Searching for "data analytics"

K12 administrators and data analytics

Data Analytics a Key Skill for Administrators in K–12

A recent report highlights how data can open the door for K-12 school administrators to maximize student outcomes.
Eli Zimmerman
K-12 school districts looking to improve student success rates should invest in training administrators in data analysis, according to a report from the Data Quality Campaign.
Report authors also call on state policymakers to help lead the charge for more literate school administrators. School and district administrators need to model and support effective data use at every level, including as part of classroom instruction

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more on data analytics in education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=data+analytics

data analytics education

Analytics for Achievement: White Paper

Around the world, in both developing and developed countries, too many primary and secondary students are falling below proficiency levels. Measuring and monitoring performance and understanding the factors at play in student achievement can help educators create the right conditions and design the most effective interventions for student success.

link to the article (PDF file) ; THE_IBM_data_Analytics_for_Achievement k12

Analytics Data Integration and Governance

Supporting Analytics through Data Integration and Governance

https://www.educause.edu/focus-areas-and-initiatives/enterprise-and-infrastructure/enterprise-it-program/supporting-analytics-through-data-integration-and-governance

Support analytics initiatives with data integration and governance. The changing landscape of enterprise IT is characterized by an expanding set of services, systems, and sourcing strategies. Data governance, cross-enterprise partnerships, and data integration are key ingredients in supporting higher education’s growing need for reliable information.

Enterprise IT Case Studies

In this set of EDUCAUSE Review case studies, see how Drake University, the University of Tennessee, and the University of Montana improved their analytics initiatives through data integrations and governance.

 

 

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more on analytics in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=analytics

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=data+governance

Analytics and Data Mining in Education

https://www.linkedin.com/groups/934617/934617-6255144273688215555

Call For Chapters: Responsible Analytics and Data Mining in Education: Global Perspectives on Quality, Support, and Decision-Making

SUBMIT A 1-2 PAGE CHAPTER PROPOSAL
Deadline – June 1, 2017

Title:  Responsible Analytics and Data Mining in Education: Global Perspectives on Quality, Support, and Decision-Making

Synopsis:
Due to rapid advancements in our ability to collect, process, and analyze massive amounts of data, it is now possible for educators at all levels to gain new insights into how people learn. According to Bainbridge, et. al. (2015), using simple learning analytics models, educators now have the tools to identify, with up to 80% accuracy, which students are at the greatest risk of failure before classes even begin. As we consider the enormous potential of data analytics and data mining in education, we must also recognize a myriad of emerging issues and potential consequences—intentional and unintentional—to implement them responsibly. For example:

· Who collects and controls the data?
· Is it accessible to all stakeholders?
· How are the data being used, and is there a possibility for abuse?
· How do we assess data quality?
· Who determines which data to trust and use?
· What happens when the data analysis yields flawed results?
· How do we ensure due process when data-driven errors are uncovered?
· What policies are in place to address errors?
· Is there a plan for handling data breaches?

This book, published by Routledge Taylor & Francis Group, will provide insights and support for policy makers, administrators, faculty, and IT personnel on issues pertaining the responsible use data analytics and data mining in education.

Important Dates:

· June 1, 2017 – Chapter proposal submission deadline
· July 15, 2017 – Proposal decision notification
· October 15, 2017 – Full chapter submission deadline
· December 1, 2017 – Full chapter decision notification
· January 15, 2018 – Full chapter revisions due
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more on data mining in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=data+mining

more on analytics in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=analytics

Libraries Big Data

Libraries Look to Big Data to Measure Their Worth—And Better Help Students

 Jeffrey R. Young     Nov 17, 2017

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2017-11-17-libraries-look-to-big-data-to-measure-their-worth-and-better-help-students

counting how many times students use electronic library resources or visit in person, and comparing that to how well the students do in their classes and how likely they are to stay in school and earn a degree. And many library leaders are finding a strong correlation, meaning that students who consume more library materials tend to be more successful academically.

carefully tracking how library use compares to other metrics, and it has made changes as a result—like moving the tutoring center and the writing lab into the library. Those moves were designed not only to lure more people into the stacks, but to make seeking help more socially-acceptable for students who might have been hesitant.

a partnership between the library, which knows what electronic materials students use, and the technology office, which manages other campus data such as usage of the course-management system. The university is doing a study to see whether library usage there also equates to student success.

