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scsu library position proposal

Please email completed forms to librarydeansoffice@stcloudstate.edu no later than noon on Thursday, October 5.

According to the email below, library faculty are asked to provide their feedback regarding the qualifications for a possible faculty line at the library.

  1. In the fall of 2013 during a faculty meeting attended by the back than library dean and during a discussion of an article provided by the dean, it was established that leading academic libraries in this country are seeking to break the mold of “library degree” and seek fresh ideas for the reinvention of the academic library by hiring faculty with more diverse (degree-wise) background.
  2. Is this still the case at the SCSU library? The “democratic” search for the answer of this question does not yield productive results, considering that the majority of the library faculty are “reference” and they “democratically” overturn votes, who see this library to be put on 21st century standards and rather seek more “reference” bodies for duties, which were recognized even by the same reference librarians as obsolete.
    It seems that the majority of the SCSU library are “purists” in the sense of seeking professionals with broader background (other than library, even “reference” skills).
    In addition, most of the current SCSU librarians are opposed to a second degree, as in acquiring more qualification, versus seeking just another diploma. There is a certain attitude of stagnation / intellectual incest, where new ideas are not generated and old ideas are prepped in “new attire” to look as innovative and/or 21st
    Last but not least, a consistent complain about workforce shortages (the attrition politics of the university’s reorganization contribute to the power of such complain) fuels the requests for reference librarians and, instead of looking for new ideas, new approaches and new work responsibilities, the library reorganization conversation deteriorates into squabbles for positions among different department.
    Most importantly, the narrow sightedness of being stuck in traditional work description impairs  most of the librarians to see potential allies and disruptors. E.g., the insistence on the supremacy of “information literacy” leads SCSU librarians to the erroneous conclusion of the exceptionality of information literacy and the disregard of multi[meta] literacies, thus depriving the entire campus of necessary 21st century skills such as visual literacy, media literacy, technology literacy, etc.
    Simultaneously, as mentioned above about potential allies and disruptors, the SCSU librarians insist on their “domain” and if they are not capable of leading meta-literacies instructions, they would also not allow and/or support others to do so.
    Considering the observations above, the following qualifications must be considered:
  3. According to the information in this blog post:
    http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/06/14/technology-requirements-samples/
    for the past year and ½, academic libraries are hiring specialists with the following qualifications and for the following positions (bolded and / or in red). Here are some highlights:
    Positions
    digital humanities
    Librarian and Instructional Technology Liaison

library Specialist: Data Visualization & Collections Analytics

Qualifications

Advanced degree required, preferably in education, educational technology, instructional design, or MLS with an emphasis in instruction and assessment.

Programming skills – Demonstrated experience with one or more metadata and scripting languages (e.g.Dublin Core, XSLT, Java, JavaScript, Python, or PHP)
Data visualization skills
multi [ meta] literacy skills

Data curation, helping students working with data
Experience with website creation and design in a CMS environment and accessibility and compliance issues
Demonstrated a high degree of facility with technologies and systems germane to the 21st century library, and be well versed in the issues surrounding scholarly communications and compliance issues (e.g. author identifiers, data sharing software, repositories, among others)

Bilingual

Provides and develops awareness and knowledge related to digital scholarship and research lifecycle for librarians and staff.

Experience developing for, and supporting, common open-source library applications such as Omeka, ArchiveSpace, Dspace,

 

Responsibilities
Establishing best practices for digital humanities labs, networks, and services

Assessing, evaluating, and peer reviewing DH projects and librarians
Actively promote TIGER or GRIC related activities through social networks and other platforms as needed.
Coordinates the transmission of online workshops through Google HangoutsScript metadata transformations and digital object processing using BASH, Python, and XSLT

liaison consults with faculty and students in a wide range of disciplines on best practices for teaching and using data/statistical software tools such as R, SPSS, Stata, and MatLab.

 

In response to the form attached to the Friday, September 29, email regarding St. Cloud State University Library Position Request Form:

 

  1. Title
    Digital Initiatives Librarian
  2. Responsibilities:
    TBD, but generally:
    – works with faculty across campus on promoting digital projects and other 21st century projects. Works with the English Department faculty on positioning the SCSU library as an equal participants in the digital humanities initiatives on campus
  • Works with the Visualization lab to establish the library as the leading unit on campus in interpretation of big data
  • Works with academic technology services on promoting library faculty as the leading force in the pedagogical use of academic technologies.
  1. Quantitative data justification
    this is a mute requirement for an innovative and useful library position. It can apply for a traditional request, such as another “reference” librarian. There cannot be a quantitative data justification for an innovative position, as explained to Keith Ewing in 2015. In order to accumulate such data, the position must be functioning at least for six months.
  2. Qualitative justification: Please provide qualitative explanation that supports need for this position.
    Numerous 21st century academic tendencies right now are scattered across campus and are a subject of political/power battles rather than a venue for campus collaboration and cooperation. Such position can seek the establishment of the library as the natural hub for “sandbox” activities across campus. It can seek a redirection of using digital initiatives on this campus for political gains by administrators and move the generation and accomplishment of such initiatives to the rightful owner and primary stakeholders: faculty and students.
    Currently, there are no additional facilities and resources required. Existing facilities and resources, such as the visualization lab, open source and free application can be used to generate the momentum of faculty working together toward a common goal, such as, e.g. digital humanities.

 

 

 

 

NMC Horizon Report 2017 Library

NMC Horizon Report > 2017 Library Edition

http://www.nmc.org/publication/nmc-horizon-report-2017-library-edition/

PDF file 2017-nmc-horizon-report-library-EN-20ml00b

p. 26 Improving Digital Literacy

As social networking platforms proliferate and more interactions take place digitally, there are more opportunities for propagation of misinformation, copyright infringement, and privacy breaches.
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/03/28/fake-news-3/
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/03/28/fake-news-resources/

p. 34 Embracing the need for radical change

40% of faculty report that their students ” rarely” interact with campus librarians.

Empathy as the Leader’s Path to Change | Leading From the Library, By on October 27, 2016, http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2016/10/opinion/leading-from-the-library/empathy-as-the-leaders-path-to-change-leading-from-the-library/

Empathy as a critical quality for leaders was popularized in Daniel Goleman’s work about emotional intelligence. It is also a core component of Karol Wasylyshyn’s formula for achieving remarkable leadership. Elizabeth Borges, a women’s leadership program organizer and leadership consultant, recommends a particular practice, cognitive empathy.

Leadership in disruptive times, , First Published September 27, 2016, http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0340035216658911

What is library leadership?  a library leader is defined as the individual who articulates a vision for the organization/task and is able to inspire support and action to achieve the vision. A manager, on the other hand, is the individual tasked with organizing and carrying out the day-to-day operational activities to achieve the vision.Work places are organized in hierarchical and in team structures. Managers are appointed to administer business units or organizations whereas leaders may emerge from all levels of the hierarchical structures. Within a volatile climate the need for strong leadership is essential.  

Leaders are developed and educated within the working environment where they act and co-work with their partners and colleagues. Effective leadership complies with the mission and goals of the organization. Several assets distinguish qualitative leadership:

Mentoring. Motivation. Personal development and skills. Inspiration and collaboration. Engagement. Success and failure. Risk taking. Attributes of leaders.

Leaders require having creative minds in shaping strategies and solving problems. They are mentors for the staff, work hard and inspire them to do more with less and to start small and grow big. Staff need to be motivated to work at their optimum performance level. Leadership entails awareness of the responsibilities inherent to the roles of a leader. However, effective leadership requires the support of the upper management.

p. 36. Developments in Technology for Academic and Research Libraries

http://horizon.wiki.nmc.org/Horizon+Topics

  1. consumer technologies
  2. Digital strategies are not so much technologies as they are ways of using devices and software to enrich teaching, learning, research and information management, whether inside or outside the library. Effective Digital strategies can be used in both information and formal learning; what makes them interesting is that they transcended conventional ideas to create something that feels new, meaningful, and 21st century.
  3. enabling technologies
    this group of technologies is where substantive technological innovation begins to be visible.
  4. Internet technologies.
  5. learning technologies
  6. social media technologies. could have been subsumed under the consumer technology category, but they have become so ever-present and so widely used in every part of society that they have been elevated to their own category. As well-established as social media is, it continues to evolve at a rapid pace, with new ideas, tools, and developments coming online constantly.
  7. Visualization technologies.  from simple infographics to complex forms of visual data analysis. What they have in common is that they tap the brain’s inherent ability to rapidly process visual information, identify patterns, and sense order in complex situations. These technologies are a growing cluster of tools and processes for mining large data sets, exploring dynamic processes, and generally making the complex simple.

new horizon report 2017 technologies

 

 

p. 38 Big Data
Big data has significant implications for academic libraries in their roles as facilitators and supporters of the research process. big data use in the form of digital humanities research. Libraries are increasingly seeking to recruit for positions such as research data librarians, data curation specialists, or data visualization specialists

p. 40  Digital Scholarship Technologies

digital humanities scholars are leveraging new tools to aid in their work. ubiquity of new forms of communication including social media, text analysis software such as Umigon is helping researchers gauge public sentiment. The tool aggregates and classifies tweets as negative, positive, or neutral.

p. 42 Library Services Platforms

Diversity of format and materials, in turn, required new approaches to content collection and curation that were unavailable in the incumbent integrated library systems (ILS), which are primarily designed for print materials. LSP is different from ILS in numerous ways. Conceptually, LSPs are modeled on the idea of software as a service (SaaS),which entails delivering software applications over the internet.

p. 44 Online Identity.
incorporated  the  management of digital footprints into their programming and resources

simplify the idea of digital footprint as“data about the data” that people are searching or using online. As resident champions for advancing digital literacy,304 academic and research libraries are well-positioned to guide the process of understanding and crafting online identities.

Libraries are becoming integral players in helping students understand how to create and manage their online identities. website includes a social media skills portal that enables students to view their digital presence through the lens in which others see them, and then learn how they compare to their peers.

p. 46  Artificial Intelligence

https://www.semanticscholar.org/

p. 48 IoT

beacons are another iteration of the IoT that libraries have adopted; these small wireless devices transmit a small package of data continuously so that when devices come into proximity of the beacon’s transmission, functions are  triggered based on a related application.340 Aruba Bluetooth low-energy beacons to link digital resources to physical locations, guiding patrons to these resources through their custom navigation app and augmenting the user experience with location-based information, tutorials, and videos.

students and their computer science  professor  have  partnered  with   Bavaria’s State Library to develop a library app that triggers supplementary information about its art collection or other points of interest as users explore the space

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more on Horizon Reports in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=horizon+report

computers in library conference

computers in libraries conference

March 28-30 preconference workshops March 27 hyatt regency crystal city
arlington, va
http://conferences.infotoday.com/documents/221/CIL2017-Advance-Program.pdf

W5: Want Media Coverage? Add Press Room to Your Website

9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Kathy Dempsey, Editor, Marketing Library Services newsletter Owner, Libraries Are Essential consultancy

Library marketers crave media attention and coverage, but most don’t know how to get it. The first step is having a Press Room as part of your library’s website. This workshop, led by a member of the media who’s also a library marketing expert, shows you how to build a Press Room that works. It includes how your library benefits from having an online Press Room, even if you don’t have a marketing department; where it belongs in your website hierarchy; what content members of the press expect to find there; SEO basics and PR tactics to lead reporters to your online Press Room; why building relationships with the media is vital; how press coverage affects your library’s usage, funding, brand recognition, and position in the community. Help ensure positive coverage by adding this strategic tool to your website.

W8: Video: Hands-On Learning & Practice

9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Jennifer E. Burke, President, IntelliCraft Research, LLC

In this half-day workshop, a former advertising executive and trainer of strategic storytelling in marketing shares secrets on how to create video that has an impact on your community. Join her to shoot, edit, and polish a video while gathering tips, techniques, and strategies to create your own video-a medium which grabs communities in exciting new ways!

W10: Implementing an Internet of Things Infrastructure & Apps

9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

May Chang, Assistant Director, LibraryTechnology, East Carolina University
Mehdi Mohammadi, Graduate Assistant, Western Michigan University

The Internet of Things (IoT) is becoming widespread in academia as well as industry. It refers to connecting smart objects with built-in unique identifiers and sensors to communicate with each other autonomously. This enables actionable insights and ultimately makes the environment around us smarter. This workshop looks at how libraries can incorporate the IoT and reviews different aspects of developing an IoT infrastructure and creating your own application. It is based on four layers of IoT application architecture: the physical layer, the communications layer, application and services layer, and data analytics. Speakers discuss the potentials and challenges of IoT applications, including the footprint of IoT applications, i.e., a high volume of sensory data, the tools and methods for data analytics. As a case study, they focus on location-aware applications using iBeacons and smartphone sensors to show how all the IoT elements work together. Gain a better understanding of the usefulness of IoT in libraries, learn the main elements and underlying technologies of IoT applications, and understand the difference between a wide range of IoT devices, protocols and technologies to choose the right ones for your IoT application. Get budget and resource estimates and more. Come with a basic understanding of JavaScript/ HTML5/ CSS and your laptop for hands-on development practice. An instruction document will be provided for the attendees to prepare their system before the workshop.

