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digitization impact on academic library

Survey Highlights Digitization’s Impact on Campus Libraries

By David Raths  05/22/17

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/05/22/survey-highlights-digitizations-impact-on-campus-libraries.aspx

nonprofit Ithaka S+R. The study, Ithaka S+R Library Survey 2016, highlighted a number of challenges facing library directors in an era of increased digitization. Future Trends Forum video chat May 19 hosted by Bryan Alexander.

Alexander zeroed in on the finding that library directors feel increasingly less valued by supervisors such as chief academic officers.

Not surprisingly, the survey illustrates a broad shift toward electronic resources, Wolff-Eisenberg noted, with an increasing number of libraries developing policies for de-accessioning print materials that are also available digitally.

library directors are increasingly recognizing that discovery does not always happen in the library. Compared to the 2013 survey results, fewer library directors believe that it is important that the library is seen by its users as the first place that they go to discover content, and fewer believe that the library is always the best place for researchers at their institution to start their research.

There is also a substantial gap between how faculty members and library directors perceive the library’s contribution in supporting student learning. Both tend to agree that students have poor research skills, Wolff-Eisenberg noted. The faculty members see it as more of a problem, but they are less likely than library directors to see librarians contributing to student learning by helping them to develop research skills

The positions for which respondents anticipate the most growth in the next five years are related to instructional design (my note: this is IMS), information literacy and specialized faculty research support involving digital humanities, geographical information systems (GIS) and data management.

++++++++++++++++++++++
more on digitization in academic libraries in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digitization+library

SCSU library digitizing VHS

SCSU library digitizing VHS tapes

  1. plan
    1. hardware and software
    2. digitizing process
    3. archiving process
    4. issues
  2. correspondence among Greg J, Tom H and Plamen
  3. correspondence on the LITA listserv regarding “best practices for in house digital conversion”
  4. Plan
  • collecting (Identifying VHS to digitize)
  • clearing (Digitize or not digitize?):
    • duplicates (Checking collection for content in other formats)
    • establishing if DVD can be purchased (Availability for sale new)
    • clearing copyrights etc. (Copyright / fair use review )
  • Digitizing the tapes
  • Adobe Premiere CC
    • Capture
    • metadata
      Metadata screen
    • this why  metadata was entered in the post-processed MP4 file using the VLC player

metadata VLC-

 

  • export
    H.264 . /   iPAD 480p 29.9 fps

Shortcuts:

If you are using Premiere CC: 1. File/New/Sequence. 2. Ctrl M is the shortcut to export (M is for media)

Issues
the two Apple/Macs will deliver error messages with both the export to the MP4 format and for burning the CDs and DVDs.
e.g.

  • other issues
    regular restart required for new capture
    error messages e.g.
    error message Premiere CC

 

 

 

 

 

 

other issues:

audio. Audio synchronization during the digitization is off. Solution: possible solution is the last of this thread : https://forums.adobe.com/thread/2217377

open in in QT Pro copy an segment then past it into a new QT file and save. It then plays normally in Adobe products. 

old Apple desktops. needed to be rebuild and reformatted.
Apple burner issues. issues with Premiere license (bigger organization, bigger bureaucracy – keep the licenses within the library, not with IT or the business department)

old VCRs – one of the VCRs was recording bad audio signal

old VHS tapes: the signal jump makes the digital recording stop, thus requiring a constant attendance of the digitization, instead of letting it be digitized and working on something else

burn CD error

Upon upload to MediaSpace,

upload MediaSpace

 

 

the person who is uploading the digitized VHS movies can “Add Collaborator”

add collaborator

 

 

 

The collaborator can be “co-editor” and / or “co-publisher”

co editor

Thus, at the moment, Tom Hegert has been designated to a digitized VHS video as Co-:Publisher and Rhonda Huisman as “Co-Editor.”

Please DO log in into MediaSpace with your STAR ID and confirm that you can locate the video and you can, respectively edit its metadata.

If you can edit the video, this means that the proposed system will work, since the Library can follow the same pattern to “distribute” the videos to the instructors, who these videos are used by; and, respectively these instructors can further control the distribution of the videos in their classes.

  • issues:
    sharing the videos from the generic Library account for MediaSpace to the MediaSPace account of the faculty who had requested the digitization either through sending the link to the video or publish in channel (we called our channel “digitized VHS”)

MediaSpace Channel

 

 

 

  •  issue: ripping off content from DVD.
    Faculty (mostly teaching online / hybrid courses) want to place teaching material from DVD to MediaSpace. Most DVDs are DRM protected.
    Handbreak (https://handbrake.fr/) does not allow ripping DRM-ed DVDs.
    handbreak DRMto bypass this Handbreak issue, we use DVD Decrypter before we run the file through Handbreak
    Solutions:

From: “Lanska, Jeremiah K” <Jeremiah.Lanska@ridgewater.edu>
Date: Tuesday, September 11, 2018 at 10:03 AM
I use a software on a MAC called MacX DVD Video Converter Pro.
https://www.macxdvd.com/
I convert videos to MP4 with this and it just works for just about any DVD. Then upload them to MediaSpace.

Jer Lanska  Media Services Ridgewater College Jeremiah.lanska@ridgewater.edu 320-234-8575

From: “Docken, Marti L” <Marti.Docken@saintpaul.edu>
Date: Tuesday, September 11, 2018 at 8:17 AM

Good morning Plamen.  Here at Saint Paul College, we are asked to get permission from owner when we are looking at making any alterations to a video, tape, etc.  This is true of adding closed captioning as well.  The attached are forms given by Minnesota State which they may have an updated form.
Thank you and have a wonderful day.
Marti Docken Instructional Technology Specialist 651.846.1339 marti.docken@saintpaul.edu

Permission Request Form to Add Closed Caption-288flgx

Memo Closed Captioning Copyright FINAL 10 03 2011-1065jox

From: Geri Wilson
Sent: Friday, September 14, 2018 3:23 PM
What I do with DVDs is give a warning to the faculty that the MediaSpace link with the captions I’ve created should not be widely shared and should be treated as if it were still a DVD that can be shown in the classroom, but not posted on D2L. Because even if we use those forms, I don’t believe it gives us the right to use the video in a broader way. However, a safer approach might be to burn a new DVD with captions, so that it’s still in the same format that can’t be misused as easily.

Just my 2 cents. Geri

From: “Hunter, Gary B” <Gary.Hunter@minnstate.edu>
Date: Friday, September 14, 2018 at 2:55 PM
To: Plamen Miltenoff_old <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: RE: Process of ripping DVD video to mount it on MediaSpace

I’ll assume the contents of the DVDs are movies/films unless I hear otherwise from you.  There’s a lot we need to consider from a copyright perspective. Let me know a day and time that we can touch base via a phone call.  Next week my schedule is flexible, so let me know what day and time work for you.  Until we speak, here’s some of the information related to making copies of copyrighted works for nonprofit teaching purposes.

There are two sections of the Copyright Act that authorize “copying” of copyrighted works for nonprofit educational purposes.  It doesn’t matter if the copyrighted works are being copied from DVDs, CDs, flash drives, a computer’s hard drive, etc., the same sections of the Copyright Act apply.

  1. Section 110(2), also known as the TEACH Act, allows nonprofit educational institutions to make a digital copy of a nondramatic copyrighted work and save it to a server for online and hybrid teaching.  I have a TEACH Act checklist on the IP Tools & Forms webpage at http://www.minnstate.edu/system/asa/academicaffairs/policy/copyright/forms.html.  The checklist identifies the few things that may not be copied under this section of the Copyright Act.  If an instructor meets the various requirements on the checklist, than you can make a digital copy of the entire nondramatic copyrighted work and save it to MediaSpace. For nondramatic works, all MinnState instructors should be able to complete the TEACH Act checklist successfully, so I wouldn’t request a completed checklist from them.

Under the TEACH Act, nonprofit educational institutions are only permitted to make a digital copy of reasonable and limited portions of dramatic copyrighted works.  Movies and films are usually dramatic works.   Most people in higher education interpret “reasonable and limited portions” to mean something less than the whole and not the entire movie/film.  There are several guidance documents on the TEACH Act on the IP Tools & Forms webpage that go into greater detail as to what is reasonable and limited portions.  Unfortunately, this section only authorizes the copying of part of the movie/film and not the entire thing.

  1. Section 107 Fair Use of the Copyright Act is the second section that permits copying of copyrighted works for nonprofit educational purposes.  Fair Use is used more than any other section to make copies of copyrighted works for nonprofit educational purposes. An instructor needs to complete a fair Use Checklist showing the proposed copying is authorized by fair use.  An instructor who completes a Fair Use Checklist that ends up being 50/50 or more in support of fair use for their proposed copying of a copyrighted work, should be able to make the digital copy.  Fair Use has some nuances in it for unique situations.  Let’s set up a phone call to further discuss them.  There is also a flow chart that may helpful at http://www.minnstate.edu/system/asa/academicaffairs/policy/copyright/docs/Flow%20Chart-Using%20video%20in%20Online%20-%20D2L%20Courses.pdf.

