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Death by PowerPoint

How PowerPoint is killing critical thought

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/sep/23/powerpoint-thought-students-bullet-points-information?CMP=share_btn_link

Bored students is the least of it – the bullet point-ization of information is making us stupid and irresponsible

The genesis story runs like this: from the late 1950s corporations began to realise that, rather than going to the trouble of developing new products they hoped would meet a need, they could use marketeers to create the perception of need, then develop products to meet it (a shift brilliantly dramatised in the TV series Mad Men). To do this, different departments had to be able to speak to each other, to sell ideas internally. So while there had always been meetings, now there were meetings about meetings and – hey presto! – the modern world was born.

The presentational precursor to PowerPoint was the overhead projector, which is why PP screens are still called “slides”. The program owes most to Whitfield Diffie, one of the time lords of online cryptography, but it was quickly snapped up by Microsoft. Its coding/marketing roots are intrinsic to its cognitive style, being relentlessly linear and encouraging short, affirmative, jargonesque assertions: arguments that are resolved, untroubled by shades of grey.

It’s no coincidence that the two most famous PowerPoint presentations are: a) the one presented to Nasa managers by engineers, explaining with unarguable illogic why damaged tiles on the space shuttle Columbia were probably nothing to fret about; and b) General Colin Powell’s equally fuzzy pitch for war with Iraq. Now, blaming PowerPoint for Iraq would be a bit like blaming Darwin for Donald Trump, but the program made scrutiny of the case harder. Not for nothing did Brigadier General McMaster, of the US military, subsequently liken the proliferation of PP presentation in the military to an “internal threat”, saying: “It’s dangerous because it can create the illusion of understanding and the illusion of control. Some problems are not bullet-izable.

More on the topic in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/11/11/death-by-powerpoint/

maximise PowerPoint’s true potential.

http://www.theguardian.com/guardian-masterclasses/2015/may/12/using-powerpoint-for-data-visualisation-adam-frost-tobias-sturt-digital-course2

Course content

  • An introduction to the principles of data visualisation
  • Storytelling with PowerPoint
  • How to design using PowerPoint
  • Creating compelling narratives
  • Practical exercise: create a sample slide using pen and paper
  • Tools and further reading
  • Q&A and group discussion

DEATH OF pOWERPOINT

MN eSummit 2015

#MNsummit2015

Main speaker

Aaron Doering

aaron doening

aaron doening

Engagement not completion

Design experience not product

Create change, not simply respond to it

He was a geography teacher : Dimitrina

Experience explore expand. Adventure based how to collaborate in ways we have not collaborated before pedagogical guidelines internet driven

Instructor – content – design

Today: first think is design, content, instructor. So how do we design learning environments is the most important one

Guide learners as designers. Constructivism. Design for meaning. Through the power of the story.

Geotetic  design a learning environment learn geography using GIS

Situated movies (student-centered learning)

Grant Earthducation go to the most remote parts of the world to align their education with their culture, instead of what the government is downing as culture

Use of phone: whoever answers instructor’s question first, gets to pose the next question to the rest of the audience.

Design based research

Self-narrative, referencing the experience real world issues in real time

  1. reference knowledge . knowledge overlap. Technological pedagogical content knowledge.

Geotetic not only how prepare teachers, but desing learning environmwer of the story.

we explore: https://www.we-explore.com/

9.5 design as a learner.

the U Media Lab.
The Changing Earth. App GoX (instagram on steroids.  tell their story through the app). How is this different from Google Earth
Raptor Lab (rehabilitate a raptor).

  1. design experiences
  2. build trust
  3. guide learners as designers
  4. recognize learners as experts
  5. encourage collaboration
  6. inspire self narrative
  7. reference the knowledge domains
  8. teach for change
  9. design as learner

adoering@umn.edi     chasingseals.com   @chasingseals

 

podcast pontification (audio version of blog self reflections)

 Greg Steinke The U
A Digital Story Assignment using WeVideo

wevideo

WeVideo is the Google response to iMovie cloud

The U is on Google email and thus google drive and all other google tools

The Center for Digital Storytelling. short videos, 3-5 min incorporate photographs with the author narration, reflection

Assignment (verbal directions). process (write a 2 page script, every page is about a minute of video), gather images that support the story; edit the script (rewrite); record audio to the script (use an app on the phone instead of WeVideo), WeVideo can edit the audio recording; edit the story, edit the photos to match the story; YourTube and/or Google+

working with faculty: is the digital story a good fit for your course? two questions: does the course have many writing assignments? does everyone have to do the same type of assignment? do you want to offer choices? do you want your students to share their work outside of the class? to you want to explore opportunities for students to develop 21 century skills?