W15: Tech Trends for Libraries in 2017 & Beyond

1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

David Lee King, Digital Services Director, Topeka & Shawnee County Public Library and Publisher, davidleeking.com

Technology has changed the face of libraries and is continuing to change how we work and how we deliver services to customers. This workshop introduces emerging technology trends and shows how those trends are reshaping library services. Examples are provided of how to incorporate these evolving trends into libraries. Attendees learn what trends to look for, find out the difference between a technology trend and a fad, and get ideas on how their library can respond to technology as it emerges.

 

W16: UX Design for Broader Discovery

1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Stephanie Rosso, Principal Web Developer, Hennepin County Library
Amy Luedtke, Senior Librarian, Information Programs and Services, Hennepin County Library
Iain Lowe, BiblioCommons Inc.

While patrons have embraced using online technology to access their public library, most of these interactions are limited to borrowing transactions. If libraries are to be truly relevant in the digital world, we need to nudge patrons out of the well-worn pattern of log-in/transact /log-out and find ways to get them to linger long enough to discover the richness the library has to offer beyond borrowing items, while offering them opportunities to add their own voice to the library’s online community. This workshop explores design patterns and techniques for introducing content to patrons at appropriate moments in their learned workflows. It considers how to encourage patrons to add their voice to the library community and overcome concerns about privacy and security. It shares research and experience from BiblioCommons and Hennepin County Public Library’s efforts and looks at analogs from other domains. Workshop participants will be asked to participate actively in a hands-on session to solve a specific design challenge in teams.

My note: Ha. Even the public library understands that service goes beyond “borrowing items” and must have “patrons to add their voice.” Only in the academic library, prevails the opinion that librarians are those omnipotent and all-knowing lecturing types.

B103: Website Redesign: Techniques & Tools

1:15 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Dana Haugh, Web Services Librarian, Stony Brook University
Roy Degler, Associate Professor, Digital Library Services, Digital Resources and Discovery Services, Oklahoma State University
Emily R Mitchell, Librarian / Webmaster, SUNY Oswego

Join three web experts to learn about tips, tools, and techniques for taking the pain out of website redesigns. Haugh provides advice on the visual design of your next site and shows some examples of library web redesigns. Degler takes a look at why many libraries are using popular, free, CSS-based frameworks such as Bootstrap; explains how the grid layout works; and shows how the built-in responsive design layouts can deliver a site that works on desktop, smartphones, and tablets. Often the biggest challenge in redesign isn’t the visual design, content management system or coding. It’s the people and politics. Everyone thinks they know what the library website should look like, but no two people—let alone groups—can ever agree. How do you move ahead with a library redesign when you’re facing conflicting demands from the administration, co-workers, users, and stakeholders? Mitchell tackles this challenge head on and points out the weapons that we have at hand—from data to documentation; and discusses how to wield those weapons effectively to win (almost) any fight in order to build a great website. Grab lots of insights and ideas from this experienced panel.

C102: Digital Literacy & Coding Program Models

11:15 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Karen Walker, E-Services & Digital Access Manager, Jacksonville Public Library
Brandy McNeil, Associate Director – Tech Education & Training, The New York Public Library
Steven Deolus, Technology Training Program Coordinator, TechConnect (Technology Training Program Department), The New York Public Library

This session looks at how one library created a technology class and programming model that spans a 21-branch, 844-square-mile library system. It discusses mobile classrooms and how Chromebooks, MacBooks, tablets, and other equipment are used to create “classrooms” throughout the system. It shares how the library is focusing on members and programming for the community, for instance, the development of Spanish language, 50+ and immigrant/refugee programming. It looks at developing new programs and instructors using the 3D model from printer to pens, from tablets to coding, from core expertise to everyone. NYPL speakers discuss how coding is the new black! They discuss how to launch a coding program at your library, how to expand the age range of current coding programs, how to promote events related to your program to gain participants, how to get staff buy-in, how to educate staff, and how to create partnerships with some of the biggest names in the game. The NYPL Tech- Connect program will help you plan out all your needs to take your existing or non-existing coding programs further.

My note: one more proof that digital literacy is not “information literacy dressed in the new verbal cloth” of “digital literacy,” but entails way more topics, skills and knowledge. Information Literacy is a 1990s concept. Time to upgrade to 2016 concepts and recognize that digital literacy requires skills beyond handling information. Moreover, information today is way more complex then the skills being taught, since information from social media is more complex then information from news media and it entails technology skills, which one does not have to preside upon for handling news media

E104: From Textbook to Activism: Engaging Students in Social Issues They Care About

2:15 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Janie Pickett, Head Librarian, Eureka High School, Eureka, Mo.
Anna Gray, Social Studies Teacher, Eureka High School, Eureka, Mo.

recent collaborative effort between a high school social studies teacher and a school librarian transformed a “same-old” unit on social movements in the 20th century into a dynamic study of effective social activism—and how students can become effective activists. Using both primary and secondary resources, students learned to analyze social issues, then to identify the type of activism that proved effective for those issues. Next, students selected social situations important to them, analyzed the changes they sought to effect, and determined a means of activism to effect that change in practical—and often surprising—ways. The project’s design and implementation is straightforward and replicable. This session provides concrete steps to follow, specific patterns for locating learning resources, and reproducible forms that educators can carry back to their own campuses.

B202: Managing Tech & Innovation

11:45 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Jen Baum Sevec, Senior Metadata and Acquisitions Librarian, Library Of Congress
Brett Williams, Systems & Liaison Librarian, University of Toronto Mississauga

Sevec offers leaders at any level the opportunity to up their game by learning current management strategies for technology and innovation. Library leaders and constituents engage in the nearly constant interplay of enabling technology and innovations to explore a wealth of information and greater depth of data in the Information Age. A framework for managing this interplay is provided as well as an understanding of the dynamic lifecycle inherent in technological innovations and constituent demands. Williams provides an introduction to Wardley Value Chain Mapping, an innovative IT planning processes discussed by Simon Wardley on his blog Bits and Pieces. He shares specific examples of how this tool can be used by systems librarians, library administrators, and library IT decision makers.

B203: Finding Your Social Media Voice

1:45 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Meghan Kowalski, Head, Preservation, The Catholic University of America
Kirsten Mentzer, Technology Specialist, Northern Virginia Community College’s Medical Education Campus
Alexandra Radocchia Zealand, Web Editor, New Media Developer and Video Producer, Web Team, Arlington Public Library PLA, VLA, ALA, LLAMA
Lennea R. Bower, Program Specialist, Virtual Services, Montgomery County Public Libraries

This session provides an in-depth look at how to speak in social media. Each institution and organization’s social media accounts has a personality. How you say something is just as important as what you say and why you say it. Your voice on social media says a lot to your followers. If done well, your tone will help to attract and keep an audience. The wrong kind of voice will turn people away. Finding the right voice can be difficult and involves a lot of trial and error. Speakers provide tips for finding the right voice and presenting the best personality for your intended followers. Social media is no longer the “new kid on the block,” and the panel highlights the best ways to communicate content, being real, tone, and more. They showcase what kinds of tones can be used and how to find the “real voice” for your accounts, why those voices are (or are not) successful for those accounts; and how to make your chosen voice sustainable and consistent across your accounts.

C203: Migrating & Developing With Drupal

1:45 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

June Yang, Senior Librarian, International Monetary Fund
Linda Venable, Systems Librarian, International Monetary Fund
Elizabeth Zoby, Information Specialist, PAE, National Institute of Corrections (NIC)
Billy Mathews, Web Developer, PAE, National Institute of Corrections (NIC)

Migrating to a new ILS system is not easy, and it is even more challenging when faced with a very tight deadline. Presenters share the recent experience of migrating from SirsiDynix Symphony to Alma within 5 months: what worked, what didn’t, lessons learned, and what to prepare in advance of the migration. They also share some insight about post migration work related to data cleanup, workflows review, etc. Zoby and Mathews share their development of the NIC micro-sites using Drupal, an open-source content management software, to create dynamic websites that make accessing material easy and user-friendly. Instead of having to download and shift through large PDF documents, users can access the content on easily searchable websites which can be edited by authorized users. See how the NIC Information Center is using these sites to help customers and the public access information in innovative ways.

D202: Funding Opps for Digital Library Initiatives

11:45 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Trevor Owens, Digital Archivist, Office of Strategic Initiatives, Library Of Congress
Nicole Ferraiolo, Program Officer, Scholarly Resources, Council on Library & Information Resources
Joel Wurl, Senior Program Officer, National Endowment for the Humanities

Discovering and deciphering guidelines for grant programs is a daunting and challenging process. This session provides an opportunity to directly hear from and ask questions about grant opportunities for digital libraries’ initiatives to program officers from different government and private funders. Following brief overviews of the relevant funding opportunities at their organizations, panelists discuss the kinds of projects that best fit their specific programs. Get suggestions on how to develop a competitive proposal and insights on the application and review process. Panelists consider themes and trends from the digital library projects that have received funding, such as digitization, open educational resources, linked data, crowdsourcing, open access publishing, emulation and virtualization, and data visualization. By bringing together representatives from different funders, this session offers a unique opportunity to connect directly with program officers and identify new opportunities and approaches for funding.

A301: Augmented Reality & Learning

10:45 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Ashley Todd-Diaz, Head, Special Collections & University Archives, Towson University
Earl Givens, Head, Systems & Technology, Catawba College
Art Gutierrez, Head, Technical Services, Emporia State University
Bethanie O’Dell, Virtual Learning Librarian, Emporia State University

Just when you thought the battle of augmented reality (AR) was over with Pokémon GO, libraries across the nation have been exploring additional AR options in order to meet the needs of the mobile learners walking through their doors. With the use of free AR software, four individuals team up to become the ultimate masters of AR. Hear from a panel of closely networked professionals, each with a unique story of embedding AR into specific library services directed for higher education. These stories range from embedding AR with liaison departments to incorporating AR into information literacy sessions (both online and face-to-face).

A304: Multimodal Learning: From Textbooks to Playlists

2:45 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Laurie Burruss, Professor, Pasadena City College

Colleges, universities, and libraries are considering adding video making, or visual literacy, as a core skill. Preparing individuals for a highly visual communication landscape requires critical thinking to offset consumerism as well as multimodal learning and cognitive skills. Researching, creating, and sharing video playlists are important ways to create personalized learning pathways and promote continuous learning. Explore a number of case studies that demonstrate the positive learning outcomes of multimodal learning in academic and corporate settings and discover how to create playlists that can be annotated, edited, and shared across teams.

B304: Raspberry Pi

2:45 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

David Bennett, Systems Librarian, Robert Morris University

Raspberry Pi is an inexpensive computing tool that is ideal for new projects within libraries. It’s a powerful single board computer that plays high-definition video, yet it’s only the size of a credit card. The Raspberry Pi 3 was released in February of 2016, and the built-in networking options make it an exciting fit for library applications. Learn how Raspberry Pi can be used as a people counter, a dedicated OPAC, a social media tool, and more.

D302: Upping Our “Gamification”: Speaking Millennials’ Language

11:45 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

David Folmar, Emerging Technology Librarian, Main Branch, Richmond Public Library Author, Game It Up! Using Gamification to Incentivize Your Library

Be tech-smart and culture-savvy by using game-design thinking and gaming activities to connect with current users in a fun way and draw in new ones. Hear from a library communicator who literally wrote the book on this topic. Online games are incredibly popular; libraries, book apps, and learning institutions are leveraging this to bring in new audiences and engage with existing ones in new ways. Why are they doing this, what is the benefit, and how do you make it work to promote your library? Get the answers here!

D303: Library Story in Video

1:45 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Jennifer E. Burke, President, IntelliCraft Research, LLC

Video is a powerful, emotional storytelling medium that plays well in social media, and its use is still fast-growing. Video can spread your library’s story, and you can do it without hiring an expensive pro. A tech-savvy info pro shares basic video facts, along with her favorite tools, tips, and techniques that almost anyone can use for creating short, compelling videos to promote library services, staffers, and resources.

My note: my mouth ran dry to repeat this to the SCSU library. In vain. 1. make a low-cost social-media type of movie of 30 sec each week/month. 2. post on a prominent place on the library web page. 3. Have web form harvest info from patrons on the issu[s] reflected in the video 4. mirror video on the social media 5. aim as ultimate goal patrons (students, faculty, staff) furbishing the video footage instead of library staff
Why is it soooo difficult to comprehend?

E302: Zero to Maker: Invention Literacy & Mobile Memory Lab

11:45 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Dominique China, Information Services Librarian, Brampton Library
Colleen Dearborn, Adult Services Librarian, Alsip-Merrionette Park Library, Alsip, Ill.