We also have to consider whether or not the movies/films were purchased with “personal use” rights or “public performance” rights.  Or if an educational license or some similar type of license gives us permission to make copies or publicly perform the movie/film.  More layers of the onion that need peeled back to address the copyright concerns.

++++++++++++++

  • Issue: confidentiality
    All digitized material is backedup on DVDs, whether faculty wants a DVD or not.
    Some video content is confidential (e.g. interviews with patients) and faculty does not want any extra copies, but the DVD submitted to them. How do we archive / do we archive the content then?

error msg upload MediSpaceBurning (Archiving)

  • where to store the burned DVDs? their shelf life is 12 years.
  • DVD’s must be labeled with soft tip perm marker, not labels. labels glue ages quickly.
  • all our desktops are outdated (5+ years and older). We used two Apple/Macs. OS El Captain, Version 10.11.6, 2.5 Gxz Intel Core i5. 8GB memory, 1333 MHz DDR3, Graphic Card AMD Radeon HD 6750 MD 512 MB

 

Question about the process of archiving the CDs and DVDs after burning. What is the best way to archive the digitized material? Store the CD and DVDs? Keep them in the “cloud?”

Question about the management of working files: 1. Premiere digitizes the original hi-quality file in .mov format and it is in GB. The export is in .mp4 format and it is in MB. Is it worth to store the GB-size .mov format and for how long, considering that the working station has a limited HDD of 200GB

we decided to export two types of files using Adobe Premiere: a) a low end .MP4 file about several hundred megabites, which respectively is uploaded in SCSU Media Space (AKA Kaltura) and b) one high-end (better quality) one the realm of several GBs, which was the archived copy

digital preservation vhs tapes-workflow

We placed a request for two 2TB HDD with the library dean and 10TB file space with the SCSU IT department. Idea being to have the files for MediaSpace readily available on the hardrives, if we have to make them available to faculty and the high-end files being stored on the SCSU file server.

 

++++++++++++++++++

2. correspondence among Greg J, Tom H and Plamen

email correspondence Greg, Tom, Plamen regarding Kaltura account:

From: Greg <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>
Date: Friday, November 17, 2017 at 11:32 AM
To: Plamen Miltenoff <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: RE: Question Kaltura

Plamen,

Channels are not required using this workflow.  Just the collaboration change.

–g–

From: Miltenoff, Plamen
Sent: Friday, November 17, 2017 11:31 AM
To: Jorgensen, Greg S. <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>; Hergert, Thomas R. <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: Question Kaltura

Greg,

About the channel:

Do I create one channel (videos)?

It seems to be a better idea to create separate channels for each of faculty, who’s videotapes are digitized.

Your take?

p

 

From: Greg <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>
Date: Friday, November 17, 2017 at 11:28 AM
To: Plamen Miltenoff <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>, Thomas Hergert <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: RE: Supplemental Account Request Status

Plamen,

You can now sign in here: https://scsu.mediaspace.kaltura.com/  with SCSULibraryVideo as the user and whatever password you selected.

Upload a video.

Click the edit button:

Choose the collaboration ‘tab’:

Add a collaborator:

Just type in part of their name:

Add them as co-editor and co-publisher.

******* any user you wish to collaborate with, will need to first sign in to mediaspace in order to provision their account.****  After they have signed in, you will be able to add them as collaborator.

Once they’ve been added, they will have access to the video in their MedisSpace account.

Like so:

From the My Media area:

Click ‘Filters’:

Then choose either media I can publish, or media I can edit:

If you want to simply change ownership to the requestor (for video available only to a single person), just choose change media owner on the collaboration tab.

The process above will allow for any number of collaborators, in a fashion similar to ‘on reserve’.

–g–

From: Miltenoff, Plamen
Sent: Friday, November 17, 2017 11:19 AM
To: Jorgensen, Greg S. <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>; Hergert, Thomas R. <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: FW: Supplemental Account Request Status

Tom,

I submitted the request to Greg with the “SCSULibraryVideo” name

Greg, I submitted, Tom, Rachel W and Rhonda H (and you) as “owners.”
Pls, if possible, do not assigned to Tom ownership rights yet and add him later on.

I also received your approval, so I am starting to work on it

Txs

p

—————-

 

From: Husky Tech <huskytech@stcloudstate.edu>
Date: Friday, November 17, 2017 at 11:16 AM
To: Plamen Miltenoff <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: Supplemental Account Request Status

Plamen,

This message confirms your request for a new Supplemental Account with the requested username of SCSULibraryVideo. Please allow 2-3 business days for processing. You will be notified by email when your request is approved or denied. You may also check the status of your request by returning to the Supplemental Accounts Maintenance site.

Thank you for your request and please contact us with questions or concerns.

HuskyTech
720 4th Avenue South
St. Cloud, MN 56301
(320) 308-7000
HuskyTech@stcloudstate.edu

From: “Jorgensen, Greg S.” <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>
Date: Friday, November 17, 2017 at 11:11 AM
To: “Miltenoff, Plamen” <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>, Tom Hergert <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: RE: Kaltura’s account for the library

 

Plamen, (or Tom)

 

Go here and request one: https://huskynet.stcloudstate.edu/myHuskyNet/supplemental-acct.asp

Once you’ve done that, just let me know the name of the account.  (LibraryVideoDrop, SCSULibraryVideo, etc….)

I’ll then add it to the Mediaspace access list.

 

If there’s already an account to which you have access, we can use that, too.  Remember, though, credentials will be shared at least between the two of you.

 

–g–

 

From: Miltenoff, Plamen
Sent: Friday, November 17, 2017 11:08 AM
To: Jorgensen, Greg S. <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>; Hergert, Thomas R. <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: Re: Kaltura’s account for the library

Well, that is a good question. Do we need a “STAR ID” type of account for the library?
If so, who will be the person to talk to. After Diane Schmitt, I do not know who to ask

Tom, can you ask the library dean’s office for any “generic” account?

Greg, for the time being, is it possible to have me as the “owner” of that account? Would that conflict with my current Kaltura account/content?

Can I participate for this project with my student account (as you helpled me several weeks ago restore it for D2L usage)?

p

—————-

Plamen Miltenoff, Ph.D., MLIS

Professor

320-308-3072

pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu

http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/

Knowledge is built from active engagement with conflicting and confounding ideas that challenge older, pre-existing knowledge (Piaget, 1952).

From: Greg <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>
Date: Friday, November 17, 2017 at 11:04 AM
To: Thomas Hergert <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>, Plamen Miltenoff <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: RE: Kaltura’s account for the library

Tom – I think we can accommodate that, too….

I like Plamen’s idea of a test.

Plamen – is there a library dept supplemental account we should also use as part of the test?

–g–

From: Hergert, Thomas R.
Sent: Friday, November 17, 2017 10:50 AM
To: Jorgensen, Greg S. <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>; Miltenoff, Plamen <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: Re: Kaltura’s account for the library

Yes, except that there may be needs for multiple faculty to access the files. Think of it as analogous to DVDs on reserve or even in the general collection.

Tom

From: “Jorgensen, Greg S.” <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>
Date: Friday, November 17, 2017 at 10:29 AM
To: Tom Hergert <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>, “Miltenoff, Plamen” <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: RE: Kaltura’s account for the library

Hmmm…..

Would this be the process:

  • VHS digitized
  • File placed in Mediaspace (SCSULibrary supplemental acct, for example, would be the ‘owner’/uploader)
  • Link sent to original faculty requestor for review of file (if it was edited/correct edits made, CC burned in for open captions, etc…)
  • Ownership transfer to requesting faculty so they can share link/embed, etc… as they need.

–g–

From: Hergert, Thomas R.
Sent: Friday, November 17, 2017 10:24 AM
To: Jorgensen, Greg S. <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>; Miltenoff, Plamen <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: Re: Kaltura’s account for the library

Send someone the link, probably allow downloads by faculty, absolutely stream via MediaSpace

Tom

From: “Jorgensen, Greg S.” <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>
Date: Friday, November 17, 2017 at 10:22 AM
To: Tom Hergert <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>, “Miltenoff, Plamen” <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: RE: Kaltura’s account for the library

Share, as in send someone the link? Or share, as in, let others upload/download from the location?

Do these things need to stream from the location (as in Mediaspace), or is this more of a file drop?

–g–

From: Hergert, Thomas R.
Sent: Friday, November 17, 2017 9:19 AM
To: Jorgensen, Greg S. <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>; Miltenoff, Plamen <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: Re: Kaltura’s account for the library

I think we’re hoping for an account from which we can share Library resources such as the digitized versions of VHS tapes that Plamen and I are creating. As I understand it, a closed channel is probably not the best answer. We need a common repository that can have open access to SCSU Kaltura users.

Tom

From: “Jorgensen, Greg S.” <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>
Date: Thursday, November 16, 2017 at 2:03 PM
To: “Miltenoff, Plamen” <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Cc: Tom Hergert <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: RE: Kaltura’s account for the library

A single account can’t really be shared in the way you’re asking, but we can easily add a dept. supplemental account to Mediaspace.  I just need the name of the account.

Depending on what you intend, maybe a closed channel? Create a closed channel and add individuals as needed?

