Searching for "mendeley"

Embase and Mendeley

Systematic reviews with Embase and Mendeley

Xuanyan Xu, Embase Solution Marketing Manager; Max Dumoulin, VP of Institutional Offerings at Elsevie  50 mins

https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/16527/323183

PICO framework to structure a question (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/08/08/embase-and-mendeley/):
Population, Patient, Problem
Intervention
Comparison
Outcome

prepare systematic review

 

 

 

Emtree: controlled vocabulary for describing bio medicine and life science consents.

Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions

https://training.cochrane.org/handbook

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More on search and classification
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/05/21/measuring-learning-outcomes-of-new-library-initiatives/ namely Sebastian Bock presentation from Springer Nature: https://www.facebook.com/InforMediaServices/videos/1541922439251581/ and https://drive.google.com/file/d/1jSOyNXQuqgGTrhHIapq0uxAXQAvkC6Qb/view

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more on Mendeley in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mendeley

bibliographical data analysis nVivo

Bibliographical data analysis with Zotero and nVivo

Bibliographic Analysis for Graduate Students, EDAD 518, Fri/Sat, May 15/16, 2020

This session will not be about qualitative research (QR) only, but rather about a modern 21st century approach toward the analysis of your literature review in Chapter 2.

However, the computational approach toward qualitative research is not much different than computational approach for your quantitative research; you need to be versed in each of them, thus familiarity with nVivo for qualitative research and with SPSS for quantitative research should be pursued by any doctoral student.

Qualitative Research

Here a short presentation on the basics:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2019/03/25/qualitative-analysis-basics/

Further, if you wish to expand your knowledge, on qualitative research (QR) in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=qualitative+research

Workshop on computational practices for QR:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/04/01/qualitative-method-research/

Here is a library instruction session for your course
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2020/01/24/digital-literacy-edad-828/

Once you complete the overview of the resources above, please make sure you have Zotero working on your computer; we will be reviewing the Zotero features before we move to nVivo.

Here materials on Zotero collected in the IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=zotero

Of those materials, you might want to cover at least:

https://youtu.be/ktLPpGeP9ic

Familiarity with Zotero is a prerequisite for successful work with nVivo, so please if you are already working with Zotero, try to expand your knowledge using the materials above.

nVivo

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/01/11/nvivo-shareware/

Please use this link to install nVivo on your computer. Even if we were not in a quarantine and you would have been able to use the licensed nVivo software on campus, for convenience (working on your dissertation from home), most probably, you would have used the shareware. Shareware is fully functional on your computer for 14 days, so calculate the time you will be using it and mind the date of installation and your consequent work.

For the purpose of this workshop, please install nVivo on your computer early morning on Saturday, May 16, so we can work together on nVivo during the day and you can continue using the software for the next two weeks.

Please familiarize yourself with the two articles assigned in the EDAD 815 D2L course content “Practice Research Articles“ :

Brosky, D. (2011). Micropolitics in the School: Teacher Leaders’ Use of Political Skill and Influence Tactics. International Journal of Educational Leadership Preparation, 6(1). https://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ972880

Tooms, A. K., Kretovics, M. A., & Smialek, C. A. (2007). Principals’ perceptions of politics. International Journal of Leadership in Education, 10(1), 89–100. https://doi.org/10.1080/13603120600950901

It is very important to be familiar with the articles when we start working with nVivo.

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How to use Zotero

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2020/01/27/zotero-workshop/

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How to use nVivo for bibliographic analysis

The following guideline is based on this document:

Bibliographical data analysis using Nvivo

whereas the snapshots are replaced with snapshots from nVivol, version 12, which we will be using in our course and for our dissertations.

Concept of bibliographic data

Bibliographic Data is an organized collection of references to publish in literature that includes journals, magazine articles, newspaper articles, conference proceedings, reports, government and legal publications. The bibliographical data is important for writing the literature review of a research. This data is usually saved and organized in databases like Mendeley or Endnote. Nvivo provides the option to import bibliographical data from these databases directly. One can import End Note library or Mendeley library into Nvivo. Similar to interview transcripts, one can represent and analyze bibliographical data using Nvivo. To start with bibliographical data representation, this article previews the processing of literature review in Nvivo.