Invention literacy is not just about understanding how a thing is made or how it works; it is also the ability to use that knowledge to bring one’s own ideas into reality. China gives examples of how one public library is empowering children, teens, and adults to become “invention-literate” through its maker programming. Find out how a combination of high- and low-tech equipment, safe and accessible learning environments, and a unique community partnership is nurturing invention, creative confidence, innovation, and entrepreneurship. Sparked by the CIL 2016 Hawkins and Mears talk about personal digital archiving and the DCPL Memory Lab, Dearborn shares her library’s inexpensive journey to create a mobile memory lab program. She discusses the acquisition of equipment and technology, the demo classes, lesson plans about personal archiving, outreach to other community organizations, and providing classes on related topics, such as saving and uploading images, backing up files and using cloud storage, writing and self-publishing memoirs, conducting oral interviews with veterans and other family memories, coding and saving memories on a website, etc. Future plans include digitizing local history documents, a community website with links to these documents, as well as to our patrons’ digitized images, videos, interviews and memoirs.

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more on technology in library in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=technology+library

technology requirements for librarians job samples

also academic technology

Data Visualization Designer and Consultant for the Arts
Lecturer
The University Libraries of Virginia Tech seeks a specialist to join a team offering critical and sophisticated new technology development services that enhance the scholarly and creative expression of faculty and graduate students. This new position will bring relevant computational techniques to the enhance the fields of Art and Design at Virginia Tech, and will serve as a visual design consultant to project teams using data visualization methodologies.

The ideal candidates will have demonstrated web development and programming skills, knowledge of digital research methods and tools in Art and Design, experience managing and interpreting common types of digital data and assets studied in those fields.

The Data Visualization Designer & Digital Consultant for the Arts will not only help researchers in Art and Design fields develop, manage, and sustain digital creative works and digital forms of scholarly expression, but also help researchers across Virginia Tech design effective visual representations of their research. Successful candidates will work collaboratively with other Virginia Tech units, such as the School of Visual Arts; the School of Performing Arts; the Moss Center for the Arts; the Institute for Creativity, Arts, and Technology; and the arts community development initiative VTArtWorks (made possible by the Institute of Museum and Library Services [SP-02-15-0034-15])

Responsibilities

– Investigates and applies existing and emerging technologies that help strengthen the Libraries’ mission to enhance and curate visual representations of data at Virginia Tech.

– Develops and modifies technologies and designs processes that facilitate data visualization/exploration, data and information access, data discovery, data mining, data publishing, data management, and preservation

– Serves as consultant to researchers on data visualization, visual design principles, and related computational tools and methods in the digital arts

– Keeps up with trends in digital research issues, methods, and tools in related disciplines

– Identifies data, digital scholarship, and digital library development referral opportunities; makes connections with research teams across campus

– Participates in teams and working groups and in various data-related projects and initiatives as a result of developments and changes in library services

The James E. Walker Library at Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU) seeks a systems librarian to contribute to the mission of the library through administration and optimization of the library’s various management systems.

This is a 12-month, tenure-track position (#401070) at the rank of assistant/associate professor. Start date for the position is July 1, 2018. All library faculty are expected to meet promotion and tenure standards.

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http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/10/10/code4lib-2018-2/

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Wake Forest University

Digital Curation Librarian

This position reports to the team director. The successful candidate will collaborate with campus faculty and library colleagues to ensure long-term preservation and accessibility of digital assets, projects, and datasets collected and created by the library, and to support metadata strategies associated with digital scholarship and special collections. The person in this position will engage in national and/or international initiatives and insure that best practice is followed for curation of digital materials.

Responsibilities:

Coordinate management of digital repositories, working across teams, including Digital Initiatives & Scholarly Communication, Special Collections & Archives, Technology, and Resource Services, to ensure the sustainability of projects and content
Create and maintain policies and procedures guiding digital preservation practices, including establishing authenticity and integrity workflows for born digital and digitized content
In collaboration with the Digital Collections Librarian, create guidelines and procedures for metadata creation, transformation, remediation, and enhancement
Perform metadata audits of existing digital assets to ensure compliance with standards
Maintain awareness of trends in metadata and resource discovery
Participates in team and library-wide activities; serves on Library, Librarians’ Assembly, and University committees; represents the library in relevant regional, state, and national organizations
Participates in local, regional, or national professional organizations; enriches professional expertise by attending conferences and professional development opportunities, delivering presentations at professional meetings, publishing in professional publications, and serving on professional committees
Perform other duties as assigned
Required Qualifications:

Master’s degree in Library Science from an ALA-accredited program or a master’s degree in a related field
Knowledge of best practices for current digital library standards for digital curation and of born digital and digitized content
Knowledge of current trends in data stewardship and data management plans
Experience with preservation workflows for born digital and digitized content
Experience with metadata standards and protocols (such as Dublin Core, Open Archives Initiative-Protocol for Metadata Harvesting (OAI-PMH), METS, MODS, PREMIS)
Demonstrated ability to manage multiple projects, effectively identify and leverage resources, as well as meet deadlines and budgets
Aptitude for complex, analytical work with an attention to detail
Ability to work independently and as part of a team
Excellent communication skills
Strong service orientation
Desired Qualifications:

One to three years of experience with digital preservation or metadata creation in an academic library setting
Experience with developing, using, and preserving research data collections
Familiarity with GIS and data visualization tools
Demonstrated skills with scripting languages and/or tools for data manipulation (e.g. OpenRefine http://openrefine.org/, Python, XSLT, etc.)

 

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Mimi O’Malley is the learning technology translation strategist at Spalding University

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/10/03/embedded-librarianship-in-online-courses/

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JSON and Structured Data

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THE DIGITAL HUMANITIES: IMPLICATIONS FOR LIBRARIANS,

LIBRARIES, AND LIBRARIANSHIP

The redefinition of humanities scholarship has received major attention in higher education over the past few years. The advent of digital humanities has challenged many aspects of academic librarianship. With the acknowledgement that librarians must be a necessary part of this scholarly conversation, the challenges facing subject/liaison librarians, technical service librarians, and library administrators are many. Developing the knowledge base of digital tools, establishing best procedures and practices, understanding humanities scholarship, managing data through the research lifecycle, teaching literacies (information, data, visual) beyond the one-shot class, renegotiating the traditional librarian/faculty relationship as ‘service orientated,’ and the willingness of library and institutional administrators to allocate scarce resources to digital humanities projects while balancing the mission and priorities of their institutions are just some of the issues facing librarians as they reinvent themselves in the digital humanities sphere.

A CALL FOR PROPOSALS

College & Undergraduate Libraries, a peer-reviewed journal published by Taylor & Francis, invites proposals for articles to be published in the fall of 2017. The issue will be co-edited by Kevin Gunn (gunn@cua.edu) of the Catholic University of America and Jason Paul (pauljn@stolaf.edu) of St. Olaf College.

The issue will deal with the digital humanities in a very broad sense, with a major focus on their implications for the roles of academic librarians and libraries as well as on librarianship in general. Possible article topics include, but are not limited to, the following themes, issues, challenges, and criticism:

  • Developing the project development mindset in librarians
  • Creating new positions and/or cross-training issues for librarians
  • Librarian as: point-of-service agent, an ongoing consultant, or as an embedded project librarian
  • Developing managerial and technological competencies in librarians
  • Administration support (or not) for DH endeavors in libraries
  • Teaching DH with faculty to students (undergraduate and graduate) and faculty
  • Helping students working with data
  • Managing the DH products of the data life cycle
  • Issues surrounding humanities data collection development and management
  • Relationships of data curation and digital libraries in DH
  • Issues in curation, preservation, sustainability, and access of DH data, projects, and products
  • Linked data, open access, and libraries
  • Librarian and staff development for non-traditional roles
  • Teaching DH in academic libraries
  • Project collaboration efforts with undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty
  • Data literacy for librarians
  • The lack of diversity of librarians and how it impacts DH development
  • Advocating and supporting DH across the institution
  • Developing institutional repositories for DH
  • Creating DH scholarship from the birth of digital objects
  • Consortial collaborations on DH projects
  • Establishing best practices for dh labs, networks, and services
  • Assessing, evaluating, and peer reviewing DH projects and librarians.

Articles may be theoretical or ideological discussions, case studies, best practices, research studies, and opinion pieces or position papers.

Proposals should consist of an abstract of up to 500 words and up to six keywords describing the article, together with complete author contact information. Articles should be in the range of 20 double-spaced pages in length. Please consult the following link that contains instructions for authors: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.V0DJWE0UUdU.

Please submit proposals to Kevin Gunn (gunn@cua.edu) by August 17, 2016; please do not use Scholar One for submitting proposals. First drafts of accepted proposals will be due by February 1, 2017 with the issue being published in the fall of 2017. Feel free to contact the editors with any questions that you may have.

Kevin Gunn, Catholic University of America

Jason Paul, St. Olaf College

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The Transformational Initiative for Graduate Education and Research (TIGER) at the General Library of the University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez (UPRM) seeks an enthusiastic and creative Research Services Librarian to join our recently created Graduate Research and Innovation Center (GRIC).

The Research Services Librarian works to advance the goals and objectives of Center and leads the creation and successful organization of instructional activities, collaborates to envision and implement scholarly communication services and assists faculty, postdoctoral researchers, and graduate students in managing the lifecycle of data resulting from all types of projects. This initiative is funded by a five year grant awarded by the Promoting Postbaccalaureate Opportunities for Hispanic Americans Program (PPOHA), Title V, Part B, of the U.S. Department of Education.

The Research Services Librarian will build relationships and collaborate with the GRIC personnel and library liaisons as well as with project students and staff. This is a Librarian I position that will be renewed annually (based upon performance evaluation) for the duration of the project with a progressive institutionalization commitment starting on October 1st, 2016. .

The Mayaguez Campus of the University of Puerto Rico is located in the western part of the island. Our library provides a broad array of services, collections and resources for a community of approximately 12,100 students and supports more than 95 academic programs. An overview of the library and the university can be obtained through http://www.uprm.edu/library/.

REQUIRED QUALIFICATIONS

  • Master’s degree in library or information science (MLS, MIS, MLIS) from an ALA (American Library Association)-accredited program • Fully bilingual in English and Spanish • Excellent interpersonal and communication skills and ability to work well with a diverse academic community • Experience working in reference and instruction in an academic/research library and strong assessment and user-centered service orientation • Demonstrated experience working across organizational boundaries and managing complex stakeholder groups to move projects forward • Experience with training, scheduling and supervising at various settings • Ability to work creatively, collaboratively and effectively on teams and on independent assignments • Experience with website creation and design in a CMS environment and accessibility and compliance issues • Strong organizational skills and ability to manage multiple priorities.

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS

  • Experience creating and maintaining web-based subject guides and tutorials • Demonstrated ability to deliver in-person and online reference services • Experience helping researchers with data management planning and understanding of trends and issues related to the research lifecycle, including creation, analysis, preservation, access, and reuse of research data • Demonstrated a high degree of facility with technologies and systems germane to the 21st century library, and be well versed in the issues surrounding scholarly communications and compliance issues (e.g. author identifiers, data sharing software, repositories, among others) • Demonstrate awareness of emerging trends, best practices, and applicable technologies in academic librarianship • Demonstrated experience with one or more metadata and scripting languages (e.g. Dublin Core, XSLT, Java, JavaScript, Python, or PHP) • Academic or professional experience in the sciences or other fields utilizing quantitative methodologies • Experience conducting data-driven analysis of user needs or user testing.
  • Second master’s degree, doctorate or formal courses leading to a doctorate degree from an accredited university

PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES AND DUTIES

  1. Manages daily operations, coordinates activities, and services related to the GRIC and contributes to the continuing implementation of TIGER goals and objectives.
  2. Works closely with liaison and teaching librarians to apply emerging technologies in the design, delivery, and maintenance of high-quality subject guides, digital collection, learning objects, online tutorials, workshops, seminars, mobile and social media interfaces and applications.
  3. Provide support to faculty and graduate students through the integration of digital collection, resources, technologies and analytical tools with traditional resources and by offering user-centered consultation and specialized services 4. Participates in the implementation, promotion, and assessment of the institutional repository and e-science initiative related to data storage, retrieval practices, processes, and data literacy/management.
  4. Advises and educates campus community about author’s rights, Creative Commons licenses, copyrighted materials, open access, publishing trends and other scholarly communication issues.
  5. Develops new services as new needs arise following trends in scholarly communication e-humanities, and e-science.
  6. Provides and develops awareness and knowledge related to digital scholarship and research lifecycle for librarians and staff.
  7. Actively disseminates project outcomes and participates in networking and professional development activities to keep current with emerging practices, technologies and trends.
  8. Actively promote TIGER or GRIC related activities through social networks and other platforms as needed.
  9. Periodically collects, analyzes, and incorporates relevant statistical data into progress reports as needed (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, Springshare, among others).
  10. Actively collaborates with the TIGER Project Assessment Coordinator and the Springshare Administrator to create reports and tools to collect data on user needs.
  11. Coordinates the transmission of online workshops through Google Hangouts Air with the Agricultural Experiment Station Library staff.
  12. Collaborates in the creation of grants and external funds proposals.
  13. Availability and flexibility to work some weeknights and weekends.

