Searching for "effective presentations"

effective presentations and AR

SORRY, POWERPOINT: THE SLIDE DECK OF THE FUTURE WILL BE IN AR

https://www.wired.com/story/prezi-augmented-reality/
augmented reality takeover. It’s played out at Snapchat and Facebook, at Google and Apple. Companies are using AR to design carssell furniture, make little digital sharks swim around your breakfast table. What if Prezi could apply that same technology to make better presentations?
the product isn’t ready for a public launch yet. Prezi has enlisted a select group of influencers to try out the AR tools and offer feedback before the company releases a beta version.

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more on effective presentations in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=effective+presentations

effective presentations

How to Give an Effective Presentation Expert Tips the effective communication skills

http://www.makeitmech.com/2017/08/how-to-give-effective-presentation.html

https://plus.google.com/101419367635742293475

  1. How to introduce Yourself
  2. Speech/Presentation Opening techniques
  3. Presentation/Speech main body
  4. How to Conclude/End the Speech/Presentation


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more on effective presentations in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=effective+presentation

effective presentations

Plan

  1. effective presentations
    1. reality: more dynamic environment/two way conversation
    2. conversation does not stop with the end of the presentation
    3. data-mining
    4. communities and connectivity
  2. PowerPoint (the Death of)
  3. Alternatives to PowerPoint

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More on presentations in this IMS blog:

free image sources:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/06/01/social-media-and-presentations-free-image-sources/

Presentation tools for teachers:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/09/30/the-5-best-free-slideshow-presentation-and-creation-tools-for-teachers/

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/07/09/2014-best-educational-web-sites/

Basics of design:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/01/22/basics-of-design/

 

faculty camp “effective presentation”

faculty camp “effective presentation”

Do you have a presentation you are proud of and sure it impacts your teaching and your students’ learning? Come and share with us your experience in delivering effective presentations.

When: Oct 19, 2-3PM in Miller Center 205 (Professional Development Room)

Who can attend: everyone from experts to novices

Why attend: 1. we deliver the basics of effective presentations 2. We support your ideas and experience in producing effective presentations 3. We provide on-the-spot clinic to improve your presentations 4. We continue support your improvement of presentations

What to do (plan): 1. Bring your presentation[s] you would like to work on 2. Outline the expertise in presentations you feel most confident about 3. Outline the areas you feel a need for help

How to do (plan): 1. Attend the camp 2. Vote your best medium to receive information and support (e.g. SCSU blog, Facebook page, Twitter hashtag (e.g. #SCSUpresent)

Plan for the 1 hour camp:
1. 5 min intro of participants (networking)
2. 5 min intro to the topic:
Here is the Kahoot based on your suggestions:
https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/b948aa1c-89ed-4e4b-b715-480719f7da5b
we will not have time for more Kahoots, but here several more just in case
https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/249dc625-b4a9-4b88-95d3-b47582f64314
https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/ba24d16a-8d62-481d-a629-68b8e94b6900
https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/f00f4817-0ba4-4d56-9d19-33e6260a760b

3. 10-15 min to discuss the basics of effective presentation as per the Kahoot and let faculty pitch in with their ideas
4. Rest of the time, break into groups and start helping each other hands-on with our presentations
or
we can continue with providing information about resources:
e.g.
visuals:

free images

For Social Media and Presentations: Free Image Sources

stock photos


and Flickr + Creative Commons license
5. 5 min before the end:
– decide on a platform for future continuous collaboration:
SCSU blog, Facebook page, Twitter hashtag (e.g. #SCSUpresent)
– inform participants about other related possibilities:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/blendedonline/
and
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/coursecapture/
and let them submit evaluation:
http://tinyurl.com/feedbackIMS

topics for IM260

proposed topics for IM 260 class

  • Media literacy. Differentiated instruction. Media literacy guide.
    Fake news as part of media literacy. Visual literacy as part of media literacy. Media literacy as part of digital citizenship.
  • Web design / web development
    the roles of HTML5, CSS, Java Script, PHP, Bootstrap, JQuery, React and other scripting languages and libraries. Heat maps and other usability issues; website content strategy. THE MODEL-VIEW-CONTROLLER (MVC) design pattern
  • Social media for institutional use. Digital Curation. Social Media algorithms. Etiquette Ethics. Mastodon
    I hosted a LITA webinar in the fall of 2016 (four weeks); I can accommodate any information from that webinar for the use of the IM students
  • OER and instructional designer’s assistance to book creators.
    I can cover both the “library part” (“free” OER, copyright issues etc) and the support / creative part of an OER book / textbook
  • Big Data.” Data visualization. Large scale visualization. Text encoding. Analytics, Data mining. Unizin. Python, R in academia.
    I can introduce the students to the large idea of Big Data and its importance in lieu of the upcoming IoT, but also departmentalize its importance for academia, business, etc. From infographics to heavy duty visualization (Primo X-Services API. JSON, Flask).
  • NetNeutrality, Digital Darwinism, Internet economy and the role of your professional in such environment
    I can introduce students to the issues, if not familiar and / or lead a discussion on a rather controversial topic
  • Digital assessment. Digital Assessment literacy.
    I can introduce students to tools, how to evaluate and select tools and their pedagogical implications
  • Wikipedia
    a hands-on exercise on working with Wikipedia. After the session, students will be able to create Wikipedia entries thus knowing intimately the process of Wikipedia and its information.
  • Effective presentations. Tools, methods, concepts and theories (cognitive load). Presentations in the era of VR, AR and mixed reality. Unity.
    I can facilitate a discussion among experts (your students) on selection of tools and their didactically sound use to convey information. I can supplement the discussion with my own findings and conclusions.
  • eConferencing. Tools and methods
    I can facilitate a discussion among your students on selection of tools and comparison. Discussion about the their future and their place in an increasing online learning environment
  • Digital Storytelling. Immersive Storytelling. The Moth. Twine. Transmedia Storytelling
    I am teaching a LIB 490/590 Digital Storytelling class. I can adapt any information from that class to the use of IM students
  • VR, AR, Mixed Reality.
    besides Mark Gill, I can facilitate a discussion, which goes beyond hardware and brands, but expand on the implications for academia and corporate education / world
  • IoT , Arduino, Raspberry PI. Industry 4.0
  • Instructional design. ID2ID
    I can facilitate a discussion based on the Educause suggestions about the profession’s development
  • Microcredentialing in academia and corporate world. Blockchain
  • IT in K12. How to evaluate; prioritize; select. obsolete trends in 21 century schools. K12 mobile learning
  • Podcasting: past, present, future. Beautiful Audio Editor.
    a definition of podcasting and delineation of similar activities; advantages and disadvantages.
  • Digital, Blended (Hybrid), Online teaching and learning: facilitation. Methods and techniques. Proctoring. Online students’ expectations. Faculty support. Asynch. Blended Synchronous Learning Environment
  • Gender, race and age in education. Digital divide. Xennials, Millennials and Gen Z. generational approach to teaching and learning. Young vs old Millennials. Millennial employees.
  • Privacy, [cyber]security, surveillance. K12 cyberincidents. Hackers.
  • Gaming and gamification. Appsmashing. Gradecraft
  • Lecture capture, course capture.
  • Bibliometrics, altmetrics
  • Technology and cheating, academic dishonest, plagiarism, copyright.

