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The Journal of Emerging Learning Design special issue: The Digital Humanities

Call for Papers
The Journal of Emerging Learning Design special issue: The Digital Humanities

Submissions due date

On/before November 14, 2016.

Editors
Jerry Alan Fails (Boise State University) and AJ Kelton (Montclair State University)

Introduction
The Journal of Emerging Learning Design is pleased to announce the Call for Papers for its first Special Issue: The Digital Humanities.

With roots reaching back as far as 1940, the term Digital Humanities came into wide usage in late 2012 and has slowly risen in popularity since then. A Google Scholar search for “digital humanities” yields just under 30 results during the year 2000 and over 4,700 during 2015.  The increase in the number of published articles in 15 years is second only to the diversity of the research that is included.

About the ELDj

The Journal of Emerging Learning Design (ELDj) is an open access, peer-reviewed, online journal that provides a platform for academics and practitioners to explore emerging learning design theories, concepts, and issues and their implications at national and international levels.

An outgrowth of the annual Emerging Learning Design Conference, which makes its home at Montclair State University (MSU), the ELDj invites scholarly communication in the emerging learning design field and will present best practices in design and implementation by offering articles that present, propose, or review engaging and dynamic approaches to pedagogy and how technology can better enhance it.

More details can be found at http://eldj.montclair.edu/about/

About the Special Issue

The ELDj has purposefully kept the focus of the theme for this special issue broad.  The intent is to continue to break down traditional academic silos and allow for an open dialogue and sharing with respect to what is considered the Digital Humanities.  ELDj is intentionally taking a broad consideration for what is included in the digital humanities with the clear understanding that this issue, and the articles within, will contribute to this growing field and provide a groundwork for further reflection and research.

Timeline

Deadline for Submission: November 14, 2016

Notification of Acceptance: March 1st, 2017

Final Revised Submission: April 21, 2017

Publication: June 2, 2017

Publication and Presentation

The issue will be published prior to, and featured at, the 7th Annual Emerging Learning Design Conference (ELDc17) on June 2nd, 2017.

Based on when a submission is accepted, authors may be offered the opportunity to present their research at the 7th Annual Emerging Learning Design Conference in June, 2017.  Presentations must be given in an appropriate presentation format for the conference: panel (full conference audience), workshop (120 minutes), concurrent (45 minutes), or Sparks! (5 minutes to full conference audience).

Submission Details

Manuscripts should be the appropriate length for the material being presented.

  • Full paper manuscripts can vary from 2500-4500 words in addition to an abstract of 250 words and a works cited section of appropriate length.
  • Briefs or Trends papers have a limit of 1000 words.

A description of each type of submission and guidelines can be found at http://eldj.montclair.edu/submission-guidelines/  ELDj uses a double-blind, peer-review process. Submissions should not have been published previously or be under consideration for publication elsewhere.   Authors should review the above linked guidelines for important and relevant information.

Submissions should be sent to eldj@mail.montclair.edu: questions and information requests may be sent to the Editors at the same address.

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more on digital humanities and publications for digital humanities in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+humanities

learning experience design

Building a Learning Innovation Network

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/blogs/technology-and-learning/building-learning-innovation-network

new interdisciplinary field of learning innovation emerging.

Learning innovation, as conceptualized as an interdisciplinary field, attempts to claim a space at the intersection of design, technology, learning science and analytics — all in the unique context of higher education.

professional associations, such as POD, ELI, UPCEA, (https://upcea.edu/) OLC (https://onlinelearningconsortium.org/), ASU GSV (https://www.asugsvsummit.com/) and SXSW Edu (https://www.sxswedu.com/) — among many other conferences and events put on by professional associations.

A professional community of practice differs from that of an interdisciplinary academic network. Professional communities of practice are connected through shared professional goals. Where best practices and shared experiences form the basis of membership in professional associations, academic networks are situated within marketplaces for ideas. Academic networks run on the generation of new ideas and scholarly exchange. These two network models are different.

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https://elearningindustry.com/learning-experience-design-instructional-design-difference

“Learning Experience Design™ is a synthesis of Instructional Design, educational pedagogy, neuroscience, social sciences, design thinking, and User Experience Design.”

The Process: ADDIE Vs. Design Thinking

The Process: ADDIE Vs. Design Thinking

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more on LX design in this iMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=learning+design

Universal Design for Learning

CAST’s 4th Annual UDL Symposium:Empowering Learners

http://www.cast.org/whats-new/events/2018/07/4th-annual-udl-symposium.html

This year’s UDL Symposium was an opportunity to come together as a community to explore the promise of Universal Design for Learning for empowering learners. By engaging in sessions designed to encourage critical conversations, problem-solving, and hands-on exploration, participants considered empowerment through a UDL lens. Participants left with a deeper understanding of the important role empowerment plays in learning and with concrete examples of ways to leverage UDL for these critical aims.We hope our participants left with the confidence and the motivation to apply their learning to their practice—and with a new network of colleagues to encourage and support their efforts.

microlearning instructional design

Microlearning: The Emerging Instructional Design Strategy in Elearning

BY SYED AMJAD ALI NOVEMBER 8, 2017

https://elearning.adobe.com/2017/11/microlearning-the-emerging-instructional-design-strategy-in-elearning/
Microlearning is a learning strategy that involves bite-sized learning nuggets (small and focused segments) designed to meet a specific learning outcome. To put it simply, the learning content is chunked to reduce learner’s cognitive overload making it easy for learners to absorb and recall.