SALARY: $ 45,720.00 yearly+ (12 month year).

BENEFITS: University health insurance, 30 days of annual leave, 18 days of sick leave.

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Technology Integration and Web Services Librarian

The Ferris Library for Information, Technology and Education (FLITE) at Ferris State University (Big Rapids, Michigan) invites applications for a collaborative and service-oriented Technology Integration and Web Services Librarian.  The Technology Integration and Web Services Librarian ensures that library   systems and web services support and enhance student learning. Primary responsibilities include management and design of the library website’s  architecture, oversight of the technical and administrative aspects of the library management system and other library enterprise applications, and the seamless integration of all library web-based services. Collaborates with other library faculty and staff to provide reliable electronic access to online resources and to improve the accessibility, usability, responsiveness, and overall user experience of the library’s website. Serves as a liaison to other campus units including Information Technology Services. The Technology Integration and Web Services Librarian is a 12-month, tenure-track faculty position based in the Collections & Access Services team and reports to the Assistant Dean for Collections & Access Services.

Required Qualifications:  ALA accredited master’s degree in library or information science by the time of hire. Minimum 2 years recent experience in administration and configuration of a major enterprise system, such as a library management system. Minimum 2 years recent experience in designing and managing a large-scale website using HTML5, Javascript, and CSS. Demonstrated commitment to the principles of accessibility, universal design, and user-centered design methodologies.  Recent experience with object-oriented programming and scripting languages used to support a website. Experience working in a Unix/ Linux environment. Experience with SQL and maintaining MySQL, PostgreSQL, and/ or Oracle databases. Knowledge of web site analytics and experience with making data-driven decisions.

For a complete posting or to apply, access the electronic applicant system by logging on to https://employment.ferris.edu/postings/25767.

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http://www.all-acad.com/Job/C1538660/Director-of-Digital-Projects/Massachusetts-Institute-of-Technology-%28MIT%29/Cambridge-Massachusetts-United-States/

DIRECTOR OF DIGITAL PROJECTS, MIT Libraries, to direct the development, maintenance, and scaling of software applications and tools designed to dramatically increase access to research collections, improve service capabilities, and expand the library platform.  Will be responsible for leading efforts on a variety of collaborative digital library projects aimed at increasing global access to MIT’s collections and facilitating innovative human and machine uses of a full range of research and teaching objects and metadata; and lead a software development program and develop partnerships with external academic and commercial collaborators to develop tools and platforms with a local and global impact on research, scholarly communications, education, and the preservation of information and ideas.

MIT Libraries seek to be leaders in the collaborative development of a truly open global network of library repositories and platforms. By employing a dynamic, project-based staffing model and drawing on staff resources from across the Libraries to deliver successful outcomes, it is poised to make immediate progress.

A full description is available at http://libraries.mit.edu/about/#jobs.

REQUIRED:  four-year college degree; at least seven years’ professional experience and increasing responsibility with library systems and digital library strategy and development; evidence of broad, in-depth technology and systems knowledge; experience with integrated library systems/library services platforms, discovery technologies, digital repositories, and/or digital preservation services and technologies and demonstrated understanding of the trends and ongoing development of such systems and of emerging technologies in these areas; and experience directly leading and managing projects (i.e., developing proposals; establishing timelines, budgets, and staffing plans; leading day-to-day project work; and delivering on commitments).  Job #13458-S

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THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA LIBRARIES  Digital Projects Librarian Position Description

General Summary of Responsibilities

The University of Alabama Libraries seeks an innovative, dynamic, and service-oriented professional for the position of Digital Projects Librarian. Reporting to the Head of Web Services, this position is primarily responsible for development, implementation, and project management of technology projects in a collaborative environment, as well as supporting the development and management of the UA Libraries various web interfaces. This position will also act as primary administrator for LibApps and similar cloud-based library application suites.

Primary Duties and Responsibilities

Reporting to the head of Web Services, the Digital Projects Librarian will manage and extend the University Libraries services by planning and implementing a variety of projects for internal and external audiences. The position will also integrate, manage, and extend various software platforms and web-based tools using LAMP technology skills and web programming languages such as PHP, CSS, and JavaScript.  S/he will support tools such as the University Libraries web site and intranet, will work with an institutional repository instance and digital archives website, and will work with the LibApps suite of library tools. Will modify, implement and create widgets and small applications for learning tools and other interfaces and APIs. The librarian will interact with a wide range of individuals with differing technological abilities and will be expected to successfully collaborate across departments. The librarian will maintain a knowledge of current best practices in security for web tools, and library privacy concerns. The librarian will work to identify promising new technologies that can impact services and generate a better user experience. The librarian will be expected to have some participation in usability and user experience studies.

Department Information

The Web Services Unit is part of the University Libraries Office of Library Technology and is responsible for web applications, web sites, content, and services that comprise the University Libraries web presence. Among its duties, Web Services manages the University Libraries discovery service application, multiple instances of the WordPress CMS, WordPress Blogs, the LibApp suite of library tools, and Omeka as well as other tools, along with usability and accessibility efforts.

 

Duties

  • Administrate the UA suite of the LibApps tools (LibGuides, LibCal, LibAnswers, etc.); responsible for implementation of existing guidelines and maintaining continuity of look, feel and action;
  • Works as part of team that is responsible for management and extension of the University Libraries various web-based applications and tools (such as WordPress as a CMS and other CMS frameworks, WordPress Blogs, custom apps using an Angular JS framework and Bootstrap, Omeka, Drupal);
  • General, project-based web development and UX implementation within the framework of our web site, intranet and student portal;
  • Responsible for creating, modifying and implementing learning-tool solutions, such as Blackboard Learn widgets;
  • Evaluate the use and effectiveness of web applications and other technological services using analytics, usability studies, and other methods;
  • Work to identify and assist in implementing and evaluating promising emerging technologies and social media tools;
  • Provide technical expertise for the use of social media applications and tools;
  • Other duties as assigned.

Required qualifications

  • Master’s degree in Library & Information Sciences from an ALA-accredited program or advanced degree in Instructional Technology or comparable field from an accredited institution;
  • Ability to successfully initiate, track, and manage projects;
  • Demonstrated experience working on digital library projects;
  • Experience administering CMS-type tools and an understanding of web programming work;
  • Familiarity with the Linux and/or Unix command-line;
  • Excellent interpersonal, communication, and customer service skills and the ability to interact effectively with faculty, students, and staff.

Preferred Qualifications

  • One year of experience working in an academic library on large digital projects – either implementation or programming/developing, or both.
  • Demonstrable experience creating course and/or subject guides via LibGuides or a comparable application;
  • Experience developing for libraries using current best practices in writing and implementation of multiple scripting or programing languages;
  • Experience with automated development repository environments using Grunt, Bower, GitHub, etc.
  • Experience with an Open Source content management systems such as WordPress;
  • Demonstrated ability to work collaboratively in a large and complex environment;
  • Familiarity with project management and team productivity tools such as Asana, Trello, and Slack;
  • Knowledge of XML and library metadata standards ;
  • Knowledge of scripting languages such as XSLT, JavaScript, Python, Perl, and PHP;
  • Familiarity with responsive design methodologies and best practices;
  • Familiarity with agile-design practices;
  • Knowledge of graphic design and image editing software.

Environment:

The University of Alabama, The Capstone University, is the State of Alabama’s flagship public university and the senior comprehensive doctoral level institution in Alabama. UA enrolls over 37,000 students, is ranked in the top 50 public universities in the United States, and its School of Library and Information Studies is ranked in the top 15 library schools in the country. UA has graduated 15 Rhodes Scholars, 15 Truman Scholars, has had 121 Fulbright Scholars, is one of the leading institutions for National Merit Scholars (150 in 2015), and has 5 Pulitzer Prize winners among its ranks. Under the new leadership of President Stuart Bell, UA has launched a strategic planning process that includes an aggressive research agenda and expansion of graduate education. UA is located in Tuscaloosa, a metropolitan area of 200,000, with a vibrant economy, a moderate climate, and a reputation across the South as an innovative, progressive community with an excellent quality of life. Tuscaloosa provides easy access to mountains, several large cities, and the beautiful Gulf Coast.

The University of Alabama is an equal opportunity employer and is strongly committed to the diversity of our faculty and staff. Applicants from a broad spectrum of people, including members of ethnic minorities and disabled persons, are especially encouraged to apply. The University Libraries homepage may be accessed at http://libraries.ua.edu

Prior to employment the successful candidate must pass a pre-employment background investigation.

SALARY/BENEFITS: This will be a non-tenure track 12-month renewable appointment for up to three year cycles at the Assistant Professor rank based on performance, funding, and the needs of the University Libraries. Salary is commensurate with qualifications and experience.  Excellent benefits, including professional development support and tuition fee waiver.

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Digital Humanities Developer

https://jobs.columbia.edu/applicants/jsp/shared/frameset/Frameset.jsp?time=1472763140687

Columbia University Libraries seeks a collegial, collaborative, and creative Digital Humanities Developer to join our Libraries IT staff. The Digital Humanities Developer will provide technology support for digital humanities-focused projects by evaluating, implementing and managing relevant platforms and applications; the Developer will also analyze, transform and/or convert existing humanities-related data sets for staff, engage in creative prototyping of innovative applications, and provide technology consulting and instructional support for Libraries staff.

This new position, based in the Libraries’ Digital Program Division, will work on a variety of projects, collaborating closely with the Digital Humanities Librarian, the Digital Scholarship Coordinator, other Libraries technology groups, librarians in the Humanities & History division and project stakeholders. The position will contribute to building out flexible and sustainable technology platforms for the Libraries’ DH programs and will
also explore new and innovative DH applications and tools.

Responsibilities include:
– Evaluate, implement and manage web and related software applications and platforms relevant to the digital humanities program
– Analyze, transform and/or convert existing humanities-related data sets for staff, students and faculty as needed
– Engage in creative prototyping and model innovative technology solutions in support of the goals of the Digital Humanities Center
– Provide technology consulting, guidance and instruction to CUL staff a well as students and faculty as required
– Conduct independent exploration of technology issues and opportunities in the Digital Humanities domain

The successful candidate will have great collaboration and communication skills and a strong interest in developing expertise in the evolving field of digital humanities.

Columbia University is An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer and strongly encourages individuals of all backgrounds and cultures to consider this position.

-Bachelor’s degree in computer science or a related field, with experience in the humanities, a minimum of 3 years of related work experience, or an equivalent combination of education and experience

Significant experience with UNIX, relational databases (e.g., MySQL, PostgreSQL), and one or more relevant software / scripting languages (e.g., JavaScript, PHP, Python, Ruby/Rails, Perl); experience with modern web standards (HTML5 / CSS / JavaScript); ability to manage software development using revision control software such as SVN and GIT/GITHUB; strong interpersonal skills and demonstrated ability to work as part of collaborative teams; ability to communicate effectively with faculty, students, and staff, including both technical and non-technical collaborators; commitment to supporting and working in a diverse collegial environment

Advanced degree in computer science or a related field, or an advanced degree in the humanities or related field; experience in one or more of the following areas: natural language processing, text analysis, data-mining, machine learning, spatial information / mapping, data modeling, information visualization, integrating digital media into web applications; experience with XML/XSLT, GIS, SOLR, linked data technologies; experience with platforms used for digital exhibits or archives.

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UMass Dartmouth, Assistant/Associate Librarian – Online Services and Digital Applications Librarian, Dartmouth, MA

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS AND ABILITIES REQUIRED:

  • Experience in the design, development and management of web interfaces, including demonstrated pro?ciency with HTML, CSS, and web authoring tools.
  • Working knowledge of relevant coding languages such as Javascript and PHP
  • Ability and willingness to develop work?ows and standards related to all aspects of the library’s web presence and services including related applications.
  • Strong problem solving skills
  • Excellent organizational skills, including the capability for managing a variety of tasks and multiple priorities
  • Demonstrated initiative and proven ability to learn new technologies and adapt to changes in the profession.
  • Understanding of library services and technologies in an academic environment.
  • Strong service orientation and awareness of end user needs as related to library online services and technologies
  • Possesses an understanding of, and a commitment to, usability testing and ongoing assessment of web interfaces
  • Demonstrated ability to thrive in a team environment, working both independently and collaboratively as appropriate.
  • Ability to learn new technical skills quickly and adapt emerging technologies to new domains.
  • Proven ability and willingness to share expertise with colleagues and to articulate technology strategy to non-technical sta? and patrons.
  • Must be available to respond to situations and systems maintenance work that will occur during weekends or evenings.
  • Excellent oral, written, and interpersonal communication, including the ability to develop written project documentation, process procedures, reports, etc.

