Searching for "media literacy"

information literacy and social media

library approach to information literacy. or WHAT IS information literacy?

is it the 90-ish notion of standing up in front of bored class and lecturing them how important is to use the online databases, which the university subscribe for

52% of teens use YouTube or other Social Media sites for a typical research assignment in school:

slide 29 out of 56:

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http://image.slidesharecdn.com/generationzfinaljune17-140617085136-phpapp01/95/meet-generation-z-forget-everything-you-learned-about-millennials-29-638.jpg

Infographic from:

http://www.adweek.com/news/advertising-branding/gen-z-infographic-can-help-marketers-get-wise-future-159642

Should information literacy be about digital literacy? Geo-spatial knowledge?

some_text

Should information literacy include videos? Games?

Should information literacy be multiliteracy? Transliteracy?
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/11/27/scholarly-communication-and-information-literacy/

This is what Gen Z will expect from information literacy in particular, from library and education in general:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=h11u3vtcpaY#t=314

 

Media and Technology Literacy and Skills: May 10 workshop offered…

A a workshop for COLL 150 and HONS 100 instructors on May 10.

Here is the outline and resources.

Media Literacy and Skills

Media Literacy (according to Wikipedia — http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Media_literacy)

The term has been conceived in many different ways and across all academic departments (Mihalidis, 2008).

Media literacy is central in a broader concept of access (Sourbati, 2009).

The relationship between visual competencies and the notion of media literacy have not been fully explored or adequately specified (Griffin, 2008).

Media literacy interventions refer to education programs designed to reduce harmful effects of the media by informing the audience about one or more aspects of the media, thereby influencing media-related beliefs and attitudes, and ultimately preventing risky behaviors.  Positive effects of media literacy interventions were observed across diverse agents, target age groups, settings, topics, and countries (Jeong et al, 2012).

Media literacy, information literacy and digital literacy are the three most prevailing concepts that focus on a critical approach towards media messages

The 21st century has marked an unprecedented advancement of new media. New media has become so pervasive that it has penetrated into every aspect of our society. New media literacy plays an essential role for any citizen to participate fully in the 21st century society. Researchers have documented that literacy has evolved historically from classic literacy (reading-writing-understanding) to audiovisual literacy to digital literacy or information literacy and recently to new media literacy. A review of literature on media literacy reveals that there is a lack of thorough analysis of unique characteristics of newmedia and its impacts upon the notion of new media literacy. The purpose of the study is to unpack new media literacyand propose a framework for a systematic investigation of new media literacy

Hobbs versus Potter

Media Skills

Ten basic new media skills that today’s journalist should know: http://www.siliconvalleywatcher.com/mt/archives/2008/03/ten_basic_new_m.php

  • HTML is not dead. QR codes are only one new technology, which can revive it. But:
  • WordPress might be preferable to Adobe Dreamweaver.
  • PPT is not enough. Prezi does not replace it. Then what? Desktop/lpatop versus tablet (Stampsy). Or the Cloud m(VoiceThread)? Does Media skills = presentation skills?
  • iMovie | Movie Maker (local) versus YouTube (Cloud)
  • Flickr (Cloud) versus Photoshop (local).

Sources:

Mihailidis, P. (2008). Are We Speaking the Same Language? Assessing the State of Media Literacy in U.S. Higher Education. Simile8(4), 1-14. doi:10.3138/sim.8.4.001 http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=40303609

Hobbs, R. (2011). EMPOWERING LEARNERS WITH DIGITAL AND MEDIA LITERACY. Knowledge Quest39(5), 12-17. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=61819923

http://www.knightcomm.org/digital-and-media-literacy-a-plan-of-action/

Koltay, T. (2011). The media and the literacies: media literacy, information literacy, digital literacy. Media, Culture & Society33(2), 211-221. doi:10.1177/0163443710393382  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=59569702

