Searching for "edpuzzle"

Kahoot and Edpuzzle

Workshop on Kahoot and Edpuzzle, Tuesday, March 21, 2PM, MC 205

Matt Barton delivers Edpuzzle:

https://www.facebook.com/InforMediaServices/videos/1141474562629706/
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more on Edpuzzle in this blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=edpuzzle

Flipped Lessons Through EDPuzzle: How to Create & Distribute

How to Create & Distribute Flipped Lessons Through EDPuzzle

EDpuzzle is a neat tool that allows you to add your voice and text questions to educational videos. On EDpuzzle you can search for educational videos and or upload your own videos to use as the basis of your lesson. EDpuzzle has an online classroom component that you can use to assign videos to students and track their progress through your video lessons.

http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2015/02/how-to-create-distribute-flipped.html?m=1

media literacy part of digital citizenship

Making Media Literacy Central to Digital Citizenship

that kind of tech — expensive, bleeding-edge tools — makes headlines but doesn’t make it into many classrooms, especially the most needy ones. What does, however, is video.

68 percent of teachers are using video in their classrooms, and 74 percent of middle schoolers are watching videos for learning.

Video is a key aspect of our always-online attention economy that’s impacting votingbehavior, and fueling hate speech and trolling. Put simply: Video is a contested civic space.

We need to move from a conflation of digital citizenship with internet safety and protectionism to a view of digital citizenship that’s pro-active and prioritizes media literacy and savvy.

equip students with some essential questions they can use to unpack the intentions of anything they encounter. One way to facilitate this thinking is by using a tool like EdPuzzle

We need new ways of thinking that are web-specific. Mike Caulfield’s e-book is a great deep dive into this topic, but as an introduction to web literacy you might first dig into the notion of reading “around” as well as “down” media — that is, encouraging students to not just analyze the specific video or site they’re looking at but related content (e.g., where else an image appears using a reverse Google image search).

Active viewing — engaging more thoughtfully and deeply with what you watch — is a tried-and-true teaching strategy for making sure you don’t just watch media but retain information.

For this content, students shouldn’t just be working toward comprehension but critique; they need to not just understand what they watch, but also have something to say about it. One of my favorite techniques for facilitating this more dialogic and critical mode of video viewing is by using aclassroom backchannel, like TodaysMeet, during video viewings

only 3 percent of the time tweens and teens spend using social media is focused on creation

There are a ton of options out there for facilitating video creation and remix, but two of my favorites are MediaBreaker and Vidcode.

The Anti-Defamation League and Teaching Tolerance have lesson plans that connect to both past and present struggles, and one can also look to the co-created syllabi that have sprung up around Black Lives MatterCharlottesville, and beyond. Pair these resources with video creation tools,

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more on media literacy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=media+literacy

more on digital citizenship in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+citizenship

digital assessment session for SCSU faculty

please consider the following opportunities:

  1. Remote attendance through : https://webmeeting.minnstate.edu/collaborate
  2. Recording of the session: (URL will be shared after the session)
  3. Request a follow up meeting for your individual project: https://doodle.com/digitalliteracy

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more on digital assessment in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=edpuzzle

digital assessment

Unlocking the Promise of Digital Assessment

By Stacey Newbern Dammann, EdD, and Josh DeSantis October 30, 2017

https://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/teaching-with-technology-articles/unlocking-promise-digital-assessment/

The proliferation of mobile devices and the adoption of learning applications in higher education simplifies formative assessment. Professors can, for example, quickly create a multi-modal performance that requires students to write, draw, read, and watch video within the same assessment. Other tools allow for automatic grade responses, question-embedded documents, and video-based discussion.