google communities for sharing

wewideo has a tutorial at Center for Digital Storytelling

students can use the digital story for their eportfolio

the entire exercise is entirely based on mobile devices

time frame: scaffolding options

3d printing products were the tangible result of the project and the digital storytelling just the format to present

Google Drive master folder for the phone images and video; iOS apps: MoviePro, FiLMc Pro, VoiceRecord Pro (including mp3); Android: WeVideo

Storyboard template

Faculty Development Programs: Digital Storytelling Community of Practice

http://it.umn.edu/faculty-development-programs-digital-0

Poster sessions:

Brad Hokanson

http://dha.design.umn.edu/faculty/BHokanson.html

iPAD video kit:

ipad video kit

Laurie Conzemius
Critical Thinking

laurie

ISTE: http://conference.iste.org/2016/
Joe Lau critical thinking

apps: Popplet  blog.popplet.com  http://www.popplet.com/ (mindmapping)

into the book: http://reading.ecb.org/

Kahoot – the token system. Polleverywhere  http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/05/21/polls-and-surveys-tools-for-education/

Symbaloo https://www.symbaloo.com/home/mix/13eOcK1fiV zotero, easybib, delicious, diigo depending on the grade

youth voices; http://youthvoices.net/ replace social media like teachertube is trying to replace youtube

quandary games in education. https://www.quandarygame.org/ sim city

citizen science alliance http://www.citizensciencealliance.org/

Toontastic https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/toontastic/id404693282?mt=8 now free  storytelling

coding and programming: https://www.makewonder.com/robots/dashanddot  scratch

Osmo : https://www.playosmo.com/en/ $79.99 + give a set for free Stride principle as a parental involvement

chainlink;

kickword; https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.makario.wordkick

red herring (four categories) https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.BlueOxTech.RedHerring&hl=en

http://www.mathplayground.com/logicgames.html

http://www.mathplayground.com/thinkingblocks.html

evaluation:

telestory  https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/telestory/id915378506?mt=8

explain everything http://explaineverything.com/

 

Exploring and Connecting 3D Printing to Teaching and Learning Jason Spartz, Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota

http://pubs.lib.umn.edu/minnesota-elearning-summit/2015/program/23/

http://pubs.lib.umn.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1023&context=minnesota-elearning-summit

3db 3da 3d lisa

Jason Spartz, Saint Mary’s University of MinnesotaFollow
Lisa Truax, Saint Mary’s University of MinnesotaFollow
Karen Sorvaag, Saint Mary’s University of MinnesotaFollow
Brett Bodsgard, Saint Mary’s University of MinnesotaFollow

chemistry professor. 3D printing with different materials.
what else can be made (e.g. reaction vessel)

printing of atoms

crystalography dbase

Karen: pre-service teachers professor: how to use 3d printers and be comfortable with them. Steve Hoover. Thinkercad and Autodesk123D>
3D academy http://www.team3dacademy.com/index2.html
. Pinterest board for3d Printing with resources

Lisa: graphic design. not intuitive.  Rhinoceros (not free anymore). 123D strong learning curve. 3d printing will be incorporated in the curriculum.  sculpture students and others don’t like fudging on the computer, but Adobe people love it. Some items takes up to 4 hours to print out. when working on the computer is difficult for some students to visualize the dimensionality.

collaborative learning opportunities.

no makerspace or fab lab. additional interest from the theater and business dept. 3d printing is connected to future work skills. new media ecology or media literacy set of skills.

the main presenter: build excitement and interest and gradually step back. how much material goes through and should we charge back. clean and maintenance involved; not too bad. better then a copier. plastic inexpensive. sizes with plastic – $25 and $50. how many project of a spool: depending on the size of the projects but considerable amount. two printers one art dept and one in the faculty dev area.

non profit visually impaired students.  how 3d can make difference in special ed.

3d printing lab with access for everybody. ownership brings policy. where housed: neutral place.

only one printer is barely sufficient for faculty to figure out how to use it. purchasing two more if students and curricula to be involved.

 

3dc 3d lisa 3da 3db

 

The Balancing Act: Team-Creating an eBook as an Alternative Method for Content Delivery Tom Nechodomu, University of Minnesota

ebook

tnecho@umn.edu
Susan Andre sandre@umn.edu
Linda Buturian butur001@umn.edu
Faculty Created digital stories – google “cultivaitng change series”
student created digital stories –
http://www.cehd.umn.edu/academics/online/
http://www.cehd.umn.edu/PSTL/water/
http://www.cehd.umn.edu/The-Changing-story/
Susan Andre uses a slide titled “trust” to elucidate how the entire project was enabled. “trust” and “transparency” are sparse currency in the environment I work in. if she is right an ebook ain’t happening anytime soon at my place.
inclining habitat.
students involvement. use stipends. student artists. food for the video interviews. create a community, student centered.
people able to change the book.
copyright process; did you find it cumbersome. copyright permission center.
time span and amount of hours spent: 3-4 months per chapter.