“Victor” CHEN, D., WU, J., & WANG, Y. (2011). Unpacking New Media Literacy. Journal Of Systemics, Cybernetics & Informatics9(2), 84-88. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=83259046

Sourbati, M. (2009). Media Literacy and Universal Access in Europe. Information Society25(4), 248-254. doi:10.1080/01972240903028680  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=43050924

GRIFFIN, M. (2008). Visual competence and media literacy: can one exist without the other?. Visual Studies,23(2), 113-129. doi:10.1080/14725860802276255  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=33944793

Jeong, S., Cho, H., & Hwang, Y. (2012). Media Literacy Interventions: A Meta-Analytic Review. Journal Of Communication62(3), 454-472. doi:10.1111/j.1460-2466.2012.01643.x http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=76349359

Yates, B. L. (2002). Media education’s present and future: A survey of teachers. Simile2(3), N.PAG. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=10537377

Technology Literacy and Skills

Technology Literacy

definition:

consider this: http://blog.lib.umn.edu/chri1010/TLI/023958.html

Technology Literacy is the ability to responsibly use appropriate technology to communicate, solve problems, and access, manage, integrate, evaluate, and create information to improve learning in all subject areas and to acquire lifelong knowledge and skills in the 21st century.

http://www.coloradotechliteracy.org/org/documentation/module1/definition.htm
http://www.setda.org/toolkit/nlitoolkit/tla/tla02.htm 

Technology literacy is the ability of an individual, working independently and with others, to responsibly, appropriately and effectively use technology tools to access, manage, integrate, evaluate, create and communicate information.

http://www.montgomeryschoolsmd.org/departments/techlit/docs/Definition%20of%20Technology%20Literacy.pdf

“Technological Literacy is the ability to use, manage, assess, and understand technology” (Gallop Poll, 2004, p. 1). “Technological literacy encompasses three interdependent dimensions: (1) knowledge, (2) ways of thinking and acting; and (3) capabilities” (Technically Speaking, 2006, p.1).

http://cms.bsu.edu/-/media/WWW/DepartmentalContent/Senate/AgendasMinutes/200708/techlit2.pdf

Comprehension of technological innovation and the impact of technology on society — may include the ability to select and use specific innovations appropriate to one’s interests and needs.

http://www.education.com/definition/technological-literacy/

Technological Literacy Reconsidered: http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/ejournals/JTE/v4n2/waetjen.jte-v4n2.html

ICT literacy, which is increasingly referred to as the fourth literacy, is neither as well defined nor as readily assessed as reading, writing, and arithmetic (Mirray and Perez, 2010).

The importance for the public and educators to be proficienttechnology users since technology literacy is one of the important skills in the 21st century (Eisenberg et al, 2010).

Technology literacy is hampered by well-intentioned educators who are trying to develop checklists and tests (Miners, 2007).

Technology Skills:

Sources:

http://www.p21.org/overview/skills-framework/350

Pérez, J., & Murray, M. (2010). Generativity: The New Frontier for Information and Communication Technology Literacy. Interdisciplinary Journal Of Information, Knowledge & Management5127-137.  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=58079824

Eisenberg, M., Johnson, D., & Berkowitz, B. (2010). Information, Communications, and Technology (ICT) Skills Curriculum Based on the Big6 Skills Approach to Information Problem-Solving. Library Media Connection28(6), 24-27. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=50728714

Miners, Z., & Pascopella, A. (2007). The NEW Literacies. District Administration43(10), 26-34. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=27024204

NAEP Will Include Technology Literacy in 2012. (Cover story). (2008). Electronic Education Report15(20), 1-7.  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=62828392

Heller-Ross, H. (2004). Reinforcing information and technology literacy. College & Research Libraries News65(6), 321-325. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=13541089

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Do you have ideas and materials regarding Media and Technology Literacy and Skills? Pls contribute…

social media and students

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2019-01-16-here-s-what-happened-when-students-solved-social-media-problems-with-design-thinking

