Searching for "curation"

digital curation

Digital Curation: Definitions, Tools, and Strategies de David Kelly

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Digital Curation: What kind of curator are you? #converge11 from Joyce Seitzinger

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Engaging higher education tools via digital curation from Australian Digital Futures Institute

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http://digitalcuration.umaine.edu/

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Unger on digital curation
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/12/06/digital-curation/

more on digital storytelling in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+storytelling

more on data literacy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/09/19/scopus-webinar/

digital curation

Ungerer, L. M. (2016). Digital Curation as a Core Competency in Current Learning and Literacy: A Higher Education Perspective. The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 17(5). https://doi.org/10.19173/irrodl.v17i5.2566
 metaliteracy
Technology considerably impacts on current literacy requirements (Reinking, as cited in Sharma & Deschaine, 2016). Being literate in the 21st century requires being able to decode and comprehend multimodal texts and digital format and also engage with these texts in a purposeful manner. Literacy is not merely based on a specific skill, but consists of a process that embraces the dynamic, social, and collaborative facets of digital technology (Lewis & Fabos, as cited in Mills, 2013).
Mackey and Jacobson (2011) suggest reframing the concept of information literacy as metaliteracy (supporting multiple literacy types) because of a tremendous growth in social media and collaborative online communities. They propose that information literacy currently involves more than a set of discrete skills, since active knowledge production and distribution in collaborative online communities are also necessary.
 Mackey and Jacobson (2011) position metaliteracy as an overarching and comprehensive framework that informs other literacy types. It serves as the basis for media literacy, digital literacy, ICT literacy, and visual literacy.
According to Mills (2013, p. 47), digital curation is the sifting and aggregation of internet and other digital resources into a manageable collection of what teachers and students find relevant, personalized and dynamic. It incorporates the vibrancy of components of the Internet and provides a repository that is easily accessible and usable.
 digital-curation

Pedagogies of Abundance

According to Weller (2011), a pedagogy of abundance should consider a number of assumptions such as that content often is freely available and abundant. Content further takes on various forms and it is often easy and inexpensive to share information. Content is socially based and since people filter and share content, a social approach to learning is advisable. Further, establishing and preserving connections in a network is easy and they do not have to be maintained on a one-to-one basis. Successful informal groupings occur frequently, reducing the need to formally manage groups.

Resource-based learning. Ryan (as cited in Weller, 2011) defines resource-based learning as “an integrated set of strategies to promote student centred learning in a mass education context, through a combination of specially designed learning resources and interactive media and technologies.”

Problem-based learning. Problem-based learning takes place when learners experience the process of working toward resolving a problem encountered early in the learning process (Barrows & Tamblyn, as cited in Weller, 2011). Students often collaborate in small groups to identify solutions to ill-defined problems, while the teacher acts as facilitator and assists groups if they need help. Problem-based learning meets a number of important requirements such as being learner-directed, using diverse resources and taking an open-ended approach.

Communities of practice. Lave and Wenger’s (as cited in Weller, 2011) concept of situated learning and Wenger’s (as cited in Weller, 2011) idea of communities of practice highlight the importance of apprenticeship and the social role in learning.

My note: this article spells out what needs to be done and how. it is just flabeghasting that research guides are employed so religiously by librarians. They are exactly the opposite concept of the one presented in this article: they are closed, controlled by one or several librarians, without a constant and easy access of the instructor, not to mention the students’ participation

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curation tools

4 Great Curation Tools Created by Teachers for Teachers

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2016/04/4-great-digital-curation-tools-created.html

April  28, 2016

Edshelf

Edshelf is ‘a socially curated discovery engine of websites, mobile apps, desktop programs, and electronic products for teaching and learning. You can search and filter for specific tools, create shelves of tools you use for various purposes, rate and review tools you’ve used, and receive a newsletter of tools recommended by other educators.

Graphite

a free service from nonprofit Common Sense Education designed to help preK-12 educators discover, use, and share the best apps, games, websites, and digital curricula for their students by providing unbiased, rigorous ratings and practical insights from our active community of teachers

Scoop.it

find out content related to your topics by ‘reviewing your suggestion lists and the topics from other curators

educlipper

social learning platform that allows teachers to curate and share educational content. Some of the interesting features it provides include: ‘Explore top quality education resources for K-12, create clips from the web, Drive, Dropbox, use your camera to capture awesome work that you create in and out of the classroom, create whiteboard recordings, create differentiated groups and share content with them, create Personal Learning Portfolios, create Class Portfolios as a teacher and share Assignments with students, provide quality feedback through video, audio, text, badges, or grades, collaborate with other users on eduClipboards for class projects or personal interests

topics for IM260

proposed topics for IM 260 class

  • Media literacy. Differentiated instruction. Media literacy guide.
    Fake news as part of media literacy. Visual literacy as part of media literacy. Media literacy as part of digital citizenship.
  • Web design / web development
    the roles of HTML5, CSS, Java Script, PHP, Bootstrap, JQuery and other scripting languages. Heat maps and other usability issues; website content strategy.
  • Social media for institutional use. Digital Curation. Social Media algorithms. Etiquette Ethics. Mastodon
    I hosted a LITA webinar in the fall of 2016 (four weeks); I can accommodate any information from that webinar for the use of the IM students
  • OER and instructional designer’s assistance to book creators.
    I can cover both the “library part” (“free” OER, copyright issues etc) and the support / creative part of an OER book / textbook
  • “Big Data.” Data visualization. Large scale visualization. Text encoding. Analytics, Data mining. Unizin
    I can introduce the students to the large idea of Big Data and its importance in lieu of the upcoming IoT, but also departmentalize its importance for academia, business, etc. From infographics to heavy duty visualization (Primo X-Services API. JSON, Flask).
  • NetNeutrality, Digital Darwinism, Internet economy and the role of your professional in such environment
    I can introduce students to the issues, if not familiar and / or lead a discussion on a rather controversial topic
  • Digital assessment. Digital Assessment literacy.
    I can introduce students to tools, how to evaluate and select tools and their pedagogical implications
  • Wikipedia
    a hands-on exercise on working with Wikipedia. After the session, students will be able to create Wikipedia entries thus knowing intimately the process of Wikipedia and its information.
  • Effective presentations. Tools, methods, concepts and theories (cognitive load). Presentations in the era of VR, AR and mixed reality.
    I can facilitate a discussion among experts (your students) on selection of tools and their didactically sound use to convey information. I can supplement the discussion with my own findings and conclusions.
  • eConferencing. Tools and methods
    I can facilitate a discussion among your students on selection of tools and comparison. Discussion about the their future and their place in an increasing online learning environment
  • Digital Storytelling. Immersive Storytelling. The Moth. Twine. Transmedia Storytelling
    I am teaching a LIB 490/590 Digital Storytelling class. I can adapt any information from that class to the use of IM students
  • VR, AR, Mixed Reality.
    besides Mark Gill, I can facilitate a discussion, which goes beyond hardware and brands, but expand on the implications for academia and corporate education / world
  • IoT. Arduino, Raspberry PI. Industry 4.0
  • Instructional design. ID2ID
    I can facilitate a discussion based on the Educause suggestions about the profession’s development
  • Microcredentialing in academia and corporate world. Blockchain
  • IT in K12. How to evaluate; prioritize; select. obsolete trends in 21 century schools. K12 mobile learning
  • Podcasting: past, present, future. Beautiful Audio Editor.
    a definition of podcasting and delineation of similar activities; advantages and disadvantages.
  • Digital, Blended (Hybrid), Online teaching and learning: facilitation. Methods and techniques. Proctoring. Online students’ expectations. Faculty support. Asynch. Blended Synchronous Learning Environment
  • Gender, race and age in education. Digital divide. Xennials, Millennials and Gen Z. generational approach to teaching and learning. Young vs old Millennials. Millennial employees.
  • Privacy, [cyber]security, surveillance. K12 cyberincidents. Hackers.
  • Gaming and gamification. Appsmashing. Gradecraft
  • Lecture capture, course capture.
  • Bibliometrics, altmetrics
  • Technology and cheating, academic dishonest, plagiarism, copyright.

code4lib 2018

Code2LIB February 2018

http://2018.code4lib.org/

2018 Preconference Voting

10. The Virtualized Library: A Librarian’s Introduction to Docker and Virtual Machines
This session will introduce two major types of virtualization, virtual machines using tools like VirtualBox and Vagrant, and containers using Docker. The relative strengths and drawbacks of the two approaches will be discussed along with plenty of hands-on time. Though geared towards integrating these tools into a development workflow, the workshop should be useful for anyone interested in creating stable and reproducible computing environments, and examples will focus on library-specific tools like Archivematica and EZPaarse. With virtualization taking a lot of the pain out of installing and distributing software, alleviating many cross-platform issues, and becoming increasingly common in library and industry practices, now is a great time to get your feet wet.

