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Games in the library

Games in the library

bibliography and research

http://scottnicholson.com/pubs/index.html

Playing in the Past: A History of Games, Toys, and Puzzles in North American Libraries
Author(s): Scott Nicholson
Source: The Library Quarterly, Vol. 83, No. 4 (October 2013), pp. 341-361
Published by: The University of Chicago Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/671913

demonstrate the different ways in which libraries have used games, toys, and puzzles over the last 150 years through bothcollections and services
p, 342 Defining games –
p. 348 Games as the Subject of Collections\
p. 350A significant shift in academic libraries is a focus on providing services to students. Since agrowing number of academic publications both current issues and back volumes

are ac-cessible online through library subscriptions, the physical space of academic libraries is notneeded for collections of periodicals. The concept of the “learning commons”has become
popular on US campuses in the past decade; it combines traditional library resources and
the availability of library staff members with group work spaces, computer access and assis-
tance, and writing assistance to provide one place where students can get assistance with
course work. In addition, many of these learning commons also include cafes, social spaces,
and other support of the social lives of students, and it is in this role that academic libraries
provide access to collections of games.

p. 357 Another upcoming area of gaming in libraries is gamification. Gamification is the application of game design elements to a nongame setting ðDeterding et al. 2011Þ.

————————————-

Nicholson, S. (2013, June). Exploring Gamification Techniques for Classroom Management. Paper Presented at Games+Learning+Society 9.0, Madison, WI

The concept of meaningful gamification is that the primary use of game layers is not to provide
external rewards, but rather to help participants find a deeper connection to the underyling topic

——————————-

 

More on games in education in this blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=games

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=gaming

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=gamification

free “big data” sources

The Free ‘Big Data’ Sources Everyone Should Know

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/20141210080103-64875646-the-free-big-data-sources-everyone-should-know

Data.gov, click here.
US Census Bureau click here.
European Union Open Data Portal, click here.
Data.gov.uk, click here.
The CIA World Factbook, click here.
Healthdata.gov, click here.
NHS Health and Social Care Information Centre, click here.
Amazon Web Services public datasets, click here.
Facebook Graph, click here.
Gapminder, click here.
Google Trends, click here.
Google Finance, click here.
Google Books Ngrams, click here.
National Climatic Data Center, click here.
DBPedia, click here.
Topsy, click here.
Likebutton, click here.
New York Times, click here.
Freebase, click here.
Million Song Data Set, click here.

typology of public library engagement

From Distant Admirers to Library Lovers–and beyond

http://www.pewinternet.org/files/2014/03/PIP-Library-Typology-Report.pdf

http://blog.mendeley.com/academic-life/from-distant-admirers-to-library-lovers/

p. 4
typology is a statistical analysis that clusters individuals into groups based on certain attributes; in this case, those are people’s usage of, views toward, and access to libraries.

Public library users and proponents are not a niche group: 30% of Americans ages 16 and older are highly engaged with public libraries, and an additional 39% fall into medium engagement categories.
 Americans’ library habits do not exist in a vacuum: Americans’ connection—or lack of connection—with public libraries is part of their broader information and social landscape. As a rule, people who have extensive economic, social, technological, and cultural resources are also more likely to use and value libraries as part of those networks. Many of those who are less engaged with public libraries tend to have lower levels of technology use, fewer ties to their neighbors, lower feelings of personal efficacy, and less engagement with other cultural activities.
 Life stage and special circumstances are linked to increased library use and higher engagement with information: Deeper connections with public libraries are often associated with key life moments such as having a child, seeking a job, being a student, and going through a situation in which research and data can help inform a decision. Similarly, quieter times of life, such as retirement, or less momentous periods,

Library; what should be…

Amidst discussions at LRS and forthcoming strategic planning –

The LinkedIn Higher Education Teaching and Learning group has a discussion started:

“The library as space is becoming more important, even as students are able to log on to databases from wherever.”

based on the the article

Spikes, Stacks, and Spaces

from Inside Higher Ed blog: https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/confessions-community-college-dean/spikes-stacks-and-spaces


  • Julie Steward
    Julie

    Julie Steward

    Instructional Designer

    University libraries are increasingly the ONLY place on campus that has quiet spaces, since cell-phone conversations are ubiquitous. I think a professional shushher would be a nice touch to any library. Either that, or zero-talking floors and okay-with-some-noise-floors alternating.