An effective microlearning course:

  • Provides deeper learning on a specific concept or a performance objective
  • Is bite-sized, effectively chunked and easily digestible
  • Designed for exact moment-of-need – Right information at right time
  • Ideal for extended performance support providing a better mobile learning experience
  • Focused on a single performance objective, concept or idea
  • Is usually 4 to 5 minutes in length, or shorter
My note:
Adobe is trying to reshape an old theory: chunking
http://snitkof.com/cg156/chunkingtheory.php
https://elearning.adobe.com/2017/11/microlearning-the-emerging-instructional-design-strategy-in-elearning/
by calling it “microlearning”?
What do you think?

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more on instructional design in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=instructional+design

learning space design

An Open Repository of Learning Space Design

The cross-institutional FLEXspace team created a global forum for sharing examples of technology-enhanced learning environments and their impact on teaching and learning.

By Meg Lloyd 10/12/16

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/10/12/an-open-repository-of-learning-space-design.aspx

The Flexible Learning Environments eXchange (FLEXspace) a highly searchable, peer-reviewed repository of technology-enhanced learning spaces, freely available to the higher ed community.

FLEXspace uses the Artstor Shared Shelf platform to create its open education resource and share it with the higher education community.

A user begins by accessing the public facing FLEXspace website, which describes each project.

Ultimately, FLEXspace, used in conjunction with other resources like the Learning Space Rating System, will not only promote understanding of other institutions’ efforts, but also assist individual campus stakeholders in creating master learning space plans.

 

 

 

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more on learning spaces in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=learning+space

online learning and course design

Online learning can work if universities just rethink the design of their courses

https://theconversation.com/online-learning-can-work-if-universities-just-rethink-the-design-of-their-courses-50848

Course design is key to improving student engagement

Training teachers in how to design their courses is key to re-engaging individual students and holding back the tide of dropouts.

Five tips for designing an online course:

  1. State your objective: Each lesson should have one concise, action-oriented learning objective to ensure your lesson design process is focused.
  2. Think as a private tutor: Learners today are inundated with media tailored to them and they expect learning to be tailored as well. So think about how the tools available, including new technologies, will help create meaningful learning moments for all your students.
  3. Storyboard before you build: Being able to see a complete lesson, especially one that integrates various mediums, is essential to creating a successful learning experience.
  4. Build towards high-order thinking: Technology in education can go beyond multiple-choice questions and document repositories. Don’t be afraid to integrate tools that let learners create and share.
  5. Remember you’re learning too: Reviewing learner results from a lesson shouldn’t just be about their score, but also evaluating how effectively the lesson was developed and executed so your teaching can adapt and learn as well.

DESIGNING A LEARNING GAME

Can a Child’s Creativity and Persistence be Assessed by a Game?

http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/12/16/can-a-childs-creativity-and-persistence-be-assessed-by-a-game/

Evidence Based Design. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evidence-based_design

For conscientiousness, researchers were looking for evidence of persistence, perfectionism, organization and carefulness.

more on games, gaming and gamification in this blog at

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=game&submit=Search

Blended Learning Course Design: A Boot Camp for Instructors

Blended Learning Course Design: A Boot Camp for Instructors
http://bit.ly/12V6NzN

Madison, WI
July 29 – 30, 2013

This intensive two-day workshop offers one-to-one instruction and consultation from top innovators in blended learning. It’s a hands-on, working workshop. You bring a syllabus, exams, other course materials, and a computer. You leave with an action plan for a blended course that will keep you on the cutting edge of pedagogy.

Through this process, you will:

– Take one of your existing face-to-face courses and convert it into a blended format
– Feel comfortable and confident with the technology so that IT becomes an aid rather than a barrier to communicating with your students
– Learn the most pedagogically effective ways to blend instructional technology, course content, and course activities to promote interaction of students with each other, the instructor, and the content

You will finish with an understanding of how to balance what happens before class, what happens in class, and what happens after class. You will learn how to organize your own Learning Management System (LMS), and you will be exposed to the very best technology tools to support student learning.

Topics explored during this event include course design principles, pedagogical considerations, technology how-to’s, and student engagement strategies.

LEARN MORE AT http://bit.ly/12V6NzN

Enquiries: support@magnapubs.com

D2L: Course Builder, Course Design Accelerator, Learning Activity Library…

Are you a user of Course Builder, Course Design Accelerator, Learning Activity Library…

Ken Miller (kwmiller@stcloudstate.edu) and I sat today as part of our Technology Week gatherings and were wondering how faculty is using these tools.

We won’t to hear other faculty how they integrate Learning Objectives and Outcomes through the process of building a D2L Course using Course Builder.

