Searching for "geography"

Best Apps Games and Sites of the Last Year

Mobile: Best Apps, Games and Sites of the Last Year

https://thejournal.com/Articles/2016/01/05/Best-AppsGames-and-Sites-of-the-Last-Year.aspx

GameMaker: Studio
Grades: 5–12
Pricing: Free, paid
Concepts: Digital creation, programming and coding, game design

GameMaker: Studio is a robust game-making tool that appeals to both entry-level novices and game-development pros alike.

The Orchestra
Grades: 6–12
Pricing: $13.99
Concepts: Music theory, memorization, listening, part-whole relationships

The Orchestra is an interactive iPad app for exploring classical music, the orchestra and orchestral instruments.

WonderBox
Grades: 2–8
Pricing: Free
Concepts: Design, geography, curiosity, imagination, making new creations

As its name suggests, WonderBox is an app that piques kids’ natural curiosity through video, drawing, taking pictures, messaging with family and friends and engaging in multistep challenges.

A.D.A.M. Interactive Anatomy Online
Grades: 9–12
Pricing: Free to try, paid
Concepts: Anatomy, biology, memorization, part-whole relationships

A.D.A.M. Interactive Anatomy Online is a 3D visualization and curriculum-development tool all about the human body. Teachers can select and create assignments that allow students to manipulate 3D images of the human body.

Construct 2
Grades: 7–12
Pricing: Free, paid
Concepts: Digital creation, programming and coding, game design

Construct 2 is a Web-based 2D game-creation tool for students and teachers who want to get into game design without the need to know programming languages.

Fruity Fractions
Grades: 1–3
Pricing: $2.99
Concepts: Fractions, part-whole relationships

Set in a tropical jungle full of brightly colored fruit and animated birds, Fruity Fractions teaches fractions concepts to kids in first through third grades.

MN eSummit 2015

#MNsummit2015

Main speaker

Aaron Doering

aaron doening

aaron doening

Engagement not completion

Design experience not product

Create change, not simply respond to it

He was a geography teacher : Dimitrina

Experience explore expand. Adventure based how to collaborate in ways we have not collaborated before pedagogical guidelines internet driven

Instructor – content – design

Today: first think is design, content, instructor. So how do we design learning environments is the most important one

Guide learners as designers. Constructivism. Design for meaning. Through the power of the story.

Geotetic  design a learning environment learn geography using GIS

Situated movies (student-centered learning)

Grant Earthducation go to the most remote parts of the world to align their education with their culture, instead of what the government is downing as culture

Use of phone: whoever answers instructor’s question first, gets to pose the next question to the rest of the audience.

Design based research

Self-narrative, referencing the experience real world issues in real time

  1. reference knowledge . knowledge overlap. Technological pedagogical content knowledge.

Geotetic not only how prepare teachers, but desing learning environmwer of the story.

we explore: https://www.we-explore.com/

9.5 design as a learner.

the U Media Lab.
The Changing Earth. App GoX (instagram on steroids.  tell their story through the app). How is this different from Google Earth
Raptor Lab (rehabilitate a raptor).

  1. design experiences
  2. build trust
  3. guide learners as designers
  4. recognize learners as experts
  5. encourage collaboration
  6. inspire self narrative
  7. reference the knowledge domains
  8. teach for change
  9. design as learner

adoering@umn.edi     chasingseals.com   @chasingseals

 

podcast pontification (audio version of blog self reflections)

 Greg Steinke The U
A Digital Story Assignment using WeVideo

wevideo

WeVideo is the Google response to iMovie cloud

The U is on Google email and thus google drive and all other google tools

The Center for Digital Storytelling. short videos, 3-5 min incorporate photographs with the author narration, reflection

Assignment (verbal directions). process (write a 2 page script, every page is about a minute of video), gather images that support the story; edit the script (rewrite); record audio to the script (use an app on the phone instead of WeVideo), WeVideo can edit the audio recording; edit the story, edit the photos to match the story; YourTube and/or Google+

working with faculty: is the digital story a good fit for your course? two questions: does the course have many writing assignments? does everyone have to do the same type of assignment? do you want to offer choices? do you want your students to share their work outside of the class? to you want to explore opportunities for students to develop 21 century skills?

google communities for sharing

wewideo has a tutorial at Center for Digital Storytelling

students can use the digital story for their eportfolio

the entire exercise is entirely based on mobile devices

time frame: scaffolding options

3d printing products were the tangible result of the project and the digital storytelling just the format to present