cartoons humor learning

Creating Cartoons to Spark Engagement, Learning

http://www.toondoo.com/

my note:
Avoid using infographics for purposes, which toodoo can serve.
Infographics are for about visualization of stats, not just visualization.
#FindTheRightTool
By Vicki E. Phillips
As instructors, we are constantly looking for new ways to capture our students’ attention and increase their participation in our classes, especially in the online modalities. We spend countless hours crafting weekly announcements for classes and then inevitably receive multiple emails from our students asking the very same questions that we so carefully and completely answered in those very same announcements! The question remains, how do we get them to read our posts?
It was precisely that problem I was trying to solve when I came across several articles touting the benefits of comics in higher education classrooms. I knew I couldn’t create an entire comic book, but I wondered if I could create a content-related cartoon that would not only capture students’ attention and maybe make them laugh, but also interest them enough that they would read the entire announcement or post. In doing so, I would be freed from responding to dozens of emails asking the same questions outlined in the announcements and students could focus on the homework.
A quick Internet search led me to a plethora of free “click and drag” cartoon making software applications to try. I started posting my own cartoons on characters, themes, etc. on the weekly literature we were studying in my upper division American and Contemporary World Literature classes, as well as to offer reminders or a few words of encouragement. Here’s an example of one I posted during week 7 of the semester when students can become discouraged with their assignment load: http://www.toondoo.com/cartoon/10115361
After a positive response, I decided to provide my online students the opportunity to try their hand at cartoon creation. I created a rubric and a set of instructions for an easy to use, free program that I had used, and I opened up the “cartoon challenge” to the students. The results were nothing short of amazing—what intrigued me the most was the time and effort they took with their cartoons. Not only did they create cartoons on the story we were reading, but they also wrote additional posts explaining their ideas for the creation, discussing why they chose a particular scene, and identifying those elements pertinent to the points they were making. These posts tended to receive many more substantial comments from their peers than the traditional discussion board posts, indicating they were being read more.
When students in my face-to-face course heard about the cartoons, they asked to try this approach as well. Their cartoons, shared in class via the overhead projector, led to some of the most engaging and interesting discussions I have ever had in the residential literature classes as students explained how they came up with the elements they chose, and why they picked a certain scene from the reading. The positive student feedback has been instrumental in my continuing to offer this option in both my online and face-to-face classes.
How does one get started in making these cartoons? The good news is you do not have to be an artist to make a cartoon! There are free programs with templates, clip art, and all the elements you would need to click and drag into place all those wonderful ideas you have simmering in your brain. My favorite to use is ToonDoo, available at http://toondoo.com. I like it because there are literally hundreds of elements, a search bar, and it lets me customize what I want to say in the dialog bubbles. It is very user friendly, even for those of us with limited artistic ability.
The whole experience has been overwhelmingly positive for me, and judging from the feedback received, for the students as well. It has also reminded me of one of my teaching goals, which is to incorporate more activities which would fall under assimilating and creating aspects of Bloom’s Taxonomy (Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy, 2001). If that is your goal as well, then try inserting a cartoon in those weekly announcements and ask for feedback from your students—I think you’ll be pleasantly surprised!
References:
Armstrong, Patricia (n.d.) Bloom’s Taxonomy, Vanderbilt University, Center for Teaching. Retrieved from https://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/blooms-taxonomy/#2001
Pappas, Christopher (2014) The 5 Best Free Cartoon Making Programs for Teachers. Retrieved from: https://elearningindustry.com/the-5-best-free-cartoon-making-tools-for-teachers
Vicki E. Phillips is an assistant professor of English and Literature at Rasmussen College, Ocala, Fla.

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cartoons for historians and history teaching / learning:
http://www.historycomics.net/

http://www.readingwithpictures.org/

http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2016/10/10-ideas-for-using-comics-in-your.html

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more on effective presentations in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=presentations

more on create infographics in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/04/09/infographics-how-to-create-them/

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