–g–

From: Miltenoff, Plamen
Sent: Thursday, November 16, 2017 11:41 AM
To: Jorgensen, Greg S. <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>
Cc: Hergert, Thomas R. <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: Kaltura’s account for the library

Greg,

Can you help me create a MediaSpace account for the library use.
How can it be tight up to the STAR ID login specifications?

Is it possible, let’s say Tom and I to use our STAR ID to login into such account?
Any info is welcome…

Plamen

++++++++++++

3. correspondence on the LITA listserv regarding “best practices for in house digital conversion”

 

From: <lita-l-request@lists.ala.org> on behalf of Sharona Ginsberg <lita-l@lists.ala.org>
Reply-To: “lita-l@lists.ala.org” <lita-l@lists.ala.org>
Date: Tuesday, November 21, 2017 at 10:07 AM
To: “lita-l@lists.ala.org” <lita-l@lists.ala.org>
Subject: Re: [lita-l] best practices for in house digital conversion

I’m at an academic rather than public library, but you can see what we offer for digital conversion here: https://www.oswego.edu/library/digital-conversion. We’ve been generally happy with our equipment, and I especially think the Elgato Video Capture device (VHS to digital) is a good tool.

– Sharona

From: <lita-l-request@lists.ala.org> on behalf of Molly Schwartz <mschwartz@metro.org>
Reply-To: “lita-l@lists.ala.org” <lita-l@lists.ala.org>
Date: Tuesday, November 21, 2017 at 10:03 AM
To: “lita-l@lists.ala.org” <lita-l@lists.ala.org>
Subject: Re: [lita-l] best practices for in house digital conversion

Hi Stew,

We are not a public library, but we did recently set up an AV media transfer rack here in METRO’s studio in partnership with the XFR Collective. There is a full list of the media formats we can transfer here on our website, as well as a lot more great information in the documentation.

 

I would also definitely recommend DCPL’s Memory Lab and the project to build a Memory Lab Network, which is more applicable to public libraries.

 

best,

Molly

 

On Tue, Nov 21, 2017 at 10:49 AM, Stewart Wilson <SWilson@onlib.org> wrote:

Hi all,

I know there is a lot of information already out here, but is anyone up for a conversation about media conversion technologies for public library patrons?

 

I’m interested in best practices and recommended technologies or guides that you use in your system.

 

Anything that converts projector slides, 35mm, VHS, photographs, cassette, etc.

 

We are building a new PC for this and 3D rendering, so any recommendations for things like soundcards or video capture cards are also useful.

 

Thanks for your help; this group is the best.​

 

Stew Wilson

Paralibrarian for Network Administration and Technology

Community Library of Dewitt & Jamesville

swilson@onlib.org

315 446 3578
To maximize your use of LITA-L or to unsubscribe, see http://www.ala.org/lita/involve/email

Molly C. Schwartz

Studio Manager

http://metro.org/services/599studio

mschwartz@metro.org

212-228-7132

esummit 2018 prsentation
https://www.slideshare.net/aidemoreto/scsu-library-digitizing-archiving-vhs-tapes-105758307

SCSU library digitizing/ archiving VHS tapes from Plamen Miltenoff

++++++++
more on digitizing in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digitizing

computers in library conference

computers in libraries conference

March 28-30 preconference workshops March 27 hyatt regency crystal city
arlington, va
http://conferences.infotoday.com/documents/221/CIL2017-Advance-Program.pdf

W5: Want Media Coverage? Add Press Room to Your Website

9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Kathy Dempsey, Editor, Marketing Library Services newsletter Owner, Libraries Are Essential consultancy

Library marketers crave media attention and coverage, but most don’t know how to get it. The first step is having a Press Room as part of your library’s website. This workshop, led by a member of the media who’s also a library marketing expert, shows you how to build a Press Room that works. It includes how your library benefits from having an online Press Room, even if you don’t have a marketing department; where it belongs in your website hierarchy; what content members of the press expect to find there; SEO basics and PR tactics to lead reporters to your online Press Room; why building relationships with the media is vital; how press coverage affects your library’s usage, funding, brand recognition, and position in the community. Help ensure positive coverage by adding this strategic tool to your website.

W8: Video: Hands-On Learning & Practice

9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Jennifer E. Burke, President, IntelliCraft Research, LLC

In this half-day workshop, a former advertising executive and trainer of strategic storytelling in marketing shares secrets on how to create video that has an impact on your community. Join her to shoot, edit, and polish a video while gathering tips, techniques, and strategies to create your own video-a medium which grabs communities in exciting new ways!

W10: Implementing an Internet of Things Infrastructure & Apps

9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

May Chang, Assistant Director, LibraryTechnology, East Carolina University
Mehdi Mohammadi, Graduate Assistant, Western Michigan University

The Internet of Things (IoT) is becoming widespread in academia as well as industry. It refers to connecting smart objects with built-in unique identifiers and sensors to communicate with each other autonomously. This enables actionable insights and ultimately makes the environment around us smarter. This workshop looks at how libraries can incorporate the IoT and reviews different aspects of developing an IoT infrastructure and creating your own application. It is based on four layers of IoT application architecture: the physical layer, the communications layer, application and services layer, and data analytics. Speakers discuss the potentials and challenges of IoT applications, including the footprint of IoT applications, i.e., a high volume of sensory data, the tools and methods for data analytics. As a case study, they focus on location-aware applications using iBeacons and smartphone sensors to show how all the IoT elements work together. Gain a better understanding of the usefulness of IoT in libraries, learn the main elements and underlying technologies of IoT applications, and understand the difference between a wide range of IoT devices, protocols and technologies to choose the right ones for your IoT application. Get budget and resource estimates and more. Come with a basic understanding of JavaScript/ HTML5/ CSS and your laptop for hands-on development practice. An instruction document will be provided for the attendees to prepare their system before the workshop.

W15: Tech Trends for Libraries in 2017 & Beyond

1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

David Lee King, Digital Services Director, Topeka & Shawnee County Public Library and Publisher, davidleeking.com

Technology has changed the face of libraries and is continuing to change how we work and how we deliver services to customers. This workshop introduces emerging technology trends and shows how those trends are reshaping library services. Examples are provided of how to incorporate these evolving trends into libraries. Attendees learn what trends to look for, find out the difference between a technology trend and a fad, and get ideas on how their library can respond to technology as it emerges.

 

W16: UX Design for Broader Discovery

1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Stephanie Rosso, Principal Web Developer, Hennepin County Library
Amy Luedtke, Senior Librarian, Information Programs and Services, Hennepin County Library
Iain Lowe, BiblioCommons Inc.

While patrons have embraced using online technology to access their public library, most of these interactions are limited to borrowing transactions. If libraries are to be truly relevant in the digital world, we need to nudge patrons out of the well-worn pattern of log-in/transact /log-out and find ways to get them to linger long enough to discover the richness the library has to offer beyond borrowing items, while offering them opportunities to add their own voice to the library’s online community. This workshop explores design patterns and techniques for introducing content to patrons at appropriate moments in their learned workflows. It considers how to encourage patrons to add their voice to the library community and overcome concerns about privacy and security. It shares research and experience from BiblioCommons and Hennepin County Public Library’s efforts and looks at analogs from other domains. Workshop participants will be asked to participate actively in a hands-on session to solve a specific design challenge in teams.

My note: Ha. Even the public library understands that service goes beyond “borrowing items” and must have “patrons to add their voice.” Only in the academic library, prevails the opinion that librarians are those omnipotent and all-knowing lecturing types.

B103: Website Redesign: Techniques & Tools

1:15 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Dana Haugh, Web Services Librarian, Stony Brook University
Roy Degler, Associate Professor, Digital Library Services, Digital Resources and Discovery Services, Oklahoma State University
Emily R Mitchell, Librarian / Webmaster, SUNY Oswego

Join three web experts to learn about tips, tools, and techniques for taking the pain out of website redesigns. Haugh provides advice on the visual design of your next site and shows some examples of library web redesigns. Degler takes a look at why many libraries are using popular, free, CSS-based frameworks such as Bootstrap; explains how the grid layout works; and shows how the built-in responsive design layouts can deliver a site that works on desktop, smartphones, and tablets. Often the biggest challenge in redesign isn’t the visual design, content management system or coding. It’s the people and politics. Everyone thinks they know what the library website should look like, but no two people—let alone groups—can ever agree. How do you move ahead with a library redesign when you’re facing conflicting demands from the administration, co-workers, users, and stakeholders? Mitchell tackles this challenge head on and points out the weapons that we have at hand—from data to documentation; and discusses how to wield those weapons effectively to win (almost) any fight in order to build a great website. Grab lots of insights and ideas from this experienced panel.

