Searching for "leaderboards"

how to leaderboards

How to Create a Leaderboard for eLearning with Google

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/16GvzEQmnZRTx02yzCi5E8aNbZL7QTDomqu9nmaLk35s/edit#gid=0

https://community.articulate.com/discussions/articulate-storyline/how-to-create-a-free-leaderboard-for-elearning-with-google

https://support.geckoboard.com/hc/en-us/articles/115005738248-Create-leaderboards-using-spreadsheets

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more on leaderboards in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=leaderboards

alternative leaderboards

Gamification: Alternative Leaderboards

https://elearningindustry.com/gamification-alternative-leaderboards
Wanting to win’ versus “wanting to avoid losing” is a subtle yet crucial distinction; Murayama and Elliot’s (2012) set of meta-analyses found the effects of competition depend on this distinction in the minds of players. When someone wants to perform better than others, they tend to benefit from competition. But when they want to avoid performing worse than others, competing tends to reduce their performance.
Senko et al’s (2017) meta-analysis found that “wanting to win” improves the performance of participants only when it’s accompanied by strategies that support feelings of mastery. So “wanting to win” alone is not enough to inoculate players from the downsides of competitive social environments.

There are 2 principles of design to support the outcome:

  1. Workplace performance is more complex than a single number on a leaderboard.
    Let’s show the major competencies that drive the performance, instead of one single number.
  2. Don’t just compare yourself to others. Compare your performance against your own history!
    Let’s show the trajectory for driving competencies!

Imagine a leaderboard more like a performance dashboard where your overall performance is broken down your top competencies with your historical data points. You can see the trajectory of where you’re heading. Then, you can show the company average and top performers’ numbers on each competency. You can identify your strength and opportunities. Then, you can apply AI to give you guidance on how to change your trajectory based on top performers’ data points.

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More on leaderboards in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=leaderboards

more on gamification in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=gamification

Fortnite is Instagram of gaming

The Most Important Video Game on the Planet

How Fortnite became the Instagram of gaming

https://medium.com/new-york-magazine/the-most-important-video-game-on-the-planet-c26988a8f497  Jan 11 2019,Brian Feldman

http://nymag.com/intelligencer/2018/07/how-fortnite-became-the-most-popular-video-game-on-earth.html

Every number released in conjunction with Fortnite is staggering, even within the context of a $137 billion industry. On the same day as its Fortnite Pro-Am tournament at E3, the video-game industry’s largest convention, the game was released for the Nintendo Switch, and within 24 hours it had been downloaded more than 2 million times. Analysts estimate that Fortnite is currently raking in more than $300 million a month, and has made its maker, Epic Games, more than $1.2 billion since its battle royale mode launched in late September.

Fortnite is virtually identical on every platform, and players can move from their PlayStation to their phone and back without missing a beat. Milligan first heard about the game back in September. “It was the next new game, like when Minecraft came out, but way more popular.”

The cadence of a Fortnite game is that nothing is happening and then, very suddenly, everything is happening. The game has three main modes: solo (every player for themselves), duos (teams of two), and squads (teams of three or four), but there are consistently around 100 players in every session.

Even when kids aren’t playing Fortnite, they’re talking about Fortnite or finding ways to profit from it.

Video games pioneered the dopamine-rush cycle. Using bright graphics and sound effects to make players feel continual accomplishment, arcade games were honed to make players feel like they needed to feed in just one more quarter over and over again — slot machines that kept people entranced without ever having to pay out. The addictive core of video-gaming never went away, even as games became more complicated: Every win, every high score, every 100 percent completion, every secret and Easter egg was a chance for a little rush of accomplishment and satisfaction.

And then mobile products learned to do the same thing. Give people goals, reward them with flashes of color, and you could entrance them into something resembling addiction. This was called, tellingly and unsurprisingly, “gamification”: Treat every app and every activity as a video game, with scores, prizes, and leaderboards. Snapchat rewarded users who talked every day with “streaks”; the exercise app Strava allowed you to compete with other joggers and earn badges; Foursquare turned the entire world into a game of king of the hill.

The process has come full circle. Fortnite is a gamified video game.