“Social: The New Media.” So I got to work, curating a playlist of videos on topics I wanted them to explore—such as the well-publicised problems with social media platforms and false news

the Stanford History Education Group (SHEG), Google’s Applied Digital Skills and the archives of The Sift from the News Literacy Project.

certification with Future Design School, and equipped with their curriculum app,

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more on social media and education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media+education

more on fake news in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=FAKE+NEWS

ICT information and communication technology literacy

The Role of Librarians in Supporting ICT Literacy

May 9, 2019,

https://er.educause.edu/blogs/2019/5/the-role-of-librarians-in-supporting-ict-literacy

Academic librarians increasingly provide guidance to faculty and students for the integration of digital information into the learning experience.

TPACK: Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge

Many librarians have shied away from ICT literacy, concerned that they may be asked how to format a digital document or show students how to create a formula in a spreadsheet. These technical skills focus more on a specific tool than on the underlying nature of information.

librarians have begun to use an embedded model as a way to deepen their connection with instructors and offer more systematic collection development and instruction. That is, librarians focus more on their partnerships with course instructors than on a separate library entity.

If TPACK is applied to instruction within a course, theoretically several people could be contributing this knowledge to the course. A good exercise is for librarians to map their knowledge onto TPACK.

Large dotted line circle labelled Contexts. Inside large circle are three smaller circles overlapping to create a Venn diagram. Pink Circle: Technological Knowledge (TK). Blue Circle: Content Knowledge (CK). Yellow Circle: Pedagogical Knowledge (PK). Pink/Blue overlap: Technological Content Knowledge (TCK). Blue/Yellow Overlap: Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK). Yellow/Pink Overlap: Technological Pedagogical Knowledge (TPK). Center where all 3 overlap: Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK).

ICT reflects the learner side of a course. However, ICT literacy can be difficult to integrate because it does not constitute a core element of any academic domain. Whereas many academic disciplines deal with key resources in their field, such as vocabulary, critical thinking, and research methodologies, they tend not to address issues of information seeking or collaboration strategies, let alone technological tools for organizing and managing information.

Instructional design for online education provides an optimal opportunity for librarians to fully collaborate with instructors.

The outcomes can include identifying the level of ICT literacy needed to achieve those learning outcomes, a task that typically requires collaboration between the librarian and the program’s faculty member. Librarians can also help faculty identify appropriate resources that students need to build their knowledge and skills. As education administrators encourage faculty to use open educational resources (OERs) to save students money, librarians can facilitate locating and evaluating relevant resources. These OERs not only include digital textbooks but also learning objects such as simulations, case studies, tutorials, and videos.

Reading online text differs from reading print both physically and cognitively. For example, students scroll down rather than turn online pages. And online text often includes hyperlinks, which can lead to deeper coverage—as well as distraction or loss of continuity of thought. Also, most online text does not allow for marginalia that can help students reflect on the content. Teachers and students often do not realize that these differences can impact learning and retention. To address this issue, librarians can suggest resources to include in the course that provide guidance on reading online.

My note – why specialist like Tom Hergert and the entire IMS is crucial for the SCSU library and librarians and how neglecting the IMS role hurts the SCSU library
Similarly, other types of media need to be evaluated, comprehended, and interpreted in light of their critical features or “grammar.” For example, camera angles can suggest a person’s status (as in looking up to someone), music can set the metaphorical tone of a movie, and color choices can be associated with specific genres (e.g., pastels for romances or children’s literature, dark hues for thrillers). Librarians can explain these media literacy concepts to students (and even faculty) or at least suggest including resources that describe these features

My note – on years-long repetition of the disconnect between SCSU ATT, SCSU library and IMS
instructors need to make sure that students have the technical skills to produce these products. Although librarians might understand how media impacts the representation of knowledge, they aren’t necessarily technology specialists. However, instructors and librarians can collaborate with technology specialists to provide that expertise. While librarians can locate online resources—general ones such as Lynda.com or tool-specific guidance—technology specialists can quickly identify digital resources that teach technical skills (my note: in this case IMS). My note: we do not have IDs, another years-long reminder to middle and upper management. Many instructors and librarians have not had formal courses on instructional design, so collaborations can provide an authentic means to gain competency in this process.