Main speaker
David Wiley. Making Teaching and Learning Awesome with Open

MN Learning Commons
open educational resources
LUMEN
lumen
education – sharing feedback, encouragement with students passion about the discipline, yourself
open is not the same as free.  free + permissions + copyright permission: 5 r = retain (make and own copies), reuse (use in a wide range of ways), revise (adapt, modify, and improve), remix (combine two or more), redistribute (share with others)
open:
free and unfettered access
perpetual, irrevocable copyright permissions
(look but don’t touch is not open)
tech enables OER permits
traditionally copyright materials on the Internet – not so good ; jet on the road
openly copyright materials on the internet _ yes: jet in the air
permission-less innovation. relatively inexpensive and broad permissions.
intellectual infrastructure of education: learning outcomes/objectives; assessments; textbooks. they are relatively expensive and narrow permissions.
disappearing ink strategies: buyback, rental, ebooks, online subscription
 mad, glad, sad, rad: the grumpy cat. student success per dollar
opennetgroup.org/review
change in student learning: replace commercial with open books – small. realign, bigger change. rethink is the large change.
responsibilities:
attribution and meeting other license requirements
thin common cartridge: a way to bring the content to the CMS, but the content remains on the creative commons
github.com/lumenlearning https://github.com/lumenlearning
disposable assignment: students hate doing them, instructors hate grading them. waste of time and energy
renewable assignment: students see value in doing them; instructor sees value grading them
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AsFU3sAlPx4
so what?
open education infrastructure: open outcomes, objectives, activities, educational resources
the culture of glued legos must be eradicated. open pedagogy. open credentialing model
summary: don’t settle for “affordable.” improve student outcomes. improve affordability. improve design / academic freedom

links generated from the discussion at my presentation:

https://www.google.com/search?q=tin+can&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8

http://www.uwosh.edu/library/quizsmith

http://glickconsulting.com/resouce_brainegames

https://www.google.com/search?q=techers+skills&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8

http://www.northeastern.edu/camd/gamedesign/people/sebastian-deterding/

https://www.duolingo.com/  Duolingo. App to learn languages using games

http://www.gamification.co/gabe-zichermann/

https://zebrazapps.com/  ZebraZapps

why necessary to know how to code

Why People Are Obsessed With Teaching Kids How To Code

http://www.forbes.com/sites/quora/2014/12/05/why-people-are-obsessed-with-teaching-kids-how-to-code

Computers and the software they run are not magic. Nor should they be perceived as such.
Learning to code is not valuable because everyone needs to program computers, but because such an integral part of modern life needs to be understood at a basic, comprehensible level.

https://www.quora.com/Why-is-it-important-to-know-how-to-code

More on coding and education in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=coding

IPython notebook

Library Juice Academy

course_intro

I also encourage students to download and install Python on their own systems. Python is a
mature and robust language with a great many third party distributions and versions, such as Ipython.
One I recommend is Active State Python. Active State produces refined and well supported
distributions with easy to use installers. Their basic, individual distribution is free. You can find it at
http://www.activestate.com/activepython/downloads
https://host.lja-computing.net:8888/notebooks/profile_intro_programming_p1/Intro_Programming_Lesson1_pmiltenoff.ipynb
  • Integers: A signed or unsigned whole number running from -32,768 to 32,768 or from 0 to 65,535 if not signed. Integers are used anytime something needs to be counted.
  • Long Integer: Any whole number outside the above range. Python doesn’t distinguish between the two though many languages do. Practically, Python’s integers range from −2,147,483,648 to 2,147,483,648 or 0 to 0 to 4,294,967,295. Most of us will be very happy with this many whole numbers to choose from.
  • Real and Floating Point Numbers: Real numbers are signed or unsigned numbers including decimals. The numbers 2,3,4 are Integers and Real Numbers. The numbers 2.1, 2.9,3.9 are Real Numbers, but not Integers. Real Numbers can include representations of irrational numbers such as pi. Real numbers must be rational, that is a decimal number that terminates after a finite number of decimals. You will sometimes encounter the term Floating Point Numbers. This is a technical term referring to the way that large Real Numbers are represented in a computer. Python hides this detail from you so Real and Floating Point are used intercangeably in this language.
  • Binary Numbers: And Octal and Hexadecimal. These are numbers used internally by computers. You will run into these values fairly often. For instance, when you see color values in HTML such as “FFFFFF” or “0000FF”,
Hexadecimal and Octal are used because humans can read them without too much trouble and they are compromise between what computers process and what we can read. Any time you see something in Octal or Hexadecimal, you are looking at something that interfaces with the lower levels of a computer. You will most commonly use Hexadecimal numbers when dealing with Unicode character encodings. Python will interpret any number which begins with a leading zero as binary unless formatting commands have been used.
Numbers such as 7i are referred to as complex. They have a real part, the 7, and an imaginary part, i. Chance are you won’t use complex numbers unless you’re working with scientific data.
A String consists of a sequence of characters. The term String refers to how this data type is represented internally. You store text in Strings. Text can by anything, letters, words, sentences, paragraphs, numbers, just about anything.
Lists are close cousins to Strings, though you may never need to think of them that way. A list is just that, a list of things. Lists may contain any number of numbers or any number of strings. List may even contain any number of other lists. Lists are compared to arrays, but they are not the same thing. In most uses, the function the same so the difference, for our purposes, is moot. Strings are like lists in that, internally, the computer works with strings in an identical manner to lists. This is why the operations on Strings are so different from numbers.
The last main data type in the Python programming language is the dictionary. Dictionaries are map types, known in other languages as hashes, and in computer science as Associative Arrays. The best way to think of what the dictionary does is to consider a Library of Congress Call Number(something this audience is familiar with). The call number is what’s called a Key. It connects to a record which contains information about a book. The combination of keys and records, called values, comprises a dictionary. A single key will connect to a discrete group of values such as the items in this record. Dictionaries will be touched on in the next lesson in some detail in the next course. These are fairly advanced data structures and require a solid understanding a programming fundamentals in order to be used properly.

