Searching for "education technology"

Videos Explaining BYOD for Teachers and Students ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Excellent Videos Explaining BYOD for Teachers and Students ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning:

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2013/11/excellent-videos-explaining-byod-for.html

Bring Your Own Device/Technology is an initiative meant to increase students learning opportunities through technology.

Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/

A Resource of educational web tools and mobile apps for teachers and educators

conferences and related events regarding technology in education

Looking to attend and/or present at appropriate event regarding technology in education?
Please have a tentative list below.
Do you know an event, which is worth presenting/attending? Please contribute!

by Barry Dahl (Greg Jorgensen) - link to a list of conferences regarding e-learning:

http://www.scoop.it/t/e-learning-conferences

campus technology conf. - boston - http://events.campustechnology.com/Events/CT-Summer-Educational-Technology-Conference/Home.aspx
educause - anaheim – October - http://www.educause.edu/annual-conference
devlearn las vegas – October - http://www.elearningguild.com/DevLearn/content/2825/devlearn-2013-conference-and-expo---home/?gclid=CJj7usLCy7gCFdBaMgodeR8AoQ
dist. learning - ann arbor -- ??
iste (intl soc. tech ed)  july – Atlanta - http://www.isteconference.org/2014/
aect (assoc education communications and tech) - oct 29 - 2 nov, Anaheim - http://aectorg.yourwebhosting.com/events/Louisville/default.asp
ascd (assoc of supervision and curricular dev) - november 1 - 3, las vegas - http://www.ascd.org/conferences/conference-on-educational-leadership/2013-registration.aspx#payment
salt (soc. of applied learning and tech) - august 14 - 16, reston, VA - http://www.salt.org/dc/washingtonR.asp?pn=wPrices
National Forum on Active Learning Classrooms  - august - u of m - http://www.cce.umn.edu/National-Forum-on-Active-Learning-Classrooms/index.html
D2L Fusion - july – Nashville – http://fusion.desire2learn.com
Sloan c - november disney world, florida - http://sloanconsortium.org/conference/2013/aln/registration
QM - october 1-4, Nashville - https://www.qualitymatters.org/5th-annual-conference-2013-0
distance teaching and learning - madison - august 7 – 9 - http://www.uwex.edu/disted/conference/2013_Registration.cfm
LERN  - san fran. - nov. 21 – 23 - http://www.lern.org/conference/

CCUMC – october 9-13 – Chicago – http://www.ccumc.org/2013-conference-rates

The United States Distance Learning Association (USDLA) http://www.usdla.org/2014_national_conference/home.html

AI and XR and Educational Gaming

AI and Mixed Reality Drive Educational Gaming into ‘Boom Phase’

By Dian Schaffhauser 09/16/19

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2019/09/16/ai-and-mixed-reality-drive-educational-gaming-into-boom-phase.aspx

Artificial intelligence and mixed reality have driven demand in learning games around the world, according to a new report by Metaari. A five-year forecast has predicted that educational gaming will reach $24 billion by 2024, with a compound annual growth rate of 33 percent and a quadrupling of revenues. Metaari is an analyst firm that tracks advanced learning technology.

book XR education

Donally, J. (2018). Learning Transported: Augmented, Virtual and Mixed Reality for All Classrooms. Portland, Oregon: International Society for Technology in Education.
book review:
http://www.edtechroundup.org/reviews/book-review-learning-transported-augmented-virtual-and-mixed-reality-for-all-classrooms-by-jaime-donally
++++++++++
more on XR in education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=xr+education

RPO and education

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-01-16-ready-player-one-science-fiction-s-vision-for-the-future-of-education

 

Whenever I’m doing a virtual-reality demonstration, I ask for 40 minutes to an hour to get all of the students set up with their headsets, oriented in the virtual space, and then the learning can actually begin. It is not just something where you can throw headsets in a classroom and expect everyone to immediately start the learning objectives that you’re aiming for. You do need to do a little of that work explaining how the technology functions and making sure that everyone has the vision requirements, the hearing requirements, the physical requirements.

+++++++++++
more on Ready Player One in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=ready+player+one

AI in education

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2019-01-23-how-much-artificial-intelligence-should-there-be-in-the-classroom

a two-day conference about artificial intelligence in education organized by a company called Squirrel AI.

he believes that having AI-driven tutors or instructors will help them each get the individual approach they need.

the Chinese government has declared a national goal of surpassing the U.S. in AI technology by the year 2030, so there is almost a Sputnik-like push for the tech going on right now in China.