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS:

  • Knowledge of Responsive Web Design and W3C Web Usability Guidelines.
  • Experience supporting an Integrated Library System (ILS)/Library Management Platform and/or discovery system such as Ex Libris’s Primo.
  • Experience using web development languages such as PHP, Javascript, XML, XSLT, and CSS3.
  • Experience with content management systems such as Drupal or WordPress
  • Familiarity with the technical applications and strategies used to enhance the discover ability of library and digital collections.
  • Experience with managing projects, meeting deadlines, and communicating to various stakeholders in an academic library environment.
  • Experience working in a Linux environment.
  • Experience supporting web applications utilizing the LAMP stack (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP).

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http://hrs.appstate.edu/employment/epa-jobs/1383

Electronic Resources Librarian

Category: Academic Affairs College: Library Department: Belk Library

Qualifications

The University Libraries at Appalachian State University seeks a responsive and collaborative Electronic Resources Librarian. The Electronic Resources Librarian will ensure a seamless and transparent research environment for students and faculty by managing access to electronic resources. Working collaboratively across library teams, the Electronic Resources Librarian will identify and implement improvements in online content, systems and services. The successful candidate will have strong project management, problem solving, and workflow management skills. The Electronic Resources Librarian is a member of the Resource Acquisition and Management Team.

Required

  • ALA-accredited master’s degree.
  • Excellent communication, presentation, and interpersonal skills.
  • Demonstrated e-resources project and workflow management skills.

Preferred

  • Experience with integrated library systems (Sierra preferred).
  • Experience with setup and maintenance of knowledge base, OpenURL, and discovery systems (EDS preferred).
  • Experience with proxy setup and maintenance (Innovative’s WAM, and/or EZ Proxy preferred).
  • Knowledge of security standards and protocols such as LDAP, Single-Sign On, and Shibboleth, and data transfer standards and protocols such as IP, FTP, COUNTER, and SUSHI.
  • Advanced skills with office productivity software including MS Office, and Google Apps for Education.
  • Evidence of establishing and maintaining excellent vendor relationships.
  • Demonstrated ability to work collaboratively across library teams.
  • Demonstrated skill in technical trouble-shooting and problem-solving.
  • Demonstrated supervisory skills.
  • Second advanced degree.

———————————————————————–

—–Original Message—–
From: lita-l-request@lists.ala.org [mailto:lita-l-request@lists.ala.org] On Behalf Of Spencer Lamm
Sent: Thursday, October 13, 2016 12:13 PM
To: lita-l@lists.ala.org
Subject: [lita-l] Jobs: Digital Repository Application Developer, Drexel University Libraries

Summary

Drexel University Libraries seeks a collaborative and creative professional to develop solutions for managing digital collections, research data, university records, and digital scholarship. Working primarily with our Islandora implementation, this position will play a key role as the Libraries advance preservation services and public access for a wide array of digital content including books, articles, images, journals, newspapers, audio, video, and datasets.

As a member of the Data & Digital Stewardship division, the digital repository application developer will work in a collaborative, team-based environment alongside other developers, as well as archives, metadata, and data services staff. The position’s primary responsibility will be working in a Linux environment with the Islandora digital repository stack, which includes the Fedora Commons digital asset management layer, Apache Solr, and Drupal. To support the ingestion and exposure of new collections and digital object types the position will extend the repository using tools such as: RDF, SPARQL, and triplestores; the SWORD protocol; and XSLT.

Reporting to the manager, discovery systems, the developer will collaborate with collection managers and stakeholders across campus. In addition, the successful candidate will play an active role in the Islandora and Fedora open source communities, contributing code, participating in working groups and engaging in other activities in support of current and future implementers of these technologies.

Job URL: http://www.drexeljobs.com/applicants/Central?quickFind=81621

Key Responsibilities

  • Enhance, extend, and maintain the Libraries’ Islandora-based digital

repository

  • Script metadata transformations and digital object processing using

BASH, Python, and XSLT

  • Develop workflows and integrate systems in collaboration with the

Libraries’ data infrastructure developer to support the ingestion of university records and research output, including datasets and publications

  • Work with campus collection managers and technology staff to plan and

coordinate content migrations

  • Collaborate with team members on the exposure of library and

repository data for indexing by search tools and reuse by other applications

  • Ensure adherence of systems to technical, quality assurance, data

integrity, and security standards for managing data

  • Document solutions and workflows for internal purposes and also as

part of compliance with University legal and privacy requirements

  • As part of the discovery systems team, provide support for library

applications and systems

Required Qualifications

  • Bachelor’s degree in Information or Computer Sciences or a related

field, or an equivalent combination of education and experience

  • 3 years minimum application or systems development experience
  • Experience with scripting languages such as Python and BASH
  • Demonstrated proficiency with a major language such as Java, PHP, Ruby
  • Experience performing data transfers utilizing software library or

language APIs

  • Experience with XML, XSLT, XPath, XQuery, and data encoding languages

and standards

  • Experience with Linux
  • Commitment to continuously enhancing development skills
  • Strong analytical and problem solving ability
  • Strong oral and written communications skills
  • Demonstrated success in working effectively both independently and

within teams

  • Evidence of flexibility and initiative working within a dynamic

environment and a diverse matrix organization

 

Preferred Qualifications

  • Experience in an academic, library, or archives environments
  • Experience with the Fedora Commons and Islandora digital asset

management systems

  • Working knowledge of Apache, Tomcat & other delivery servers.
  • Experience with triple stores, SPARQL, RDF
  • Experience with a version-control system such as Git or Subversion.

 

Interested, qualified applicants may apply at:

http://www.drexeljobs.com/applicants/Central?quickFind=81621

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https://jobs.mtholyoke.edu/index.cgi?&JA_m=JASDET&JA_s=459

Librarian and Instructional Technology Liaison – Data Services (#459)

Date Posted: 10/19/2016  Type/Department: Staff in Library, Information & Technology Services
As a member of a fully blended group of librarians and instructional technologists in the Research & Instructional Support (RIS) department, the Librarian/Library and Instructional Technology Liaison (title dependent on qualifications) will work closely with fellow liaisons in RIS to provide forward-looking library research and instructional technology services to faculty and students, with a special focus on data services.The liaison collaborates broadly across LITS as well as with internal and external partners to support faculty and students participating in the College’s data science curricular initiative and in data-intensive disciplines. The liaison coordinates the development, design, and provision of responsive and flexible data services programming for faculty and students, including data analysis, data storage, data publishing, data management, data visualization, and data preservation. The liaison consults with faculty and students in a wide range of disciplines on best practices for teaching and using data/statistical software tools such as R, SPSS, Stata, and MatLab.All liaisons collaborate with faculty to support the design, implementation and assessment of meaningfully integrated library research and technology skills and tools (including Moodle, the learning management system) into teaching and learning activities; provide library research and instructional technology consultation; effectively design, develop, deliver, and assess seminars, workshops, and other learning opportunities; provide self-motivated leadership in imagining and implementing improvements in teaching and learning effectiveness; serve as liaison to one or more academic departments or programs, supporting pedagogical and content needs in the areas of collection development, library research, and instructional technology decisions; maintain high levels of quality customer service standards responding to questions and problems;  partner with colleagues across Library, Information, and Technology Services (LITS) to ensure excellence in the provision of services in support of teaching and learning;  and actively work to help the RIS team and the College to create a welcoming environment in which a diverse population of students, faculty, and staff can thrive.Evening and weekend work may be necessary. In some circumstances, it may be important to assist during adverse weather and emergency situations to ensure essential services and service points are covered. Performs related duties as assigned.Qualifications:

  • Advanced degree required, preferably in education, educational technology, instructional design, or MLS with an emphasis in instruction and assessment. Open to other combinations of education and experience such as advanced degree in quantitative academic disciplines with appropriate teaching and outreach experience.
  • 3-5 years experience in an academic setting with one or more of the following: teaching, outreach, instructional technology and design support, or research support.
  • Significant experience with statistical/quantitative data analysis using one or more of the following tools: R, SPSS, Stata, or MatLab.
  • Significant experience with one or more of the following: data storage, data publishing, data management, data visualization, or data preservation.

Skills:

  • Demonstrated passion for the teaching and learning process, an understanding of a variety of pedagogical approaches, and the ability to develop effective learning experiences.
  • Demonstrated ability to lead projects that include diverse groups of people.
  • A love of learning, the ability to think critically with a dash of ingenuity, the open-mindedness to change your mind, the confidence to admit to not knowing something, and a willingness to learn and move on from mistakes.
  • Attention and care for detail without losing sight of the big picture and our users’ needs.
  • Flexibility to accept, manage, and incorporate change in a fast-paced environment.
  • Excellent oral and written communication, quantitative, organization, and problem-solving skills.
  • The ability to work independently with minimal supervision.
  • Able to maintain a professional and tactful approach in all interactions, ensuring confidentiality and an individual’s right to privacy regarding appropriate information.
  • Enthusiastic service orientation with sensitivity to the needs of users at all skill levels; the ability to convey technical information to a non-technical audience is essential.
  • Ability to travel as needed to participate in consortia and professional meetings and events.

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From: lita-l-request@lists.ala.org [mailto:lita-l-request@lists.ala.org] On Behalf Of Williams, Ginger
Sent: Tuesday, November 22, 2016 8:37 AM
To: ‘lita-l@lists.ala.org’ <lita-l@lists.ala.org>
Subject: [lita-l] Job: Library Specialist Data Visualization & Collection Analytics (Texas USA)

 

library Specialist: Data Visualization & Collections Analytics

 

The Albert B. Alkek Library at Texas State University is seeking a Library Specialist: Data Visualization & Collections Analytics. Under the direction of the Head of Acquisitions, this position provides library-wide support for data visualization and collection analytics projects to support data-driven decision making. This position requires a high level of technical expertise and specialized knowledge to gather, manage, and analyze collection data and access rights, then report complex data in easy-to-understand visualizations. The position will include working with print and digital collections owned or leased by the library.

 

RESPONSIBILITIES: Develop and maintain an analytics strategy for the library. Manage and report usage statistics for electronic resources. Conduct complex holdings comparison analyses utilizing data from the Integrated Library System (ILS), vendors and/or external systems. Produce reports from the ILS on holdings and circulation. Develop strategies to clean and normalize data exported from the ILS and other systems for use in further analysis. Utilize data visualization strategies to report and present analytics. Conduct benchmarking with vendors, peer institutions, and stakeholders. Coordinate record-keeping of current and perpetual access rights for electronic resources and the management of titles in preservation systems such as LOCKSS and PORTICO. Maintain awareness of developments with digital preservation systems and national and international standards for electronic resources. Serve as the primary resource person for questions related to collections analytics and data visualization. Represent department and library-wide needs by participating in various committees. Participate in formulating departmental and unit policies. Pursue professional development activities to improve knowledge, skills, and abilities. Coordinate and/or perform special projects, participate in department & other staff meetings and perform other duties as needed.

QUALIFICATIONS:

Required: Ability to read, analyze, and understand data in a variety of formats; strong written, oral, and interpersonal skills, including ability to work effectively in a team; experience using R, Tableau, BayesiaLab or other data visualization or AI applications, demonstrated by an online portfolio; advanced problem solving, critical thinking, and analytical skills; demonstrated advanced proficiency with Microsoft Excel, including experience using VBA, macros, and formulas; intermediate familiarity with relational databases such as Microsoft Access, including creating relationships, queries, and reports; innovative thinking including the ability to utilize analytics/visualization tools in new, creative, and effective ways.

 

Preferred:  Bachelor’s degree in quantitative or data visualization field such as Applied Statistics, Data Science, or Business Analytics or certificate in data visualization; familiarity with library collection management standards and tools, such as reporting modules within integrated library systems, COUNTER, SUSHI, PIE-J, LOCKSS, PORTICO, library electronic resource usage statistics, and continuing resources; experience with SQL or other query language.

 

SALARY AND BENEFITS:  Commensurate with qualifications and experience. Benefits include monthly contribution to health insurance/benefits package and retirement program. No state or local income tax.

BACKGROUND CHECK: Employment with Texas State University is contingent upon the outcome of a criminal history background check.

Texas State’s 38,849 students choose from 98 bachelor’s, 90 master’s and 12 doctoral degree programs offered by the following colleges: Applied Arts, McCoy College of Business Administration, Education, Fine Arts and Communication, Health Professions, Liberal Arts, Science and Engineering, University College and The Graduate College. As an Emerging Research University, Texas State offers opportunities for discovery and innovation to faculty and students.

Application information:

Apply online at http://jobs.hr.txstate.edu

Texas State University is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Texas State, a member of the

Texas State University System, is committed to increasing the number of women and

minorities in administrative and professional positions.

