Searching for "leader"

K12 IT leaders work with people

K-12 IT leaders need to work with people, not just tech

<https://www.educationdive.com/news/k-12-it-leaders-need-to-work-with-people-not-just-tech/555004/

My note: this is the first step toward the conclusion of my dissertation: the CIO in education must wear three hats: computer geek, educator and administrator.

District Administration reports.

Since edtech varies from district to district and state to state, it’s unlikely that an IT candidate will be up-to-speed on the current system in use. Alabama solves this problem by offering the Alabama Chief Technology Officer certification program.

It is critical for those in K-12 IT leadership to understand the unique customer service needs of the education industry. When technology doesn’t work, it throws a wrench into an entire day of learning. Educators need a fast fix and responsive service. Effective tech leaders will delegate by teaming up with tech-savvy teachers who can serve as school tech leaders. This strategy allows for an on-site tech expert to step in to put out fires before the tech expert arrives.

Former teachers can also make strong chief technology officers because they understand both tech and education. This allows them to build trust with the staff, which is a critical component to launching new technology initiatives.

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more on digital literacy for EDAD in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy+edad

toxic leadership

The Mediation Role of Toxic Leadership in the Effect of Job Stress on Job Satisfaction
H. Tezcan Uysal Department of Management and Organization
Zonguldak Vocational College Bülent
Ecevit University, Turkey

(6) (PDF) The Mediation Role of Toxic Leadership in the Effect of Job Stress on Job Satisfaction. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/331249551_The_Mediation_Role_of_Toxic_Leadership_in_the_Effect_of_Job_Stress_on_Job_Satisfaction [accessed May 16 2019].

Six Leadership Lessons

Six Leadership Lessons From Harvard’s “Girl President” Drew Gilpin Faust

Cami Anderson Jan 10, 2019

https://www.forbes.com/sites/camianderson1/2019/01/10/six-leadership-lessons-from-harvards-girl-president-drew-gilpin-faust/

Drew Gilpin Faust, Harvard University’s first and only female president

1) Do It For The Right Reasons.

As a history professor early in her career, Drew never envisioned crossing over to university administration, “what my faculty colleagues call the ‘dark side.’” She would raise her hand for leadership tasks not because she wanted to get noticed, but because she felt it was “good citizenship to serve others.”

2) Don’t Be Afraid To Take The Leap.

3) Define Yourself Publicly, Or Others Will Do It For You.

“If you don’t define yourself publicly, someone else will, and it will likely be according to stereotypes,”

4) Gender Is Always An Issue, But Don’t Let It Derail You.

5) Understand That True Leadership Happens In The “Grey Space.”

Being the head of an organization often involves picking between the best of two imperfect choices, forging a path without having all of the facts, or breaking a tie between two competing factions.

6) Spend Political Capital To Plow The Path For Authentic Diversity And Inclusion.

 

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more on ed leadership in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=educational+leadership

New Leaders program

Study: Schools with principals from New Leaders program show higher student learning gains

K-8 students with the same principal, who was trained by the nonprofit, for at least three years get higher math and English language arts scores than those with other leaders.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/study-schools-with-principals-from-new-leaders-program-show-higher-student/549011/

Principals trained and supported by New Leaders — a New York City-based nonprofit — are contributing to higher student achievement and staying in their jobs longer than those hired through other preparation programs, a new RAND Corp. study shows.

Students attending K-8 schools that have had a New Leaders principal for at least three years score at least 3% higher in math and roughly 2% higher in English language arts (ELA) than students with school leaders prepared in other ways.

The RAND researchers found that specific aspects of being a leader — specifically competencies related to instruction, and adult and team leadership — were more closely associated with increases in student achievement.

What New Leaders calls “cultural capital,” which includes skills related to “cultural leadership” and “operational leadership,” was more closely linked to retention.

2017 Stanford University study showed that academic growth among CPS students in grades 3-8 was increasing at a faster rate than in most districts in the nation.

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more of EDAD in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=edad

The Show Horse and the Plow Horse Leadership

Leadership: The Show Horse and the Plow Horse

Caleb Gipple

when I say show horse leadership I am not describing an arrogant leader patting themselves on the back for a moment of leadership. Instead, I am describing moments and events of leadership that we have the capacity to personally acknowledge as good leadership. Examples of this would be a situation where you help someone on your team overcome an obstacle or you go out of your way to care for those under your leadership. There is nothing wrong with show horse leadership, in fact, I think it is extremely beneficial to identify when you are doing good leadership so you can make that behavior a trend.

plow horse. To explain, these individuals don’t view him as a leader because he is leading a big initiative or he has a position of authority. They view him this way because of how he makes them feel. I had heard countless individuals explain how he approaches meeting and interactions and it aligns perfectly with Simon Sinek’s idea of a “circle of safety” in his book Leaders Eat Last.