The issue of privacy also emerged during a session on libraries and data at the annual Educause conference earlier this month.

Online course, storytelling, data

Online Course | A Thousand Words and a Picture: Storytelling with Data

https://events.educause.edu/courses/2019/a-thousand-words-and-a-picture-storytelling-with-data

Part 1: March 13, 2019 | 1:00–2:30 p.m. ET
Part 2: March 20, 2019 | 1:00–2:30 p.m. ET
Part 3: March 27, 2019 | 1:00–2:30 p.m. ET

Overview

A picture is worth a thousand words, but developing a data picture worth a thousand words involves careful thought and planning. IT leaders are often in need of sharing their story and vision for the future with campus partners and campus leadership. Delivering this message in a compelling way takes a significant amount of thought and planning. This session will take participants through the process of constructing their story, how to (and how not to) incorporate data and anecdotes effectively, how to design clear data visualizations, and how to present their story with confidence.

Learning Objectives

During this course, participants will:

  • Develop a story that elicits a specific outcome
  • Identify and effectively use data elements to support a compelling story
  • Learn how to tell your story in a clear and effective way

NOTE: Participants will be asked to complete assignments in between the course segments that support the learning objectives stated below and will receive feedback and constructive critique from course facilitators on how to improve and shape their work.

Facilitator

Leah LangLeah Lang, Director of Analytics Services, EDUCAUSE

Leah Lang leads EDUCAUSE Analytics Services, a suite of data services, products, and tools that can be used to inform decision-making about IT in higher education. The foundational service in this suite is the EDUCAUSE Core Data Services (CDS), higher education’s comprehensive IT benchmarking data service.

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more Educause webinars in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=educause+webinar

Microsoft BrightBytes DataSense

Microsoft Takes a Bite Out of BrightBytes, Acquiring Its DataSense Platform and Team

Tony Wan     Feb 5, 2019

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2019-02-04-microsoft-takes-a-bite-out-of-brightbytes-acquires-its-datasense-platform-and-team

From launching new tablets to virtual-reality curriculum, Microsoft has added plenty to its educational offerings

DataSense, a data management platform developed by Brightbytes.

DataSense is a set of professional services that work with K-12 districts to collect data from different data systems, translate them into unified formats and aggregate that information into a unified dashboard for reporting purposes.

DataSense traces its origins to Authentica Solutions, an education data management company founded in 2013.

A month later, BrightBytes acquired Authentica. The deal was hailed as a “major milestone in the industry” and appeared to be a complement to BrightBytes’ flagship offering, Clarity, a suite of data analytics tools that help educators understand the impact of technology spending and usage on student outcomes.

Of the “Big Five” technology giants, Microsoft has become the most acqui-hungry as of late in the learning and training space. In recent years it purchased several consumer brand names whose services reach into education, including LinkedIn (which owns Lynda.com, now a part of the LinkedIn Learning suite), Minecraft (which has been adapted for use in the classroom) and Github (which released an education bundle).

Last year, Microsoft also acquired a couple of smaller education tools, including Flipgrid, a video-discussion platform popular among teachers, and Chalkup, whose services have been rolled into Microsoft Teams, its competitor to Slack.

Tackling Data in Libraries

Tackling Data in Libraries: Opportunities and Challenges in Serving User Communities

Submit proposals at http://www.iolug.org

Deadline is Friday, March 1, 2019

Submissions are invited for the IOLUG Spring 2019 Conference, to be held May 10th in Indianapolis, IN. Submissions are welcomed from all types of libraries and on topics related to the theme of data in libraries.

Libraries and librarians work with data every day, with a variety of applications – circulation, gate counts, reference questions, and so on. The mass collection of user data has made headlines many times in the past few years. Analytics and privacy have, understandably, become important issues both globally and locally. In addition to being aware of the data ecosystem in which we work, libraries can play a pivotal role in educating user communities about data and all of its implications, both favorable and unfavorable.