Google Drive master folder for the phone images and video; iOS apps: MoviePro, FiLMc Pro, VoiceRecord Pro (including mp3); Android: WeVideo

Storyboard template

Faculty Development Programs: Digital Storytelling Community of Practice

http://it.umn.edu/faculty-development-programs-digital-0

Poster sessions:

Brad Hokanson

http://dha.design.umn.edu/faculty/BHokanson.html

iPAD video kit:

ipad video kit

Laurie Conzemius
Critical Thinking

laurie

ISTE: http://conference.iste.org/2016/
Joe Lau critical thinking

apps: Popplet  blog.popplet.com  http://www.popplet.com/ (mindmapping)

into the book: http://reading.ecb.org/

Kahoot – the token system. Polleverywhere  http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/05/21/polls-and-surveys-tools-for-education/

Symbaloo https://www.symbaloo.com/home/mix/13eOcK1fiV zotero, easybib, delicious, diigo depending on the grade

youth voices; http://youthvoices.net/ replace social media like teachertube is trying to replace youtube

quandary games in education. https://www.quandarygame.org/ sim city

citizen science alliance http://www.citizensciencealliance.org/

Toontastic https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/toontastic/id404693282?mt=8 now free  storytelling

coding and programming: https://www.makewonder.com/robots/dashanddot  scratch

Osmo : https://www.playosmo.com/en/ $79.99 + give a set for free Stride principle as a parental involvement

chainlink;

kickword; https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.makario.wordkick

red herring (four categories) https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.BlueOxTech.RedHerring&hl=en

http://www.mathplayground.com/logicgames.html

http://www.mathplayground.com/thinkingblocks.html

evaluation:

telestory  https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/telestory/id915378506?mt=8

explain everything http://explaineverything.com/

 

Exploring and Connecting 3D Printing to Teaching and Learning Jason Spartz, Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota

http://pubs.lib.umn.edu/minnesota-elearning-summit/2015/program/23/

http://pubs.lib.umn.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1023&context=minnesota-elearning-summit

3db 3da 3d lisa

Jason Spartz, Saint Mary’s University of MinnesotaFollow
Lisa Truax, Saint Mary’s University of MinnesotaFollow
Karen Sorvaag, Saint Mary’s University of MinnesotaFollow
Brett Bodsgard, Saint Mary’s University of MinnesotaFollow

chemistry professor. 3D printing with different materials.
what else can be made (e.g. reaction vessel)

printing of atoms

crystalography dbase

Karen: pre-service teachers professor: how to use 3d printers and be comfortable with them. Steve Hoover. Thinkercad and Autodesk123D>
3D academy http://www.team3dacademy.com/index2.html
. Pinterest board for3d Printing with resources

Lisa: graphic design. not intuitive.  Rhinoceros (not free anymore). 123D strong learning curve. 3d printing will be incorporated in the curriculum.  sculpture students and others don’t like fudging on the computer, but Adobe people love it. Some items takes up to 4 hours to print out. when working on the computer is difficult for some students to visualize the dimensionality.

collaborative learning opportunities.

no makerspace or fab lab. additional interest from the theater and business dept. 3d printing is connected to future work skills. new media ecology or media literacy set of skills.

the main presenter: build excitement and interest and gradually step back. how much material goes through and should we charge back. clean and maintenance involved; not too bad. better then a copier. plastic inexpensive. sizes with plastic – $25 and $50. how many project of a spool: depending on the size of the projects but considerable amount. two printers one art dept and one in the faculty dev area.

non profit visually impaired students.  how 3d can make difference in special ed.

3d printing lab with access for everybody. ownership brings policy. where housed: neutral place.

only one printer is barely sufficient for faculty to figure out how to use it. purchasing two more if students and curricula to be involved.

 

3dc 3d lisa 3da 3db

 

The Balancing Act: Team-Creating an eBook as an Alternative Method for Content Delivery Tom Nechodomu, University of Minnesota

ebook

tnecho@umn.edu
Susan Andre sandre@umn.edu
Linda Buturian butur001@umn.edu
Faculty Created digital stories – google “cultivaitng change series”
student created digital stories –
http://www.cehd.umn.edu/academics/online/
http://www.cehd.umn.edu/PSTL/water/
http://www.cehd.umn.edu/The-Changing-story/
Susan Andre uses a slide titled “trust” to elucidate how the entire project was enabled. “trust” and “transparency” are sparse currency in the environment I work in. if she is right an ebook ain’t happening anytime soon at my place.
inclining habitat.
students involvement. use stipends. student artists. food for the video interviews. create a community, student centered.
people able to change the book.
copyright process; did you find it cumbersome. copyright permission center.
time span and amount of hours spent: 3-4 months per chapter.