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more on FortNite in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=fortnite

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/03/31/ready-player-one/

Gaming and Gamification for SPED 204

https://catalog.stcloudstate.edu/Catalog/ViewCatalog.aspx?pageid=viewcatalog&topicgroupid=1994&entitytype=CID&entitycode=SPED+204

SPED 204. Program Overview and E-Portfolio

Credits: 1
Department: Special Education
Description: Overview of the programmatic standards for general and special education, how these standards are integrated in special education curriculum, and e-portfolio requirements for documenting acquisition of the above standards.
  1. Gaming and Gamification.

    why Gaming and Gamification? Vygotsky and ZPD (immersive storytelling is a form of creative play)

    from: https://cpb-us-e1.wpmucdn.com/blog.stcloudstate.edu/dist/d/10/files/2015/03/Gaming-and-Gamification-in-academic-and-library-settings-final-draft-1digudu.pdf
    play >>> games >>> serious games >>> Game Based learning >>>>+ Digital Game Based learning
    Games are type of cooperative learning. Games embody the essence of constructivism, which for students/gamers means constructing their own knowledge while they interact (learn cooperatively). Learning can happen without games, yet games accelerate the process. Games engage. Games, specifically digital ones, relate to the digital natives, those born after 1976 – 80, who are also known as Generation Y, or Millennials”

    is it generational? Is it a fad? is it counter-pedagogical?

    what is the difference between GBL (Game Based Learning) and DGBL (Digital GBL): share examples, opinions. Is one better / preferable then the other? Why?

    Kahoot game (Yahoo): https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/1412b52c-da28-4507-b658-7dfeedf0864c 
    hands-on assignment (10 min): split in groups and discuss your experience with games; identify your preferable mode (e.g. GBL vs DGBL) and draft a short plan of transitioning your current curricula to a curricula incorporating games.

    What is gamification? Why gamification, if we have games?
    “Gamification takes game elements (such as points, badges, leaderboards, competition, achievements) and applies them to a non – game setting. It has the potential to turn routine, mundane tasks into refreshing, motivating experiences

    let’s check our understanding of gamification: https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/542b5b23-acbd-4575-998e-e199ea08b3e7

    hands-on assignment (10 min): split in groups and use your electronic devices: smartphones, tablets, laptops to experience any of the following gamification tools:

    The Future is Now:

    Hands-on assignment (10 min): Experience Oculus Go, Google Cardboard, Samsung Gear 360,  Vuze,
    create your own VR (video 360) orientation tours:

SOE workshop gamification

School of Education workshop on gaming and gamification

shortlink: http://bit.ly/soegaming

Join us for a LIVE broadcast:

Live broadcast on Adobe Connect:
https://webmeeting.minnstate.edu/scsuteched
Live broadcast on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/events/1803394496351600

 

Outline:
The Gamification of the educations process is not a new concept. The advent of educational technologies, however, makes the idea timely and pertinent. In short 60 min, we will introduce the concept of gamification of the educational process and discuss real-live examples.

Learning Outcomes:

  • at the end of the session, participants will have an idea about gaming and gamification in education and will be able to discriminate between those two powerful concepts in education
  • at the end of this session, participants will be able search and select VIdeo 360 movies for their class lessons
  • at the end of the session, participants will be able to understand the difference between VR, AR and MR.

if you are interested in setting up a makerspace and/or similar gaming space at your school, please contact me after this workshop for more information.

  1. Gaming in education
    Minecraft.edu
    http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/10/26/pedagogically-sound-minecraft-examples/
    Simcity.com

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Here some online games suitable for educators:
http://www.onlinecolleges.net/50-great-sites-for-serious-educational-games/

https://www.learn4good.com/games/for-high-school-students.htm

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Let’s learn more about gaming and education with Kahoot (please click on Kahoot):

https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/78e64d54-3607-48fa-a0d3-42ff557e29b1

Let’s take a quiz together:

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  1. Gamification in education
    1. How would you define gamification of the educational process?
    2. Gaming and Gamification in academic and library settings (paper)
      Short URL: http://scsu.mn/1F008Re
      Gamification takes game elements (such as points, badges, leaderboards, competition, achievements) and applies them to a non-game setting. It has the potential to turn routine, mundane tasks into refreshing, motivating experiences (What is GBL (Game-Based Learning)?, n.d.).
      Gamification is defined as the process of applying game mechanics and game thinking to the real world to solve problems and engage users (Phetteplace & Felker, 2014, p. 19; Becker, 2013, p. 199; Kapp, 2012). Gamification requires three sets of principles: 1. Empowered Learners, 2. Problem Solving, 3. Understanding (Gee, 2005).
    3. Apply gamification tactics to existing learning task
      split in groups and develop a plan to gamify existing learning task
    4. gamification with and without technology
      https://www.thespruce.com/board-games-for-college-kids-3570593

+++ hands-on ++++++++++++++++ hands-on ++++++++++++++++ hands-on ++++++

  1. Video 360 in the classroom (proposed book chapter)
    1. the importance of Video 360
      p. 46 Virtual Reality
      http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/08/30/nmc-horizon-report-2017-k12/
      p. 47 Google is bringing VR to UK kids
      http://www.wired.co.uk/article/google-digital-skills-vr-pledge
      Video 360 movies for education:
      http://virtualrealityforeducation.com/google-cardboard-vr-videos/science-vr-apps/
      Watch this movie on the big screen:

      from the web page above, choose a movie or click on this lin
      k:
      https://youtu.be/nOHM8gnin8Y (to watch a black hole in video 360)
      Open the link on your phone and insert the phone in Google Cardboard. Watch the video using Google Cardboard. 
    2. Discuss the difference between in your experience watching the movie on the big screen and using Google Cardboard. What are the advantages of using goggles, such as Google Cardboard?
      Enter your findings here:
      https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Nz42T6CaYsx8qVl9ee_IC25EyqS0A8aZcQdX2F6RMjg/edit?usp=sharing