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Assistant Professor
Working Title Assistant Professor – Web Development Librarian #002847
Department Office of the Dean – Hunter Library
Position Summary Hunter Library seeks an enthusiastic, innovative, collaborative, and user-oriented librarian for the position of Web Development and User Experience Librarian. This librarian will research, develop, and assess enhancements to the library’s web presence. The person in this position will design new sites and applications to improve the user experience in discovering, finding, and accessing library content and services. Providing vision and leadership in designing, developing and supporting the library website content and integrating it with the larger library web presence, which includes discovery tools, digital collections, and electronic resources; supervision of one technology support analyst, as well as staff/student employees engaged in related work, as assigned. Monitors workflow and deadlines; day-to-day management, including programming and editorial recommendations, of the library’s web pages and intranet; serves as a member of the library’s web steering committee, an advisory group that includes representatives from across the library; development and implementation web applications and tools, particularly for mobile environments. The library values collaboration and broad engagement in library-wide decisions and initiatives. This position reports directly to the Head of Technology, Access, and Special Collections.
Carnegie statement WCU embraces its role as a regionally engaged university and is designated by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching as a community engaged university. Preference will be given to candidates who can demonstrate a commitment to public engagement through their teaching, service, and scholarship
Knowledge, Skills, & Abilities Required for this Position Strong leadership skills and ability to lead a web based electronic content management development team; experience in designing, developing, and supporting web sites using HTML, CSS, and JavaScript; familiarity with User Experience Design; basic skills in graphic design; familiarity with usability testing, WAI guidelines, and web analytics; familiarity with mobile platforms, applications, and design; familiarity with responsive design; familiarity with content management systems, intranets, relational databases, and web servers; demonstrated flexibility and initiative; strong commitment to user-centered services and service excellence; strong analytical and problem-solving skills; ability to work effectively with faculty, staff, and students; superior oral and written communication skills; ability to achieve tenure through effective job performance, service, and research.
Minimum Qualifications ALA-accredited master’s degree or international equivalent in library or information science; strong leadership skills and ability to lead a web based electronic content management development team; experience in designing, developing, and supporting web sites using HTML, CSS, and JavaScript; familiarity with User Experience Design; basic skills in graphic design; familiarity with usability testing, WAI guidelines, and web analytics; familiarity with mobile platforms, applications, and design; familiarity with responsive design; familiarity with content management systems, intranets, relational databases, and web servers. Demonstrated flexibility and initiative; strong commitment to user-centered services and service excellence; strong analytical and problem-solving skills; ability to work effectively with faculty, staff, and students; superior oral and written communication skills; ability to achieve tenure through effective job performance, service, and research
Preferred Qualifications Academic library experience; demonstrated skills in User Experience Design; demonstrated experience with usability testing, WAI guidelines, and web analytics; demonstrated experience with mobile platforms, applications, and design; demonstrated experience developing responsive web pages or applications; demonstrated experience with content management systems, relational databases, and web servers; skills or interest in photography; experience with graphic design software; familiarity with a programming environment that includes languages such as ASP.NET, PHP, Python, or Ruby
Position Type Permanent Full-Time

Position: Library Information Analyst

 

Position summary
The Library Information Analyst coordinates Access & Information Services (AIS) technology assessment activities, working in a 24/5 environment to support the technology needs of customers. This position will analyze and report quantitative and qualitative data gathered from various technology-related services including the iSpace (library maker space), equipment lending, and all public-facing user technology. Using this data, the incumbent will support strategic planning for improving and operationalizing technology-related services, provide analysis to support a wide variety of data to management, and makes recommendations for process improvements.

How to apply
See the full job description to learn more and apply online.

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THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA LIBRARIES

Web Development Librarian

The University of Alabama Libraries seeks a talented and energetic professional Web Development Librarian in the Web Technologies and Development unit. Reporting to the Manager of Web Technologies and Development, this position will be responsible for supporting and extending the Libraries’ custom web applications, tools, and web presence. The position will also engage in project work, and support new technology initiatives derived from our strategic plan. The position duties will be split among extending and supporting our custom PHP web apps framework, maintaining and enhancing our web site, maintaining and extending our custom Bento search tool, and developing for open-source digital initiatives such as EBSCO’s FOLIO library framework. The position will also support inter-departmental development and troubleshooting using your front-stack and back-end skills.

The successful candidate will maintain a knowledge of current best practices in all areas of responsibility with special attention to security. S/he will identify promising new technologies that can positively impact services or generate a better user experience and will be an innovative and entrepreneurial professional who desires to work in a creative, collaborative and respectful environment.

The Web Technologies and Applications department is responsible for the development of such nationally-recognized tools as our Bento search interface and our innovative applications of Ebsco’s EDS tool. The University Libraries emphasizes a culture of continuous learning, professional growth, and diversity through ongoing and regular training, and well-supported professional development.

REQUIRED QUALIFICATIONS:

  • MLS/MLIS degree from an ALA accredited program, or
  • Demonstrated ability to work independently, as well as collaboratively with diverse constituencies; comfortable with ambiguity; and effective oral, written and interpersonal communication
  • Experience (1 year+) developing for LAMP systems / extensive familiarity with PHP and MySQL or other back-end development Eg, must be able to write SQL queries and PHP code, and show understanding of web application usage using these tools within a Linux and Apache environment.
  • Extensive familiarity with front-stack development using Javascript and Javascript libraries, AJAX, JSON, HTML 5 and
  • Familiarity with version control usage systems in a development
  • Familiarity with basic UX, iterative design, accessibility standards and mobile first
  • Experience developing within a WordPress
  • Ability to problem solve
  • Ability to set and follow through on both individual and team priorities and
  • Aptitude for learning new technologies and working in a dynamic
  • Demonstrated comfort with an evolving technology
  • A desire to be awesome, and develop awesome projects.

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS:

  • 1-3 years of programming and development experience in a web environment using LAMP
  • Experience developing for, and supporting, common open-source library applications such as Omeka, ArchiveSpace, Dspace,
  • Experience with Java, Ruby, RAML
  • Familiarity with NoSQL databases and
  • Experience interacting with and manipulating REST API data
  • Application or mobile development
  • Experience with professional workflows using IDEs, staging servers, Git, Grunt, and
  • Familiarity with js, Bootstrap, Angular.js, Roots.io.
  • Familiar with UX methodologies and
  • Experience with web security issues, HTTPS, and developing secure
  • Experience developing for and within open-source

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Web Developer/Content Strategist
0604162
University Libraries

Desired Qualifications

– Experience working with Drupal or similar CMS.

– Experience working with LibGuides.

– Familiarity with academic libraries.

General Summary: Designs, develops and maintains websites and related applications for the University Libraries. The position also leads a team to develop holistic communication strategies including the creation and maintenance of an intuitive online experience.

– Develops web content strategy for all University Libraries departments. Serves as Manager for CMS website. Leads effort to coordinate website messaging across multiple platforms including Libraries CMS, LibGuides, social media, and other electronic outlets. Leads research, organization, and public relations efforts concerning the development and release of new websites.

– Designs, tests, debugs and deploys websites. Maintains and updates website architecture and content. Ensures website architecture and content meets University standards.

– Collaborates with University staff to define and document website requirements. Gathers and reports usage statistics, errors or other performance statistics to improve information access and further the goals of the University Libraries.

– Works with Libraries Resource Management to incorporate web-related materials and resources from the Integrated Library System into other web platforms. Works with Libraries IT Services to coordinate maintenance of the architecture, functionality, and integrity of University Libraries websites.

Minimum Qualifications

– Bachelor’s degree or higher in a related field from an accredited institution.

– Three years’ relevant experience.

– Strong interpersonal, written and verbal communication skills.

– Experience documenting technical and content standards.

– Skills involving strong attention to detail.

– Supervisory or lead experience.

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Academic Technology Specialist

https://www.rfcuny.org/careers/postings?pvnID=HO-1710-002124

General Description

Under supervision of the Director of Educational Technology, the Academic Technology Specialist will implement complex technical programs and/or projects; perform a range of work in development/programming, communications, technical support, instructional design, and other similar functions to support faculty, staff and students depending on the needs of the Office of Educational Technology; and provide input to educational technology policy-making decisions.Key Responsibilities and Activities:

  • Support in the implementation of 21st Century technologies, such as ePortfolios, blended/asynchronous courses, mobile learning, Web 2.0 tools for education;
  • Develop and implement innovative pedagogical applications using the latest computer, mobile and digital media;
  • Develop educational and interactive websites, including interactive learning modules, multimedia presentations, and rich media;
  • Provide one-to-one guidance to faculty in Blackboard, ePortfolios, blended/online learning, mobile learning, and digital media use in the classroom across all disciplines in a professional setting;
  • Support and enhance existing homegrown applications as required;
  • Develop and administer short-term training courses for faculty and students. Provide support for Blackboard, Digication, and WordPress users.
  • Keep abreast of the latest hardware and software developments and adapt them for pedagogical uses across disciplines.

 

Other Duties

  • Manage multiple projects in a dynamic team-oriented environment;
  • Serve as a liaison between Academic Departments and the Office of Educational Technology, and as a technical resource in all aspects of instructional design, as well as technologies used in the classroom.
 Qualifications
  • Bachelor Degree in Computer Science or related field, and three years of related work experience. Master Degree preferred.
  • In-depth experience of programming in ASP.NET MVC, PHP and C#;
  • In-depth experience with lecture capturing solutions (e.g. Tegrity, Panopto), TurnItIn, Camtasia, Adobe CS Suite,
  • Strong understanding of database design (MySQL, MS SQL);
  • Strong understanding of HTML5, CSS3, HTML, XHTML, XML, JavaScript, AJAX, JQUERY, and Internet standards and protocols;
  • Strong teamwork and interpersonal skills;
  • Knowledge of project development life cycle is a plus;
  • Strong understanding of WordPress Multisites, Kaltura, WikiMedia, and other CMS platforms is a plus;
  • Experience with Windows Mobile, iOS, and other mobile environments / languages is a plus.

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Digital Literacies Librarian

Instruction Services Division – Library
University of California, Berkeley Library
Hiring range: Associate Librarian
$65,942 – $81,606 per annum, based on qualifications
This is a full time appointment available starting March 2019.

The University of California, Berkeley seeks a creative, collaborative, and user-oriented colleague as the Digital Literacies Librarian. The person in this role will join a team committed to teaching emerging scholars to approach research with confidence, creativity, and critical insight, empowering them to access, critically evaluate, and use information to create and distribute their own research in a technologically evolving environment. This position also has a liaison role with the School of Information, building collections and supporting research methodologies such as computational text analysis, data visualization, and machine learning.

The Environment

The UC Berkeley Library is an internationally renowned research and teaching facility at one of the nation’s premier public universities. A highly diverse and intellectually rich environment, Berkeley serves a campus community of 30,000 undergraduate students, over 11,000 graduate students, and 1,500 faculty. With a collection of more than 12 million volumes and a collections budget of over $15 million, the Library offers extensive collections in all formats and robust services to connect users with those collections and build their related research skills.

The Instruction Services Division (ISD) is a team of seven librarians and professional staff who provide leadership for all issues related to the Library’s educational role such as student learning, information literacy, first-year and transfer student experience, reference and research services, assessment of teaching and learning, instructor development, and the design of physical and virtual learning environments. We support course-integrated instruction, drop-in workshops, online guides, and individual research. Our work furthers the Library’s involvement in teaching and learning initiatives and emphasizes the opportunities associated with undergraduate education. We cultivate liaison relationships with campus partners and academic programs.

The School of Information (I School) offers: professional masters degrees in information management, data science, and cybersecurity; a doctoral program in Information Management & Systems; and a Graduate Certificate in Information and Communication Technologies and Development. Research areas include: natural language processing, computer-mediated communication, data science, human-computer interaction, information policy, information visualization, privacy, technology for developing regions, and user experience and design.

Responsibilities

Reporting to the Head of the Instruction Services Division, the Digital Literacies Librarian will further the Library’s digital literacy initiative (Level Up) by working with colleagues in the Library and engaging with campus partners. This librarian will play a key role in supporting information literacy and emerging research methods across the disciplines, partnering with colleagues who have expertise in these areas (e.g. Data Initiatives Expertise Group, Data and GIS Librarians, Digital Humanities Librarian) and campus partners (e.g. D-Lab, Academic Innovation Studio, Research IT, Research Data Management). Collaborations will be leveraged to identify, implement, and promote entry-level research support services for undergraduate users. This librarian will actively participate in the Library’s reference and instructional services—providing in-person reference, virtual reference, individual research consultations, in-person classes, and the development of online instructional content. This librarian will provide consultation and training to students, faculty, and librarians on using digital tools and techniques to enhance their research and to improve teaching and learning. Serving as a liaison to the I School, this position will establish strong relationships with faculty and graduate students and gain insights into trends in information studies that can be incorporated into the library’s instructional portfolio, with a special focus on undergraduates.

Working with colleagues in ISD and across the Library, the Digital Literacies Librarian will develop innovative programs and services. A key pedagogical tactic is promoting peer-to-peer learning for undergraduates, including administering the Library Undergraduate Fellows program. The Fellows program provides students with training and networking opportunities while helping the Library experiment and pilot service models to best support emerging scholars. New service models are piloted in the Center for Connected Learning (CCL) beta site in Moffitt Library. Currently in the design phase, the CCL is a hub for undergraduates to engage in multidisciplinary, multimodal inquiry and creation. Students learn from peers and experts as they ask, seek, and find answers to their questions in an environment unbound by disciplines or domain expertise. Students discover possibilities for learning and research by experimenting directly with new methods and tools. The space is run in partnership with students, and they are empowered to influence service and space design, structure, and policies. The Digital Literacies Librarian will contribute to this ethos by ensuring that emerging scholars are supported to experiment and be connected to the Library’s wealth of scholarly resources and programs.