  • Andrea KiralyAndrea

    Andrea Kiraly

    Information Specialist, Visiting Lecturer at University of Szeged

    Today university/academic libraries have “all-inclusive services” and they are places for social life, too. In my point of view it is very important for libraries to be always ready for changes, to be regenerative, and to find new ways including the needs of next (Y, Z?) generation. A library is a third place, “a place to be”. And study. With librarians behind the scenes.

    Russ B. likes this

  • Russ BarclayRuss

    Russ Barclay

    Visiting Professor at Campbellsville University

    I note many university libraries have become bistros complete with internet access and quiet rooms for students and student teams to meet and work.

    …And, of course, there are books and databases. Whether students attend to those assets is an open question for me.

  • Sharon BlantonSharon

    Sharon Blanton

    Vice President and Chief Information Officer at Hawaii Pacific University

    I had the opportunity to spend some time in a local high school library yesterday. It was a hub of activity with a class in session, students browsing stacks, small group activities, and numerous meetings. I thought it was great to see so many students collaborating and having fun. The students were very engaged.

    Stephen L. likes this

  • Laura GabigerLaura

    Laura Gabiger

    Professor at Johnson & Wales University

    Top Contributor

    It seems important that Matt Reed mentions both the group study areas and the individual quiet spaces in a library. In the past, university libraries tended to be places for individual quiet work. But as Russ and Sharon mention, students have meetings in libraries to work on group activities. If we pay attention to developments in higher education, student work will be increasingly collaborative rather than individual, interdisciplinary rather than narrowly focused in one disciplinary area. In the USA we can find these values set forth in places such as the AAC&U list of high-impact practices, where collaborative assignments and projects are recommended:http://www.aacu.org/sites/default/files/files/hip_tables.pdf

    Some experts recommend that the most valuable things students can learn to do is work on problem-solving with other people who come from diverse backgrounds.

    Libraries may need less space for stacks as printed books and periodicals are replaced with digital storage, but the need for meeting rooms and collaborative study areas may increase. And of course a coffee shop on the premises definitely helps.

    Stephen L. likes this

  • Dr..Myrna FernandoDr..Myrna

    Dr..Myrna Fernando

    Professor 1 at Technological University of the Philippines

    What is the bearing of a library as a Learning Resource Center if not significant to the students. I think it speaks so much on the learning impact not only by the students together with the faculty. This is also the reason why the area of Library is included in institutional/programs accreditation.

Horizon Report 2014, Library edition

http://cdn.nmc.org/media/2014-nmc-horizon-report-library-EN.pdf

p. 4 new and rapidly changing technologies, an abundance of digital information in myriad formats, an increased understanding of how students learn evolving research methods, and changing practices in how scholars communicate and disseminate their research and creative work.

Engagement requires an outward focus

A liaison who understands how scholars in a particular discipline communicate and share
information with one another can inform the design and development of new publishing services, such as
digital institutional repositories.

Liaisons cannot be experts themselves in each new capability, but knowing when to call in a
colleague, or how to describe appropriate expert capabilities to faculty, will be key to the new liaison role.

an increasing focus on what users do (research, teaching, and learning) rather than on what librarians do (collections, reference, library instruction).

hybrid model, where liaisons pair their expertise with that of functional specialists, both within and outside of libraries

p. 6 Trend 1: Develop user-centered library services

Many libraries are challenged to brand such a service point, citing a “hub” or “center” to refer to services that can include circulation, reference, computer support, writing assistance, and more.

For liaisons, time at a reference desk has been replaced by anticipating recurrent needs and developing
easily accessible online materials (e.g., LibGuides, screencasts) available to anyone at any time, and
by providing more advanced one-on-one consultations with students, instructors, and researchers who
need expert help. Liaisons not only answer questions using library resources, but they also advise and
collaborate on issues of copyright, scholarly communication, data management, knowledge management,
and information literacy. The base level of knowledge that a liaison must possess is much broader than
familiarity with a reference collection or facility with online searching; instead, they must constantly keep up
with evolving pedagogies and research methods, rapidly developing tools, technologies, and ever-changing
policies that facilitate and inform teaching, learning, and research in their assigned disciplines.