Importing bibliographical data

Bibliographic Data is imported using Mendeley, Endnote and other such databases or applications that are supported with Nvivo.  Bibliographical data here refers to material in the form of articles, journals or conference proceedings. Common factors among all of these data are the author’s name and year of publication. Therefore, Nvivo helps  to import and arrange these data with their titles as author’s name and year of publication. The process of importing bibliographical data is presented in the figures below.

import Zotero data in nVivo

 

 

 

 

select the appropriate data from external folder

select the appropriate data from external folder

step 1 create record in nVIvo

 

step 2 create record in nVIvo

step 3 create record in nVIvo

 

Coding strategies for literature review

Coding is a process of identifying important parts or patterns in the sources and organizing them in theme node. Sources in case of literature review include material in the form of PDF. That means literature review in Nvivo requires grouping of information from PDF files in the forms of theme nodes. Nodes directly do not create content for literature review, they present ideas simply to help in framing a literature review. Nodes can be created on the basis of theme of the study, results of the study, major findings of the study or any other important information of the study. After creating nodes, code the information of each of the articles into its respective codes.

Nvivo allows coding the articles for preparing a literature review. Articles have tremendous amount of text and information in the forms of graphs, more importantly, articles are in the format of PDF. Since Nvivo does not allow editing PDF files, apply manual coding in case of literature review.  There are two strategies of coding articles in Nvivo.

  1. Code the text of PDF files into a new Node.
  2. Code the text of PDF file into an existing Node. The procedure of manual coding in literature review is similar to interview transcripts.

Add Node to Cases

 

 

 

 

 

The Case Nodes of articles are created as per the author name or year of the publication.

For example: Create a case node with the name of that author and attach all articles in case of multiple articles of same Author in a row with different information. For instance in figure below, five articles of same author’s name, i.e., Mr. Toppings have been selected together to group in a case Node. Prepare case nodes like this then effortlessly search information based on different author’s opinion for writing empirical review in the literature.

Nvivo questions for literature review

Apart from the coding on themes, evidences, authors or opinions in different articles, run different queries based on the aim of the study. Nvivo contains different types of search tools that helps to find information in and across different articles. With the purpose of literature review, this article presents a brief overview of word frequency search, text search, and coding query in Nvivo.

Word frequency

Word frequency in Nvivo allows searching for different words in the articles. In case of literature review, use word frequency to search for a word. This will help to find what different author has stated about the word in the article. Run word frequency  on all types of sources and limit the number of words which are not useful to write the literature.

For example, run the command of word frequency with the limit of 100 most frequent words . This will help in assessing if any of these words remotely provide any new information for the literature (figure below).

Query Text Frequency

andword frequency search

and

word frequency query saved

Text search

Text search is more elaborative tool then word frequency search in Nvivo. It allows Nvivo to search for a particular phrase or expression in the articles. Also, Nvivo gives the opportunity to make a node out of text search if a particular word, phrase or expression is found useful for literature.

For example: conduct a text search query to find a word “Scaffolding” in the articles. In this case Nvivo will provide all the words, phrases and expression slightly related to this word across all the articles (Figure 8 & 9). The difference between test search and word frequency lies in generating texts, sentences and phrases in the latter related to the queried word.

Query Text Search

Coding query

Apart from text search and word frequency search Nvivo also provides the option of coding query. Coding query helps in  literature review to know the intersection between two Nodes. As mentioned previously, nodes contains the information from the articles.  Furthermore it is also possible that two nodes contain similar set of information. Therefore, coding query helps to condense this information in the form of two way table which represents the intersection between selected nodes.

For example, in below figure, researcher have search the intersection between three nodes namely, academics, psychological and social on the basis of three attributes namely qantitative, qualitative and mixed research. This coding theory is performed to know which of the selected themes nodes have all types of attributes. Like, Coding Matrix in figure below shows that academic have all three types of attributes that is research (quantitative, qualitative and mixed). Where psychological has only two types of attributes research (quantitative and mixed).

In this way, Coding query helps researchers to generate intersection between two or more theme nodes. This also simplifies the pattern of qualitative data to write literature.

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Please do not hesitate to contact me with questions, suggestions before, during or after our workshop and about ANY questions and suggestions you may have about your Chapter 2 and, particularly about your literature review:

Plamen Miltenoff, Ph.D., MLIS

Professor | 320-308-3072 | pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu | http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/ | schedule a meeting: https://doodle.com/digitalliteracy | Zoom, Google Hangouts, Skype, FaceTalk, Whatsapp, WeChat, Facebook Messenger are only some of the platforms I can desktopshare with you; if you have your preferable platform, I can meet you also at your preference.