C102: Digital Literacy & Coding Program Models

11:15 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Karen Walker, E-Services & Digital Access Manager, Jacksonville Public Library
Brandy McNeil, Associate Director – Tech Education & Training, The New York Public Library
Steven Deolus, Technology Training Program Coordinator, TechConnect (Technology Training Program Department), The New York Public Library

This session looks at how one library created a technology class and programming model that spans a 21-branch, 844-square-mile library system. It discusses mobile classrooms and how Chromebooks, MacBooks, tablets, and other equipment are used to create “classrooms” throughout the system. It shares how the library is focusing on members and programming for the community, for instance, the development of Spanish language, 50+ and immigrant/refugee programming. It looks at developing new programs and instructors using the 3D model from printer to pens, from tablets to coding, from core expertise to everyone. NYPL speakers discuss how coding is the new black! They discuss how to launch a coding program at your library, how to expand the age range of current coding programs, how to promote events related to your program to gain participants, how to get staff buy-in, how to educate staff, and how to create partnerships with some of the biggest names in the game. The NYPL Tech- Connect program will help you plan out all your needs to take your existing or non-existing coding programs further.

My note: one more proof that digital literacy is not “information literacy dressed in the new verbal cloth” of “digital literacy,” but entails way more topics, skills and knowledge. Information Literacy is a 1990s concept. Time to upgrade to 2016 concepts and recognize that digital literacy requires skills beyond handling information. Moreover, information today is way more complex then the skills being taught, since information from social media is more complex then information from news media and it entails technology skills, which one does not have to preside upon for handling news media

E104: From Textbook to Activism: Engaging Students in Social Issues They Care About

2:15 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Janie Pickett, Head Librarian, Eureka High School, Eureka, Mo.
Anna Gray, Social Studies Teacher, Eureka High School, Eureka, Mo.

recent collaborative effort between a high school social studies teacher and a school librarian transformed a “same-old” unit on social movements in the 20th century into a dynamic study of effective social activism—and how students can become effective activists. Using both primary and secondary resources, students learned to analyze social issues, then to identify the type of activism that proved effective for those issues. Next, students selected social situations important to them, analyzed the changes they sought to effect, and determined a means of activism to effect that change in practical—and often surprising—ways. The project’s design and implementation is straightforward and replicable. This session provides concrete steps to follow, specific patterns for locating learning resources, and reproducible forms that educators can carry back to their own campuses.

B202: Managing Tech & Innovation

11:45 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Jen Baum Sevec, Senior Metadata and Acquisitions Librarian, Library Of Congress
Brett Williams, Systems & Liaison Librarian, University of Toronto Mississauga

Sevec offers leaders at any level the opportunity to up their game by learning current management strategies for technology and innovation. Library leaders and constituents engage in the nearly constant interplay of enabling technology and innovations to explore a wealth of information and greater depth of data in the Information Age. A framework for managing this interplay is provided as well as an understanding of the dynamic lifecycle inherent in technological innovations and constituent demands. Williams provides an introduction to Wardley Value Chain Mapping, an innovative IT planning processes discussed by Simon Wardley on his blog Bits and Pieces. He shares specific examples of how this tool can be used by systems librarians, library administrators, and library IT decision makers.

B203: Finding Your Social Media Voice

1:45 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Meghan Kowalski, Head, Preservation, The Catholic University of America
Kirsten Mentzer, Technology Specialist, Northern Virginia Community College’s Medical Education Campus
Alexandra Radocchia Zealand, Web Editor, New Media Developer and Video Producer, Web Team, Arlington Public Library PLA, VLA, ALA, LLAMA
Lennea R. Bower, Program Specialist, Virtual Services, Montgomery County Public Libraries

This session provides an in-depth look at how to speak in social media. Each institution and organization’s social media accounts has a personality. How you say something is just as important as what you say and why you say it. Your voice on social media says a lot to your followers. If done well, your tone will help to attract and keep an audience. The wrong kind of voice will turn people away. Finding the right voice can be difficult and involves a lot of trial and error. Speakers provide tips for finding the right voice and presenting the best personality for your intended followers. Social media is no longer the “new kid on the block,” and the panel highlights the best ways to communicate content, being real, tone, and more. They showcase what kinds of tones can be used and how to find the “real voice” for your accounts, why those voices are (or are not) successful for those accounts; and how to make your chosen voice sustainable and consistent across your accounts.

C203: Migrating & Developing With Drupal

1:45 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

June Yang, Senior Librarian, International Monetary Fund
Linda Venable, Systems Librarian, International Monetary Fund
Elizabeth Zoby, Information Specialist, PAE, National Institute of Corrections (NIC)
Billy Mathews, Web Developer, PAE, National Institute of Corrections (NIC)

Migrating to a new ILS system is not easy, and it is even more challenging when faced with a very tight deadline. Presenters share the recent experience of migrating from SirsiDynix Symphony to Alma within 5 months: what worked, what didn’t, lessons learned, and what to prepare in advance of the migration. They also share some insight about post migration work related to data cleanup, workflows review, etc. Zoby and Mathews share their development of the NIC micro-sites using Drupal, an open-source content management software, to create dynamic websites that make accessing material easy and user-friendly. Instead of having to download and shift through large PDF documents, users can access the content on easily searchable websites which can be edited by authorized users. See how the NIC Information Center is using these sites to help customers and the public access information in innovative ways.

D202: Funding Opps for Digital Library Initiatives

11:45 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Trevor Owens, Digital Archivist, Office of Strategic Initiatives, Library Of Congress
Nicole Ferraiolo, Program Officer, Scholarly Resources, Council on Library & Information Resources
Joel Wurl, Senior Program Officer, National Endowment for the Humanities

Discovering and deciphering guidelines for grant programs is a daunting and challenging process. This session provides an opportunity to directly hear from and ask questions about grant opportunities for digital libraries’ initiatives to program officers from different government and private funders. Following brief overviews of the relevant funding opportunities at their organizations, panelists discuss the kinds of projects that best fit their specific programs. Get suggestions on how to develop a competitive proposal and insights on the application and review process. Panelists consider themes and trends from the digital library projects that have received funding, such as digitization, open educational resources, linked data, crowdsourcing, open access publishing, emulation and virtualization, and data visualization. By bringing together representatives from different funders, this session offers a unique opportunity to connect directly with program officers and identify new opportunities and approaches for funding.

A301: Augmented Reality & Learning

10:45 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Ashley Todd-Diaz, Head, Special Collections & University Archives, Towson University
Earl Givens, Head, Systems & Technology, Catawba College
Art Gutierrez, Head, Technical Services, Emporia State University
Bethanie O’Dell, Virtual Learning Librarian, Emporia State University

Just when you thought the battle of augmented reality (AR) was over with Pokémon GO, libraries across the nation have been exploring additional AR options in order to meet the needs of the mobile learners walking through their doors. With the use of free AR software, four individuals team up to become the ultimate masters of AR. Hear from a panel of closely networked professionals, each with a unique story of embedding AR into specific library services directed for higher education. These stories range from embedding AR with liaison departments to incorporating AR into information literacy sessions (both online and face-to-face).

A304: Multimodal Learning: From Textbooks to Playlists

2:45 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Laurie Burruss, Professor, Pasadena City College

Colleges, universities, and libraries are considering adding video making, or visual literacy, as a core skill. Preparing individuals for a highly visual communication landscape requires critical thinking to offset consumerism as well as multimodal learning and cognitive skills. Researching, creating, and sharing video playlists are important ways to create personalized learning pathways and promote continuous learning. Explore a number of case studies that demonstrate the positive learning outcomes of multimodal learning in academic and corporate settings and discover how to create playlists that can be annotated, edited, and shared across teams.

B304: Raspberry Pi

2:45 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

David Bennett, Systems Librarian, Robert Morris University

Raspberry Pi is an inexpensive computing tool that is ideal for new projects within libraries. It’s a powerful single board computer that plays high-definition video, yet it’s only the size of a credit card. The Raspberry Pi 3 was released in February of 2016, and the built-in networking options make it an exciting fit for library applications. Learn how Raspberry Pi can be used as a people counter, a dedicated OPAC, a social media tool, and more.

D302: Upping Our “Gamification”: Speaking Millennials’ Language

11:45 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

David Folmar, Emerging Technology Librarian, Main Branch, Richmond Public Library Author, Game It Up! Using Gamification to Incentivize Your Library

Be tech-smart and culture-savvy by using game-design thinking and gaming activities to connect with current users in a fun way and draw in new ones. Hear from a library communicator who literally wrote the book on this topic. Online games are incredibly popular; libraries, book apps, and learning institutions are leveraging this to bring in new audiences and engage with existing ones in new ways. Why are they doing this, what is the benefit, and how do you make it work to promote your library? Get the answers here!

D303: Library Story in Video

1:45 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Jennifer E. Burke, President, IntelliCraft Research, LLC

Video is a powerful, emotional storytelling medium that plays well in social media, and its use is still fast-growing. Video can spread your library’s story, and you can do it without hiring an expensive pro. A tech-savvy info pro shares basic video facts, along with her favorite tools, tips, and techniques that almost anyone can use for creating short, compelling videos to promote library services, staffers, and resources.

My note: my mouth ran dry to repeat this to the SCSU library. In vain. 1. make a low-cost social-media type of movie of 30 sec each week/month. 2. post on a prominent place on the library web page. 3. Have web form harvest info from patrons on the issu[s] reflected in the video 4. mirror video on the social media 5. aim as ultimate goal patrons (students, faculty, staff) furbishing the video footage instead of library staff
Why is it soooo difficult to comprehend?