Librarians at many institutions are now focusing on collaborating with faculty to develop thoughtful assignments
and provide online instructional materials that are built into key courses within a curriculum and provide
scaffolding to help students develop library research skills over the course of their academic careers

p. 7 Trend 2: A hybrid model of liaison and functional specialist is emerging.

Current specialist areas of expertise include copyright, geographic information systems (GIS), media production and integration, distributed education or e-learning, data management, emerging technologies,
user experience, instructional design, and bioinformatics.

At the University of Guelph, the liaison model was abandoned altogether in favor of a functional specialist
approach

p. 8 Trend 3: Organizational flexibility must meet changing user needs.

p. 9 provide education and consultation services for personal information management. Tools, workshops, websites, and individual consults are offered in areas such as citation management, productivity tools, managing alerts and feeds, personal archiving, and using social networking for teaching and professional development.

p. 11 data management, knowledge management and scholarly communication

digital scholarship

p. 12 Liaisons need to be able to provide a general level of knowledge about copyright, data management, the need for metadata and the ontologies available in their disciplines.

p. 13 Liaisons need to be able to provide a general level of knowledge about copyright, data management, the need for metadata and the ontologies available in their disciplines.

p. 16 replacing the traditional tripartite model of collections, reference, and instruction

6 Library of Congress Recommended Format Specifications

These six categories are:

  • Textual Works and Musical Compositions
  • Still Image Works
  • Audio Works
  • Moving Image Works
  • Software and Electronic Gaming and Learning
  • Datasets/Databases

From: Scanlon, Donna [mailto:dscanlon@loc.gov]
Sent: Tuesday, June 24, 2014 6:34 AM
To: ‘lita-l@ala.org’
Subject: [lita-l] Library of Congress Recommended Format Specifications

The Library of Congress announces the availability of its Recommended Format Specifications, a document describing the hierarchies of the physical and technical characteristics of creative formats, both analog and digital, which will best maximize the chances for preservation and continued accessibility of creative content.  Creators and publishers have also begun to employ a wide array of intangible digital formats, as well as continuing to change and adapt the physical formats in which they work.  The Library needs to be able to identify the formats which are suitable for large-scale acquisition and preservation for long-term access if it is to continue to build its collection and ensure that it lasts into the future.

The Library was able to identify six basic categories of creative output, which represent significant parts of the publishing, information, and media industries, especially those that are rapidly adopting digital production and are central to building the Library’s collections:  Textual Works and Musical Compositions; Still Image Works; Audio Works; Moving Image Works; Software and Electronic Gaming and Learning; and Datasets/Databases.  Technical teams, made up of experts came from across the institution bringing specialized knowledge in technical aspects of preservation, ongoing access needs and developments in the marketplace and in the publishing world, were established to identify recommended formats for each of these categories and to establish hierarchies of preference among the formats within them.

The Library will be revisiting these specifications on an annual basis.  The creation and publication of these recommended format specifications is not intended to serve as an answer to all the questions raised in preserving and providing long-term access to creative content.  They do not provide instructions for receiving this material into repositories, managing that content or undertaking the many ongoing tasks which will be necessary to maintain this content so that it may be used well into the future.

The Recommended Format Specifications are available at http://www.loc.gov/preservation/resources/rfs/.  For more information, please contact Ted Westervelt [thwe@loc.gov].