(One three-hour session)

11. Digital Empathy: Creating Safe Spaces Online
User research is often focused on measures of the usability of online spaces. We look at search traffic, run card sorting and usability testing activities, and track how users navigate our spaces. Those results inform design decisions through the lens of information architecture. This is important, but doesn’t encompass everything a user needs in a space.

This workshop will focus on the other component of user experience design and user research: how to create spaces where users feel safe. Users bring their anxieties and stressors with them to our online spaces, but informed design choices can help to ameliorate that stress. This will ultimately lead to a more positive interaction between your institution and your users.

The presenters will discuss the theory behind empathetic design, delve deeply into using ethnographic research methods – including an opportunity for attendees to practice those ethnographic skills with student participants – and finish with the practical application of these results to ongoing and future projects.

(One three-hour session)

14. ARIA Basics: Making Your Web Content Sing Accessibility

https://dequeuniversity.com/assets/html/jquery-summit/html5/slides/landmarks.html
Are you a web developer or create web content? Do you add dynamic elements to your pages? If so, you should be concerned with making those dynamic elements accessible and usable to as many as possible. One of the most powerful tools currently available for making web pages accessible is ARIA, the Accessible Rich Internet Applications specification. This workshop will teach you the basics for leveraging the full power of ARIA to make great accessible web pages. Through several hands-on exercises, participants will come to understand the purpose and power of ARIA and how to apply it for a variety of different dynamic web elements. Topics will include semantic HTML, ARIA landmarks and roles, expanding/collapsing content, and modal dialog. Participants will also be taught some basic use of the screen reader NVDA for use in accessibility testing. Finally, the lessons will also emphasize learning how to keep on learning as HTML, JavaScript, and ARIA continue to evolve and expand.

Participants will need a basic background in HTML, CSS, and some JavaScript.

(One three-hour session)

18. Learning and Teaching Tech
Tech workshops pose two unique problems: finding skilled instructors for that content, and instructing that content well. Library hosted workshops are often a primary educational resource for solo learners, and many librarians utilize these workshops as a primary outreach platform. Tackling these two issues together often makes the most sense for our limited resources. Whether a programming language or software tool, learning tech to teach tech can be one of the best motivations for learning that tech skill or tool, but equally important is to learn how to teach and present tech well.

This hands-on workshop will guide participants through developing their own learning plan, reviewing essential pedagogy for teaching tech, and crafting a workshop of their choice. Each participant will leave with an actionable learning schedule, a prioritized list of resources to investigate, and an outline of a workshop they would like to teach.

(Two three-hour sessions)

23. Introduction to Omeka S
Omeka S represents a complete rewrite of Omeka Classic (aka the Omeka 2.x series), adhering to our fundamental principles of encouraging use of metadata standards, easy web publishing, and sharing cultural history. New objectives in Omeka S include multisite functionality and increased interaction with other systems. This workshop will compare and contrast Omeka S with Omeka Classic to highlight our emphasis on 1) modern metadata standards, 2) interoperability with other systems including Linked Open Data, 3) use of modern web standards, and 4) web publishing to meet the goals medium- to large-sized institutions.

In this workshop we will walk through Omeka S Item creation, with emphasis on LoD principles. We will also look at the features of Omeka S that ease metadata input and facilitate project-defined usage and workflows. In accordance with our commitment to interoperability, we will describe how the API for Omeka S can be deployed for data exchange and sharing between many systems. We will also describe how Omeka S promotes multiple site creation from one installation, in the interest of easy publishing with many objects in many contexts, and simplifying the work of IT departments.

(One three-hour session)

24. Getting started with static website generators
Have you been curious about static website generators? Have you been wondering who Jekyll and Hugo are? Then this workshop is for you

My notehttps://opensource.com/article/17/5/hugo-vs-jekyll

But this article isn’t about setting up a domain name and hosting for your website. It’s for the step after that, the actual making of that site. The typical choice for a lot of people would be to use something like WordPress. It’s a one-click install on most hosting providers, and there’s a gigantic market of plugins and themes available to choose from, depending on the type of site you’re trying to build. But not only is WordPress a bit overkill for most websites, it also gives you a dynamically generated site with a lot of moving parts. If you don’t keep all of those pieces up to date, they can pose a significant security risk and your site could get hijacked.

The alternative would be to have a static website, with nothing dynamically generated on the server side. Just good old HTML and CSS (and perhaps a bit of Javascript for flair). The downside to that option has been that you’ve been relegated to coding the whole thing by hand yourself. It’s doable, but you just want a place to share your work. You shouldn’t have to know all the idiosyncrasies of low-level web design (and the monumental headache of cross-browser compatibility) to do that.

Static website generators are tools used to build a website made up only of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. Static websites, unlike dynamic sites built with tools like Drupal or WordPress, do not use databases or server-side scripting languages. Static websites have a number of benefits over dynamic sites, including reduced security vulnerabilities, simpler long-term maintenance, and easier preservation.

In this hands-on workshop, we’ll start by exploring static website generators, their components, some of the different options available, and their benefits and disadvantages. Then, we’ll work on making our own sites, and for those that would like to, get them online with GitHub pages. Familiarity with HTML, git, and command line basics will be helpful but are not required.

(One three-hour session)

26. Using Digital Media for Research and Instruction
To use digital media effectively in both research and instruction, you need to go beyond just the playback of media files. You need to be able to stream the media, divide that stream into different segments, provide descriptive analysis of each segment, order, re-order and compare different segments from the same or different streams and create web sites that can show the result of your analysis. In this workshop, we will use Omeka and several plugins for working with digital media, to show the potential of video streaming, segmentation and descriptive analysis for research and instruction.

(One three-hour session)

28. Spark in the Dark 101 https://zeppelin.apache.org/
This is an introductory session on Apache Spark, a framework for large-scale data processing (https://spark.apache.org/). We will introduce high level concepts around Spark, including how Spark execution works and it’s relationship to the other technologies for working with Big Data. Following this introduction to the theory and background, we will walk workshop participants through hands-on usage of spark-shell, Zeppelin notebooks, and Spark SQL for processing library data. The workshop will wrap up with use cases and demos for leveraging Spark within cultural heritage institutions and information organizations, connecting the building blocks learned to current projects in the real world.

(One three-hour session)

29. Introduction to Spotlight https://github.com/projectblacklight/spotlight
http://www.spotlighttechnology.com/4-OpenSource.htm
Spotlight is an open source application that extends the digital library ecosystem by providing a means for institutions to reuse digital content in easy-to-produce, attractive, and scholarly-oriented websites. Librarians, curators, and other content experts can build Spotlight exhibits to showcase digital collections using a self-service workflow for selection, arrangement, curation, and presentation.

This workshop will introduce the main features of Spotlight and present examples of Spotlight-built exhibits from the community of adopters. We’ll also describe the technical requirements for adopting Spotlight and highlight the potential to customize and extend Spotlight’s capabilities for their own needs while contributing to its growth as an open source project.

(One three-hour session)

31. Getting Started Visualizing your IoT Data in Tableau https://www.tableau.com/
The Internet of Things is a rising trend in library research. IoT sensors can be used for space assessment, service design, and environmental monitoring. IoT tools create lots of data that can be overwhelming and hard to interpret. Tableau Public (https://public.tableau.com/en-us/s/) is a data visualization tool that allows you to explore this information quickly and intuitively to find new insights.

This full-day workshop will teach you the basics of building your own own IoT sensor using a Raspberry Pi (https://www.raspberrypi.org/) in order to gather, manipulate, and visualize your data.

All are welcome, but some familiarity with Python is recommended.

(Two three-hour sessions)

32. Enabling Social Media Research and Archiving
Social media data represents a tremendous opportunity for memory institutions of all kinds, be they large academic research libraries, or small community archives. Researchers from a broad swath of disciplines have a great deal of interest in working with social media content, but they often lack access to datasets or the technical skills needed to create them. Further, it is clear that social media is already a crucial part of the historical record in areas ranging from events your local community to national elections. But attempts to build archives of social media data are largely nascent. This workshop will be both an introduction to collecting data from the APIs of social media platforms, as well as a discussion of the roles of libraries and archives in that collecting.