Statements, an Overview

Programs consist of statements. A statement is a unit of executable code. Think of a statement like a sentence. In a nutshell, statements are how you do things in a program. Writing a program consists of breaking down a problem you want to solve into smaller pieces that you can represent as mathematical propositions and then solve. The statement is where this process gets played out. Statements themselves consist of some number of expressions involving data. Let’s see how this works.

An expression would be something like 2+2=4. This expression, however is not a complete statements. Ask Python to evaluate it and you will get the error “SyntaxError: can’t assign to operator”. What’s going on here? Basically we didn’t provide a complete statement. If we want to see the sum of 2+2 we have to write a complete statement that tells the interpreter what to do and what to do it with. The verb here is ‘print’ and the object is ‘2+2’. Ask Python to evaluate ‘print 2+2’ and it will show ‘4’. We could also throw in subject and do something a bit more detailed: ‘Sum=2+2’. In this case we are assigning the value of 2+2 to the variable, Sum. We can then do all sorts of things with Sum. We can print it. We can add other numbers to it, hand it off to a function and so on. For instance, might want to know the root of Sum. In which case we might write something like ‘print sqrt(sum)’ which will display ‘2’.

A shell is essentially a user interface that provides you access to a system’s features. Normally, this means access to an Operating System. In cases like this, the shell provides you access to the Python programming environment.

Anything preceed by a “#” is not interpreted or executed by the programming shell. Comments are used widely to document programs. One school of programming holds that code should be so clear that comments are uncessary.

Operations on Numbers

Expressions are discrete statements in programming that do something. They typically occupy one line of code, though programmers will sometimes squeeze more in. This is generally bad form and can really make your program a mess. Expressions consist of operations and data or rather data and operations on them. So, what can you do with numbers? Here is a concise list of the basic operations for integers and real numbers of all types:

Arithemetic:

  • Addition: z= x + y
  • Subtraction: z = x – y
  • Multiplication: z = x * y. Here the asterisk serves as the ‘X’ multiplication symbol from grade school.
  • Division: z = x/y. Division.
  • Exponents: z = x ** y or xy, x to the y power.

Operations have an order of precedence which follows the algebraic order of precedence. The order can be remembered by the old Algebra mnenomic, Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally which is remeinds you that the order of operations is:

  1. Parentheses
  2. Exponents
  3. Multiplication
  4. Division
  5. Addition
  6. Subtraction

Operations on Strings

Strings are strange creatures as I’ve noted before. They have their own operations and the arithmetic operations you saw earlier don’t behave the same way with strings.

Putting Expressions Together to Make Statements

As I noted earlier, all computer languages, and natural languages, possess pragmatics, larger scale structures which reduce ambiguity by providing context. This is a fancy way of saying just as sentences posses rules of syntax to make able to be comprehended, larger documents have similar rules. Computer Programs are no different. Here’s a break down of the structure of programs in Python, in a general sense.

  1. Programs consist of one or more modules.
  2. Modules consist of one or more statements.
  3. Statements consist of one or more expressions.
  4. Expressions create and/or manipulate objects(and variables of all kinds).

Modules and Programs are for the next class in the series, though we will survey these larger structures next lesson. For now, we’ll focus on statements and expressions. Actually, we’ve already started with expressions above. In Python, statements can do three things.