Qualifications

Minimum Basic Qualification required at the time of application:

● Bachelor’s degree

Additional Required Qualifications required by start date of position:

● Master’s degree from an ALA accredited institution or equivalent international degree.
● Two or more years experience providing reference and/or instruction services in an academic or research library.
● Two or more years experience using digital scholarship methodologies.

Additional Preferred Qualifications:

● Experience applying current developments in information literacy, instructional design, digital initiatives, and assessment.
● Demonstrated understanding of methods and tools related to text mining, web scraping, text and data analysis, and visualization.
● Experience with data visualization principles and tools.
● Demonstrated ability to plan, coordinate, and implement effective programs, complex projects, and services.
● Demonstrated analytical, organizational, problem solving, interpersonal, and communication skills.
● Demonstrated initiative, flexibility, creativity, and ability to work effectively both independently and as a team member.
● Knowledge of the role of the library in supporting the research lifecycle.
● Participation in Digital Humanities Summer Institute (DHSI), ARL Digital Scholarship Institute, Library Carpentry, or other intensive program.

● Experience with or coursework in collection development in an academic or research library.
● Knowledge of licensing issues related to text and data mining.
● Familiarity with data science principles and programming languages such as Python or R.

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Making and Innovation Specialist, UNLV University Libraries [R0113536]

https://www.higheredjobs.com/admin/details.cfm?JobCode=176885111

ROLE of the POSITION

The Making and Innovation Specialist collaborates with library and campus colleagues to connect the Lied Library Makerspace with learning and research at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. This position leads the instructional initiatives of the Makerspace, coordinates curricular and co-curricular outreach, and facilitates individual and group instruction. The incumbent coordinates daily Makerspace operations and supervises a team of student employees who maintain safety standards and provide assistance to users. As a member of the Department of Knowledge Production, this position works jointly with all disciplines to explore the application of technology in learning and research, and prioritizes creating inclusive spaces and experiences for the UNLV community.

QUALIFICATIONS

This position requires a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited college or university and professionals at all stages of their career are encouraged to apply.

Required

Technology

  • Ability to use technology in creative ways to facilitate research and learning.
  • Ability to maintain and troubleshoot digital fabrication technology.
  • Experience with 3D modeling and printing principles including equipment, software, and basic CAD skills.
  • Working knowledge of vector graphic editors and laser cutting or vinyl cutting equipment.
  • Experience with circuitry, Arduino microcontrollers, and Raspberry Pi single-board computers.
  • Coding skills as they apply to circuitry preferred.

Instructional & Organizational

  • Ability to create and maintain policies and instructional materials/guides for Makerspace equipment and services.
  • Managerial skills to hire, train, supervise, and inspire a team of student employees.
  • Excellent oral and written communication skills including the ability to describe relatively complex technical concepts to a non-technical audience.
  • Aptitude for developing and supporting learner-centered instruction for a variety of audiences.
  • Demonstrated capacity and skill to engage students and contribute to student success.
  • Ability to work creatively, collaboratively, and effectively to promote teamwork, diversity, equality, and inclusiveness within the Libraries and the campus.
  • Experience in a relevant academic or public setting preferred.

interactive world map

Prospect project

The Prospect project at UNC’s DIL

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/prospect-project-uncs-dil-matthew-belskie-msis?trk=hp-feed-article-title-publish

Prospect is a WordPress plugin.  In an overly wordy sentence, Prospect is a domain-agnostic framework for data visualization in support of the digital humanities.

The concept is a simple one.  We take data, and we represent it with images.  We all get that part of it.  The importance of that kind of work relies on the fact that we are humans, and we understand visual structures better and with more fidelity than we do tables of data.

Digital humanities isn’t just limited to the humanities – the design concepts that guide that field are relevant to all domains.  At that level what we’re really talking about is a digital literacy, and one that will be instrumental in many of the possible futures that exist for our students.

Educause 2015

Gamify! Play! Learn! Turn Campus Resources into Exciting Learning Experiences

Thursday
Oct 29th, 2015
4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
Eastern Time
Sagamore Ballroom 3
slide 6
  • Gamification is the use of game mechanics and
    game design techniques in non-game contexts.
  • Gamification uses the natural desire for competition, achievement, status, altruism and/or collaboration (depending on the personality type).
slide 8 Gamification Mechanic Types
  • Objectives: A behavioral mechanic type, requiring the user to take action for the reward.
  • Progression: Move the user through the content.
  • Feedback: Informing the user of their status

Gamification Mechanic Benefits       Each gamification mechanic result in one or more benefits.

Gamification Personality Types

People are motivated to play games differently.

Explorers: Pride themselves in exploring all facets of a game or the context surrounding it.

Killers: Driven by player vs player competition. Always comparing themselves to others.

Socializer: Prefers to chat, play cooperatively, and share game experiences with others.

Achievers: Look to achieve all objectives available in a game. Desires to beat the game itself.

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Adaptive Learning in Online Learning: Results from an Ongoing Evaluation

Wednesday
Oct 28th, 2015
11:40 AM – 12:30 PM
Eastern Time
Wabash Ballroom 2
This session will present results from an evaluation of the integration of RealizeIT adaptive learning technology into three fully online courses: General Psychology, Pathophysiology for Nursing Practice, and College Algebra. Presenters will discuss the impact on students, faculty, and the university.

Adaptive learning systems provide each student with a personalized learning experience, adapting the presentation of the content, and possibly the assessment to the individual ability of the student
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Badges: A New Mode for Faculty Development

Wednesday
Oct 28th, 2015
1:30 PM – 2:30 PM
Eastern Time
Poster Sessions, Exhibit Hall H-K
Co-developed by Learning Technologies and the Faculty Colloquium on Excellence in Teaching and Learning at Indiana University, a digital badge pilot (badges.iu.edu) was launched to support faculty professional development and growth. This session will cover the competency levels, topics of study, and the badging platform to document levels of achievement.
Outcomes: Understand the basics of a three-tiered framework for digital badges * Review the online badging platform * Explore topics for faculty development

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Open Digital Badges: Microcredentials and the Higher Ed Landscape

Wednesday
Oct 28th, 2015
1:30 PM – 2:30 PM
Eastern Time
Poster Sessions, Exhibit Hall H-K
Because they contain claims and evidence and circulate in networks, open digital badges are transforming credentialing. We will highlight the findings from a two-year study of 29 badge development projects, introduce a new project supporting badge innovation in major learning management systems, and interactively discuss the future of badges in higher education.
Outcomes: Understand the open badge ecosystem and how it benefits learning in higher education * Review digital developments in badge delivery * Discover contexts for the future of badges. Daniel Hickeyhttp://www.educause.edu/library/resources/where-badges-work-betterA Framework for Interactivity in Competency-Based Courses: http://er.educause.edu/articles/2015/8/a-framework-for-interactivity-in-competency-based-coursesBadging in a Learner-Centered Context  http://er.educause.edu/multimedia/2015/8/badging-in-a-learner-centered-context



Mozilla Open Badges 101: Digging into Badges (a webinar)

personalized learning or competency-based does not resolve it. GPA does not respond to employers search
regimenting credentials. digital representation of of skill or achievement. represent achievements on the web. social status (foursquare). granular, evidence-based and transferable. badge ecosystem (across multiple areas), this is why open badges; open system. Open Badge Standard: issuer information; earner information; criteria URL; evidence URL; Standards Alignment; Taxonomy Tags

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Data Visualization: The What, the Who, and the How

(overlaps with infographics)
Wednesday
Oct 28th, 2015
2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
Eastern Time
Meeting Room 231-232
Data visualization tools are becoming much stronger and are now targeted at a much wider audience. This panel will explore what we should be trying to do with data visualization, who will be doing it, and how we might support and steer it.
OUTCOMES: Identify multiple opportunities for use of data visualization * Learn about multiple user communities, including those not centrally managed * Explore ways to support users and steer them toward good practiceshttp://www.educause.edu/sites/default/files/library/presentations/E15/SESS029/Data%2BViz%2BEducause%2B151028%2BFINAL1.pptxslides 7: What works well for technically savvy developers may not work for faculty or staff without those same credentials.

  • Data Wrapper
  • Raw
  • Infogram
  • Tableau
    • Oracle suite of OBIEE (Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition) has been very successful for CSU
    • Cognos (IBM) is another tool that is very popular for developers and has been used by USG central office
    • D3 (For Data Driven Documents)
    • Fusion Charts
    • Chart js
    • Google Charts

slide 11: Two primary design goals supported through Data Visualization:

  • Discovery and Exploration

–What story is the data telling you

–Identify patterns and exceptions

  • Decision-making

–Compare, contrast, choose

–Explain, make a point, decide

slide 15:

qTo communicate

qPresent more clearly or more forcefully than would be accomplished with text or tables

qReports, dashboards, infographics, etc.

qTo discover

qAllow us to see what would be difficult or impossible to see if not presented in a useful visualization

qRealm of research but moving into the mainstream

qCan same visualization serve both purposes?

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iPad, You Pad, We All Pad: Transforming Teaching and Learning

Wednesday
Oct 28th, 2015
2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
Eastern Time
Meeting Room 237-238
California State University Northridge, Lynn University, and Jackson State University have all deployed one-to-one iPad tablet initiatives, with the objectives to increase student engagement and learning, improve the quality of teaching materials, and decrease student costs. This session will discuss the transformational educational opportunities afforded by the iPad and highlight technology and pedagogical lessons learned.
Outcomes: Learn about the transformational impact of one-to-one iPad initiatives in the classroom * Understand the need for extensive faculty development and faculty adoption strategies * Appreciate deployment and support challenges====================

The Avalon Video and Audio Repository for Libraries and Beyond

Wednesday
Oct 28th, 2015
1:30 PM – 2:30 PM
Eastern Time
Poster Sessions, Exhibit Hall H-K
The Avalon Media System provides an open-source streaming media solution, based on Hydra/Fedora repository technologies, focused on delivery of library media collections, but it is finding other uses, including support for publication, teaching and learning content, and digital scholarship. As a result, new features enhance support for additional research and instructional use cases.
Outcomes: Understand the problems Avalon solves * Understand the extended use cases addressed with Avalon, both present and intended future * Learn how best to engage with the Avalon project.========================

 Karuta: Design Your Own Portfolio Process

Wednesday
Oct 28th, 2015
1:30 PM – 2:30 PM
Eastern Time
Poster Sessions, Exhibit Hall H-K
The Karuta Open Source Portfolio, currently under incubation by the Apereo Foundation, offers dramatic flexibility for designing portfolio workflows with rubrics to assess learning outcomes. Karuta is LTI enabled for integration with the LMS for easy access and transfer of evidence of learning. Subsequent releases will add functionality for showcasing as well as reporting. Outcome: Learn how Karuta can flexibly support your programs and institution through leveraging its functionality
=======================

Supporting the Discovery and Adoption of Open E-Textbooks

Wednesday
Oct 28th, 2015
1:30 PM – 2:30 PM
Eastern Time
Poster Sessions, Exhibit Hall H-K
The California Open Education Resources Council comprises faculty from the three CA higher education systems working together to identify open textbooks for high impact courses. The selected open textbooks are in the process of being peer reviewed and curated in the CA Open Online Library.
Outcomes: Identify quality open textbooks for general education, high-impact courses * Learn how to interpret textbook peer reviews with a faculty-created rubric * Understand how to reference these resources for the discovery of quality no- or low-cost materialshttp://www.educause.edu/sites/default/files/library/presentations/E15/PS58/COOL%2BEducause%2BPoster%2B2015.pdf
====================

Seminar 12P – Six Secrets for Evaluating Online Teaching (separate registration is required)

Tuesday
Oct 27th, 2015
12:30 PM – 4:00 PM
Eastern Time
Meeting Room 241-242
What makes online teaching different from face-to-face teaching? How can we tell when it’s done well? Faculty members, administrators, and IT leaders will learn six evaluation “secrets” from the authors of the new book Evaluating Online Teaching. You will leave this seminar with use-them-now strategies, tools, and templates to take back to your campus.
OUTCOMES: Distinguish online content and practices that “count” as teaching behaviors * Design self-, peer-, and administrative-evaluation analytic tools * Develop a 6-stage, campus-wide program for evaluating online teachinghttp://www.educause.edu/annual-conference/2015/seminar-12p-six-secrets-evaluating-online-teaching-separate-registration-required

10 Handout – Forms and Resources
3 MB, PDF
08 Handout – Ten Principles Operationalized
355 KB, PDF
07 Handout – Checklist for Campus Readiness
140 KB, PDF
06 Handout – Institutional Audit
305 KB, PDF
05 Handout – The Three I’s
188 KB, PDF
04 Handout – Penn State Faculty Online …
87 KB, PDF
00 Workshop Presentation File
12 MB, Powerpoint Slides

========================

Reimagining Learning Space Design across the Disciplines

Thursday
Oct 29th, 2015
8:00 AM – 8:50 AM
Eastern Time
Meeting Room 235-236
Learn how the University of Pittsburgh is creating a scalable classroom model for active learning on a traditional campus. Administrators, faculty, and instructional technologists and designers recently collaborated to reimagine legacy large-enrollment lecture halls. The focus of this session is on the learning space design process across the disciplines.
Outcomes: Identify and apply the principles of active learning associated with learning space deign * Understand the design process * Assemble an effective learning space design teamhttp://www.educause.edu/annual-conference/2015/reimagining-learning-space-design-across-disciplines

==============================

Thinking Digitally: Advancing Digital Literacy with Personalized Learning Tools

Thursday
Oct 29th, 2015
8:00 AM – 8:50 AM
Eastern Time
Wabash Ballroom 2
The session will outline a scalable framework for integrating digital literacy in higher education curriculum, supported by tools that allow for active and personalized learning. Research and examples from Georgia State University’s experience implementing a pilot program will be used as a catalyst for interactive discussion and idea generation.
Outcomes: Understand the value of incorporating digital literacy into curriculum * Select from emerging personalized learning technologies to support digital literacy across diverse academic scenarios * Adapt a methodology for developing partnerships to advance digital literacy across the organizationhttp://www.educause.edu/annual-conference/2015/thinking-digitally-advancing-digital-literacy-personalized-learning-tools===============

What’s That Droning Overhead?