E302: Zero to Maker: Invention Literacy & Mobile Memory Lab

11:45 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Dominique China, Information Services Librarian, Brampton Library
Colleen Dearborn, Adult Services Librarian, Alsip-Merrionette Park Library, Alsip, Ill.

Invention literacy is not just about understanding how a thing is made or how it works; it is also the ability to use that knowledge to bring one’s own ideas into reality. China gives examples of how one public library is empowering children, teens, and adults to become “invention-literate” through its maker programming. Find out how a combination of high- and low-tech equipment, safe and accessible learning environments, and a unique community partnership is nurturing invention, creative confidence, innovation, and entrepreneurship. Sparked by the CIL 2016 Hawkins and Mears talk about personal digital archiving and the DCPL Memory Lab, Dearborn shares her library’s inexpensive journey to create a mobile memory lab program. She discusses the acquisition of equipment and technology, the demo classes, lesson plans about personal archiving, outreach to other community organizations, and providing classes on related topics, such as saving and uploading images, backing up files and using cloud storage, writing and self-publishing memoirs, conducting oral interviews with veterans and other family memories, coding and saving memories on a website, etc. Future plans include digitizing local history documents, a community website with links to these documents, as well as to our patrons’ digitized images, videos, interviews and memoirs.

+++++++++++++++++++++
more on technology in library in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=technology+library

Technology Training for Library Staff

Please join us for this free webinar and learn fun and effective ways to develop technology skills amongst library staff:

Technology Training for Library Staff: Effective and Engaging Training Programs
Wednesday, January 27, 11:00am-12:00pm PST

Registration Link: https://cc.readytalk.com/r/lpbeog1w500a&eom

 

PPT Tech Skills Library Staff

How can we get library staff excited about learning new technology skills? How can libraries be better prepared to help the public with technology questions? How can staff go from tech shy to tech savvy? Designing an engaging technology training program can help all library staff get up to speed.

Join us for this free webinar to learn about two fun and engaging staff technology training programs in public libraries. Our guest panelists will share details of their programs, including success stories and lessons learned.

  • The Estes Valley Library dedicated six months to bringing every staff member up to technical literacy through trainings that were hands-on and fun. Tech Guide Diana Laughlin will share their Technology Competencies, the process they created for staff learning, and the way they approached staff accountability.
  • The Sunnyvale Public Library designed the True Tech Ninja program. Adult Services Librarian Rachel Schmidt will share how they created a gamified program to teach technology skills through seven stages. Team work was encouraged and rewarded, and library administration played a key role in motivating staff to learn.

This webinar will be recorded and archived on the TechSoup for Libraries website. Please register for this webinar to receive an email notification when the archive is available. Email questions to cschimpf@techsoupglobal.org

Register for this webinar here: https://cc.readytalk.com/r/lpbeog1w500a&eom

Crystal Schimpf

Webinar Producer, TechSoup for Libraries

 

my notes:

1PM, Wed, Jan 27. #ts4libs

librarians excited about tech stuff
Diana Laughlin

she from a small public library in a small (5K) town in Colorado.

tech scavenger hunt: complete tech tasks all around the lib; once a year.

The Invisible Digital Divide In Libraries

by https://twitter.com/sallyheroes

tech ninja training. 7 ninja skills. your first mission is to master the library web page. complete these three tasks.

(my note: using gaming and gamification techniques). and this is how this library improved their web site – through gamification and including ALL parties, whereas this SCSU library has a web committee, where a regular LRS employee (heaven forbid a regular student) to gain participation on its web page is very much the same as to gain access to the federal reserve.

@TechSoup4Libs
“Would you like fries like that?” aka the art of up-selling: Tell patrons about services they might not already know about! . like for example the digital literacy instruction and other technology technology sessions, which some of the LRS faculty offer, but for some reason, they fail to be promoted by the LRS librarians.

Technology Skills for Library Staff: Effective and Engaging Training Programs

Dear Plamen Miltenoff,

Thank you for attending our webinar! You can view the archive materials for this webinar by clicking the links on the right. Additional resources can be viewed at the links below. Be sure to sign up to receive the TechSoup for Libraries Newsletter.

Upcoming TechSoup Webinars:

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TechSoup:

 

Digitization and Libraries

Digitization and Libraries
Thursday, September 10, 2015
2 PM Eastern | 1 PM Central
12 PM Mountain | 11 AM Pacific

Digitization is a rapidly growing area of librarianship. Whether you’re a community repository or you need to digitize old materials to save space, the ability to start a digitization project is becoming an essential skill for the modern librarian.
Join us for a new episode of American Libraries Live, Digitization and Libraries. Our expert panel will discuss digitization in both broad and specific terms, looking at current trends and long-term implications for the library community.
Our panel will include:
• Susanne Caro, Government Documents Librarian at University of Montana, author and frequent speaker on digitization and librarianship
• Alyce Scott, Professor, School of Library & Information Science San Jose State University
Tune in for this free, streaming video broadcast! You can pre-register here for this free event (pre-registration assures you a reminder before the event), or go to http://www.americanlibrarieslive.org on September 10 at 2:00 p.m. (Eastern) to view.
We are pleased to welcome the School of Information (iSchool) at San José State University as a sponsor for this episode. The iSchool prepares individuals for careers as information professionals. Graduates work in diverse areas of the information profession, such as user experience design, digital asset management, information architecture, electronic records management, information governance, digital preservation, and librarianship. Based in the heart of Silicon Valley, the iSchool is the best place to learn online.
The iSchool’s Master of Library and Information Science (MLIS) degree program was named Outstanding Online Program by the Online Learning Consortium. This prestigious national award recognizes the school’s commitment to delivering innovative, convenient, 100% online learning solutions for students across the globe. Find out more about the iSchool’s award-winning online educational programs at ischool.sjsu.edu.

Creating a Library App

Creating a Library App: Things to Know Before You Go Mobile
Tuesday, April 28, 2015 11AM-12PM PDT
Registration link: http://www.cla-net.org/?861

Mobile apps are a popular topic in libraries. But what does it take to create one and what kind of programming can you do with apps? Is an app the right solution, or should you create a responsive website? What is the process like, and what resources are needed? How do you manage privacy, security, and legal concerns? Who do you need to get the job done, and what skills should they have?

These are all important questions that should be asked (and answered) before you think about creating a mobile app. Learn from expert panelists from libraries and nonprofits who have created, developed, and managed mobile apps for their organizations. Panelists will share practical advice and information based on experience, as well as helpful tools and resources.

Participants will learn:

  • The difference between a mobile app, a mobile site, and a responsive site
  • Three important considerations when deciding whether or not to create a mobile app.
  • Five tips for approaching the design of a mobile app, mobile site, or responsive site.

About the Presenters

  • Stacey Watson is the Senior Librarian and certified scrum Master in the Digital User Experience Department at the Denver Public Library.  She oversees the user experience and content strategy for the library’s websites, online catalog, and digital services. Most recently she and her team developed Volume, a responsive website featuring hand selected albums by local artists.
  • Anna Jaeger and her team at Caravan Studios create mobile apps that are designed in partnership with nonprofit and community-focused organizations to meet the needs of their constituents. Anna has been a frequent speaker on nonprofit and environmental technology since 2007. Prior to her work with Caravan Studios, Ms. Jaeger was a founder and co-director of TechSoup Global’s GreenTech initiative and the director of TechSoup Global’s IT Engineering department.
  • Ani Boyadjian has been a working librarian since 1990. An LAPL staffer since 1996, she is now Research & Special Collections Manager at the Los Angeles Public Library, where she also oversees the Library’s Digitization efforts. She most recently spearheaded the development of the ARchive LAPL app in a partnership with USC and app developers Neon Roots, to use augmented reality to tell stories about the historic Central Library.

IRDL proposal

Applications for the 2018 Institute will be accepted between December 1, 2017 and January 27, 2018. Scholars accepted to the program will be notified in early March 2018.

Title:

Learning to Harness Big Data in an Academic Library

Abstract (200)

Research on Big Data per se, as well as on the importance and organization of the process of Big Data collection and analysis, is well underway. The complexity of the process comprising “Big Data,” however, deprives organizations of ubiquitous “blue print.” The planning, structuring, administration and execution of the process of adopting Big Data in an organization, being that a corporate one or an educational one, remains an elusive one. No less elusive is the adoption of the Big Data practices among libraries themselves. Seeking the commonalities and differences in the adoption of Big Data practices among libraries may be a suitable start to help libraries transition to the adoption of Big Data and restructuring organizational and daily activities based on Big Data decisions.
Introduction to the problem. Limitations

The redefinition of humanities scholarship has received major attention in higher education. The advent of digital humanities challenges aspects of academic librarianship. Data literacy is a critical need for digital humanities in academia. The March 2016 Library Juice Academy Webinar led by John Russel exemplifies the efforts to help librarians become versed in obtaining programming skills, and respectively, handling data. Those are first steps on a rather long path of building a robust infrastructure to collect, analyze, and interpret data intelligently, so it can be utilized to restructure daily and strategic activities. Since the phenomenon of Big Data is young, there is a lack of blueprints on the organization of such infrastructure. A collection and sharing of best practices is an efficient approach to establishing a feasible plan for setting a library infrastructure for collection, analysis, and implementation of Big Data.
Limitations. This research can only organize the results from the responses of librarians and research into how libraries present themselves to the world in this arena. It may be able to make some rudimentary recommendations. However, based on each library’s specific goals and tasks, further research and work will be needed.