  • Assign a variable
  • Change a variable
  • Take an action

Variable Names and Reserved Words

Now that we’ve seen some variable assignments, let’s talk about best practices. First off, aside from reserved words, variable names can be almost any combination of letters, numbers and punctuation marks. You, however, should never ever, use the following punctuation marks in variable names:

      • +
      • !
      • @
      • ^
      • %
      • (
      • )
      • .
      • ?
      • /
      • :
      • ;

*

These punctuation marks tends to be operators and characters that have special meanings in most computer languages. The other issue is reserved words. What are “reserved words”? They are words that Python interprets as commands. Pythons reservers the following words.:

  • True: A special value set aside for boolean values
  • False: The other special value set aside for boolean vaules
  • None: The logical equivalent of 0
  • and: a way of combining logical conditions
  • as: describes how modules are imported
  • assert: a way of forcing something to take on a certain value. Used in debugging of large programs
  • break: breaks out of a loop and goes on with the rest of the program
  • class: declares a class for object oriented design. For now, just remember not to use this variable name
  • continue: returns to the top of the loop and keeps on going again
  • def: declares functions which allow you to modularize your code.
  • elif: else if, a cotnrol structure we’ll see next lesson
  • else: as above
  • except: another control structure
  • finally: a loop control structure
  • for: a loop control structure
  • from: used to import modules
  • global: a scoping statement
  • if: a control structure/li>
  • in: used in for each loops
  • is: a logical operator
  • lamda: like def, but weird. It defines a function in a single line. I will not teach this becuase it is icky. If you ever learn Perl you will see this sort of thing a lot and you will hate it, but that’s just my personal opinion.
  • nonlocal: a scoping command
  • not: a logical operator
  • or: another logical operator
  • pass: does nothing. Used as placeholder
  • raise: raises an error. This is used to write custom error messages. Your programs may have conditions which would be considered invalid based on our business situation. The interpreter may not consider them errors, but you might not want your user to do something so you ‘raise’ an exception and stop the program.
  • return: tells a function to return a value
  • try: this is part of an error testing statement
  • while: starts a while loop
  • with: a context manager. This will be covered in the course after the next one in this series
  • yield: works like return
Variable names should be meaningful. Let’s say I have to track a person’s driver license number. explanatory names like ‘driverLicenseNumber’.

  • Use case to make your variable names readable. Python is case sensitive, meaning a variable named ‘cat’ is different from named ‘Cat’. If you use more than one word to name variable, start of lower case the change case on the second word. For instance “bigCats = [‘Tiger’,’Lion’,’Cougar’, ‘Desmond’]”. The common practice used by programmers in many settings is that variables start with lowercase and functions(methods and so on) start with upper case. This is called “Camel Case” for its lumpy, the humpy appearance. Now, as it happens, there is something of a religious debate over this. Many Python programmers prefer to keep everything lower case and join words in a name by underscores such as “big_cats”. Use whichever is easiest or looks the nicest to you.
  • Variable names should be unique. Do not reuse names. This will cause confusion later on.
  • Python conventions. Python, as with any other programming language, has culture built up around it. That means there are some conventions surrounding variable naming. Two leading underscores, __X, denote system variables which have special meaning to the interpreter. So avoid using this for your own variables. There may be a time and place, but that’s for an advanced prorgramming course. A single underscore _X indicates to other programmers that this a fundamental variable and that they mess with it at their own peril.
  • Avoid starting variable names with a number. This may or may not return an error. It can also mislead anyone reading your program.
  • “A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds”. But not to programming minds. Consistency helps the readability of code a great deal. Once you start a system, stick with it.

Statement Syntax

Putting together valid statements can be a little hard at first. There’s a grammar to them. Thus far, we’ve mainly been workign with expressions such as “x = x+1”. You can think of expression as nouns. We’ve clearly defined x, but how do we look inside? For that we need to give it a verb, the print command. We would then write “print x”. However we can skip the middle statement and print an expression such as “print x + 1”. The interpreter evaluates this per the order of operations I laid out earlier. However, once that expression is evaluated, it then applies the verb, “print”, to that expression.