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more on leadership
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=leadership

7 Words to avoid as a Leader

7 Toxic Words You Should Never Say as a Leader

 June 8, 2018
https://learning.linkedin.com/blog/learning-tips/7-toxic-words-you-should-never-say-as-a-leader
https://www.linkedin.com/learning/management-tips-weekly

7 Toxic Words a Leader Should Never Use

They are:

  1.     Can’t
  2. No
  3. Wrong
  4. Fault
  5. Never
  6. Stupid
  7. Impossible
https://www.linkedin.com/learning/management-tips-weekly/5-phrases-to-avoid
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leaders employees

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/leaders-who-dont-listen-eventually-surrounded-people-say-oleg/

Complexity A Leader’s Framework

Complexity: A Leader’s Framework for Understanding and Managing Change in Higher Education

George Siemens, Shane Dawson and Kristen Eshleman
Monday, October 29, 2018

https://er.educause.edu/articles/2018/10/complexity-a-leaders-framework-for-understanding-and-managing-change-in-higher-education

The relationships between jobs, locality, families, housing, work and government policy, tax processes, crime, psychology, environment, access to education, and urban planning interact and converge in what is known as a Complex Adaptive System (CAS).

definition: Complexity can be understood as a theory of change and adaptation that details how change occurs within systems as well as the principles and mindsets needed to flourish in turbulent environments

he complexification of higher education is an intentional goal of engaging with complexity rather than attempting to reduce it to its constituent parts. Effective vision generation, planning, and goal achievement in the modern uncertain economic-social-technical environment benefits from embracing complexity and the utilization of strategies and actions that reflect a CAS.

ive principles of complexity science are of particular relevance to the higher education system. These attributes—networks, emergence, self-organization and social coordination, feedback sensitivity, and agility—are sufficient to provide higher education leaders with an entry into complexity science as a means of observing, understanding, and interacting with change.

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more on leadership in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=ed+leadership

hi ed leader team

5 SECRETS TO DEVELOPING A HIGH-PERFORMING TEAM IN HIGHER EDUCATION
Patrick Sanaghan & Jillian Lohndorf

https://www.academia.edu/8335887/Ways_to_Improve_Teams_in_Higher_Education

6 POTENTIALLY DESTRUCTIVE MYTHS
#1: THE MYTH ABOUT TALENT
A variety of skills, experiences,and perspectives are necessary,along with high levels of trust, open communication, emotional support, and mutual accountability—all of which arevery hard to establish and maintain. One differentiator of an exceptional team is a high level of curiosity where questions(not hidden criticisms) are prized.

#2: THE MYTH ABOUT FOCUS

stellar teams allocate their time in an unexpected way. They spend two-thirds of their time on thetask at hand (gettin’ ‘er done) and a full one-third on the “process” or relational aspect of the team’s functioning

#3: THE MYTH ABOUT CONFLICT

Exceptional teams see conflict as a resource, not something to be avoided.

Leaders need both the skill and the courage to deal with conflict on their team, as well as the understanding that everyone on the team needs to be involved in its resolution. 

#4: THE MYTH ABOUT OPENNESS

  • the “ seduction of the leader ” syndrome frequently seen in higher education.  Due to the “collegial” and polite nature of most campuses, people simply don’t feel comfortable providing honest feedback,especially if it is negative or critical. 
  • Many people are reluctant to be honest, because it might hurt someone’s feelings. 
  • People don’t want to “lose their seat at the table” and fear that they risk doing so if they are truly honest.
  • People realize that the leader really isn’t open to honest feedback, even as the leader professes to want it

#5: THE MYTH ABOUT SAMENESS

One of the pervasive team dynamics that every team leader needs to be aware of is
“comfortable cloning.”
 This happens when we select people to be on our teams who have similar backgrounds to ours.

#6: THE MYTH ABOUT MOTIVATIONAL METAPHORS

One of the best ways to build a realteam is to have each team membershare their own metaphor for how theywould like the team to operate.

5 STRATEGIES FOR DEVELOPING A STELLAR TEAM

1. Make your team a learning team, by creating an internal article or book club.

2. Define the rules for decision making.

3. Create working agreements or“ground rules” for the functioning and support of the team.

4. Establish a mechanism for regular, anonymous evaluation of team meetings.

5. Conduct a leadership “audit.”

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more on leadership in higher ed in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=ed+leader

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