Main speaker
David Wiley. Making Teaching and Learning Awesome with Open

MN Learning Commons
open educational resources
LUMEN
lumen
education – sharing feedback, encouragement with students passion about the discipline, yourself
open is not the same as free.  free + permissions + copyright permission: 5 r = retain (make and own copies), reuse (use in a wide range of ways), revise (adapt, modify, and improve), remix (combine two or more), redistribute (share with others)
open:
free and unfettered access
perpetual, irrevocable copyright permissions
(look but don’t touch is not open)
tech enables OER permits
traditionally copyright materials on the Internet – not so good ; jet on the road
openly copyright materials on the internet _ yes: jet in the air
permission-less innovation. relatively inexpensive and broad permissions.
intellectual infrastructure of education: learning outcomes/objectives; assessments; textbooks. they are relatively expensive and narrow permissions.
disappearing ink strategies: buyback, rental, ebooks, online subscription
 mad, glad, sad, rad: the grumpy cat. student success per dollar
opennetgroup.org/review
change in student learning: replace commercial with open books – small. realign, bigger change. rethink is the large change.
responsibilities:
attribution and meeting other license requirements
thin common cartridge: a way to bring the content to the CMS, but the content remains on the creative commons
github.com/lumenlearning https://github.com/lumenlearning
disposable assignment: students hate doing them, instructors hate grading them. waste of time and energy
renewable assignment: students see value in doing them; instructor sees value grading them
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AsFU3sAlPx4
so what?
open education infrastructure: open outcomes, objectives, activities, educational resources
the culture of glued legos must be eradicated. open pedagogy. open credentialing model
summary: don’t settle for “affordable.” improve student outcomes. improve affordability. improve design / academic freedom

links generated from the discussion at my presentation:

https://www.google.com/search?q=tin+can&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8

http://www.uwosh.edu/library/quizsmith

http://glickconsulting.com/resouce_brainegames

https://www.google.com/search?q=techers+skills&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8

http://www.northeastern.edu/camd/gamedesign/people/sebastian-deterding/

https://www.duolingo.com/  Duolingo. App to learn languages using games

http://www.gamification.co/gabe-zichermann/

https://zebrazapps.com/  ZebraZapps

education reform Finland

Finland schools: Subjects scrapped and replaced with ‘topics’ as country reforms its education system

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/finland-schools-subjects-are-out-and-topics-are-in-as-country-reforms-its-education-system-10123911.html

Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) rankings https://nces.ed.gov/surveys/pisa/

Subject-specific lessons – an hour of history in the morning, an hour of geography in the afternoon – are already being phased out for 16-year-olds in the city’s upper schools. They are being replaced by what the Finns call “phenomenon” teaching – or teaching by topic. For instance, a teenager studying a vocational course might take “cafeteria services” lessons, which would include elements of maths, languages (to help serve foreign customers), writing skills and communication skills.

The reforms reflect growing calls in the UK – not least from the Confederation of British Industry and Labour’s Shadow Education Secretary Tristram Hunt – for education to  promote character, resilience and communication skills, rather than just pushing children through “exam factories”. (http://www.theguardian.com/education/2015/mar/20/labour-calls-time-on-exam-factory-approach-to-schooling)
(My Note/Question: so UK is ready to scrap what US pushes even harder with the STEM idea?)

More on education in Finland and its education in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=finland

GIS and GeoWeb Technologies

https://www.libraryjuiceacademy.com/moodle/login/index.php

Eva Dodsworth

Since the emergence of easily accessible dynamic online mapping tools, there has been a drastic increase in geographic interest and awareness. Whether for personal, social, professional or academic uses, people are using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to communicate information in a map format. Whether it’s using Google Earth to study urban change, or creating Google Map Mashups to deliver library resources, more and more members of society are turning to mapping programs for their visualization needs. With so many using GIS technology in their daily lives, library staff are now more than ever assisting library clients with their mapping queries.