Print is a function that comes with the Python distribution. There are many more and you can create your own. We’ll cover that a bit in next lesson. Let’s look at little more at the grammar of a statement. Consider:

x = sin(b)

Assume that b has been defined elsewhere. x is the subject, b is the object and sin is the verb. Python will go to the right side of the equal sign first. It will then go to the inside of the function and evaluate what’s there first. It then evaluates the value of the function and finishes by setting x to that value. What about something like this?

x=sin(x+3/y)

Python evaluates from the inside out according to the rules of operation. Very complex statements can be built up this way.

x = sin(log((x + 3)/(e**2)))
Regardless of what this expression evaluates to (I don’t actually know), Python starts with the innermost parentheses, then works through the value of e squared then adds 3 to x and divides the result by e squared. With that worked out, it takes the logarithm of the result and takessthe sine of that before setting x to the final result.What you cannot do is execute more than one statement on a line. No more than one verb on a line. In this context, a verb is an assignment, or a command acting on an expression
markdown cell
code cell

Call up your copy of Think Python or go to the website at http://www.greenteapress.com/thinkpython/html/. Read Chapter 2. This will reiterate much of what I’ve presnted here, but this will help cement the content into you minds. Skip section 2.6 because IPython treats everything as script mode. IPyton provides you with the illusion of interactive, but everything happens asynchronously. This means that any action you type in will not instantaneously resolve as it would if you were running Python interactively on your computer. You will have to use print statements to see the results of your work.

Your assignment consists of the following:

  • Exercise 1 from Chapter 2 of Think Python. If you type an integer with a leading zero, you might get a confusing error:
    <<< zipcode = 02492

    SyntaxError: invalid token
    Other numbers seem to work, but the results are bizarre:
    <<< zipcode = 02132
    <<< zipcode
    1114
    Can you figure out what is going on? Hint: display the values 01, 010, 0100 and 01000.

  • Exercise 3 from Chapter 2 of Think Python.Assume that we execute the following assignment statements:
    width = 17
    height = 12.0
    delimiter = ‘.’
    For each of the following expressions, write the value of the expression and the type (of the value of the expression).

    width/2
    width/2.0
    height/3
    1 + 2 5
    delimiter
    5

  • Exercise 4 from Capter 2 of Think Python. Practice using the Python interpreter as a calculator:
    1. The volume of a sphere with radius r is 4/3 π r3. What is the volume of a sphere with radius 5? Hint: 392.7 is wrong!
    2. Suppose the cover price of a book is $24.95, but bookstores get a 40% discount. Shipping costs $3 for the first copy and 75 cents for each additional copy. What is the total wholesale cost for 60 copies?
    3/ If I leave my house at 6:52 am and run 1 mile at an easy pace (8:15 per mile), then 3 miles at tempo (7:12 per mile) and 1 mile at easy pace again, what time do I get home for breakfast?

In your IPython notebook Create a markdown cell and write up your exercise in there. Just copy it from the textbook or from the above write up. Next ceate a code cell and do your work in there. Please, comment your work thoroughly. You cannot provide too many comments. Use print statements to see the outcome of your work.

Digital Humanities

Where Can I Fit into the World of Digital Humanities? A Conversation

A CSPW Digital Premodern Workshop, co-sponsored by the James Ford Bell Library
“Where Can I Fit into the World of Digital Humanities? A Conversation”

Facilitated by:

Dr. Austin Mason, historian and Robert A Oden Jr. Postdoctoral Fellow for Innovation in the Liberal Arts and Digital Humanities, Carleton College

and

Dr. Justin Schell, Digital Arts Sciences + Humanities – University of Minnesota Libraries
Saturday, 4 April 2015

9:30 am – 12:30 pm

120 Andersen Library, 222 – 21st Avenue South, West Bank Campus

premod@umn.edu
http://premodern.umn.edu

Jumping into the Digital Humanities with Sarah V. Melton

http://gla.georgialibraries.org/mediawiki/index.php/Carterette_Series_Webinars_Archive

the intersection of computing and the disciplines of the humanities. five concepts: web design; digital exhibits; GIS geographical information systems; text mining; text encoding

video games Norway

Literature, Ethics, Physics: It’s All In Video Games At This Norwegian School

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/07/literature-ethics-physics-its-all-in-video-games-at-this-norwegian-school/

game-based learning seems to be a misnomer, as the learning is not based on games, but enhanced by them. Commercial games are repurposed and modified to support curricular goals, as opposed to driving them. Of course, learning can and should also be based on games, as they are valid texts that can be studied in and of themselves, but it is important to see video games as elastic tools whose potential uses exceed their intended purpose.

My note: game-enhanced learning can be safely classified under “gamification”:

Gamification is defined as the process of applying game mechanics and game thinking to the real world to solve problems and engage users (Phetteplace & Felker, 2014, p. 19; Becker, 2013, p. 199; Kapp, 2012).

More on the issue of gaming and gamification (including coding) in Scandinavian countries:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=finland

Curriculum or the Technology

What Comes First: the Curriculum or the Technology?

http://www.edudemic.com/what-comes-first-the-curriculum-or-technology/

  • Regardless of the technology, what’s the most important lesson for students to learn?
  • Why do I need to use technology in my daily curriculum?
  • How are these tech tools enhancing what we’re doing?
  • What will the students do with these tools – during and after class?