 

 

Research Literature

“Big data is like teenage sex: everyone talks about it, nobody really knows how to do it, everyone thinks everyone else is doing it, so everyone claims they are doing it…”
– Dan Ariely, 2013  https://www.asist.org/publications/bulletin/aprilmay-2017/big-datas-impact-on-privacy-for-librarians-and-information-professionals/

Big Data is becoming an omnipresent term. It is widespread among different disciplines in academia (De Mauro, Greco, & Grimaldi, 2016). This leads to “inconsistency in meanings and necessity for formal definitions” (De Mauro et al, 2016, p. 122). Similarly, to De Mauro et al (2016), Hashem, Yaqoob, Anuar, Mokhtar, Gani and Ullah Khan (2015) seek standardization of definitions. The main connected “themes” of this phenomenon must be identified and the connections to Library Science must be sought. A prerequisite for a comprehensive definition is the identification of Big Data methods. Bughin, Chui, Manyika (2011), Chen et al. (2012) and De Mauro et al (2015) single out the methods to complete the process of building a comprehensive definition.

In conjunction with identifying the methods, volume, velocity, and variety, as defined by Laney (2001), are the three properties of Big Data accepted across the literature. Daniel (2015) defines three stages in big data: collection, analysis, and visualization. According to Daniel, (2015), Big Data in higher education “connotes the interpretation of a wide range of administrative and operational data” (p. 910) and according to Hilbert (2013), as cited in Daniel (2015), Big Data “delivers a cost-effective prospect to improve decision making” (p. 911).

The importance of understanding the process of Big Data analytics is well understood in academic libraries. An example of such “administrative and operational” use for cost-effective improvement of decision making are the Finch & Flenner (2016) and Eaton (2017) case studies of the use of data visualization to assess an academic library collection and restructure the acquisition process. Sugimoto, Ding & Thelwall (2012) call for the discussion of Big Data for libraries. According to the 2017 NMC Horizon Report “Big Data has become a major focus of academic and research libraries due to the rapid evolution of data mining technologies and the proliferation of data sources like mobile devices and social media” (Adams, Becker, et al., 2017, p. 38).

Power (2014) elaborates on the complexity of Big Data in regard to decision-making and offers ideas for organizations on building a system to deal with Big Data. As explained by Boyd and Crawford (2012) and cited in De Mauro et al (2016), there is a danger of a new digital divide among organizations with different access and ability to process data. Moreover, Big Data impacts current organizational entities in their ability to reconsider their structure and organization. The complexity of institutions’ performance under the impact of Big Data is further complicated by the change of human behavior, because, arguably, Big Data affects human behavior itself (Schroeder, 2014).

De Mauro et al (2015) touch on the impact of Dig Data on libraries. The reorganization of academic libraries considering Big Data and the handling of Big Data by libraries is in a close conjunction with the reorganization of the entire campus and the handling of Big Data by the educational institution. In additional to the disruption posed by the Big Data phenomenon, higher education is facing global changes of economic, technological, social, and educational character. Daniel (2015) uses a chart to illustrate the complexity of these global trends. Parallel to the Big Data developments in America and Asia, the European Union is offering access to an EU open data portal (https://data.europa.eu/euodp/home ). Moreover, the Association of European Research Libraries expects under the H2020 program to increase “the digitization of cultural heritage, digital preservation, research data sharing, open access policies and the interoperability of research infrastructures” (Reilly, 2013).

The challenges posed by Big Data to human and social behavior (Schroeder, 2014) are no less significant to the impact of Big Data on learning. Cohen, Dolan, Dunlap, Hellerstein, & Welton (2009) propose a road map for “more conservative organizations” (p. 1492) to overcome their reservations and/or inability to handle Big Data and adopt a practical approach to the complexity of Big Data. Two Chinese researchers assert deep learning as the “set of machine learning techniques that learn multiple levels of representation in deep architectures (Chen & Lin, 2014, p. 515). Deep learning requires “new ways of thinking and transformative solutions (Chen & Lin, 2014, p. 523). Another pair of researchers from China present a broad overview of the various societal, business and administrative applications of Big Data, including a detailed account and definitions of the processes and tools accompanying Big Data analytics.  The American counterparts of these Chinese researchers are of the same opinion when it comes to “think about the core principles and concepts that underline the techniques, and also the systematic thinking” (Provost and Fawcett, 2013, p. 58). De Mauro, Greco, and Grimaldi (2016), similarly to Provost and Fawcett (2013) draw attention to the urgent necessity to train new types of specialists to work with such data. As early as 2012, Davenport and Patil (2012), as cited in Mauro et al (2016), envisioned hybrid specialists able to manage both technological knowledge and academic research. Similarly, Provost and Fawcett (2013) mention the efforts of “academic institutions scrambling to put together programs to train data scientists” (p. 51). Further, Asomoah, Sharda, Zadeh & Kalgotra (2017) share a specific plan on the design and delivery of a big data analytics course. At the same time, librarians working with data acknowledge the shortcomings in the profession, since librarians “are practitioners first and generally do not view usability as a primary job responsibility, usually lack the depth of research skills needed to carry out a fully valid” data-based research (Emanuel, 2013, p. 207).

Borgman (2015) devotes an entire book to data and scholarly research and goes beyond the already well-established facts regarding the importance of Big Data, the implications of Big Data and the technical, societal, and educational impact and complications posed by Big Data. Borgman elucidates the importance of knowledge infrastructure and the necessity to understand the importance and complexity of building such infrastructure, in order to be able to take advantage of Big Data. In a similar fashion, a team of Chinese scholars draws attention to the complexity of data mining and Big Data and the necessity to approach the issue in an organized fashion (Wu, Xhu, Wu, Ding, 2014).

Bruns (2013) shifts the conversation from the “macro” architecture of Big Data, as focused by Borgman (2015) and Wu et al (2014) and ponders over the influx and unprecedented opportunities for humanities in academia with the advent of Big Data. Does the seemingly ubiquitous omnipresence of Big Data mean for humanities a “railroading” into “scientificity”? How will research and publishing change with the advent of Big Data across academic disciplines?

Reyes (2015) shares her “skinny” approach to Big Data in education. She presents a comprehensive structure for educational institutions to shift “traditional” analytics to “learner-centered” analytics (p. 75) and identifies the participants in the Big Data process in the organization. The model is applicable for library use.

Being a new and unchartered territory, Big Data and Big Data analytics can pose ethical issues. Willis (2013) focusses on Big Data application in education, namely the ethical questions for higher education administrators and the expectations of Big Data analytics to predict students’ success.  Daries, Reich, Waldo, Young, and Whittinghill (2014) discuss rather similar issues regarding the balance between data and student privacy regulations. The privacy issues accompanying data are also discussed by Tene and Polonetsky, (2013).

Privacy issues are habitually connected to security and surveillance issues. Andrejevic and Gates (2014) point out in a decision making “generated by data mining, the focus is not on particular individuals but on aggregate outcomes” (p. 195). Van Dijck (2014) goes into further details regarding the perils posed by metadata and data to the society, in particular to the privacy of citizens. Bail (2014) addresses the same issue regarding the impact of Big Data on societal issues, but underlines the leading roles of cultural sociologists and their theories for the correct application of Big Data.

Library organizations have been traditional proponents of core democratic values such as protection of privacy and elucidation of related ethical questions (Miltenoff & Hauptman, 2005). In recent books about Big Data and libraries, ethical issues are important part of the discussion (Weiss, 2018). Library blogs also discuss these issues (Harper & Oltmann, 2017). An academic library’s role is to educate its patrons about those values. Sugimoto et al (2012) reflect on the need for discussion about Big Data in Library and Information Science. They clearly draw attention to the library “tradition of organizing, managing, retrieving, collecting, describing, and preserving information” (p.1) as well as library and information science being “a historically interdisciplinary and collaborative field, absorbing the knowledge of multiple domains and bringing the tools, techniques, and theories” (p. 1). Sugimoto et al (2012) sought a wide discussion among the library profession regarding the implications of Big Data on the profession, no differently from the activities in other fields (e.g., Wixom, Ariyachandra, Douglas, Goul, Gupta, Iyer, Kulkami, Mooney, Phillips-Wren, Turetken, 2014). A current Andrew Mellon Foundation grant for Visualizing Digital Scholarship in Libraries seeks an opportunity to view “both macro and micro perspectives, multi-user collaboration and real-time data interaction, and a limitless number of visualization possibilities – critical capabilities for rapidly understanding today’s large data sets (Hwangbo, 2014).

The importance of the library with its traditional roles, as described by Sugimoto et al (2012) may continue, considering the Big Data platform proposed by Wu, Wu, Khabsa, Williams, Chen, Huang, Tuarob, Choudhury, Ororbia, Mitra, & Giles (2014). Such platforms will continue to emerge and be improved, with librarians as the ultimate drivers of such platforms and as the mediators between the patrons and the data generated by such platforms.