This course will introduce students to a variety of mapping tools and GIS technologies such Google Earth and the creation of dynamic KML files; ArcGIS Online and webmap publishing; Google Fusion Tables and geocoding; and GIS fundamentals with geospatial data creation. Students will be able to apply their GIS skills in their reference work, in digitization projects, in webpages, in library instruction, and more.  Through hands-on exercises, pre-recorded demonstrations and lectures, students will receive a thorough overview of mapping resources that will enhance and expose their library’s resources.

http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/WeekOne_2014.wmv

 

http://www.placingliterature.com/map?modal=1

http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/WeekTwo.wmv

http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/WeekThree_Part_One.mov

http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/WeekThree_Part2.mov

http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/WeekFour.mov

 

– How to enable offline maps in your Google Maps app – http://www.huffingtonpost.com/map-happy/how-to-enable-offline-maps_b_6525832.html

– Huge news – Google Earth Pro, which used to cost the public $400 is now free! What does that mean for you? Extra features! You can import GIS files, tables, and export animated movie files!  http://google-latlong.blogspot.com.es/2015/01/google-earth-pro-is-now-free.html

– Don’t live in Canada?  Too bad! Google Maps plots best tobagonning hills in Canada!http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/google-map-plots-canada-s-best-tobogganing-hills-1.2218207

– a map of 19 countries that were named after specific people – http://www.vox.com/2015/2/1/7954179/map-countries-pe

 

Maps that shaped the world

http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-30840318

 

 

Content for Week Two – February 9th – February 15th

Week Two:

Podcast includes:

  • Citizen Mapping
  • OpenStreetMap – crowdsourcing
    more heads are better then one
    NYPL geomapping volunteers.

http://www.openstreetmap.org/

citizen crime reporting app for NYPD http://www.nyc.gov/html/nypd/html/crime_mapping/nyc_crime_map_introduction.shtml

when the jet disappeared, crowdsourcing for parts on the satellite maps of the ocean

potholes map

maps of the threes. emerald bug in Mnpls

http://www.fuf.net/

how does foursquare and checkins in FB and Google +fit it

  • Google Earth
  • Assignment

Podcast and Powerpoint can be accessed from:http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/JuicyLibrarianMaterial.html

Tutorials: Google Earth

Assignments:

1.       Discussion question:

Discover some citizen mapping projects that you are interested in OR

Contribute your local knowledge to Google Map Maker AND Share with the class online

2.       Google Earth Map

Please complete the tutorial and then create a map in Google Earth with the following components:

  • A title
  • A written introduction to your project
  • At least five placemarks, embedded with html tags, and images, if possible.
  • Imported KML file(s) file format by GEarth, but other apps is using it. using notepad or MS Word, one can create KML file.
    screen overlay, can be text, image, anything. legend. HTML code.
  • A screen overlay  (i.e. a legend)

areal photography.

history.
images from the library, Google is willing to buy them. citizen mapping. scanning and uploading.

geographical and societal awareness.

Gallery: 360Cities.

google street view – historical views

Google Earth Mapping

Submit online as a KML/KMZ file

I had the opportunity to experience a gizmo that can be used to display a variety of mapping projects, including citizen mapping: Science on a Sphere. It is a sphere on which you can project static maps or animations. The one I saw, in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s facility on Ford Island in Honolulu, displayed animations showing the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and the 2011 tsunami in Japan, as well as airline flight paths, ocean currents, polar ice cap change over time, and many other types of geospatial data.

The Great Backyard Bird Count actually starts today and runs through Monday, February 16th. At a minimum, it only requires 15 minutes of observation on any or all the days:  http://gbbc.birdcount.org/

Happy Cow is a site well-known to many vegetarians/vegans for finding restaurants which I’ve used when travelling. Users can submit reviews and/or restaurants that they’d like profiled (although the site reserves the right to approve or not the listing). http://www.happycow.net/search.html 

———————————–

wq and leaflet – a framework that could catch on
by Timothy Clarke – Thursday, February 12, 2015, 2:21 PM

One of the impediments to citizen mapping is the line-of-sight cell tower limitations of mobile phones, or the wifi requirements for other mobile devices.  Citizen mapping in urban and suburban environments is well-served by mobile devices, but what about natural areas, dense leaf cover, or extreme topography?  Even if obtaining absolute mapping coordinates isn’t the issue, much crowdsourcing assumes an ability to connect back to a central data repository (e.g., a web database, ‘the cloud’).  Equipment that can interact with GPS satellites and support data capture is typically expensive and generally requires proprietary software.

wq (https://wq.io/) is a framework that is ‘device first’ and ‘offline-enabled’.  It attempts to leverage several open source technologies to build an entire mobile solution that can support citizen science data collection work, and then synchronize with a central repository once the device (and operator) return to an area served by cellular or wifi networks.