Think Curriculum Enhancements, Not Technology Implementations

1) Learn How Students Are Using Technology at Home

2) Don’t Use Technology for the Sake of Using Technology

3) Focus on Just One Tech Implementation

4) Utilize the SAMR Model

The SAMR model, developed by Dr. Ruben Puentedura, represents the stages of tech integration: Substitution, Augmentation, Modification and Redefinition. This model challenges us to assess and reflect on not only how we integrate technology into our curriculum, but also how we modify, redefine and transform our classrooms through its use.

5) Actively Seek Out Professional Development Opportunities

  • Younger students utilizing QR codes to add a challenging yet fun element to learning to spell.
  • Older students creating digital books or movies to demonstrate a deep understanding on a topic, rather than simply discussing or assessing it.
  • Video conferencing with other schools in your area or network to research, discuss, debate and develop potential solutions to globally significant problems.
  • Skyping with local leaders and guest speakers on specific topics such as coding or programming, networking and composing music.

In Short

Integrating technology into the classroom can be exhilarating, fun, and at times a little scary. That said, I’ve often found that teachers are hungry for more information, and welcome the chance to bring new ideas to the classroom.

In the end, if teachers and their administration are ready to embrace the messiness and the risks that sometimes come with technology, the reward is that your school’s curriculum – which must be strong to start – can truly be taken to the next level, and beyond. Otherwise, we’ll all be still left trying to figure out how an abacus works.

GIS and GeoWeb Technologies

https://www.libraryjuiceacademy.com/moodle/login/index.php

Eva Dodsworth

Since the emergence of easily accessible dynamic online mapping tools, there has been a drastic increase in geographic interest and awareness. Whether for personal, social, professional or academic uses, people are using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to communicate information in a map format. Whether it’s using Google Earth to study urban change, or creating Google Map Mashups to deliver library resources, more and more members of society are turning to mapping programs for their visualization needs. With so many using GIS technology in their daily lives, library staff are now more than ever assisting library clients with their mapping queries.

This course will introduce students to a variety of mapping tools and GIS technologies such Google Earth and the creation of dynamic KML files; ArcGIS Online and webmap publishing; Google Fusion Tables and geocoding; and GIS fundamentals with geospatial data creation. Students will be able to apply their GIS skills in their reference work, in digitization projects, in webpages, in library instruction, and more.  Through hands-on exercises, pre-recorded demonstrations and lectures, students will receive a thorough overview of mapping resources that will enhance and expose their library’s resources.

http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/WeekOne_2014.wmv

 

http://www.placingliterature.com/map?modal=1

http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/WeekTwo.wmv

http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/WeekThree_Part_One.mov

http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/WeekThree_Part2.mov

http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/WeekFour.mov

 

– How to enable offline maps in your Google Maps app – http://www.huffingtonpost.com/map-happy/how-to-enable-offline-maps_b_6525832.html

– Huge news – Google Earth Pro, which used to cost the public $400 is now free! What does that mean for you? Extra features! You can import GIS files, tables, and export animated movie files!  http://google-latlong.blogspot.com.es/2015/01/google-earth-pro-is-now-free.html

– Don’t live in Canada?  Too bad! Google Maps plots best tobagonning hills in Canada!http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/google-map-plots-canada-s-best-tobogganing-hills-1.2218207

– a map of 19 countries that were named after specific people – http://www.vox.com/2015/2/1/7954179/map-countries-pe

 

Maps that shaped the world

http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-30840318

 

 

Content for Week Two – February 9th – February 15th

Week Two:

Podcast includes:

  • Citizen Mapping
  • OpenStreetMap – crowdsourcing
    more heads are better then one
    NYPL geomapping volunteers.

http://www.openstreetmap.org/

citizen crime reporting app for NYPD http://www.nyc.gov/html/nypd/html/crime_mapping/nyc_crime_map_introduction.shtml

when the jet disappeared, crowdsourcing for parts on the satellite maps of the ocean

potholes map

maps of the threes. emerald bug in Mnpls

http://www.fuf.net/

how does foursquare and checkins in FB and Google +fit it

  • Google Earth
  • Assignment

Podcast and Powerpoint can be accessed from:http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/JuicyLibrarianMaterial.html

Tutorials: Google Earth

Assignments:

1.       Discussion question:

Discover some citizen mapping projects that you are interested in OR

Contribute your local knowledge to Google Map Maker AND Share with the class online

2.       Google Earth Map

Please complete the tutorial and then create a map in Google Earth with the following components:

  • A title
  • A written introduction to your project
  • At least five placemarks, embedded with html tags, and images, if possible.
  • Imported KML file(s) file format by GEarth, but other apps is using it. using notepad or MS Word, one can create KML file.
    screen overlay, can be text, image, anything. legend. HTML code.
  • A screen overlay  (i.e. a legend)

areal photography.

history.
images from the library, Google is willing to buy them. citizen mapping. scanning and uploading.

geographical and societal awareness.