Assuming no prior experience, the workshop will begin with an explanation of how APIs operate. We will then focus specifically on the Twitter API, as Twitter is of significant interest to researchers and hosts an important segment of discourse. Through a combination of hands-on and demos, we will gain experience with a number of tools that support collecting social media data (e.g., Twarc, Social Feed Manager, DocNow, Twurl, and TAGS), as well as tools that enable sharing social media datasets (e.g., Hydrator, TweetSets, and the Tweet ID Catalog).

The workshop will then turn to a discussion of how to build a successful program enabling social media collecting at your institution. This might cover a variety of topics including outreach to campus researchers, collection development strategies, the relationship between social media archiving and web archiving, and how to get involved with the social media archiving community. This discussion will be framed by a focus on ethical considerations of social media data, including privacy and responsible data sharing.

Time permitting, we will provide a sampling of some approaches to social media data analysis, including Twarc Utils and Jupyter Notebooks.

(One three-hour session)

scsu library position proposal

Please email completed forms to librarydeansoffice@stcloudstate.edu no later than noon on Thursday, October 5.

According to the email below, library faculty are asked to provide their feedback regarding the qualifications for a possible faculty line at the library.

  1. In the fall of 2013 during a faculty meeting attended by the back than library dean and during a discussion of an article provided by the dean, it was established that leading academic libraries in this country are seeking to break the mold of “library degree” and seek fresh ideas for the reinvention of the academic library by hiring faculty with more diverse (degree-wise) background.
  2. Is this still the case at the SCSU library? The “democratic” search for the answer of this question does not yield productive results, considering that the majority of the library faculty are “reference” and they “democratically” overturn votes, who see this library to be put on 21st century standards and rather seek more “reference” bodies for duties, which were recognized even by the same reference librarians as obsolete.
    It seems that the majority of the SCSU library are “purists” in the sense of seeking professionals with broader background (other than library, even “reference” skills).
    In addition, most of the current SCSU librarians are opposed to a second degree, as in acquiring more qualification, versus seeking just another diploma. There is a certain attitude of stagnation / intellectual incest, where new ideas are not generated and old ideas are prepped in “new attire” to look as innovative and/or 21st
    Last but not least, a consistent complain about workforce shortages (the attrition politics of the university’s reorganization contribute to the power of such complain) fuels the requests for reference librarians and, instead of looking for new ideas, new approaches and new work responsibilities, the library reorganization conversation deteriorates into squabbles for positions among different department.
    Most importantly, the narrow sightedness of being stuck in traditional work description impairs  most of the librarians to see potential allies and disruptors. E.g., the insistence on the supremacy of “information literacy” leads SCSU librarians to the erroneous conclusion of the exceptionality of information literacy and the disregard of multi[meta] literacies, thus depriving the entire campus of necessary 21st century skills such as visual literacy, media literacy, technology literacy, etc.
    Simultaneously, as mentioned above about potential allies and disruptors, the SCSU librarians insist on their “domain” and if they are not capable of leading meta-literacies instructions, they would also not allow and/or support others to do so.
    Considering the observations above, the following qualifications must be considered:
  3. According to the information in this blog post:
    http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/06/14/technology-requirements-samples/
    for the past year and ½, academic libraries are hiring specialists with the following qualifications and for the following positions (bolded and / or in red). Here are some highlights:
    Positions
    digital humanities
    Librarian and Instructional Technology Liaison

library Specialist: Data Visualization & Collections Analytics

Qualifications

Advanced degree required, preferably in education, educational technology, instructional design, or MLS with an emphasis in instruction and assessment.

Programming skills – Demonstrated experience with one or more metadata and scripting languages (e.g.Dublin Core, XSLT, Java, JavaScript, Python, or PHP)
Data visualization skills
multi [ meta] literacy skills

Data curation, helping students working with data
Experience with website creation and design in a CMS environment and accessibility and compliance issues
Demonstrated a high degree of facility with technologies and systems germane to the 21st century library, and be well versed in the issues surrounding scholarly communications and compliance issues (e.g. author identifiers, data sharing software, repositories, among others)

Bilingual

Provides and develops awareness and knowledge related to digital scholarship and research lifecycle for librarians and staff.

Experience developing for, and supporting, common open-source library applications such as Omeka, ArchiveSpace, Dspace,

 

Responsibilities
Establishing best practices for digital humanities labs, networks, and services

Assessing, evaluating, and peer reviewing DH projects and librarians
Actively promote TIGER or GRIC related activities through social networks and other platforms as needed.
Coordinates the transmission of online workshops through Google HangoutsScript metadata transformations and digital object processing using BASH, Python, and XSLT

liaison consults with faculty and students in a wide range of disciplines on best practices for teaching and using data/statistical software tools such as R, SPSS, Stata, and MatLab.

 

In response to the form attached to the Friday, September 29, email regarding St. Cloud State University Library Position Request Form:

 

  1. Title
    Digital Initiatives Librarian
  2. Responsibilities:
    TBD, but generally:
    – works with faculty across campus on promoting digital projects and other 21st century projects. Works with the English Department faculty on positioning the SCSU library as an equal participants in the digital humanities initiatives on campus
  • Works with the Visualization lab to establish the library as the leading unit on campus in interpretation of big data
  • Works with academic technology services on promoting library faculty as the leading force in the pedagogical use of academic technologies.
  1. Quantitative data justification
    this is a mute requirement for an innovative and useful library position. It can apply for a traditional request, such as another “reference” librarian. There cannot be a quantitative data justification for an innovative position, as explained to Keith Ewing in 2015. In order to accumulate such data, the position must be functioning at least for six months.
  2. Qualitative justification: Please provide qualitative explanation that supports need for this position.
    Numerous 21st century academic tendencies right now are scattered across campus and are a subject of political/power battles rather than a venue for campus collaboration and cooperation. Such position can seek the establishment of the library as the natural hub for “sandbox” activities across campus. It can seek a redirection of using digital initiatives on this campus for political gains by administrators and move the generation and accomplishment of such initiatives to the rightful owner and primary stakeholders: faculty and students.
    Currently, there are no additional facilities and resources required. Existing facilities and resources, such as the visualization lab, open source and free application can be used to generate the momentum of faculty working together toward a common goal, such as, e.g. digital humanities.

 

 

 

 

Scopus webinar

Scopus Content: High quality, historical depth and expert curation

Bibliographic Indexing Leader

Register for the September 28th webinar

https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/13703/275301

metadata: counts of papers by yer, researcher, institution, province, region and country. scientific fields subfields
metadata in one-credit course as a topic:

publisher – suppliers =- Elsevier processes – Scopus Data

h-index: The h-index is an author-level metric that attempts to measure both the productivity and citation impact of the publications of a scientist or scholar. The index is based on the set of the scientist’s most cited papers and the number of citations that they have received in other publications.

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https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/9995/275813

Librarians and APIs 101: overview and use cases
Christina Harlow, Library Data Specialist;Jonathan Hartmann, Georgetown Univ Medical Center; Robert Phillips, Univ of Florida

https://zenodo.org/

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Slides | Research data literacy and the library from Library_Connect

 The era of e-science demands new skill sets and competencies of researchers to ensure their work is accessible, discoverable and reusable. Librarians are naturally positioned to assist in this education as part of their liaison and information literacy services.

Research data literacy and the library

Christian Lauersen, University of Copenhagen; Sarah Wright, Cornell University; Anita de Waard, Elsevier

https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/9995/226043

Data Literacy: access, assess, manipulate, summarize and present data

Statistical Literacy: think critically about basic stats in everyday media

Information Literacy: think critically about concepts; read, interpret, evaluate information

data information literacy: the ability to use, understand and manage data. the skills needed through the whole data life cycle.

Shield, Milo. “Information literacy, statistical literacy and data literacy.” I ASSIST Quarterly 28. 2/3 (2004): 6-11.