Let’s learn more about gaming and education with Kahoot (please click on Kahoot):

https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/6c9e7368-f830-4a9c-8f5a-df1899e96665

  1. VR, AR, MR and Video 360.
    1. discuss your ideas to apply VR/AR/MR and Video 360 in real life and your profession
      https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Cq6zDXJ9xkN7h81RpiLkdflbAuX8y_my2VrbO3mZ5mM/edit?usp=sharing
  2. Creating your own games:
    http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/02/19/unity/

++++++ RESOURCES ++++++++++ RESOURCES ++++++++++ RESOURCES +++++++

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=games

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=gamification

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=video+360

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For further information about Information Media:

IM Facebook Group https://www.facebook.com/groups/326983293392/
IM Facebook Page http://www.facebook.com/Informationmedia
IM Blog blog.stcloudstate.edu/im
IM LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/information-media-department-31360b28/
Twitter https://twitter.com/IM_SCSU
Youtube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIluhVNJLJYEJ7983VmhF8w

IM554 discussion on GBL

IM554 discussion on Game Based Learning

Here is the “literature”:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/03/19/recommendations-for-games-and-gaming-at-lrs/
this link reflects my recommendations to the SCSU library, based on my research and my publication: http://scsu.mn/1F008Re

Here are also Slideshare shows from conferences’ presentations on the topic:

https://www.slideshare.net/aidemoreto/gamification-and-byox-in-academic-libraries-low-end-practical-approach

https://www.slideshare.net/aidemoreto/gaming-and-gamification-in-academic-and-library-settings

Topic :Gaming and Gamification in Academic Settings

  1. Intro: why is it important to discuss this trend
    1. The fabric of the current K12 and higher ed students: Millennials and Gen Z
    2. The pedagogical theories and namely constructivism
      1. Csikszentmihalyi’s “flow” concept (being in the zone)
      2. Active learning
      3. Sociocultural Theory
      4. Project-Based Learning
    3. The general milieu of increasing technology presence, particularly of gaming environment
    4. The New Media Consortium and the Horizon Report

Discussion: Are the presented reasons sufficient to justify a profound restructure of curricula and learning spaces?

  1. Definition and delineation
    1. Games
    2. Serious Games
    3. Gamification
    4. Game-based learning
    5. Digital game-based learning
    6. Games versus gamification
    7. Simulations, the new technological trends such as human-computer interaction (HCI) such as augmented reality (AR),virtual reality (VR) and mixed reality (MR) (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/02/22/virtual-augmented-mixed-reality/ )

Discussion: Is there a way to build a simpler but comprehensive structure/definition to encompass the process of gaming and gamification in education?

  1. Gaming and Gamification
    1. Pros
    2. Cons
    3. Debates

Discussion: Which side are you on and why?

  1. Gaming and Gamification and BYOD (or BYOx)
    1. gaming consoles versus gaming over wi-fi
    2. gaming using mobile devices instead of consoles
    3. human-computer interaction (HCI) such as augmented reality (AR),virtual reality (VR) and mixed reality (MR) (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/02/22/virtual-augmented-mixed-reality/ )

Discussion: do you see a trend to suggest that either one or the other will prevail? Convergence?

  1. Gaming in Education
    1. student motivation, student-centered learning, personalized learning
    2. continued practice, clear goals and immediate feedback
    3. project-based learning, Minecraft and SimCity EDU
    4. Gamification of learning versus learning with games
    5. organizations to promote gaming and gamification in education (p. 6 http://scsu.mn/1F008Re)
    6. the “chocolate-covered broccoli” problem

Discussion: why gaming and gamification is not accepted in a higher rate? what are the hurdles to enable greater faster acceptance? What do you think, you can do to accelerate this process?

  1. Gaming in an academic library
    1. why the academic library? sandbox for experimentation
    2. the connection between digital literacy and gaming and gamificiation
    3. Gilchrist and Zald’s model for instruction design through assessment
    4. the new type of library instruction:
      in house versus out-of-the box games. Gamification of the process
      http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/bi/

Discussion: based on the example (http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/bi/), how do you see transforming academic library services to meet the demands of 21st century education?