Every library needs to find its place in the large organization and in society in regard to this very new and very powerful phenomenon called Big Data. Libraries might not have the trained staff to become a leader in the process of organizing and building the complex mechanism of this new knowledge architecture, but librarians must educate and train themselves to be worthy participants in this new establishment.

 

Method

 

The study will be cleared by the SCSU IRB.
The survey will collect responses from library population and it readiness to use and use of Big Data.  Send survey URL to (academic?) libraries around the world.

Data will be processed through SPSS. Open ended results will be processed manually. The preliminary research design presupposes a mixed method approach.

The study will include the use of closed-ended survey response questions and open-ended questions.  The first part of the study (close ended, quantitative questions) will be completed online through online survey. Participants will be asked to complete the survey using a link they receive through e-mail.

Mixed methods research was defined by Johnson and Onwuegbuzie (2004) as “the class of research where the researcher mixes or combines quantitative and qualitative research techniques, methods, approaches, concepts, or language into a single study” (Johnson & Onwuegbuzie, 2004 , p. 17).  Quantitative and qualitative methods can be combined, if used to complement each other because the methods can measure different aspects of the research questions (Sale, Lohfeld, & Brazil, 2002).

 

Sampling design

 

  • Online survey of 10-15 question, with 3-5 demographic and the rest regarding the use of tools.
  • 1-2 open-ended questions at the end of the survey to probe for follow-up mixed method approach (an opportunity for qualitative study)
  • data analysis techniques: survey results will be exported to SPSS and analyzed accordingly. The final survey design will determine the appropriate statistical approach.

 

Project Schedule

 

Complete literature review and identify areas of interest – two months

Prepare and test instrument (survey) – month

IRB and other details – month

Generate a list of potential libraries to distribute survey – month

Contact libraries. Follow up and contact again, if necessary (low turnaround) – month

Collect, analyze data – two months

Write out data findings – month

Complete manuscript – month

Proofreading and other details – month

 

Significance of the work 

While it has been widely acknowledged that Big Data (and its handling) is changing higher education (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=big+data) as well as academic libraries (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/03/29/analytics-in-education/), it remains nebulous how Big Data is handled in the academic library and, respectively, how it is related to the handling of Big Data on campus. Moreover, the visualization of Big Data between units on campus remains in progress, along with any policymaking based on the analysis of such data (hence the need for comprehensive visualization).

 

This research will aim to gain an understanding on: a. how librarians are handling Big Data; b. how are they relating their Big Data output to the campus output of Big Data and c. how librarians in particular and campus administration in general are tuning their practices based on the analysis.

Based on the survey returns (if there is a statistically significant return), this research might consider juxtaposing the practices from academic libraries, to practices from special libraries (especially corporate libraries), public and school libraries.

 

 

References:

 

Adams Becker, S., Cummins M, Davis, A., Freeman, A., Giesinger Hall, C., Ananthanarayanan, V., … Wolfson, N. (2017). NMC Horizon Report: 2017 Library Edition.

Andrejevic, M., & Gates, K. (2014). Big Data Surveillance: Introduction. Surveillance & Society, 12(2), 185–196.

Asamoah, D. A., Sharda, R., Hassan Zadeh, A., & Kalgotra, P. (2017). Preparing a Data Scientist: A Pedagogic Experience in Designing a Big Data Analytics Course. Decision Sciences Journal of Innovative Education, 15(2), 161–190. https://doi.org/10.1111/dsji.12125

Bail, C. A. (2014). The cultural environment: measuring culture with big data. Theory and Society, 43(3–4), 465–482. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11186-014-9216-5

Borgman, C. L. (2015). Big Data, Little Data, No Data: Scholarship in the Networked World. MIT Press.

Bruns, A. (2013). Faster than the speed of print: Reconciling ‘big data’ social media analysis and academic scholarship. First Monday, 18(10). Retrieved from http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/4879

Bughin, J., Chui, M., & Manyika, J. (2010). Clouds, big data, and smart assets: Ten tech-enabled business trends to watch. McKinsey Quarterly, 56(1), 75–86.

Chen, X. W., & Lin, X. (2014). Big Data Deep Learning: Challenges and Perspectives. IEEE Access, 2, 514–525. https://doi.org/10.1109/ACCESS.2014.2325029

Cohen, J., Dolan, B., Dunlap, M., Hellerstein, J. M., & Welton, C. (2009). MAD Skills: New Analysis Practices for Big Data. Proc. VLDB Endow., 2(2), 1481–1492. https://doi.org/10.14778/1687553.1687576

Daniel, B. (2015). Big Data and analytics in higher education: Opportunities and challenges. British Journal of Educational Technology, 46(5), 904–920. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.12230

Daries, J. P., Reich, J., Waldo, J., Young, E. M., Whittinghill, J., Ho, A. D., … Chuang, I. (2014). Privacy, Anonymity, and Big Data in the Social Sciences. Commun. ACM, 57(9), 56–63. https://doi.org/10.1145/2643132

De Mauro, A. D., Greco, M., & Grimaldi, M. (2016). A formal definition of Big Data based on its essential features. Library Review, 65(3), 122–135. https://doi.org/10.1108/LR-06-2015-0061

De Mauro, A., Greco, M., & Grimaldi, M. (2015). What is big data? A consensual definition and a review of key research topics. AIP Conference Proceedings, 1644(1), 97–104. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4907823

Dumbill, E. (2012). Making Sense of Big Data. Big Data, 1(1), 1–2. https://doi.org/10.1089/big.2012.1503

Eaton, M. (2017). Seeing Library Data: A Prototype Data Visualization Application for Librarians. Publications and Research. Retrieved from http://academicworks.cuny.edu/kb_pubs/115

Emanuel, J. (2013). Usability testing in libraries: methods, limitations, and implications. OCLC Systems & Services: International Digital Library Perspectives, 29(4), 204–217. https://doi.org/10.1108/OCLC-02-2013-0009

Graham, M., & Shelton, T. (2013). Geography and the future of big data, big data and the future of geography. Dialogues in Human Geography, 3(3), 255–261. https://doi.org/10.1177/2043820613513121

Harper, L., & Oltmann, S. (2017, April 2). Big Data’s Impact on Privacy for Librarians and Information Professionals. Retrieved November 7, 2017, from https://www.asist.org/publications/bulletin/aprilmay-2017/big-datas-impact-on-privacy-for-librarians-and-information-professionals/

Hashem, I. A. T., Yaqoob, I., Anuar, N. B., Mokhtar, S., Gani, A., & Ullah Khan, S. (2015). The rise of “big data” on cloud computing: Review and open research issues. Information Systems, 47(Supplement C), 98–115. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.is.2014.07.006

Hwangbo, H. (2014, October 22). The future of collaboration: Large-scale visualization. Retrieved November 7, 2017, from http://usblogs.pwc.com/emerging-technology/the-future-of-collaboration-large-scale-visualization/

Laney, D. (2001, February 6). 3D Data Management: Controlling Data Volume, Velocity, and Variety.

Miltenoff, P., & Hauptman, R. (2005). Ethical dilemmas in libraries: an international perspective. The Electronic Library, 23(6), 664–670. https://doi.org/10.1108/02640470510635746

Philip Chen, C. L., & Zhang, C.-Y. (2014). Data-intensive applications, challenges, techniques and technologies: A survey on Big Data. Information Sciences, 275(Supplement C), 314–347. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ins.2014.01.015

Power, D. J. (2014). Using ‘Big Data’ for analytics and decision support. Journal of Decision Systems, 23(2), 222–228. https://doi.org/10.1080/12460125.2014.888848

Provost, F., & Fawcett, T. (2013). Data Science and its Relationship to Big Data and Data-Driven Decision Making. Big Data, 1(1), 51–59. https://doi.org/10.1089/big.2013.1508

Reilly, S. (2013, December 12). What does Horizon 2020 mean for research libraries? Retrieved November 7, 2017, from http://libereurope.eu/blog/2013/12/12/what-does-horizon-2020-mean-for-research-libraries/

Reyes, J. (2015). The skinny on big data in education: Learning analytics simplified. TechTrends: Linking Research & Practice to Improve Learning, 59(2), 75–80. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11528-015-0842-1

Schroeder, R. (2014). Big Data and the brave new world of social media research. Big Data & Society, 1(2), 2053951714563194. https://doi.org/10.1177/2053951714563194

Sugimoto, C. R., Ding, Y., & Thelwall, M. (2012). Library and information science in the big data era: Funding, projects, and future [a panel proposal]. Proceedings of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 49(1), 1–3. https://doi.org/10.1002/meet.14504901187

Tene, O., & Polonetsky, J. (2012). Big Data for All: Privacy and User Control in the Age of Analytics. Northwestern Journal of Technology and Intellectual Property, 11, [xxvii]-274.

van Dijck, J. (2014). Datafication, dataism and dataveillance: Big Data between scientific paradigm and ideology. Surveillance & Society; Newcastle upon Tyne, 12(2), 197–208.