Carlson, J., Fosmire, M., Miller, C. C., & Nelson, M. S. (2011). Determining data information literacy needs: A study of students and research faculty. Portal: Libraries & the Academy, 11(2), 629-657.

data information literacy needs

embedded librarianship,

Courses developed: NTRESS 6600 research data management seminar. six sessions, one-credit mini course

http://guides.library.cornell.edu/ntres6600
BIOG 3020: Seminar in Research skills for biologists; one-credit semester long for undergrads. data management organization http://guides.library.cornell.edu/BIOG3020

lessons learned:

  • lack of formal training for students working with data.
  • faculty assumed that students have or should have acquired the competencies earlier
  • students were considered lacking in these competencies
  • the competencies were almost universally considered important by students and faculty interviewed

http://www.datainfolit.org/

http://www.thepress.purdue.edu/titles/format/9781612493527

ideas behind data information literacy, such as the twelve data competencies.

http://blogs.lib.purdue.edu/dil/the-twelve-dil-competencies/

http://blogs.lib.purdue.edu/dil/what-is-data-information-literacy/

Johnston, L., & Carlson, J. (2015). Data Information Literacy : Librarians, Data and the Education of a New Generation of Researchers. Ashland: Purdue University Press.  http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dnlebk%26AN%3d987172%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

NEW ROLESFOR LIbRARIANS: DATAMANAgEMENTAND CURATION

the capacity to manage and curate research data has not kept pace with the ability to produce them (Hey & Hey, 2006). In recognition of this gap, the NSF and other funding agencies are now mandating that every grant proposal must include a DMP (NSF, 2010). These mandates highlight the benefits of producing well-described data that can be shared, understood, and reused by oth-ers, but they generally offer little in the way of guidance or instruction on how to address the inherent issues and challenges researchers face in complying. Even with increasing expecta-tions from funding agencies and research com-munities, such as the announcement by the White House for all federal funding agencies to better share research data (Holdren, 2013), the lack of data curation services tailored for the “small sciences,” the single investigators or small labs that typically comprise science prac-tice at universities, has been identified as a bar-rier in making research data more widely avail-able (Cragin, Palmer, Carlson, & Witt, 2010).Academic libraries, which support the re-search and teaching activities of their home institutions, are recognizing the need to de-velop services and resources in support of the evolving demands of the information age. The curation of research data is an area that librar-ians are well suited to address, and a num-ber of academic libraries are taking action to build capacity in this area (Soehner, Steeves, & Ward, 2010)

REIMAgININg AN ExISTINg ROLEOF LIbRARIANS: TEAChINg INFORMATION LITERACY SkILLS

By combining the use-based standards of information literacy with skill development across the whole data life cycle, we sought to support the practices of science by develop-ing a DIL curriculum and providing training for higher education students and research-ers. We increased ca-pacity and enabled comparative work by involving several insti-tutions in developing instruction in DIL. Finally, we grounded the instruction in the real-world needs as articu-lated by active researchers and their students from a variety of fields

Chapter 1 The development of the 12 DIL competencies is explained, and a brief compari-son is performed between DIL and information literacy, as defined by the 2000 ACRL standards.

chapter 2 thinking and approaches toward engaging researchers and students with the 12 competencies, a re-view of the literature on a variety of educational approaches to teaching data management and curation to students, and an articulation of our key assumptions in forming the DIL project.

Chapter 3 Journal of Digital Curation. http://www.ijdc.net/

http://www.dcc.ac.uk/digital-curation

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/10/19/digital-curation-2/

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/12/06/digital-curation/

chapter 4 because these lon-gitudinal data cannot be reproduced, acquiring the skills necessary to work with databases and to handle data entry was described as essential. Interventions took place in a classroom set-ting through a spring 2013 semester one-credit course entitled Managing Data to Facilitate Your Research taught by this DIL team.

chapter 5 embedded librar-ian approach of working with the teaching as-sistants (TAs) to develop tools and resources to teach undergraduate students data management skills as a part of their EPICS experience.
Lack of organization and documentation presents a bar-rier to (a) successfully transferring code to new students who will continue its development, (b) delivering code and other project outputs to the community client, and (c) the center ad-ministration’s ability to understand and evalu-ate the impact on student learning.
skill sessions to deliver instruction to team lead-ers, crafted a rubric for measuring the quality of documenting code and other data, served as critics in student design reviews, and attended student lab sessions to observe and consult on student work

chapter 6 Although the faculty researcher had created formal policies on data management practices for his lab, this case study demonstrated that students’ adherence to these guidelines was limited at best. Similar patterns arose in discus-sions concerning the quality of metadata. This case study addressed a situation in which stu-dents are at least somewhat aware of the need to manage their data;

chapter 7 University of Minnesota team to design and implement a hybrid course to teach DIL com-petencies to graduate students in civil engi-neering.
stu-dents’ abilities to understand and track issues affecting the quality of the data, the transfer of data from their custody to the custody of the lab upon graduation, and the steps neces-sary to maintain the value and utility of the data over time.

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more on Scopus in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=scopus

embedded librarian qualifications

qualifications of the embedded librarian: is there any known case for an academic library to employ as embedded librarian a specialist who has both MLIS and terminal degree in a discipline, where he works as embedded librarian.

I also think that we need to be more welcoming to people who may not have come through a traditional education program (i.e., the M.L.S.) but who bring critical skills and new perspectives into the library.
The Changing Roles of Academic and Research Libraries – Higher Ed Careers – HigherEdJobs. (2013). Retrieved from https://www.higheredjobs.com/HigherEdCareers/interviews.cfm?ID=632

“Embedded librarian” is understood as librarians presence in traditional classroom environments and or through LMS.
Then opinions vary: According to Kvienlid (2012), http://www.cclibinstruction.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/CCLI2012proceedings_Kvenild.pdf

  1. “Their engagement can be over two or more class sessions, even co-teaching the class in some cases. This model provides in-depth knowledge of student research projects during the research and revision process.” This is for first-year experience students.
  2. Embedding with project teams in Business and STEM programs involves:  “in – depth participation in short – term projects, aiding the team in their searches, literature review, grant preparation, data curation, or other specialized information aspects of the project. This level of embedment requires a heavy time commitment during the length of the project, as well as subject expertise and established trust with the research team.”
  3. embedding in departments as a liaison. 
    “They are usually closely affiliated with the departme nt (maybe even more so than with the libraries) and might be paid out of departmental funds. These librarians learn the ways and needs of their patrons in their natural environment. They often work as finders of information, organizers of information, and taxonomy creators. Embedding within departments provides in – depth knowledge of the users of library services, along with potential isolation from other librarians. It involves a high degree of specialization, co – location and shared responsibility”

best practices, new opptunities (video, screencasts, social media. Adobe Connect) , Assessment

here is Kvenild 2016 article also

Kvenild, C., Tumbleson, B. E., Burke, J. J., & Calkins, K. (2016). Embedded librarianship: questions and answers from librarians in the trenches. Library Hi Tech34(2), 8-11.

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utilizing technology tools; and providing information literacy and assessment. Technology tools continue to evolve and change, and most librarians can anticipate using multiple learning management systems over time. There is an ongoing need for professional development in online library instruction and assessment

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Tumbleson, B. E., & Burke, J. (. J. (2013). Embedding librarianship in learning management systems: A how-to-do-it manual for librarians. Neal-Schuman, an imprint of the American Library Association.

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/05/04/lms-and-embedded-librarianship/

read in red my emphasis on excerpts from that book

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Monroe-Gulick, A., O ’brien, M. S., & White, G. (2013). Librarians as Partners: Moving from Research Supporters to Research Partners. In Moving from Research Supporters to Research Partners. Indianapolis, IN. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/sites/ala.org.acrl/files/content/conferences/confsandpreconfs/2013/papers/GulickOBrienWhite_Librarians.pdf

From Supporter to Partner

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Andrews, C. (2014). An Examination of Embedded Librarian Ideas and Practices: A Critical Bibliography.

http://academicworks.cuny.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1000&context=bx_pubs

emphasis is on undergraduate. “a tremendous amount of literature published addressing library/faculty partnerships.”

“There will never be one golden rule when it comes to way in which a librarian networks with faculty on campus.”

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Bobish, G. (2011). Participation and Pedagogy: Connecting the Social Web to ACRL Learning Outcomes. Journal Of Academic Librarianship37(1), 54-63.

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https://www.researchgate.net/publication/232382226_Participation_and_Pedagogy_Connecting_the_Social_Web_to_ACRL_Learning_Outcomes

requested through researchgate

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Cahoy, E. S., & Schroeder, R. (2012). EMBEDDING AFFECTIVE LEARNING OUTCOMES IN LIBRARY INSTRUCTION. Communications In Information Literacy6(1), 73-90.

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attention must be paid to students’ affective, emotional needs throughout the research
process. My note: And this is exactly what comprise half of my service of. The relatively small amount of research into affective learning, as opposed to cognition, remains true to this day.

p. 78  As the 50-minute one-shot session is still the norm for library research sessions on the
majority of campuses, behavioral assessment can be problematic.