Gallery: 360Cities.

google street view – historical views

Google Earth Mapping

Submit online as a KML/KMZ file

I had the opportunity to experience a gizmo that can be used to display a variety of mapping projects, including citizen mapping: Science on a Sphere. It is a sphere on which you can project static maps or animations. The one I saw, in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s facility on Ford Island in Honolulu, displayed animations showing the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and the 2011 tsunami in Japan, as well as airline flight paths, ocean currents, polar ice cap change over time, and many other types of geospatial data.

The Great Backyard Bird Count actually starts today and runs through Monday, February 16th. At a minimum, it only requires 15 minutes of observation on any or all the days:  http://gbbc.birdcount.org/

Happy Cow is a site well-known to many vegetarians/vegans for finding restaurants which I’ve used when travelling. Users can submit reviews and/or restaurants that they’d like profiled (although the site reserves the right to approve or not the listing). http://www.happycow.net/search.html 

———————————–

wq and leaflet – a framework that could catch on
by Timothy Clarke – Thursday, February 12, 2015, 2:21 PM

One of the impediments to citizen mapping is the line-of-sight cell tower limitations of mobile phones, or the wifi requirements for other mobile devices.  Citizen mapping in urban and suburban environments is well-served by mobile devices, but what about natural areas, dense leaf cover, or extreme topography?  Even if obtaining absolute mapping coordinates isn’t the issue, much crowdsourcing assumes an ability to connect back to a central data repository (e.g., a web database, ‘the cloud’).  Equipment that can interact with GPS satellites and support data capture is typically expensive and generally requires proprietary software.

wq (https://wq.io/) is a framework that is ‘device first’ and ‘offline-enabled’.  It attempts to leverage several open source technologies to build an entire mobile solution that can support citizen science data collection work, and then synchronize with a central repository once the device (and operator) return to an area served by cellular or wifi networks.

I’m stretching here, so if I get stuff wrong, please don’t yell.  Still, I’ll take a pass at generally describing the framework and its related technology stack.

wq relies upon python, and a web framework called django for building offline-capable web apps that can run on iOS and Android devices.  These web apps, then, rely very heavily upon javascript, particularly requirejs (http://requirejs.org/) and mustache (https://mustache.github.io/), for the templates that permit quick and (somewhat) painless web application development.  Data visualization relies upon d3.js (http://d3js.org/), and geography makes heavy use of Leaflet (http://leafletjs.com/) — maybe the most pertinent layer of the stack for those of us in this course.  If you’re not familiar withLeaflet.js, check it out!

Finally, wq extends several other open source technologies to enable synchronizing between a central data repository and multiple mobile devices in the hands of citizen mappers.  Lastly, wq employs a set of tools to more easily build and distribute customized mapping apps that can be served from Apple’s app store, Google Play, etc.

What wq intends is to allow highly specialized citizen science/citizen mapping apps to be more easily and quickly built, based upon a solid collection of aligned F/OSS tools.  Ideally, an app can spin up quickly to respond to a particular need (e.g., a pipeline spill), or a specialized audience (the run up to a public comment period for a development project), or even something like a high school field trip or higher ed service learning project.

Some examples of citizen mapping projects already built upon wq are here:

https://wq.io/examples/

—————–

Creating a walking tour map with Google Earth_2014

————-

Week 3

Podcast includes:

  • Geocoding
  • Georeferencing
  • Spatial Data Formats
  • Geospatial Data Online
  • Discussion Question

Podcast and Powerpoint available from: http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/JuicyLibrarianMaterial.html

Tutorials: BatchGeo (optional); Google Fusion (optional)

https://en.batchgeo.com/

enter Xcel data, and export KLM file ready for google map and/or google earth

https://support.google.com/fusiontables/answer/2571232
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Google_Fusion_Tables

store maps online, no latitude needed.
visualize geospatial data by map
spatial analysis by mapping different layers together
showing data by map, graph or chart
e.g. how many cars cross specific point
crowdsourcing: spotting butterflies, using fusion tables to map the spices and sightings
http://www.theguardian.com/news/datablog/2011/mar/31/deprivation-map-indices-multiple

students: journalism, history, geography.

Georeferencing (geocoding – data, geo referencing – image)
historical air maps or photos are much more useful when they are georeferenced.
Photos from different year is difficult to lay over one another without referencing. the only reference might be the river. usually reference the four corners, but sometimes river. Using GIS program to determine the longitute/latitude for each corner. sometimes only farmland and it is impossible

 

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