  • Multi-Modal Assessments – create multiple-choice and open-ended items that are distributed digitally and assessed automatically. Student responses can be viewed instantaneously and downloaded to a spreadsheet for later use.
    • (socrative.com) and
    • Poll Everywhere (http://www.pollev.com).
    • Formative (http://www.goformative.com) allows professors to upload charts or graphic organizers that students can draw on with a stylus. Formative also allows professors to upload document “worksheets” which can then be augmented with multiple-choice and open-ended questions.
    • Nearpod (http://www.nearpod.com) allows professors to upload their digital presentations and create digital quizzes to accompany them. Nearpod also allows professors to share three-dimensional field trips and models to help communicate ideas.
  • Video-Based Assessments – Question-embedded videos are an outstanding way to improve student engagement in blended or flipped instructional contexts. Using these tools allows professors to identify if the videos they use or create are being viewed by students.
    • EdPuzzle (edpuzzle.com) and
    • Playposit (http://www.playposit.com) are two leaders in this application category. A second type of video-based assessment allows professors to sustain discussion-board like conversation with brief videos.
    • Flipgrid (http://www.flipgrid.com), for example, allows professors to posit a video question to which students may respond with their own video responses.
  • Quizzing Assessments – ools that utilize close-ended questions that provide a quick check of student understanding are also available.
    • Quizizz (quizizz.com) and
    • Kahoot (http://www.kahoot.com) are relatively quick and convenient to use as a wrap up to instruction or a review of concepts taught.

Integration of technology is aligned to sound formative assessment design. Formative assessment is most valuable when it addresses student understanding, progress toward competencies or standards, and indicates concepts that need further attention for mastery. Additionally, formative assessment provides the instructor with valuable information on gaps in their students’ learning which can imply instructional changes or additional coverage of key concepts. The use of tech tools can make the creation, administration, and grading of formative assessment more efficient and can enhance reliability of assessments when used consistently in the classroom. Selecting one that effectively addresses your assessment needs and enhances your teaching style is critical.

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more on digital assessment in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/03/15/fake-news-bib/

interactivity for the library

In 2015, former library dean purchased two large touch-screen monitors (I believe paid $3000 each). Shortly before that, I had offered to the campus fitting applications for touch screens (being that large screens or mobiles):

Both applications fit perfect the idea of interactivity in teaching (and learning) – http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=interactivity

With the large touch screens, I proposed to have one of the large screens, positioned outside in the Miller Center lobby and used as a dummy terminal (50” + screens run around $700) to mount educational material (e.g. Guenter Grass’s celebration of his work: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/04/15/gunter-grass-1927-2015/ ) and have students explore by actively engaging, rather than just passively absorbing information. The bus-awaiting students are excellent potential users and they visibly are NOT engaged by by the currently broadcasted information on these screens, but can be potentially engaged if such information is restructured in interactive content.

The initial library administration approval was stalled by a concern with students “opening porno sites” while the library is closed which, indeed, would have been a problem.

My 2015 inquiry with the IT technicians about freezing a browser and a specific tab, which could prevent such issues, but it did not go far (pls see solution below). Failing to secure relatively frigid environment on the touch screen, the project was quietly left to rot.

I am renewing my proposal to consider the rather expensive touch screen monitors, which have been not utilized to their potential, and test my idea to engage students in a meaningful knowledge-building by using these applications to either create content or engage with content created by others.

Further, I am proposing that I investigate with campus faculty the possibility to bring the endeavor a step further by having a regularly-meeting group to develop engaging content using these and similar apps; for their own classes or any other [campus-related] activities. The incentive can be some reward, after users and creators “vote” the best (semester? Academic year?) project. The less conspicuous benefit will be the exposure of faculty to modern technology; some of the faculty are still abiding by lecturing style, other faculty, who seek interactivity are engulfed in the “smart board” fiction. Engaging the faculty in the touch screen creation of teaching materials will allow them to expand the practice to their and their students’ mobile devices. The benefit for the library will be the “hub” of activities, where faculty can learn from each other experience[s] in the library, rather than in their own departments/school only. The reward will be an incentive from the upper administration (document to attach in PDR?). I will need both your involvement/support. Tom Hergert by helping me rally faculty interest and the administrators incentivizing faculty to participate in the initial project, until it gains momentum and recognition.

In the same fashion, as part of the aforementioned group or separate, I would like to host a regularly-meeting group of students, who besides play and entertainment, aim the same process of creating interactive learning materials for their classes/projects. Same “best voted” process by peers. My preferable reward: upper administration is leaving recommendation in the students’ Linkedin account for future employers. I will need both your involvement/support. The student union can be decisive in bringing students to this endeavor.  Both of you have more cloud with the student union then only a regular faculty such as me.