Waller, M. A., & Fawcett, S. E. (2013). Data Science, Predictive Analytics, and Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform Supply Chain Design and Management. Journal of Business Logistics, 34(2), 77–84. https://doi.org/10.1111/jbl.12010

Weiss, A. (2018). Big-Data-Shocks-An-Introduction-to-Big-Data-for-Librarians-and-Information-Professionals. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/ISBN/9781538103227/Big-Data-Shocks-An-Introduction-to-Big-Data-for-Librarians-and-Information-Professionals

West, D. M. (2012). Big data for education: Data mining, data analytics, and web dashboards. Governance Studies at Brookings, 4, 1–0.

Willis, J. (2013). Ethics, Big Data, and Analytics: A Model for Application. Educause Review Online. Retrieved from https://docs.lib.purdue.edu/idcpubs/1

Wixom, B., Ariyachandra, T., Douglas, D. E., Goul, M., Gupta, B., Iyer, L. S., … Turetken, O. (2014). The current state of business intelligence in academia: The arrival of big data. CAIS, 34, 1.

Wu, X., Zhu, X., Wu, G. Q., & Ding, W. (2014). Data mining with big data. IEEE Transactions on Knowledge and Data Engineering, 26(1), 97–107. https://doi.org/10.1109/TKDE.2013.109

Wu, Z., Wu, J., Khabsa, M., Williams, K., Chen, H. H., Huang, W., … Giles, C. L. (2014). Towards building a scholarly big data platform: Challenges, lessons and opportunities. In IEEE/ACM Joint Conference on Digital Libraries (pp. 117–126). https://doi.org/10.1109/JCDL.2014.6970157

 

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more on big data





Collecting, Preserving, and Transforming the News

: National Library of Iceland http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/iceland/

Collecting, Preserving, and Transforming the News

Conference website: https://ifla2017.landsbokasafn.is/

Organizers: National Library of Iceland, IFLA News Media Section (http://www.ifla.org/news-media), and IFLA Information Technology Section

(http://www.ifla.org/it)

Theme & sub-themes

From printed newspapers to born-digital news, libraries and other cultural heritage institutions have a central role in ensuring future access to news content. This conference will examine issues and challenges in collecting and preserving the news and making it available to users. Do access and preservation have different prerequisites? In addition, the conference will explore how news media is used and transformed by researchers and the public.

Can we recognize variable user needs? Do we offer the most suitable APIs?

Proposals should address the main theme and related topics, including but not limited to:

Users’ experiences with digital newspaper collections and their usability expectations

Case studies of patron services for digitized and born-digital news (e.g., management systems, reading devices, printout services, etc.)

How digitized news collections are being used in the digital humanities, by researchers, and by the public

The importance and possibilities of citizen science

Long-term sustainability planning for news collections and the role of institutional commitment in preservation and sustainability planning

How institutions make digital newspaper collections freely accessible

Rules, regulations, or legislation for mandatory deposit of news content, paper or otherwise

Legal deposit libraries offering access to in-copyright digitized newspapers

National Libraries co-operating with newspaper publishing houses in digitization, access, etc.

Data research that benefits preservation practice and planning

Changing collection building in a social media and online world

New methods for media monitoring

Harvesting and preservation of web-only news content

Issues around suppression of digitized/digital news content and take down orders

Other proposals relevant to the main conference theme will also be considered.

Note: Papers from this conference will be considered for a special issue of IFLA Journal. All authors will be invited to use feedback from the conference to revise their work and submit it for peer review in collaboration with the IFLA Journal editorial committee and the conference organizing committee.

Submission Guidelines

Proposal abstracts should be submitted as an MS Word file. Proposal abstracts must be submitted by 27 January 2017, must be in English, and should clearly

include:

Title of proposed paper

Abstract of proposed paper (no more than 300 words)

Name(s) of presenter(s) plus position and/or title

Employer / affiliated institution

Contact information including e-mail address and telephone number

Short biographical statement(s) of presenter(s)

Proposal abstracts should be emailed to all conference committee members:

Minna Kaukonen (minna.kaukonen@helsinki.fi)

Edmund Balnaves (ebalnaves@prosentient.com.au)

Mary Feeney (mfeeney@email.arizona.edu)

Örn Hrafnkelsson (orn@landsbokasafn.is)

Ana Krahmer (ana.krahmer@unt.edu)

Kazuo Takehana (k-takeha@ndl.go.jp)

Kopana Terry (kopana.terry@uky.edu)

Selected presenters will be notified by 3 February 2017. To discuss any matter relating to this Call for Papers, please contact the conference committee members listed above.

Accepted papers

Complete accepted papers should be 3000-6000 words in length and be an original submission not published elsewhere.

Complete accepted papers and accompanying presentation slides must be submitted by 17 April 2017.

Final papers should be written in English.

The papers will be made available on the Conference Website and the News Media Section Website under theCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 license.

Approximately 20 minutes will be allowed for the presentation of the paper.

Registration

Registration information will be posted on the Conference Website at the beginning of 2017.

Important dates

27 January 2017 Proposal abstracts due

3 February 2017 Acceptance notices sent to authors

10 February 2017 Start of registration

10 April 2017 Completed papers and presentations submitted

27-28 April 2017 Conference

Please note The Programme Committee regrets that it has no funding to assist prospective authors and the submission of an abstract must be on the understanding that the costs of attending the conference including registration, travel, accommodation and other expenses, are the responsibility of the presenters of the accepted papers, or their institutions. No financial support can be provided by IFLA, but a special invitation can be issued to authors.

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more about “news” in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=news

Creating a Library App: Things to Know Before You Go Mobile
Tuesday, April 28, 2015 11AM-12PM PDT
Registration link: http://www.cla-net.org/?861

Mobile apps are a popular topic in libraries. But what does it take to create one and what kind of programming can you do with apps? Is an app the right solution, or should you create a responsive website? What is the process like, and what resources are needed? How do you manage privacy, security, and legal concerns? Who do you need to get the job done, and what skills should they have?
These are all important questions that should be asked (and answered) before you think about creating a mobile app. Learn from expert panelists from libraries and nonprofits who have created, developed, and managed mobile apps for their organizations. Panelists will share practical advice and information based on experience, as well as helpful tools and resources.

Zeth Lietzau is the Manager of Digital User Experience and the Community Technology Center at the Denver Public Library. He’s the leader of their Virtual Services initiative, which defines the direction of DPL’s online services, mobile & otherwise, including the Volume Denver project which is available as a mobile-responsive site.
A303_Lietzau Makers, Hackers, and Badges at the Denver Public Library

Anna Jaeger and her team at Caravan Studios create mobile apps that are designed in partnership with nonprofit and community-focused organizations to meet the needs of their constituents. Anna has been a frequent speaker on nonprofit and environmental technology since 2007. Prior to her work with Caravan Studios, Ms. Jaeger was a founder and co-director of TechSoup Global’s GreenTech initiative and the director of TechSoup Global’s IT Engineering department.
https://cc.readytalk.com/cc/s/meetingArchive?eventId=li2t1jz4hoy6

Ani Boyadjian has been a working librarian since 1990. An LAPL staffer since 1996, she is now Research & Special Collections Manager at the Los Angeles Public Library, where she also oversees the Library’s Digitization efforts. She most recently spearheaded the development of the ARchive LAPL app in a partnership with USC and app developers Neon Roots, to use augmented reality to tell stories about the historic Central Library.

More on mobile apps in general on this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=mobile+apps

2015 IFLA International News Media Conference

Transformation of the Online News Media: Implications for Preservation and Access

Dates & location: 15-16 April 2015 – The National Library of Sweden, Stockholm, Sweden

Conference web site: http://www.kb.se/aktuellt/utbildningar/2015/IFLA-International-News-Media-Conference-/

Registration 6 February – 27 March: https://www.etouches.com/2015iflanewsmediaconference

News media material published online is an important first draft of history as the printed newspaper and broadcast news has been and still is. The digital transformation of news multiplies the usage and current online news media constantly develop new channels and modes of communication, redefine the roles of all stakeholders and transform the news in an infinite process.

The IFLA 2015 International News Media Conference 15-16 April 2015 has as its focus the transformation aspects of born digital news media and the implications for long term archiving and access, including issues of e-legal deposit of online news media and long term access to and preservation of news databases, web harvesting of online news media and user experiences with born digital news media collections.

Registration fee is 95 Euros and includes Evening reception 14 April, Light lunches 15-16 April and Dinner 15 April. The detailed programme will be posted on the conference web site and will include speakers from all over the world and tours of the library.

Organizers of the conference are IFLA News Media (Newspapers) Section.

(http://www.ifla.org/news-media) and IFLA Audiovisual and Multimedia Section (http://www.ifla.org/avms). The conference is hosted by the National Library of Sweden, Stockholm Sweden.

The day before and in conjunction with the conference, April 14, the Center for Research Libraries (Chicago, USA;http://www.crl.edu/) will hold an International Newspaper Archiving and Digitization Summit with major actors in the newspaper digitization community to consider a strategic, cooperative approach to future digitization efforts of the world’s legacy news collections.)

For further information about the conference, please contact: Pär Nilsson (email: par.nilsson@kb.se, ph: +46 10 709 34 04) Karl Isaksson (email: karl.isaksson@kb.se, ph: +46 10 709 36 34)

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