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Cha, T., & Hsieh, P. (2009). A Case Study of Faculty Attitudes toward Collaboration with Librarians to Integrate Information Literacy into the Curriculum. (Chinese). Journal Of Educational Media & Library Sciences46(4), 441-467.

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Meanwhile, different attitudes were revealed between teaching higher order thinking skills and lower order thinking skills. Librarian Domain Knowledge, Librarian Professionalism, Curriculum Strategies, and Student Learning were identified as factorial dimensions influencing faculty-librarian collaboration.

two major concerns of “Students Learning” and “Librarian Professionalism” from faculty provide insights that understanding pedagogy, enhancing instructional skills and continuing progress in librarian professionalism will contribute to consolidating partnerships when developing course-specific IL programs.

this proves how much right I am to develophttp://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/bi/

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COVONE, N., & LAMM, M. (2010). Just Be There: Campus, Department, Classroom…and Kitchen?. Public Services Quarterly6(2/3), 198-207. doi:10.1080/15228959.2010.498768

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p. 199 There is also the concept of the ‘‘blended librarian’’ as described by Bell and Shank (2004) to merge the assets and abilities of a librarian with those of one versed in technology. Academic librarians are obligated and privileged to merge several strengths to meet the needs of their user population. No longer is the traditional passive role acceptable. Bell and Shank (2004) implore academic librarians ‘‘to proactively advance their integration into the teaching and learning process’’ (p. 373).

p. 200 first year experience

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Dewey, B. I. (2004). The Embedded Librarian: Strategic Campus Collaborations. Resource Sharing & Information Networks17(1-2), 5-17.

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p. 6 the imperative for academic librarians to become embedded in the priorities of teaching, learning, and research in truly relevant ways. Embedding as an effective mode of collaboration will be explored through examples relating to the physical and virtual environment. An analysis of current approaches and next steps for the future will be addressed, with the goal of providing food for thought as librarians assess programs and activities in terms of positive collaboration and effectiveness

p. 9  new academic salon,
p. 10 the pervasive campus librarian
The fact that we are generalists and devoted to all disciplines and all sectors of the academic user community gives us a special insight on ways to advance the university and achieve its mission

this contradicts Shumaker and Talley, who assert that the embedded librarian is NOT a generalist, but specialist

p. 11 Central administrators, along with the chief academic officer, make critical funding and policy decisions affecting the library

p. 11 librarians and teaching.
In 2011, interim dean Ruth Zietlow “gave up” classes after the messy divorce with CIM. the library faculty poled itself to reveal that a significant number of the faculty does NOT want to teach.

p. 14 influencing campus virtual space
this library’s social media is imploded in its image.

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DREWES, K., & HOFFMAN, N. (2010). Academic Embedded Librarianship: An Introduction. Public Services Quarterly6(2/3), 75-82. doi:10.1080/15228959.2010.498773

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p. 75 Literature about embedded librarianship is so diverse that the definition of this term, as well as related goals and methods when embedding services and programs, can be difficult to define. What are some charateristics of an embedded program? Is embedding only achieved through an online classroom? How did embedded librarianship first begin in academic libraries?

p. 76 adopted as a term because it is a similar concept to embedded journalism.
Embedded librarian programs often locate librarians involved in the spaces of their users and colleagues, either physically or through technology, in order to become a part of their users’ culture. A librarian’s physical and metaphorical location is often what defines them as embedded.

David Shumaker and Mary Talley (see bottom of this blog entry)

Highly technical tasks, such as creating information architecture, using analytical software, and computer and network systems management were performed by less than 20% of the survey respondents. Shumaker and Talley also report embedded services are often found in tandem with specialized funding. This study also confirms embedded services are not new.

p. 77 history and evolution of the role

p. 79 methods of embedding

In North America, one would be hard-pressed to find a library that does not already electronically embed services into online reference chat, make use of Web 2.0 communication applications such as Twitter and blogs, and embed librarians and collaborators within online classrooms. These are all examples of the embedding process (Ramsay & Kinnie, 2006). The name embedded librarian in this context is a double entendre, as the insertion of widgets and multimedia files into HTML code when designing Web sites is usually called the embedding of the file.
My note: is this library actually is one that does not use Twitter and blogs in the hard-core meaning of library service

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Essinger, C. c., & Ke, I. i. (2013). Outreach: What Works?. Collaborative Librarianship5(1), 52-58.

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Recommendations:
The authors distributed their findings at a half day workshop attended by nearly all liaisons. They made the following recommendations:

  • • Personalize outreach.
  • • Spend more time marketing and reaching out to departments, even though it might mean having less time for other activities.
  • • Find an alternative advocate who can build your reputation through word-ofmouth if your relationship with your assigned department liaison is not fruitful.
  • • Seek opportunities to meet department staff in person.
  • • As much as possible, administrators should commit to keeping liaisons assignments static.

p. 57 that faculty outreach is similar to other types of relationship building: it requires time to establish trust, respect and appreciation on both sides. Even a liaison’s challenging first two years can, therefore, be viewed as productive because the relationship is developing in the background. This phenomenon also signals to library administrators the benefits of maintaining a stable workforce. Frequent changes in academic assignments and staff changes can lead to a less engaged user population, and also make the outreach assignment much more frustrating.

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Heider, K. L. (2010). Ten Tips for Implementing a Successful Embedded Librarian Program. Public Services Quarterly6(2-3), 110-121.

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embedded librarian program in the university’s College of Education and Educational Technology

p. 112 Make Sure You Have Buy-in from All Stakeholders

Include College=Department Faculty in the Interview Process

Look for the Following Qualities=Qualifications in an Embedded Librarian

Have a Physical Presence in the College=Department a Few Days Each Week

Serve as Bibliographer to College=Department

Offer Bibliographic Instruction Sessions and Guest Lectures at Main Campus, Branch Campuses, and Centers

Develop Collaborative Programs that Utilize the Library’s Resources for College=Department Improvement

#9 Offer to Teach Credit Courses for the College=Department When Department Faculty Are Not Available

#10: Publish Scholarly Works and Present at Professional Conferences with College=Department Faculty. again, Martin Lo, John Hoover,

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Hollister, C. V. (2008). Meeting Them where They Are: Library Instruction for Today’s Students in the World Civilizations Course. Public Services Quarterly4(1), 15-27.

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history and library. My note: can you break the silo in the history department? http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/05/01/history-becker/ 

world civilizations course

Faculty come to the world civilizations enterprise from a broad range of academic disciplines and world experiences, which has a significant impact on their interpretations of world history, their selections of course materials, their teaching styles, and their expectations for students. Moreover, faculty teach the course on a rotating basis. So, there is no single model of faculty-librarian collaboration that can be applied from section to section, or even from semester to semester. Faculty have widely differing views on the role of library instruction in their sections of the course, and the extent to which library research is required for coursework. They also differ in terms of their ability or willingness to collaborate with the libraries. As a result, student access to library instruction varies from section to section.

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Kesselman, M. A., & Watstein, S. B. (2009). Creating Opportunities: Embedded Librarians. Journal Of Library Administration49(3), 383-400.

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p. 384 embedded librarians in the blogosphere.
not even close to the local idea how blog must be used  for library use.

p. 387 definitions

p. 389 clinical librarianship – term from the 1970s.

p. 390 Special librarians and particularly those in corporate settings tend to be more integrated within the company they serve and are often instrumental in cost-related services such as competitive intelligence, scientific, and patent research.

p. 391 Librarians Collaborating With Faculty in Scholarly Communication Activities

My note: this is what I am doing with Martin Lo and used to do with John Hoover. Attempts with the sociology department, IS department

p. 392 Role of Librarians With Multidisciplinary Collaborations

my note : my work with Mark Gill and Mark Petzhold

p. 393 social media
again, this library cannot be farther from the true meaning of Web 2.0 collaboration.

p. 396 organizational structures

Three different types of organizational structures are generally recognized—hierarchical, matrix, and flat. We suggest that each of these conventional structures promotes, to some extent, its own brand of silos—silos that inherently pose obstacles to the assumption of new roles and responsibilities. For example, we question whether the hierarchical organization structures that define many of our libraries, with their emphasis on line, lateral staff and functional relationships and the relative ranks of parts and positions or jobs, are flexible enough to support new roles and responsibilities. In contrast, matrix management offers a different type of organizational management model in which people with similar skills are pooled for work assignments. We suggest that, in contrast to hierarchical structures, matrix management allows team members to share information more readily across task boundaries and allows for specialization that can increase depth of knowledge and allow professional development and career progression to be managed. The third organizational structure mentioned—flat or horizontal organizations, refers to an organizational structure with few or no levels of intervening management between staff and managers

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Kobzina, N. G. (2010). A Faculty—Librarian Partnership: A Unique Opportunity for Course Integration. Journal Of Library Administration50(4), 293-314.