The Conference Planning Committee is seeking proposals on topics related to data in libraries, including but not limited to:

  • Using tools/resources to find and leverage data to solve problems and expand knowledge,
  • Data policies and procedures,
  • Harvesting, organizing, and presenting data,
  • Data-driven decision making,
  • Learning analytics,
  • Metadata/linked data,
  • Data in collection development,
  • Using data to measure outcomes, not just uses,
  • Using data to better reach and serve your communities,
  • Libraries as data collectors,
  • Big data in libraries,
  • Privacy,
  • Social justice/Community Engagement,
  • Algorithms,
  • Storytelling, (https://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/lib490/)
  • Libraries as positive stewards of user data.

storytelling with data

Storytelling with Data: An Introduction to Data Visualization

Mar 04 – Mar 31, 2019

Delivery Mode : Asynchronous Workshop 
Levels : Beginner,Intermediate 
Eligible for Online Teaching Certificate elective : No

Data visualization is about presenting data visually so we can explore and identify patterns in the data, analyze and make sense of those patterns, and communicate our findings. In this course, you will explore those key aspects of data visualization, and then focus on the theories, concepts, and skills related to communicating data in effective, engaging, and accessible ways.

This will be a hands-on, project-based course in which you will apply key data visualization strategies to various data sets to tell specific data stories using Microsoft Excel or Google Sheets. Practice data sets will be provided, or you can utilize your own data sets.

Week 1: Introduction and Tool Setup
Week 2: Cognitive Load and Pre-Attentive Attributes
Week 3: Selecting the Appropriate Visualization Type
Week 4: Data Stories and Context


Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, you will be able to create basic data visualizations that are effective, accessible, and engaging. In support of that primary objective, you will:

  • Describe the benefits of data visualization for your professional situation
  • Identify opportunities for using data visualization
  • Apply visual cues (pre-attentive attributes) appropriately
  • Select correct charts/graphs for your data story
  • Use appropriate accessibility strategies for data tables

Prerequisites

Basic knowledge of Microsoft Excel or Google Sheets is required to successfully complete this course. Resources will be included to help you with the basics should you need them, but time spent learning the tools is not included in the estimated time for completing this course.
What are the key takeaways from this course?

  • The ability to explain how data visualization is connected to data analytics
  • The ability to identify key data visualization theories
  • Creating effective and engaging data visualizations
  • Applying appropriate accessibility strategies to data visualizations

Who should take this course?

  • Instructional designers, faculty, and higher education administrators who need to present data in effective, engaging, and accessible ways will benefit from taking this course

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more on digital storytelling in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+storytelling

more on data visualization in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=data+visualization

Beginner’s Guide to Google Analytics

The Absolute Beginner’s Guide to Google Analytics

https://moz.com/blog/absolute-beginners-guide-to-google-analytics

Kristi Hines June 24th, 2015

  • How many people visit my website?
  • Where do my visitors live?
  • Do I need a mobile-friendly website?
  • What websites send traffic to my website?
  • What marketing tactics drive the most traffic to my website?
  • Which pages on my website are the most popular?
  • How many visitors have I converted into leads or customers?
  • Where did my converting visitors come from and go on my website?
  • How can I improve my website’s speed?
  • What blog content do my visitors like the most?

Google Analytics account. If you have a primary Google account that you use for other services like Gmail, Google Drive, Google Calendar, Google+, or YouTube, then you should set up your Google Analytics using that Google account. Or you will need to create a new one.

Big tip: don’t let your anyone (your web designer, web developer, web host, SEO person, etc.) create your website’s Google Analytics account under their own Google account so they can “manage” it for you. If you and this person part ways, they will take your Google Analytics data with them, and you will have to start all over.

go to Google Analytics and click the Sign into Google Analytics button.

Google Analytics offers hierarchies to organize your account. You can have up to 100 Google Analytics accounts under one Google account. You can have up to 50 website properties under one Google Analytics account. You can have up to 25 views under one website property.

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more on Google Analytics in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=google+analytics

 

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