In regard to the security (porn alert, see above) I have the agreement of Dr. Tirthankar Ghos with the IS Department. Dr. Ghosh will be most pleased to announce as a class project the provision of a secure environment for the touch screen monitor to be left after the group meetings for “use” by students in the library. Dr. Ghosh is, however, concerned/uncertain with the level of cooperation from IT, considering that for his students to enable such environment, they have to have the “right” access; namely behind firewalls, administrative privileges etc. Each of you will definitely be more persuasive with Phil Thorson convincing him in the merit of having IS student work with SCSU IT technician, since it is a win-win situation: the IT technician does not have to “waste time” (as in 2015) and resolve an issue and the IS student will be having a project-based, real-life learning experience by enabling the project under the supervision of the IT technician. Besides: a. student-centered, project-based learning; b. IT technician time saved, we also aim c. no silos / collaborative SCSU working environment, as promised by the reorganization process.

post portion of video

How to Share a Portion of a YouTube Video

http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2017/09/how-to-share-portion-of-youtube-video.html

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more on video editing in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=video+editing

more on EdPuzzle in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=edpuzzle

more on YouTube in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=youtube

youtube Captivate:

apester

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compare Apester (https://app.apester.com/) to Kahoot (https://getkahoot.com/) and EdPuzzle (https://edpuzzle.com/)


(EdPuzzle needs an account)

https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/21379a63-b67c-4897-a2cd-66e7d1c83027
(you need to let me know, if you want to test it, since Kahoot is ONLY synchronous)

Apеster (https://app.apester.com/): can be played asynchronously (yet, restricted in time). Kahoot is a simultaneous game. EdPuzzle also lke Apester can be asynchronous, but like Kahoot requires an account, whereas Apester can be played by anyone.

Apester (https://app.apester.com/video is NOT working yet. Kahoot has a nice feature for a video intro and video response. Apester (https://app.apester.com/) Embed is working, but link sharing is NOT WORKING.

Both Apester and Kahoot are mobile devices compatible.

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more on presentation tools in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=effective+presentations

interactive tools for the classroom

interactive tools for the classroom https://getkahoot.com/

https://padlet.com/

https://www.tes.com/

http://flippity.net/

https://edpuzzle.com/

 

examples:
my Kahoot example:
https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/aeaf057c-36eb-4b93-bed5-69e9e6d48d07
please share yours; here some guides and directions to create it:
http://www.weareteachers.com/blogs/post/2015/12/01/best-of-teacher-helpline!-12-ways-to-use-kahoot!-in-your-classroom
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pFFv6_6was4

my Padlet example:  https://padlet.com/pmiltenoff/2l0s9cn9yghw
pls share yours; here some guides and directions:
http://www.coolcatteacher.com/how-to-use-padlet-fantastic-tool-teaching/
https://padlet.com/fbush/howtousepadlet101

my Blendspace example:
https://www.tes.com/lessons/ERYobfAgoi1kYg/
pls share yours; here some guides and directions:
https://www.tes.com/lessons/B2zzqDAF-gvk1Q/intro-to-blendspace

my Flippity.net example (Google account needed):
http://www.flippity.net/qs.asp?k=1T385tFq_wyGivbxGeoflLquePd2qghpmaPWhJiCTLp4
pls share yours; here some guides and directions:
http://flippity.net/
http://www.flippity.net/QuizShow.asp
Flippity.net: Flashcards Instructions
Flippity.net: Random Name Picker Instructions
How to Create a Quiz Show With Flippity.net – YouTube

my Edpuzzle example (Google classroom compliant) :
https://edpuzzle.com/assignments/580687fe959b16ae749e321e/watch
pls share yours; here some guides and directions

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more on interactivity in education in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=interactivity

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zaption is zapped

Zap! Zaption Sold to Workday

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2016-06-30-zap-zaption-sold-to-workday

K12 – Nearpod or EdPuzzle.

Higher Ed: HapYak or H5P

http://blog.zaption.com/post/146724427719/zaption-joins-workday

http://www.zaption.com/faq

Are there any other platforms like Zaption that you recommend?

For K12 users, we recommend you look at EDpuzzle or Nearpod. Both allow you to quickly create high-quality interactive content. For Higher Ed, we encourage you to look at HapYak or H5P – an open source interactive media platform. Finally, Vizia offers another simple but effective option for users of any kind.

Zaption is shutting down. Thankfully, educators have alternatives

For those looking to replace Zaption, Vizia is a viable alternative for creating interactive video content.

Zaption is shutting down. Thankfully, educators have alternatives

Vizia

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More on Zaption in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=zaption

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