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my LIB 290 is such class. and I am the only one who is teaching it online by QM standards.
Can the administration encourage Global Studies to combine efforts with my LIB 290 and offer a campus-wide class?

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Lange, J. j., Canuel, R. r., & Fitzgibbons, M. m. (2011). Tailoring information literacy instruction and library services for continuing education. Journal Of Information Literacy5(2), 66-80.

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McGill. p. 77 The McGill University Library’s system-wide liaison model emphasises a disciplinary approach, placing the impetus for outreach and service on individual librarians responsible for particular departments and user groups.

 

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MCMILLEN, P., & FABBI, J. (2010). How to Be an E3 Librarian. Public Services Quarterly6(2/3), 174-186. doi:10.1080/15228959.2010.497454

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ILL

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Meyer, N. J., & Miller, I. R. (2008). The Library as Service-Learning Partner: A Win-Win Collaboration with Students and Faculty. College & Undergraduate Libraries15(4), 399-413.

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ILL

I did something similar with Keith Christensen in 2012: http://bit.ly/SCSUlibGame, yet again, blocked for further consideration

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Niles, P. (2011). Meeting the Needs of the 21st Century Student. Community & Junior College Libraries17(2), 47-51.

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about Millennials

millennials. p. 48 my note: the losing battle of telling the millennials the value of books

librarians need to emphasize that not all information
is found on the Web and that the information found there might not be
reliable, depending on its source

p. 49 The latest technology can be used for communication. Two examples of this modernization process are making podcasts of library lectures and using instant messaging to answer reference queries. Students need Reference Librarians to assist them in focusing their research, showing them appropriate sources and how to use those sources. The change is not how the librarians serve the students but how the service is delivered. Instead of coming to the reference desk Millennial students may choose to use e-mail, cell phones to send a text message or use a chat reference service to communicate with the librarian. Students want to have 24/7 access to library resources and librarians.

my note: and yet this library still uses 90ish communication – the facebook page is just an easy to edit web page and the concept of Web 2.0 has not arrived or shaped the current communication.

p. 50 Librarians should examine how they present library instruction and ensure that students know why it is important. Further, Lancaster and Stillman state that librarians need to “incorporate some computer-based instruction for Millennials as it allows them to go at their own speed and acknowledges their ability to manage information” (2003, 231).
and, once again, talking about inducing library instruction with technology: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/bi/

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Oakleaf, M., & VanScoy, A. (2010). Instructional Strategies for Digital Reference: Methods to Facilitate Student Learning. Reference & User Services Quarterly49(4), 380-390.

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constructivism, social constructivism, active learning

they have a graph about metagcognition. I wish, they had found place for metaliteracy also

p. 383. #5 Let them drive. this is EXACTLY what I am offering with:http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/bi/
build their own construct

p. 386 my work with the doctoral cohorts:

In the current climate of educational accountability, reference librarians should embrace the opportunity to align reference service with the teaching and learning missions of their libraries and overarching institutions

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Rao, S., Cameron, A., & Gaskin-Noel, S. (2009). Embedding General Education Competencies into an Online Information Literacy Course. Journal Of Library Administration49(1/2), 59-73.

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online programs a 3-credit junior seminar course (JRSM 301) to assess general education competencies

p. 60 The 3-credit course titled LISC 260—Using Electronic Resources for Research has existed as a required course for this overseas cohort of students since the fall of 1999. The course was initially developed as a required course to introduce the Mercy College Libraries’ resources to this cohort of overseas students. Full-time librarians teach this course as an overload.

The course lasts for 8 weeks during fall and spring semesters and is divided into eight modules with five quizzes. Summer sessions are shorter; the summer version of the course runs for 6 weeks. There is no midterm exam, final exam, project, or term paper for this course. Sixty percent of the grade is based on the quizzes and assignments and 40% on discussion and class participation.

Each quiz addresses a specific competency. We identified the modules where the five competencies would fit best. A document containing the five general education competencies (critical thinking, information literacy, quantitative reasoning, critical reading, and writing) statements

Critical Thinking Competency This competency was placed in the second module covering the topic “Developing Search Strategies” in the second week of the course. In this module, students are required to select a topic and develop logical terminologies and search strings. This task requires a great deal of critical and analytical thinking and therefore lays the groundwork for the other competencies. The quizzes and assignments for this competency involve breaking or narrowing down the topic into subtopics, comparing two topics or ideas, and similar skills. It is hoped that students will be able to adopt Boolean and other search logic in clear and precise ways in their analyses and interpretations of their topic and use the search strategies they develop for continued assignments throughout the rest of the course.

p. 61. Information Literacy Competency The information literacy competency is introduced in the fourth module in the fourth week of the course. As part of the course, students are required to learn about the Mercy College Libraries’ indexes and databases, which this module addresses (“Information Literacy,” n.d.).

Quantitative Reasoning Competency

This seminar course is a library research course with no statistics or mathematics component. Many students enrolled in the course are not mathematics or statistics majors, hence some creativity was needed to evaluate their mathematical and computational skills. Students are given this competency in the fifth module during the fifth week of the course, which deals with subject-specific sources. It was decided that, to assess this competency, a quiz analyzing data obtained in a tabular format from one of the databases subscribed to by the library would fulfill the requirement. Students are given a choice of various countries and related data, and are asked to create some comparative demographic profiles. This approach has worked well because it gives students the opportunity to focus on countries and data that interest them.

 

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Abrizah, A., Inuwa, S., & Afiqah-Izzati, N. (2016). Systematic Literature Review Informing LIS Professionals on Embedding Librarianship Roles. Journal Of Academic Librarianship42(6), 636-643. doi:10.1016/j.acalib.2016.08.010

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requested through research gate

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Summey, T. P., & Kane, C. A. (2017). Going Where They Are: Intentionally Embedding Librarians in Courses and Measuring the Impact on Student Learning. Journal Of Library & Information Services In Distance Learning11(1/2), 158-174. doi:10.1080/1533290X.2016.1229429

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a pilot project utilizing a variety of methods.

p. 158 The concept of embedded librarians is not new, as it has antecedents in branch librarians of the seventies and academic departmental liaisons of the 1980s and 1990s. However, it is a way to proactively reach out to the campus community (Drewes & Hoffman, 2010).

There is not a one-size-fits-all definition for embedded librarianship. As a result, librarians in academic libraries may be embedded in their communities in a variety of ways and at varying levels from course integrated instruction to being fully embedded as a member of an academic department

p. 160 my note: the authors describe the standard use of LMS for embedded librarianship.

p. 163 they managed to fight out and ensure their efforts are “credited.” Assigning credits to embedded librarian activities can be a very tough process.

p. 165  assessment

the authors utilized a pre-module and post-module survey to assess the students’ performance using library resources. The survey also helped to determine the students’ perceived self-efficacy and confidence in using the library, its resources, and services. In addition, the researchers analyzed student responses to discussion questions, studied feedback at the end of the course in the course discussion forum, and conducted interviews with the faculty members teaching the courses (

In another study, researchers analyzed bibliographies of students in the course to identify what resources they cited in their research projects. More specifically, they analyzed the type and appropriateness of sources used by the students, their currency, and noting how deeply the students delved into their topics. They also looked at the number of references cited. The authors believed that examining the bibliographies provided an incomplete picture because it provided data on the sources selected by the students but not information on how they retrieved those sources.

p. 171 survey sample

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Wu, L., & Thornton, J. (2017). Experience, Challenges, and Opportunities of Being Fully Embedded in a User Group. Medical Reference Services Quarterly36(2), 138-149. doi:10.1080/02763869.2017.1293978

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this is somehow close to my role with the EDAD

Texas A&M University academic health sciences library integrating a librarian into the College of Pharmacy, approximately 250 miles away from the main library. preembedded and postembedded activities demonstrated the effectiveness and impact of

For this study, the fully embedded librarian is defined as one who is out of the traditional library and into an onsite setting to provide a full range of library services that enable collaboration with researchers or teaching faculty and support student learning. In this model, the embedded librarian is a team member of the RCOP rather than a service provider standing apart. The lines are not blurred as to the kind of services that should be embedded because the embedded librarian is 100% onsite. Very few reports in the literature describe fully embedded librarian models such as this. However, one similar model exists at the Arizona Health Sciences Library (AHSL), which is affiliated with the University of Arizona, where librarians relocated their permanent offices to the colleges of Nursing, Public Health, and Pharmacy. AHSL librarians spent close to 100% of their time in the colleges.

p. 144 The embedded librarian has gained recognition in the college and was appointed by the dean to serve on the Instructional Venues Ad Hoc Committee (IVC).