My note: Tom and I for years have tried to make aware SCSU about this combo –
Instructors likely have high content knowledge (CK) and satisfactory technological content knowledge (TCK) and technological knowledge (TK) for personal use. But even though newer instructors acquire pedagogical knowledge (PK), pedagogical content knowledge (PCK), and technological pedagogical knowledge (TPK) early in their careers, veteran instructors may not have received this training. The same limitations can apply to librarians, but technology has become more central in their professional lives. Librarians usually have strong one-to-one instruction skills (an aspect of PK), but until recently they were less likely to have instructional design knowledge. ICT literacy constitutes part of their CK, at least for newly minted professionals. Instructional designers are strong in TK, PK, and TPK, and the level of their CK (and TCK and TPK) will depend on their academic background. And technology specialists have the corner on TK and TCK (and hopefully TPK if they are working in educational settings), but they may not have deep knowledge about ICT literacy.

Therefore, an ideal team for ICT literacy integration consists of the instructor, the librarian, the instructional designer, and the technology specialist. Each member can contribute expertise and cross-train the teammates. Eventually, the instructor can carry the load of ICT literacy, with the benefit of specific just-in-time support from the librarian and instructional designer.

My note: I have been working for more then six years as embedded librarian in the doctoral cohort and had made aware the current library administrator (without any response) about my work, as well as providing lengthy bibliography (e.g. http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/08/24/embedded-librarian-qualifications/ and have had meeting with the current SOE administrator and the library administrator (without any response).
I also have delivered discussions to other institutions (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/04/12/embedded-librarian-and-gamification-in-libraries/)
Librarians should seriously consider TPACK as a way to embed themselves into the classroom to incorporate information and ICT literacy.

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more about academic library in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=academic+library

more on SAMR and TRACK models in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/05/17/transform-education-digital-tools/

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/07/29/mn-esummit-2015/

Digital Literacy Initiatives

When Bringing Your Own Device Isn’t Enough: Identifying What Digital Literacy Initiatives Really Need

Authors: Published:  Columns:

https://er.educause.edu/blogs/2019/4/when-bringing-your-own-device-isnt-enough-identifying-what-digital-literacy-initiatives-really-need

Device ownership alone doesn’t make people digitally literate; rather, digital literacy is about how and why they use devices to achieve particular goals and outcomes.

According to the 2018 EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research (ECAR) Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology, 95% of undergraduate students own a smartphone and 91% own a laptop. This near-ubiquitous ownership of these devices might suggest that digital literacy is mainstream, but just because students own digital devices does not mean that they’ve developed digital literacy.

Definitions of digital literacy can include the ability to use and access digital devices, but studies from the past decade tend to deepen this definition. A commonly cited definition from Colin Lankshear and Michele Knobel asserts that digital literacy is “shorthand for the myriad social practices and conceptions of engaging in meaning making mediated by texts that are produced, received, distributed, exchanged etc., via digital codification.”

More recently, scholars including Jennifer Sparrow have suggested even adopting the term digital fluency instead of literacy in order to capture how students may need the “ability to leverage technology to create new knowledge, new challenges, and new problems and to complement these with critical thinking, complex problem solving, and social intelligence to solve the new challenges.”

