students had the most trouble with was code integration – e.g. combining various individual software parts towards the end of the semester. The students also were challenged by the public HathiTrust APIs, as the system was developed to call the HathiTrust APIs from within the Unity programming environment and developing API calls in C#. This was a novel use of the HathiTrust search APIs for the students and a new area for the research team as well.

There are alternatives to Unity C# programming, notably WebVR, an open source specification for VR programming on the open web.

A-Frame has seen maturation as a platform agnostic and device agnostic software programming environment. The WebVR webpage notes that the specification supports HTC Vive, Oculus Rift, Samsung Gear VR, Google Daydream and Google Cardboard (WebVR Rocks, 2018). Open web platforms are consistent with library values and educational goals of sharing work that can be foundational in implementing VR learning experience both in VR environments and shareable on the web, too.

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more on VR in libraries in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality+library

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