My note: This is what Tom Hergert and I have been advocating for years: the role of the librarian is not to find info and teach how to find info ONLY. The role of the librarian is to bring 21st century to School of Education: information literacy is only a fragment of metaliteracies. Information literacy is a 1990s priority. While it is still an important part of librarians goals, digital literacy, visual and media literacy, as well as technology literacy and pedagogical application of technology is imposed as integral part of the work of the mebedded librarian.

p. 145 Challenges and Opportunities

Another challenge involved the librarian’s decision-making and effective communications skills, especially when deciding to implement library services or programs. Other challenges included speaking the client group’s language and knowing the information needs of each group—faculty, students, staff, postdocs, research assistants, and research scientists—to deliver the right information at the point of need. The following strategies were practiced to overcome these challenges: .

  • A positive attitude can increase connectivity, networking, and collaboration beyond a limited space. Proactively seeking opportunities to participate and get involved in library events, instructional programs, training workshops, or committee work shortened the distance between the remote librarian and those in main campus. .
  • As video conferencing tools or programs (e.g., Adobe Connnect, Webex, Skype, Google Hangout, Zoom) were the primary means for the remote at 18:19 24 August 2017 librarian to attend library meetings and teach in library instructional programs, spending some time learning to use these tools and embracing them greatly increased the librarian’s capacity to overcome the feelings of disconnection.
  • The willingness to travel several times a year to the main campus to meet librarians face-to-face helped in understanding the system and in getting help that seemed complicated and difficult via remote resources (e.g., computer issues). .
  • Actively listening to the faculty and students during the conversations helped understand their information needs. This served as the basis to initiate any targeted library services and programs.

Despite the challenges, the embedded librarian was presented with numerous opportunities that a traditional librarian might think impossible or difficult to experience, for example, attending RCOP department meetings or RCOP executive committee meetings to present library resources and services, serving on RCOP committees, co-teaching with faculty in RCOP credit courses, creating and grading assignments counting toward total course credits, and being given access to all RCOP course syllabi in eCampus. (the last is in essence what I am doing right now)

p. 147 Marketing Embedded Library Services

The “What’s in It for Me” (WIIFM) principle1 was a powerful technique to promote embedded library services. The essentials of WIIFM are understanding patron needs and ensuring the marketing effort or communications addressing those needs15—in other words, always telling patrons what is in it for them when promoting library services and resources. Different venues were used to practice WIIFM: .

  • RCOP faculty email list was an effective way to reach out to all the faculty. An email message at the beginning of a semester to the faculty highlighted the embedded librarian’s services. During the semester, the librarian communicated with the faculty on specific resources and services addressing their needs, such as measuring their research impact at the time of their annual evaluation, sharing grant funding resources, and promoting MSL’s resources related to reuse of images. .
  • Library orientations to new students and new faculty allowed the librarian to focus on who to contact for questions and help, available resources, and ways to access them. . Being a guest speaker for the monthly RCOP departmental faculty meetings provided another opportunity for the librarian to promote services and resources.
  • Casual conversations with faculty, students, researchers, and postdocs in the hallway, at staff luncheons, and at RCOP events helped understand their information needs, which helped the librarian initiate MSL service projects and programs.
  • The Facebook private group, created by Instructional Technology & MSL Resources @ Rangel COP, was used to announce MSL resources and services. The group currently has 256 members. The librarian is one of the group administrators who answers student questions related to library and MSL resources. (social media is my forte)

p. 148 This model would not have been successful without the strong support from MSL leadership team and the RCOP administration.

the next step would be to conduct a systematic assessment to get feedback from RCOP administrators, faculty, students, staff, postdocs, and research assistants. The integration of the library instructional program into the RCOP curriculum should be included in RCOP final course evaluations. Another future direction might be to conduct a curriculum map to get a better idea about the learning objectives of each course and to identity information literacy instruction needs across the curriculum. The curriculum mapping might also help better structure library instruction delivery to RCOP. Teaching content might be structured more purposefully and logically sequenced across the curriculum to ensure that what students have learned in one course prepares them for the next ones.

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Blake, L., Ballance, D., Davies, K., Gaines, J. K., Mears, K., Shipman, P., & … Burchfield, V. (2016). Patron perception and utilization of an embedded librarian program. Journal Of The Medical Library Association104(3), 226-230. doi:10.3163/1536-5050.104.3.008

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The overall satisfaction with services was encouraging, but awareness of the embedded program was low, suggesting an overall need for marketing of services.

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Tumbleson, B. E. (2016). Collaborating in Research: Embedded Librarianship in the Learning Management System. Reference Librarian57(3), 224-234. doi:10.1080/02763877.2015.1134376

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O’Toole, E., Barham, R., & Monahan, J. (2016). The Impact of Physically Embedded Librarianship on Academic Departments. Portal: Libraries & The Academy16(3), 529-556.

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Agrawal, P. p., & Kumar, A. (2016). Embedded Librarianship and Academic Setup: Going beyond the library stockades. International Journal Of Information Dissemination & Technology6(3), 170-173.

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India. p. 173 as of today, most of the users are not able to differentiate the library professional who have a bachelor degree, Masters degree and who are doctorate of the subject. My note: not in my case and this is my great advantage.

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Madden, H., & Rasmussen, A. M. (2016). Embedded Librarianship: Einbindung von Wissenschafts- und Informationskompetenz in Schreibkurse / Ein US-amerikanisches Konzept. Bub: Forum Bibliothek Und Information68(4), 202-205.

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ILL

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Delaney, G., & Bates, J. (2015). Envisioning the Academic Library: A Reflection on Roles, Relevancy and Relationships. New Review Of Academic Librarianship21(1), 30-51. doi:10.1080/13614533.2014.911194

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overview of the literature on embedded librarianship

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Freiburger, G., Martin, J. R., & Nuñez, A. V. (2016). An Embedded Librarian Program: Eight Years On. Medical Reference Services Quarterly35(4), 388-396. doi:10.1080/02763869.2016.1220756

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close to my role with the doctoral cohorts

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Wilson, G. (2015). The Process of Becoming an Embedded Curriculum Librarian in Multiple Health Sciences Programs. Medical Reference Services Quarterly34(4), 490-497. doi:10.1080/02763869.2015.1082386

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ILL

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Milbourn, A. a. (2013). A Big Picture Approach: Using Embedded Librarianship to Proactively Address the Need for Visual Literacy Instruction in Higher Education. Art Documentation: Bulletin Of The Art Libraries Society Of North America32(2), 274-283.

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visual literacy – this is IMS area, which was de facto shot off by the omnipotence of “information literacy”

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Talley, M. (2007). Success and the Embedded Librarian. https://www.sla.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/Success_and_the_Embedded.pdf

Shumaker, D., Talley, M. Models of Embedded Librarianship: A Research Summary. https://www.sla.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/Models_of_Embedded.pdf

Shumaker, D., Talley, M. (2009). Models of Embedded Librarianship. Final Report.  Prepared under the Special Libraries Association Research Grant 2007. https://embeddedlibrarian.files.wordpress.com/2009/08/executivesummarymodels-of-embedded-librarianship.pdf

Shumaker, D. (2013). Embedded Librarianship: Digital World Future? http://www.infotoday.com/CIL2013/session.asp?ID=W30

Modelsof embeddedlibrarianship presentation_final_mt61509 from MaryTalley
slide 8: vision of embedded librarianship:
customer centric not library centric; located in their workplace not our workplace; focused on small groups not entire populations; composed of specialists, not generalists; dependent on domain knowledge not only library skills; aming an analysis and synthesis not simply delivery; in context, not out of context; built on trusted advice not service delivery
all of the above is embodied in my work with the doctoral cohorts
slide 9: why study? because traditional library service model is in decline
slide 11: broad analytical research on successful implementation is lacking
slide 20: large institutions more likely to offer specialized services
slide 21: domain knowledge through continuous learning, not always through formal degrees.
slide 39: what matters most
slide 40: strong leadership by library managers is critical (I will add here “by deans of other colleges)
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bibliography:

Abrizah, A., Inuwa, S., & Afiqah-Izzati, N. (2016). Systematic Literature Review Informing LIS Professionals on Embedding Librarianship Roles. Journal Of Academic Librarianship42(6), 636-643. doi:10.1016/j.acalib.2016.08.010

Agrawal, P. p., & Kumar, A. (2016). Embedded Librarianship and Academic Setup: Going beyond the library stockades. International Journal Of Information Dissemination & Technology6(3), 170-173.