Digital Familiarity Implies Intrinsic Knowledge

two-thirds of faculty think that students are prepared to use software applications, but students themselves express discomfort with applying these tools for learning.

instructional designers are key players who could take a more visible role in higher education to support educators in bringing explicit instruction on digital literacy engagement into their classes. University staff in instructional design and educational/faculty development spaces consult with instructors, lead workshops, and develop support documentation on a regular basis. People in these roles could be more empowered to have conversations with the instructors they support around building in particular lessons

Douglas Belshaw can be a source of inspiration for understanding how his essential elements of digital literacy may contribute to the development of students’ digital fluencies. In particular, some practices may include:

  1. Integrating the use of different applications and platforms so that students obtain practice in navigating these spaces, learning how to locate relevant and reliable information. For example, guiding students to specific databases that provide articles, books, etc., for your discipline may improve information and digital literacy. This is critical because most students default to Google search and Wikipedia, which may not be where you want them to explore topics.
  2. Developing student’s ability to curate content and how to follow academic integrity guidelines for citations and references.
  3. Establishing the norms and purpose for effective communication in a digital academic space.

 

 

 

video skills digital literacy

Video skills are a valuable gateway to digital literacy

Learning to use the equipment and produce content helps students view the media they consume through a more critical lens

In a world of digital consumption, teaching students how to create what they see, hear and watch is like teaching them the secrets behind a magic trick. Students often spend hours weekly on digital devices, reading stories or looking at images, GIFs and video. They consume vast amounts of digital media without often understanding how it’s created.

Bradley has been teaching the video production class since 2005 as its regional occupational program (ROP) instructor for the Graphic Communications, Video Production, and Computer Animation and Modeling courses. Besides helping students develop technical skills, he also infuses his classes with classic film screenings. Students might come to class and watch “Fantasia,” “High Noon,” “Metropolis” and “Dr. Strangelove,” he says.

He also assigns students work that has a specific focus in mind and brings in local experts to help them learn more about a subject before they create.

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more on digital literacy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy

digital literacy Confucius Institute

Levi Johnson and students SCSU Confucius Institute

Posted by InforMedia Services on Thursday, August 23, 2018

Plan for Fall 2018

August 23, 2018.

My name is Plamen Miltenoff and I will be assisting in your instruction today: Here is more about me: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/ and more about the issues we will be discussing today: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/
As well as my email address for further contacts: pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu

  1. Social Media for 2018
    1. WeChat and the connection to other social media
      1. building a community on WeChat
    2. SCSU Edublog http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ci/
      1. the idea of a blog. the advantages compared to SM such as WeChat / Facebook
    3. Reflections
      1. Multimedia
    4. Connecting blogs to social media (WeChat and similar)
  2. Digital Literacy instruction
    1. what is digital literacy and how does it differ from other literacies? Why is it important?
      What other literacies must be considered when speaking about DL? E.g. media literacy: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=media+literacy
    2. Internet Resources
        1. How do we search?
          1. Google and Google Scholar (more focused, peer reviewed, academic content)
          2. Digg http://digg.com/, Reddit https://www.reddit.com/ , Quora https://www.quora.com/
          3. SCSU Library search, Google, Professional organization, (NASSP), Stacks of magazines, csu library info, but need to know what all of the options mean on that page
        2. Custom Search Engine:
          http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/11/17/google-custom-search-engine/
        3. Basic electronic (library) search information and strategies. Library research services
          https://www.semanticscholar.org/
        4. subject guide 3
        5. –Strategies for conducting advanced searches (setting up filters and search criteria)Filtersfilters
        6. ++++++++++++++++
          Search criteriasearch_criteria

      sdfgsdfg

    3. citation management software to organize bibliographic information
    4. Refworkhttps://www.refworks.com/refworks2/default.aspx?r=authentication::init&groupcode=RWStCloudSU
    5. Alternatives to Refworks (currently retired):
      1. Zotero, Mendeley, Endnote
      2. Fast and easy bibliographic tools:
        http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/12/06/bibliographic-tools-fast-and-easy/

Media Manipulation and Disinformation Online

A Review of ‘Media Manipulation and Disinformation Online’