Donna Scanlon

Electronic Resources Coordinator

Library of Congress

101 Independence Ave., SE

Washington, DC 20540

eMail: dscanlon@loc.gov

Phone: (202) 707-6235

http://eresources.loc.gov

Top Tech Trends – 2013 Annual | Library Information Technology Association (LITA)

Top Tech Trends – 2013 Annual

http://www.ala.org/lita/node/723

Trends

  • DIY Library eBook Platforms
  • Digital Rights Management
  • Discovery and rights determination
  • MOOCs, flipped classrooms, and gamification fatigue
  • Linked data
  • Makerspaces
  • Data collection and data mining

Meagan Oakleaf leading a workshop on Library Assessment

Per my tweets to the SCSU Technology (@SCSUtechinstruc) entries of today:
#MeaganOakleaf
#LibraryAssessment https://vine.co/v/htK3KDvATYq 

#LibraryAssessment and #Faculty http://ow.ly/i/3JH11  http://ow.ly/i/3JHeB  #MeaganOakleaf

#MeaganOakleaf #pm #retention and #LibraryAssessment http://ow.ly/i/3JGos 

#AssessmentManagementSystem http://ow.ly/i/3JFZJ 

Students acquire information literacy skills but assessments are scattered… #pm ##LibraryAssessment

#pm #LibraryAssessment further on #value http://ow.ly/i/3JESN 

role of the 21st-century librarians

LACUNY Institute 2020
Friday., May 8, 2020, Bronx Community College, City University of New York (CUNY)

Call for Proposals

Ending the Library Stereotype: Non-Traditional Practices for the 21st-century 
(deadline: February 25, 2020)

 *****Submit your proposal now *****

Librarianship and libraries, through the eyes of the public, have consistently been viewed as a house of books and documents where librarians help their patrons with readers’ advisory and directions. Though these elements of being a librarian exist, the stereotype of this is far from accurate. Today in 2020, Librarians perform a myriad of tasks in order to provide fluid functionality to academic, public and special collections libraries. These tasks create a multifaceted librarian where multi-departmental duties fall squarely on the shoulders of one librarian. This year’s LACUNY Institute will illustrate this multifaceted librarian to gain understanding and perspective of the reality of librarianship as we enter a new era of technology and digital scholarship.

The underlying question LACUNY Institute 2020 aims to address is what role do 21st-century librarians and library support staff play in our society? Although perceptions about librarians have changed over time, librarian stereotypes still persist. This is the case even in popular culture. For instance, Barbara Gordon, Batgirl’s alter-ego, is a librarian with a doctoral degree, yet it is often speculated that the character’s role as an information professional is part of the character’s effort to conceal her identity by working in a safe, slow-paced environment.

Librarianship is a multifaceted and creative profession. This year’s conference will highlight the different roles that librarians play in our society as librarians wear different hats. We are mentors, supervisors, activists, instructors, unofficial guidance counselors, gamers, artistsand so forth. In some instances, we may even be the “cool” professor on campus.

Paper and Panel Proposals

We are collecting individual papers and panel topic proposals pertinent to the personal and professional experience of information professionals and staff that address but are not limited to the following areas:

  • ​Activism within and outside the library
  • The roles of non-librarians or non-information professionals within the profession   
  • Partnerships between libraries and communities
  • (In)Visibility of non-librarian and part-time workers
  • How our unique experiences and/or biases influence cataloging, collection development, the hiring process, etc.
  • How information professionals bring creativity into the profession including classrooms, reference consultations, etc.
  • Multiple identities within the workplace
  • The changing role of the library and what library workers are doing to adapt
  • Interdisciplinary nature of librarianship
  • Library as a place of refuge
  • Information professionals as artists

 *****Submit your proposal now *****

Please Note: Conference registration begins Monday, December 2, 2019.

Feel free to contact us should any questions or concerns arise.

Contact Info: Nelson Santana nelson.santana02@bcc.cuny.edu ​​​​

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more on academic library in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=academic+library

tools for collaborative research and early discovery

Webinar: tools for collaborative research and early discovery

Librarians have been at the forefront in promoting open access publishing options and informing their researchers about the open access landscape. Open access is increasingly recognized as embedded within the larger framework of open science. Consequently, library and librarian roles are expanding into new areas such as open data, open educational resources and open infrastructure.

In this webinar, Elsevier product managers will present tools that enable more inclusive, collaborative and transparent research.

TOPICS:

•The library as publisher of OERs and OA journals with Digital Commons
•Open access content discovery in ScienceDirect and Scopus
•Open journal metrics: CiteScore, SNIP and SJR
•Publishing research outputs openly in Mendeley Data and SSRN

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