Andrews, C. R. (2014). CUNY Academic Works An Examination of Embedded Librarian Ideas and Practices: A Critical Bibliography. An Examination of Embedded Librarian Ideas and Practices: A Critical Bibliography. Codex, 3(1), 2150–86. Retrieved from http://academicworks.cuny.edu/bx_pubs

Blake, L., Ballance, D., Davies, K., Gaines, J. K., Mears, K., Shipman, P., & … Burchfield, V. (2016). Patron perception and utilization of an embedded librarian program. Journal Of The Medical Library Association104(3), 226-230. doi:10.3163/1536-5050.104.3.008

Bobish, G. (2011). Participation and Pedagogy: Connecting the Social Web to ACRL Learning Outcomes. Journal Of Academic Librarianship37(1), 54-63.

Cahoy, E. S., & Schroeder, R. (2012). EMBEDDING AFFECTIVE LEARNING OUTCOMES IN LIBRARY INSTRUCTION. Communications In Information Literacy6(1), 73-90.

Cha, T., & Hsieh, P. (2009). A Case Study of Faculty Attitudes toward Collaboration with Librarians to Integrate Information Literacy into the Curriculum. (Chinese). Journal Of Educational Media & Library Sciences46(4), 441-467.

COVONE, N., & LAMM, M. (2010). Just Be There: Campus, Department, Classroom…and Kitchen?. Public Services Quarterly6(2/3), 198-207. doi:10.1080/15228959.2010.498768

Delaney, G., & Bates, J. (2015). Envisioning the Academic Library: A Reflection on Roles, Relevancy and Relationships. New Review Of Academic Librarianship21(1), 30-51. doi:10.1080/13614533.2014.911194

Dewey, B. I. (2004). The Embedded Librarian: Strategic Campus Collaborations. Resource Sharing & Information Networks17(1-2), 5-17.

DREWES, K., & HOFFMAN, N. (2010). Academic Embedded Librarianship: An Introduction. Public Services Quarterly6(2/3), 75-82. doi:10.1080/15228959.2010.498773

Essinger, C. c., & Ke, I. i. (2013). Outreach: What Works?. Collaborative Librarianship5(1), 52-58.

Freiburger, G., Martin, J. R., & Nuñez, A. V. (2016). An Embedded Librarian Program: Eight Years On. Medical Reference Services Quarterly35(4), 388-396. doi:10.1080/02763869.2016.1220756

Heider, K. L. (2010). Ten Tips for Implementing a Successful Embedded Librarian Program. Public Services Quarterly6(2-3), 110-121.

Hollister, C. V. (2008). Meeting Them where They Are: Library Instruction for Today’s Students in the World Civilizations Course. Public Services Quarterly4(1), 15-27.

Kesselman, M. A., & Watstein, S. B. (2009). Creating Opportunities: Embedded Librarians. Journal Of Library Administration49(3), 383-400.

Kobzina, N. G. (2010). A Faculty—Librarian Partnership: A Unique Opportunity for Course Integration. Journal Of Library Administration50(4), 293-314.

Kvenild, C. (n.d.). The Future of Embedded Librarianship: Best Practices and Opportunities. Retrieved from http://www.cclibinstruction.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/CCLI2012proceedings_Kvenild.pdf

Lange, J. j., Canuel, R. r., & Fitzgibbons, M. m. (2011). Tailoring information literacy instruction and library services for continuing education. Journal Of Information Literacy5(2), 66-80.

Madden, H., & Rasmussen, A. M. (2016). Embedded Librarianship: Einbindung von Wissenschafts- und Informationskompetenz in Schreibkurse / Ein US-amerikanisches Konzept. Bub: Forum Bibliothek Und Information68(4), 202-205.

MCMILLEN, P., & FABBI, J. (2010). How to Be an E3 Librarian. Public Services Quarterly6(2/3), 174-186. doi:10.1080/15228959.2010.497454

Meyer, N. J., & Miller, I. R. (2008). The Library as Service-Learning Partner: A Win-Win Collaboration with Students and Faculty. College & Undergraduate Libraries15(4), 399-413.

Milbourn, A. (2013). A Big Picture Approach: Using Embedded Librarianship to Proactively Address the Need for Visual Literacy Instruction in Higher Education. Art Documentation: Bulletin Of The Art Libraries Society Of North America32(2), 274-283.

The Changing Roles of Academic and Research Libraries – Higher Ed Careers – HigherEdJobs. (2013). Retrieved from https://www.higheredjobs.com/HigherEdCareers/interviews.cfm?ID=632

Niles, P. (2011). Meeting the Needs of the 21st Century Student. Community & Junior College Libraries17(2), 47-51.

Oakleaf, M., & VanScoy, A. (2010). Instructional Strategies for Digital Reference: Methods to Facilitate Student Learning. Reference & User Services Quarterly49(4), 380-390.

O’Toole, E., Barham, R., & Monahan, J. (2016). The Impact of Physically Embedded Librarianship on Academic Departments. Portal: Libraries & The Academy16(3), 529-556.

Rao, S., Cameron, A., & Gaskin-Noel, S. (2009). Embedding General Education Competencies into an Online Information Literacy Course. Journal Of Library Administration49(1/2), 59-73.

Shumaker, D., Talley, M. Models of Embedded Librarianship: A Research Summary. https://www.sla.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/Models_of_Embedded.pdf

Shumaker, D., Talley, M. (2009). Models of Embedded Librarianship. Final Report.  Prepared under the Special Libraries Association Research Grant 2007. https://embeddedlibrarian.files.wordpress.com/2009/08/executivesummarymodels-of-embedded-librarianship.pdf

Shumaker, D. (2013). Embedded Librarianship: Digital World Future? http://www.infotoday.com/CIL2013/session.asp?ID=W30

Summey, T. P., & Kane, C. A. (2017). Going Where They Are: Intentionally Embedding Librarians in Courses and Measuring the Impact on Student Learning. Journal Of Library & Information Services In Distance Learning11(1/2), 158-174. doi:10.1080/1533290X.2016.1229429

Talley, M. (2007). Success and the Embedded Librarian. https://www.sla.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/Success_and_the_Embedded.pdf

Tumbleson, B. E., & Burke, J. (John J. . (2013). Embedding librarianship in learning management systems : a how-to-do-it manual for librarians. Retrieved from http://www.worldcat.org/title/embedding-librarianship-in-learning-management-systems-a-how-to-do-it-manual-for-librarians/oclc/836261183

Tumbleson, B. E. (2016). Collaborating in Research: Embedded Librarianship in the Learning Management System. Reference Librarian57(3), 224-234. doi:10.1080/02763877.2015.1134376

Wilson, G. (2015). The Process of Becoming an Embedded Curriculum Librarian in Multiple Health Sciences Programs. Medical Reference Services Quarterly34(4), 490-497. doi:10.1080/02763869.2015.1082386

Wu, L., & Thornton, J. (2017). Experience, Challenges, and Opportunities of Being Fully Embedded in a User Group. Medical Reference Services Quarterly36(2), 138-149. doi:10.1080/02763869.2017.1293978

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more about embedded librarian in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=embedded+librarian

eight needs project based learning

8 Needs For Project-Based Learning In The 21st Century

from https://plus.google.com/+TessPajaron/posts/5iDJo4Xt3pm

keys to designing Project-Based Learning. We also have looked at the difference between “doing projects” and project-based learning, various project-based learning resources, project-based learning apps, and offered ways for using an iPad in Project-Based Learning.

practical ideas for better teaching through project-based learning

project based learning

8. Elegant Curation

Crude curation is saving an email, favoriting a tweet, or pinning randomly to a board no one reads that students will never reference again in the future for anything.

Elegant curation is about saving a “thing” while honoring the thing itself. Showcasing it without losing its meaning or fullness. Somehow capturing both that which is being saved and its context as well–and doing so in a way that makes it accessible to yourself and others as technology continues to change. Not easy.

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more on project-based learning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=project+based

more on curation in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=curation

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