In Media Manipulation and Disinformation Online, Marwick and Lewis (2017) of the Data & Society Research Institute described the agents of media manipulation, their modus operandi, motivators, and how they’ve taken advantage of the vulnerability of online media. The researchers described the manipulators as right-wing extremists (RWE), also known as alt-right, who run the gamut from sexists (including male sexual conquest communities) to white nationalists to anti-immigration activists and even those who rebuke RWE identification but whose actions confer such classification. These manipulators rally behind a shared belief on online forums, blogs, podcasts, and social media through pranks or ruinous trolling anonymity, usurping participatory culture methods (networking, humor, mentorship) for harassment, and competitive cyber brigades that earn status by escalating bullying such as the sharing of a target’s private information.

Marwick and Lewis reported on how RWE groups have taken advantage of certain media tactics to gain viewers’ attention such as novelty and sensationalism, as well as their interactions with the public via social media, to manipulate it for their agenda. For instance, YouTube provides any individual with a portal and potential revenue to contribute to the media ecosystem. The researchers shared the example of the use of YouTube by conspiracy theorists, which can be used as fodder for extremist networks as conspiracies generally focus on loss of control of important ideals, health, and safety.

One tactic they’re using is to package their hate in a way that appeals to millennials. They use attention hacking to increase their status such as hate speech, which is later recanted as trickster trolling all the while gaining the media’s attention for further propagation

SHARED MODUS OPERANDI

Marwick and Lewis reported the following shared tactics various RWE groups use for online exploits:

  • Ambiguity of persona or ideology,
  • Baiting a single or community target’s emotions,
  • Bots for amplification of propaganda that appears legitimately from a real person,
  • “…Embeddedness in Internet culture… (p. 28),”
  • Exploitation of young male rebelliousness,
  • Hate speech and offensive language (under the guise of First Amendment protections),
  • Irony to cloak ideology and/or skewer intended targets,
  • Memes for stickiness of propaganda,
  • Mentorship in argumentation, marketing strategies, and subversive literature in their communities of interest,
  • Networked and agile groups,
  • “…Permanent warfare… (p.12)” call to action,
  • Pseudo scholarship to deceive readers,
  • “…Quasi moral arguments… (p. 7)”
  • Shocking images for filtering network membership,
  • “Trading stories up the chain… (p. 38)” from low-level news outlets to mainstream, and
  • Trolling others with asocial behavior.

teenagers in Veles, Macedonia who profited around 16K dollars per month via Google’s AdSense from Facebook post engagements

a long history of mistrust with mainstream media

If you’re a college instructor of communications or teach digital literacy as a librarian, see the corresponding syllabus for this article. It provides discussion questions and assignments for teaching students about media manipulation. To teach your students how to combat fake news online, see my post on Navigating Post-Truth Societies: Strategies, Resources, and Technologies.

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more on fake news in this iMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=fake+news

Digital Literacy for SPED 405

Digital Literacy for SPED 405. Behavior Theories and Practices in Special Education.

Instructor Mark Markell. mamarkell@stcloudstate.edu Mondays, 5:30 – 8:20 PM. SOE A235

Preliminary Plan for Monday, Sept 10, 5:45 PM to 8 PM

Introduction – who are the students in this class. About myself: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty Contact info, “embedded” librarian idea – I am available to help during the semester with research and papers

about 40 min: Intro to the library: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/bi/
15 min for a Virtual Reality tours of the Library + quiz on how well they learned the library:
http://bit.ly/VRlib
and 360 degree video on BYOD:
Play a scavenger hunt IN THE LIBRARY: http://bit.ly/learnlib
The VR (virtual reality) and AR (augmented reality) component; why is it important?
why is this technology brought up to a SPED class?
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/11/18/immersive-journalism/
autism: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/09/10/sound-and-brain/
Social emotional learning
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/05/31/vr-ar-sel-empathy/
(transition to the next topic – digital literacy)

about 50 min:

  1. Digital Literacy

How important is technology in our life? Profession?