Thursday
Oct 29th, 2015
8:00 AM – 8:50 AM
Eastern Time
Meeting Room 201-202
Session Type: Concurrent Session
A discussion of unmanned aerial vehicles (drones) and drone activities that either take place on campus or impact a campus from the outside. The state of federal aviation regulations and guidelines for drones will be covered. Attendees can share their experiences with official and rogue drone activities at their institutions.
Outcomes: Learn about the drone devices in use, from miniature to massive * Understand the impact of drones on academic institutions, for better or worse * Learn what drone activities are legally allowable, banned, or discouragedhttp://www.educause.edu/annual-conference/2015/whats-droning-overhead

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B4vcm8Bg5pkcWFlaQ1J3b3duc2M/view

5. Using small unmanned aerial vehicles  today is similar to the “fair use” of media

http://www.dronesurvivalguide.org

Resources – Higher Ed Drone Policies
The Ohio State University
Iowa State University
Indiana University
University of Kansas
Penn State University
University of New Mexico

The Association of College and University Policy
Administrators (ACUPA, acupa.org)

===================

Mobile Computing

Thursday
Oct 29th, 2015
8:00 AM – 8:50 AM
Eastern Time
Meeting Room 239
Session Type: Discussion Session
Join this lively discussion and discovery of innovative and functional uses and support for mobile computing. We will explore creative ideas for projects using mobile devices in teaching, learning, and administration. Topics may include hardware, applications, tools, special uses, wireless and mobile connectivity, web services, support issues, and security.

educause 2015

8:00 AM11:30 AM

Meeting Room 231-232
Session Type: Morning Seminar
Meeting Room 140-141
Session Type: Afternoon Seminar
Meeting Room 241-242
Session Type: Afternoon Seminar
Sagamore Ballroom 6
Meeting Room 132-133
Session Type: Discussion Session
Sagamore Ballroom 4
Poster Sessions, Exhibit Hall H-K
Session Type: Poster Session
Poster Sessions, Exhibit Hall H-K
Shoji Kajita
Session Type: Poster Session
Poster Sessions, Exhibit Hall H-K
Session Type: Poster Session
Poster Sessions, Exhibit Hall H-K
Leslie Kennedy
Session Type: Poster Session
Poster Sessions, Exhibit Hall H-K
Jon W. Dunn
Session Type: Poster Session
Sagamore Ballroom 4
Rob Peregoodoff
Meeting Room 237-238
Session Type: Concurrent Session
Meeting Room 231-232
Session Type: Concurrent Session
Meeting Room 132-133
Session Type: Discussion Session
Meeting Room 203-204
Wabash Ballroom 2
Session Type: Concurrent Session
Meeting Room 201-202
David Stack
Session Type: Concurrent Session
Meeting Room 239
Rose A. Rocchio
Session Type: Discussion Session
Sagamore Ballroom 5
Jaime Casap
Session Type: Featured Session
Meeting Room 201-202
Session Type: Concurrent Session
Meeting Room 203-204
Meeting Room 134-135
Tanya Joosten
Session Type: Discussion Session
Meeting Room 237-238
Session Type: Concurrent Session

GIS and GeoWeb Technologies

https://www.libraryjuiceacademy.com/moodle/login/index.php

Eva Dodsworth

Since the emergence of easily accessible dynamic online mapping tools, there has been a drastic increase in geographic interest and awareness. Whether for personal, social, professional or academic uses, people are using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to communicate information in a map format. Whether it’s using Google Earth to study urban change, or creating Google Map Mashups to deliver library resources, more and more members of society are turning to mapping programs for their visualization needs. With so many using GIS technology in their daily lives, library staff are now more than ever assisting library clients with their mapping queries.

This course will introduce students to a variety of mapping tools and GIS technologies such Google Earth and the creation of dynamic KML files; ArcGIS Online and webmap publishing; Google Fusion Tables and geocoding; and GIS fundamentals with geospatial data creation. Students will be able to apply their GIS skills in their reference work, in digitization projects, in webpages, in library instruction, and more.  Through hands-on exercises, pre-recorded demonstrations and lectures, students will receive a thorough overview of mapping resources that will enhance and expose their library’s resources.

http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/WeekOne_2014.wmv

 

http://www.placingliterature.com/map?modal=1

http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/WeekTwo.wmv

http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/WeekThree_Part_One.mov

http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/WeekThree_Part2.mov

http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/WeekFour.mov

 

– How to enable offline maps in your Google Maps app – http://www.huffingtonpost.com/map-happy/how-to-enable-offline-maps_b_6525832.html

– Huge news – Google Earth Pro, which used to cost the public $400 is now free! What does that mean for you? Extra features! You can import GIS files, tables, and export animated movie files!  http://google-latlong.blogspot.com.es/2015/01/google-earth-pro-is-now-free.html

– Don’t live in Canada?  Too bad! Google Maps plots best tobagonning hills in Canada!http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/google-map-plots-canada-s-best-tobogganing-hills-1.2218207

– a map of 19 countries that were named after specific people – http://www.vox.com/2015/2/1/7954179/map-countries-pe

 

Maps that shaped the world

http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-30840318

 

 

Content for Week Two – February 9th – February 15th

Week Two:

Podcast includes:

  • Citizen Mapping
  • OpenStreetMap – crowdsourcing
    more heads are better then one
    NYPL geomapping volunteers.

http://www.openstreetmap.org/

citizen crime reporting app for NYPD http://www.nyc.gov/html/nypd/html/crime_mapping/nyc_crime_map_introduction.shtml

when the jet disappeared, crowdsourcing for parts on the satellite maps of the ocean

potholes map

maps of the threes. emerald bug in Mnpls

http://www.fuf.net/

how does foursquare and checkins in FB and Google +fit it

  • Google Earth
  • Assignment

Podcast and Powerpoint can be accessed from:http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/JuicyLibrarianMaterial.html

Tutorials: Google Earth

Assignments:

1.       Discussion question:

Discover some citizen mapping projects that you are interested in OR

Contribute your local knowledge to Google Map Maker AND Share with the class online

2.       Google Earth Map

Please complete the tutorial and then create a map in Google Earth with the following components:

  • A title
  • A written introduction to your project
  • At least five placemarks, embedded with html tags, and images, if possible.
  • Imported KML file(s) file format by GEarth, but other apps is using it. using notepad or MS Word, one can create KML file.
    screen overlay, can be text, image, anything. legend. HTML code.
  • A screen overlay  (i.e. a legend)

areal photography.

history.
images from the library, Google is willing to buy them. citizen mapping. scanning and uploading.

geographical and societal awareness.

Gallery: 360Cities.

google street view – historical views

Google Earth Mapping

Submit online as a KML/KMZ file

I had the opportunity to experience a gizmo that can be used to display a variety of mapping projects, including citizen mapping: Science on a Sphere. It is a sphere on which you can project static maps or animations. The one I saw, in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s facility on Ford Island in Honolulu, displayed animations showing the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and the 2011 tsunami in Japan, as well as airline flight paths, ocean currents, polar ice cap change over time, and many other types of geospatial data.

The Great Backyard Bird Count actually starts today and runs through Monday, February 16th. At a minimum, it only requires 15 minutes of observation on any or all the days:  http://gbbc.birdcount.org/

Happy Cow is a site well-known to many vegetarians/vegans for finding restaurants which I’ve used when travelling. Users can submit reviews and/or restaurants that they’d like profiled (although the site reserves the right to approve or not the listing). http://www.happycow.net/search.html 

———————————–

wq and leaflet – a framework that could catch on
by Timothy Clarke – Thursday, February 12, 2015, 2:21 PM

One of the impediments to citizen mapping is the line-of-sight cell tower limitations of mobile phones, or the wifi requirements for other mobile devices.  Citizen mapping in urban and suburban environments is well-served by mobile devices, but what about natural areas, dense leaf cover, or extreme topography?  Even if obtaining absolute mapping coordinates isn’t the issue, much crowdsourcing assumes an ability to connect back to a central data repository (e.g., a web database, ‘the cloud’).  Equipment that can interact with GPS satellites and support data capture is typically expensive and generally requires proprietary software.

wq (https://wq.io/) is a framework that is ‘device first’ and ‘offline-enabled’.  It attempts to leverage several open source technologies to build an entire mobile solution that can support citizen science data collection work, and then synchronize with a central repository once the device (and operator) return to an area served by cellular or wifi networks.

I’m stretching here, so if I get stuff wrong, please don’t yell.  Still, I’ll take a pass at generally describing the framework and its related technology stack.

wq relies upon python, and a web framework called django for building offline-capable web apps that can run on iOS and Android devices.  These web apps, then, rely very heavily upon javascript, particularly requirejs (http://requirejs.org/) and mustache (https://mustache.github.io/), for the templates that permit quick and (somewhat) painless web application development.  Data visualization relies upon d3.js (http://d3js.org/), and geography makes heavy use of Leaflet (http://leafletjs.com/) — maybe the most pertinent layer of the stack for those of us in this course.  If you’re not familiar withLeaflet.js, check it out!

Finally, wq extends several other open source technologies to enable synchronizing between a central data repository and multiple mobile devices in the hands of citizen mappers.  Lastly, wq employs a set of tools to more easily build and distribute customized mapping apps that can be served from Apple’s app store, Google Play, etc.

What wq intends is to allow highly specialized citizen science/citizen mapping apps to be more easily and quickly built, based upon a solid collection of aligned F/OSS tools.  Ideally, an app can spin up quickly to respond to a particular need (e.g., a pipeline spill), or a specialized audience (the run up to a public comment period for a development project), or even something like a high school field trip or higher ed service learning project.

Some examples of citizen mapping projects already built upon wq are here:

https://wq.io/examples/

—————–

Creating a walking tour map with Google Earth_2014

————-

Week 3

Podcast includes:

  • Geocoding
  • Georeferencing
  • Spatial Data Formats
  • Geospatial Data Online
  • Discussion Question

Podcast and Powerpoint available from: http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/JuicyLibrarianMaterial.html

Tutorials: BatchGeo (optional); Google Fusion (optional)

https://en.batchgeo.com/

enter Xcel data, and export KLM file ready for google map and/or google earth

https://support.google.com/fusiontables/answer/2571232
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Google_Fusion_Tables

store maps online, no latitude needed.
visualize geospatial data by map
spatial analysis by mapping different layers together
showing data by map, graph or chart
e.g. how many cars cross specific point
crowdsourcing: spotting butterflies, using fusion tables to map the spices and sightings
http://www.theguardian.com/news/datablog/2011/mar/31/deprivation-map-indices-multiple

students: journalism, history, geography.

Georeferencing (geocoding – data, geo referencing – image)
historical air maps or photos are much more useful when they are georeferenced.
Photos from different year is difficult to lay over one another without referencing. the only reference might be the river. usually reference the four corners, but sometimes river. Using GIS program to determine the longitute/latitude for each corner. sometimes only farmland and it is impossible

 

Immersive Scholarship and Technologies in Academic Libraries

We define immersive scholarship as any scholarly work developed through or implemented utilizing technologies including Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality, Mixed Reality, Visualization (i.e., large format displays and visualization walls, GIS, Tableau), and any related hardware, programs or software.

We are seeking survey participants who are employed in an academic library and who currently support immersive scholarship and technologies at their institution.

how your academic library has developed tools, implemented third party hardware/software, and in what barriers you have identified at your institution in supporting immersive scholarship.

Link to Online Survey

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