CRITICAL PEDAGOGY IN AN AGE OF ONLINE LEARNING

CRITICAL PEDAGOGY IN AN AGE OF ONLINE LEARNING

http://libjournal.uncg.edu/ijcp/article/view/1055/892?fbclid=IwAR3SHDRFlxTbj7lMAuVJ_BsO3wLQaYEcEXEukUPQVXDDOqEnHg_XT9VJ1SE

Paulo Freire and Critical Pedagogy

Freire’s pedagogical concepts, such as problem posing, dialogue, praxis, conscientiazation and the politics of education, were devel-oped in a pre-Internet era. His work in popular education was deeply interpersonal and involved spending significant time in a community becoming familiar with the culture, linguistic patterns, and lifestyle of the people before ever embarking on teaching.

struggles to employ a critical pedagogy in the increasingly assessment-oriented, outcomes-based environment

While designed to make teaching in the online environment more efficient, these systems confront the critical pedagogue with challenges to create a teaching-learning environment that promotes critical reflection not only on the content of a course but on the very way in which content is delivered.

teaching in cyberspace requires a different teaching paradigm altogether

p. 170 Feenberg (2009) developed the Critical Theory of Technology (CTT),

p. 171 As outlined by CTT, technology creates a cyber culture that redefines human identity and the meaning and means of human interaction (Gomez, 2009). When viewed through this lens, online education is not simply another tool for the promotion of learning, but rather an all-encompassing environment managing and controlling access to information, structuring relationships, and redefining individual identities.

p. 171 While masquerading as efforts to enhance student learning, these industries are clearly profit-oriented. Knowledge has become a commodity, students have become consumers, faculty have become content providers, and schools operate as businesses

p. 172 Like Feenberg (2009), Freire would be concerned with the values and principles embedded in the technology of online learning, as well as the cyber culture it has created.

p. 173 Schools did not venture into online learning because they thought it was a better way to teach, but rather because they saw it as a way to reach unreached student populations with the promise of off-site educational offerings. Only later was attention given to developing online pedagogies.

Whereas education in the United States was originally viewed as a way to prepare students for effective citizenship, now it is seen as a way to develop loyal and capable employees of their corporate overlords

p. 174 A second area of concern is the banking nature of the LMSs. One of the underlying assumptions of an LMS like Blackboard™, Moodle™, or Brightspace™ is that the online platform is a repository of resources for teaching and learning.

Freire vehemently rejected this banking approach to education because it did not recognize or encourage the student’s creative, exploratory, and critical abilities. In the banking model the teacher is regarded as the holder and transmitter of knowledge, which is then imparted to the student. The banking model assumes the student is an empty vessel and does not value or recognize the student’s experiential and cultural knowledge

By contrast Freire argued for a problem-posing, constructivist approach that invites students to critically engage their world and one another. In the critical classroom, the student at times takes on the role of teacher and the teacher becomes a learner, inviting a sharing of power and mutual learning. While this approach can be carried out to an extent online, the LMS is set up to be the primary source of information in a course, and the teacher is assigned as the expert designer of the learning experience, thus limiting the constructivist nature and mutuality of the learning process.

p. 175 A third area of concern is the limited access to online learning to large sectors of society. While e-learning advocates tout the greater access to learning provided by online learning (Goral, 2013; Kashi & Conway, 2010), the digital divide is a reality impacting millions of students.

p. 176 A final area of concern is the disembodied nature of the online learning process. One of the major attractions of online learning to potential students is the freedom from having to be in a classroom in a particular time or place.

p. 177 Embodied learning means students must not only engage the cognitive dimension (thinking and reflection), but also partake in concrete action. This action in reflection, and reflection in action, referred to as praxis, involves acting on and in the world as one is seeking to learn about and transform the world.
To limit education to the transmission and reception of text-based knowledge without action undermines the entire learning process (Escobar et al., 1994).
Freire believed dialogue begins not with what the teacher professes to know, but with the student’s experience and knowledge.

p. 179 For Freire, the building of a learning community is essential to creating meaningful dialogue; this is also true for those who seek to teach effectively online. Palloff and Pratt (2007) contend that all online teaching must begin with building community and stress that a carefully constructed online learning community provides a space for students to test ideas, get feedback, and create a collaborative learning experience.
For Freire, learning was a social and democratic event where authoritarianism and control of the learning process are minimized.
“reading the world,” or conscientization, that is, understanding the larger political context in which experience occurs and knowledge is situated. In the current era of Facebook, Twitter, instant message, and other social media, in-depth discussion and analysis is often absent in favor of brief, often innocuous statements and personal opinions.
Through online academic databases, students have easy access to far more sources of information than previous generations. Furthermore, search engines like Google, Yahoo, and the like bring students in contact with remote sources, organizations, and individuals instantly.

p. 180 the challenge is not only the accessing of information, but also encouraging students to become discerning purveyors of information—to develop “critical digital literacy,” the capacity to effectively and critically navigate the databases and myriads of potential sources (Poore, 2011, p. 15)

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more on online teaching in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+teaching

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+learning

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