  1. Gaming, gamification and assessment (badges)
    1. inability of current assessments to evaluate games as part of the learning process
    2. “microcredentialing” through digital badges
    3. Mozilla Open Badges and Badgestack
    4. leaderboards

Discussion: How do you see a transition from the traditional assessment to a new and more flexible academic assessment?

digital badges in education

Digital Badges in Education: Trends, Issues, and Cases.

https://www.routledge.com/products/9781138857605

In recent years, digital badging systems have become a credible means through which learners can establish portfolios and articulate knowledge and skills for both academic and professional settings. Digital Badges in Education provides the first comprehensive overview of this emerging tool. A digital badge is an online-based visual representation that uses detailed metadata to signify learners’ specific achievements and credentials in a variety of subjects across K-12 classrooms, higher education, and workplace learning. Focusing on learning design, assessment, and concrete cases in various contexts, this book explores the necessary components of badging systems, their functions and value, and the possible problems they face. These twenty-five chapters illustrate a range of successful applications of digital badges to address a broad spectrum of learning challenges and to help readers formulate solutions during the development of their digital badges learning projects.

digital badges

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Badges and Leaderboards: Professional Developments for Teachers in K12

digital badges

http://www.shakeuplearning.com/blog/more-ideas-for-badges-in-professional-learning/

Why should I bother earning badges?

http://www.connectededucators.org/cem-digital-badges-faq/

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Canvas Badges:

https://canvas.instructure.com/courses/904071

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Edmodo Badges:

http://www.helloliteracy.com/2012/09/technologically-speaking-currently.html

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issues to consider:

digital badges: issues to consider

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More on badges and gaming in education in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=badges&submit=Search

Recommendations for games and gaming at LRS

Gaming and Gamification in academic and library settings (paper)
Short URL: http://scsu.mn/1F008Re 

Based on the literature regarding games, gaming, gamification, game-based learning, and serious games, several clear trends emerge:

  1. Gaming and gamification in the sense of game-based learning is about using games and game-like tactics in the education process, for greater engagement and better learning outcomes. However, this is only the first level of such initiative. The second and higher level is about involving students in the game-building and gamification of the learning process (as per Vygotsky’s Zone of…) thus achieving student-centered and experiential learning.
  2. When hosting games and gaming in any library, “in-person” or electronic/online games are welcome but not sufficient to fulfill their promise, especially in an academic library. Per (1), an academic library has the responsibility to involve students and guide them in learning how to engage in the building process required in true game-based learning.
  3. Game-based learning, gaming and gamification in particular, in educational (academic library) settings must consider mobile devices and the BYOD movement in particular as intrinsic parts of the entire process. Approaching the initiative primarily by acquiring online “in-person” games, or game consoles has the same limited educational potential as only hosting games, rather than elevating the students to full guided engagement with game-based learning. If public relations and raised profile are the main goals for the academic library, such an approach is justified. If the academic library seeks to maximize the value of game-based learning, then the library must consider: a. gaming consoles, b. mobile devices as part of a BYOD initiative and c. cloud-based / social games, such as MineCraft, SimCity etc.
  4. Design for game-based learning, gaming and gamification in educational (academic library) settings must include multiple forms of assessment and reward, e.g. badges, leaderboards and/or certificates as an intrinsic part of the entire process. Merely hosting games in the academic library cannot guarantee true game-based learning. The academic library, as the forefront of a game-based learning initiative on campus, must work with faculty on understanding and fine tuning badges and similar new forms of assessment and reward, as they effectively implement large scale game-based learning, focused on the students’ learning gains.

Recommendations for LRS

  1. In regard to LRS, the gaming and gamification process must be organized and led by faculty, including housing and distributing the hardware, software and applications, when needed.
  2. The attached paper and the respective conclusions summarized in four points demand educational and experiential background, which is above the limits of the LRS staff. In addition, the LRS staff has clearly admitted that the pedagogical value of gaming and gamification is beyond their interest. This recommendation is not contradicting to the fact and opportunity for LRS staff to participate in the process and contribute to the process; it just negates the possibility of staff mandating and leading the process, since it will keep the gaming and gamification process on a very rudimentary level.
  3. The process must be further led by faculty with a terminal degree in education (Ph.D.) and experience in the educational field, since, as proved by the attached paper and 4 point conclusion, the goal is not a public-library type of hosting activities, but rather involving students in a pedagogically-sound creative process, with the respective opportunity for assessment and future collaboration with instructors across campus. This recommendation is not contradicting the fact and opportunity for LRS library faculty to participate actively in the process and contribute to the process. It just safeguards from restricting the process to the realm of “public-library” type of hosting activities, but failing to elevate them to the needs of an academic campus and connecting with instructors across campus.
  4. This conclusions adhere to and are derived from the document recommended by the LRS dean, discussed and accepted by LRS faculty in 2013 about new trends and directions in academic libraries, namely diversification of LRS faculty; breaking from the traditional library mold of including faculty from different disciplines with different opinions and ideas.