I’m stretching here, so if I get stuff wrong, please don’t yell.  Still, I’ll take a pass at generally describing the framework and its related technology stack.

wq relies upon python, and a web framework called django for building offline-capable web apps that can run on iOS and Android devices.  These web apps, then, rely very heavily upon javascript, particularly requirejs (http://requirejs.org/) and mustache (https://mustache.github.io/), for the templates that permit quick and (somewhat) painless web application development.  Data visualization relies upon d3.js (http://d3js.org/), and geography makes heavy use of Leaflet (http://leafletjs.com/) — maybe the most pertinent layer of the stack for those of us in this course.  If you’re not familiar withLeaflet.js, check it out!

Finally, wq extends several other open source technologies to enable synchronizing between a central data repository and multiple mobile devices in the hands of citizen mappers.  Lastly, wq employs a set of tools to more easily build and distribute customized mapping apps that can be served from Apple’s app store, Google Play, etc.

What wq intends is to allow highly specialized citizen science/citizen mapping apps to be more easily and quickly built, based upon a solid collection of aligned F/OSS tools.  Ideally, an app can spin up quickly to respond to a particular need (e.g., a pipeline spill), or a specialized audience (the run up to a public comment period for a development project), or even something like a high school field trip or higher ed service learning project.

Some examples of citizen mapping projects already built upon wq are here:

https://wq.io/examples/

—————–

Creating a walking tour map with Google Earth_2014

————-

Week 3

Podcast includes:

  • Geocoding
  • Georeferencing
  • Spatial Data Formats
  • Geospatial Data Online
  • Discussion Question

Podcast and Powerpoint available from: http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/JuicyLibrarianMaterial.html

Tutorials: BatchGeo (optional); Google Fusion (optional)

https://en.batchgeo.com/

enter Xcel data, and export KLM file ready for google map and/or google earth

https://support.google.com/fusiontables/answer/2571232
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Google_Fusion_Tables

store maps online, no latitude needed.
visualize geospatial data by map
spatial analysis by mapping different layers together
showing data by map, graph or chart
e.g. how many cars cross specific point
crowdsourcing: spotting butterflies, using fusion tables to map the spices and sightings
http://www.theguardian.com/news/datablog/2011/mar/31/deprivation-map-indices-multiple

students: journalism, history, geography.

Georeferencing (geocoding – data, geo referencing – image)
historical air maps or photos are much more useful when they are georeferenced.
Photos from different year is difficult to lay over one another without referencing. the only reference might be the river. usually reference the four corners, but sometimes river. Using GIS program to determine the longitute/latitude for each corner. sometimes only farmland and it is impossible

 

Constructivism: Lecture and project-based learning

The blog entry title initially was:

Constructivism: Lecture versus project-based learning

Actually, the article is about both lecture and group work finding a niche in the complex process of teaching and learning.

Excellent points, ideas and discussion in and under a recently published article:

Anyone Still Listening? Educators Consider Killing the Lecture

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/07/anyone-still-listening-educators-consider-killing-the-lecture/

“Professors do not engage students enough, if at all, when trying to innovate the classroom. It’s shocking how out of touch they can be, just because they didn’t take the time to hear their students’ perspectives.”

The article and the excellent comments underneath the article do not address the possibility of cultural differences. E.g., when article cites the German research, it fails to acknowledge that the US culture is pronouncedly individualistic, whereas other societies are more collective. For more information pls consider:
Ernst, C. T. (2004). Richard E. Nisbett. The Geography of Thought: How Asians and Westerners Think Differently … and Why. Personnel Psychology, (2), 504.
Nisbett, R. E. (2009). Intelligence and how to get it : why schools and cultures count / Richard E. Nisbett. New York : W.W. Norton & Co., c2009.
The article generalizes, since another omission is the subject-oriented character of the learning process: there are subjects, where lecture might be more prevalent and there are some where project learning, peer instruction and project-based learning might be more applicable.

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