+_+++++++++++++++++
more on AI in education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=Artificial+Intelligence+and+education

ICT information and communication technology literacy

The Role of Librarians in Supporting ICT Literacy

May 9, 2019,

https://er.educause.edu/blogs/2019/5/the-role-of-librarians-in-supporting-ict-literacy

Academic librarians increasingly provide guidance to faculty and students for the integration of digital information into the learning experience.

TPACK: Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge

Many librarians have shied away from ICT literacy, concerned that they may be asked how to format a digital document or show students how to create a formula in a spreadsheet. These technical skills focus more on a specific tool than on the underlying nature of information.

librarians have begun to use an embedded model as a way to deepen their connection with instructors and offer more systematic collection development and instruction. That is, librarians focus more on their partnerships with course instructors than on a separate library entity.

If TPACK is applied to instruction within a course, theoretically several people could be contributing this knowledge to the course. A good exercise is for librarians to map their knowledge onto TPACK.

Large dotted line circle labelled Contexts. Inside large circle are three smaller circles overlapping to create a Venn diagram. Pink Circle: Technological Knowledge (TK). Blue Circle: Content Knowledge (CK). Yellow Circle: Pedagogical Knowledge (PK). Pink/Blue overlap: Technological Content Knowledge (TCK). Blue/Yellow Overlap: Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK). Yellow/Pink Overlap: Technological Pedagogical Knowledge (TPK). Center where all 3 overlap: Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK).

ICT reflects the learner side of a course. However, ICT literacy can be difficult to integrate because it does not constitute a core element of any academic domain. Whereas many academic disciplines deal with key resources in their field, such as vocabulary, critical thinking, and research methodologies, they tend not to address issues of information seeking or collaboration strategies, let alone technological tools for organizing and managing information.

Instructional design for online education provides an optimal opportunity for librarians to fully collaborate with instructors.

The outcomes can include identifying the level of ICT literacy needed to achieve those learning outcomes, a task that typically requires collaboration between the librarian and the program’s faculty member. Librarians can also help faculty identify appropriate resources that students need to build their knowledge and skills. As education administrators encourage faculty to use open educational resources (OERs) to save students money, librarians can facilitate locating and evaluating relevant resources. These OERs not only include digital textbooks but also learning objects such as simulations, case studies, tutorials, and videos.

Reading online text differs from reading print both physically and cognitively. For example, students scroll down rather than turn online pages. And online text often includes hyperlinks, which can lead to deeper coverage—as well as distraction or loss of continuity of thought. Also, most online text does not allow for marginalia that can help students reflect on the content. Teachers and students often do not realize that these differences can impact learning and retention. To address this issue, librarians can suggest resources to include in the course that provide guidance on reading online.

My note – why specialist like Tom Hergert and the entire IMS is crucial for the SCSU library and librarians and how neglecting the IMS role hurts the SCSU library
Similarly, other types of media need to be evaluated, comprehended, and interpreted in light of their critical features or “grammar.” For example, camera angles can suggest a person’s status (as in looking up to someone), music can set the metaphorical tone of a movie, and color choices can be associated with specific genres (e.g., pastels for romances or children’s literature, dark hues for thrillers). Librarians can explain these media literacy concepts to students (and even faculty) or at least suggest including resources that describe these features

My note – on years-long repetition of the disconnect between SCSU ATT, SCSU library and IMS
instructors need to make sure that students have the technical skills to produce these products. Although librarians might understand how media impacts the representation of knowledge, they aren’t necessarily technology specialists. However, instructors and librarians can collaborate with technology specialists to provide that expertise. While librarians can locate online resources—general ones such as Lynda.com or tool-specific guidance—technology specialists can quickly identify digital resources that teach technical skills (my note: in this case IMS). My note: we do not have IDs, another years-long reminder to middle and upper management. Many instructors and librarians have not had formal courses on instructional design, so collaborations can provide an authentic means to gain competency in this process.