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/08/20/employee-evolution/

Do you think technology overlaps with the broad field of special education? How?
How do you define technology? What falls under “technology?”

What is “digital literacy?” Do we need to be literate in that sense? How does it differ from technology literacy?
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy

Additional readings on “digital literacy”
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/08/23/nmc-digital-literacy/

Digital Citizenship: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/10/19/digital-citizenship-info/
Play Kahoot: https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/e844253f-b5dd-4a91-b096-b6ff777e6dd7
Privacy and surveillance: how does these two issues affect your students? Does it affect them more? if so, how?  http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/08/21/ai-tracks-students-writings/

Social Media:
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/lib290/. if you want to survey the class, here is the FB group page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/LIB290/

Is Social Media part of digital literacy? Why? How SM can help us become more literate?

Digital Storytelling:
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/lib490/

How is digital storytelling essential in digital literacy?

about 50 min:

  1. Fake News and Research

Syllabus: Teaching Media Manipulation: https://datasociety.net/pubs/oh/DataAndSociety_Syllabus-MediaManipulationAndDisinformationOnline.pdf

#FakeNews is a very timely and controversial issue. in 2-3 min choose your best source on this issue. 1. Mind the prevalence of resources in the 21st century 2. Mind the necessity to evaluate a) the veracity of your courses b) the quality of your sources (the fact that they are “true” does not mean that they are the best). Be prepared to name your source and defend its quality.
How do you determine your sources? How do you decide the reliability of your sources? Are you sure you can distinguish “good” from “bad?”
Compare this entry https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_fake_news_websites
to this entry: https://docs.google.com/document/d/10eA5-mCZLSS4MQY5QGb5ewC3VAL6pLkT53V_81ZyitM/preview to understand the scope

Do you know any fact checking sites? Can you identify spot sponsored content? Do you understand syndication? What do you understand under “media literacy,” “news literacy,” “information literacy.”  http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/03/28/fake-news-resources/

Why do we need to explore the “fake news” phenomenon? Do you find it relevant to your professional development?

Let’s watch another video and play this Kahoot: https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/21379a63-b67c-4897-a2cd-66e7d1c83027

So, how do we do academic research? Let’s play another Kahoot: https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/5e09bb66-4d87-44a5-af21-c8f3d7ce23de
If you to structure this Kahoot, what are the questions, you will ask? What are the main steps in achieving successful research for your paper?

  • Research using social media

what is social media (examples). why is called SM? why is so popular? what makes it so popular?

use SM tools for your research and education:

– Determining your topic. How to?
Digg http://digg.com/, Reddit https://www.reddit.com/ , Quora https://www.quora.com
Facebook, Twitter – hashtags (class assignment 2-3 min to search)
LinkedIn Groups
YouTube and Slideshare (class assignment 2-3 min to search)
Flickr, Instagram, Pinterest for visual aids (like YouTube they are media repositories)

Academia.com (https://www.academia.edu/Academia.edu, a paper-sharing social network that has been informally dubbed “Facebook for academics,” https://www.academia.edu/31942069_Facebook_for_Academics_The_Convergence_of_Self-Branding_and_Social_Media_Logic_on_Academia.edu

ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/

– collecting and managing your resources:
Delicious https://del.icio.us/
Diigo: https://www.diigo.com/
Evernote: evernote.com OneNote (Microsoft)

blogs and wikis for collecting data and collaborating

– Managing and sharing your information:
Refworks,
Zotero https://www.zotero.org/,
Mendeley, https://www.mendeley.com/

– Testing your work against your peers (globally):

Wikipedia:
First step:Using Wikipedia.Second step: Contributing to Wikipedia (editing a page). Third step: Contributing to Wikipedia (creating a page)  https://www.evernote.com/shard/s101/sh/ef743d1a-4516-47fe-bc5b-408f29a9dcb9/52d79bfa20ee087900764eb6a407ec86

– presenting your information


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