My note: Tom and I for years have tried to make aware SCSU about this combo –
Instructors likely have high content knowledge (CK) and satisfactory technological content knowledge (TCK) and technological knowledge (TK) for personal use. But even though newer instructors acquire pedagogical knowledge (PK), pedagogical content knowledge (PCK), and technological pedagogical knowledge (TPK) early in their careers, veteran instructors may not have received this training. The same limitations can apply to librarians, but technology has become more central in their professional lives. Librarians usually have strong one-to-one instruction skills (an aspect of PK), but until recently they were less likely to have instructional design knowledge. ICT literacy constitutes part of their CK, at least for newly minted professionals. Instructional designers are strong in TK, PK, and TPK, and the level of their CK (and TCK and TPK) will depend on their academic background. And technology specialists have the corner on TK and TCK (and hopefully TPK if they are working in educational settings), but they may not have deep knowledge about ICT literacy.

Therefore, an ideal team for ICT literacy integration consists of the instructor, the librarian, the instructional designer, and the technology specialist. Each member can contribute expertise and cross-train the teammates. Eventually, the instructor can carry the load of ICT literacy, with the benefit of specific just-in-time support from the librarian and instructional designer.

My note: I have been working for more then six years as embedded librarian in the doctoral cohort and had made aware the current library administrator (without any response) about my work, as well as providing lengthy bibliography (e.g. http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/08/24/embedded-librarian-qualifications/ and have had meeting with the current SOE administrator and the library administrator (without any response).
I also have delivered discussions to other institutions (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/04/12/embedded-librarian-and-gamification-in-libraries/)
Librarians should seriously consider TPACK as a way to embed themselves into the classroom to incorporate information and ICT literacy.

+++++++++++++
more about academic library in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=academic+library

more on SAMR and TRACK models in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/05/17/transform-education-digital-tools/

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/07/29/mn-esummit-2015/

Role of the Chief Academic Technology Officer

What’s the Role of the Chief Academic Technology Officer?

Research from the Center for Higher Education CIO Studies (CHECS) has been transferred to EDUCAUSE, including a report on the role of the Chief Academic Technology Officer and its differences and similarities to other higher ed IT tech executives.

https://library.educause.edu/resources/2019/1/the-center-for-higher-education-cio-studies-reports-2003-2018 Friday, January 18, 2019

The Center for Higher Education CIO Studies (CHECS) was a nonprofit organization founded by Dr. Wayne A. Brown, dedicated to the education and development of technology leaders in higher education. CHECS produced the CIO Study, the Technology Leadership (TL) Study, the Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) Study and the Higher Education Chief Academic Technology Officer Study.

The Chief Information Officer (CIO) study provides information about higher education CIOs’ attributes, education, experience and effectiveness. The CIO study was conducted from 2003 to 2018. Find all the CIO reports here.

The Technology Leadership (TL) study surveyed those in the next organizational layer down from the CIO.  The TL study examines the demographics of the TL, where they have worked, and the activities they are undertaking to prepare themselves to become CIOs.  The TL study was study was conducted from 2009 to 2018. Find all the TL reports here.

The Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) study examines the demographics of the higher education CISO, the career route they have taken to their role, and the activities and attributes needed for a CISO according to the CISO and the CIO. The CISO study was study was conducted from 2014 to 2017. Find all the CISO reports here.

The Higher Education Chief Academic Technology Officer Study, 2018 canvassed CIOs, known CATOs and academic technology leaders, as well as deans and provosts to understand changes happening across institutions of higher education in academic technology.

K12 Immersive Technology

K–12 Teachers Use Augmented and Virtual Reality Platforms to Teach Biology

Immersive technology allows students to explore the world firsthand on a molecular level.

Eli Zimmerman

https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2019/03/k-12-teachers-use-augmented-and-virtual-reality-platforms-teach-biology-perfcon

t universities and medical schools, students are already using AR and VR

Originally, AR and VR lesson plans revolved around the virtual field trip.with the HTC Vive, for example, can take a detailed, 3D-rendered journey. 

In May 2018, Google announced a partnership with Labster, a virtual lab simulator, to develop immersive high school and college biology and anatomy courses.

by Intel last year, Middle Township High School in New Jersey embraced the idea of using Oculus Rift headsets to examine virtual frogs. In California, a new bill introduced in the state legislature would swap out real animals in schools for virtual replacements to teach biology more humanely.

 

 

1 2 3 4 5 50