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more on nVIvo in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=nvivo

more on Zotero in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=zotero

Zotero workshop

We have openings in the upcoming Zotero workshop:

What: Zotero and comparison with similar bibliographic tools (e.g. Mendeley)
When: Tuesday, January 27, 9:30AM
Where: Zoom session: https://minnstate.zoom.us/my/zotero (9107443388)

Hands-on session for installation and introduction to using Zotero to organize your sources, in-text cite them and compile bibliography.

If you prefer F2F to online, we meet in MC 205. Here directions to MC 205: https://youtu.be/jjpLR3FnBLI

If day/time not convenient for you, please schedule a meeting: https://doodle.com/digitalliteracy

Zotero for Edublog
https://gouldguides.carleton.edu/c.php?g=146876&p=3221443

Zotero for NVivo

How to cite book chapter:

How to organize PDF in Zotero with ZotFile.com

Contact pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu
and/or via social media:
https://www.facebook.com/InforMediaServices/posts/2507587592685056
https://twitter.com/SCSUtechinstruc/status/1221849674895843330
https://www.instagram.com/p/B71PvMsp8p3/

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more info
https://elearningindustry.com/12-best-free-online-bibliography-and-citation-tools

 

How to add Zotero Word Plugin:
https://www.zotero.org/support/word_processor_integration

http://libguides.northwestern.edu/zotero/word

How to add Zotero to Google Docs:

http://libguides.northwestern.edu/zotero/google

 

tools for collaborative research and early discovery

Webinar: tools for collaborative research and early discovery

Librarians have been at the forefront in promoting open access publishing options and informing their researchers about the open access landscape. Open access is increasingly recognized as embedded within the larger framework of open science. Consequently, library and librarian roles are expanding into new areas such as open data, open educational resources and open infrastructure.

In this webinar, Elsevier product managers will present tools that enable more inclusive, collaborative and transparent research.

TOPICS:

•The library as publisher of OERs and OA journals with Digital Commons
•Open access content discovery in ScienceDirect and Scopus
•Open journal metrics: CiteScore, SNIP and SJR
•Publishing research outputs openly in Mendeley Data and SSRN

Digital fluency for new international graduate students

SHORT LINK TO THIS INFORMATION: http://bit.ly/scsugradstudies

with Melanie Guentzel, Director of Graduate Student Services, mjguentzel@stcloudstate.edu

when: Tue, Jan. 22, 2 PM
where: Plymouth campus on Zoom: https://minnstate.zoom.us/j/438287799
who: new international graduate students at SCSU

students in Engineering Management, Regulatory Affairs, and Applied Clinical Research.

Access the library from a distance: https://www.stcloudstate.edu/library/

Research and Writing Tips

Digital fluency

 

 

Clicks or Canned

Will ‘Publish or Perish’ Become ‘Clicks or Canned’? The Rise of Academic Social Networks

Jessica Leigh Brown     Aug 1, 2017

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2017-08-01-will-publish-or-perish-become-clicks-or-canned-the-rise-of-academic-social-networks

Scholars want peers to find—and cite—their research, and these days that increasingly happens on social media. The old adage ‘publish or perish’ could soon go digital as ‘clicks or canned.’

Several platforms have emerged over the past decade, offering researchers the chance to share their work and connect with other scholars. But some of those services have a bad rap from academics who say commercial sites lack the integrity of institutional repositories run by traditional universities. (Among the most widely-villified are ResearchGate and Academia.edu, which is evident by griping on social media and elsewhere.)

a 2015 paper comparing services and tools offered by various academic social networks, says researchers must weigh the benefits and drawbacks of each. “They can be great tools to advance your research, especially social research,” she says. “But just like with Facebook or any other social network, we need to be aware of potential issues we might have with copyright or privacy.”

Academia.edu is the largest of the academic social networks.

Berlin-based ResearchGate

Created as a reference-management tool to help users organize their research, Mendeley also includes a number of social-networking features.

Scholabrate. The service claims to provide a more Facebook-esque, visual experience for academics seeking to network with others in their field.

Similar to Mendeley, Zotero functions primarily as a research tool, allowing users to collect, save, cite and share materials from a wide range of sources. The site also maintains a significant community of academics who can connect through groups and forums, or through their search engine.

 

suggestions for academic writing

these are suggestions from Google Groups with doctoral cohorts 6, 7, 8, 9 from the Ed leadership program

How to find a book from InterLibrary Loan: find book ILL

Citing someone else’s citation?:

http://library.northampton.ac.uk/liberation/ref/adv_harvard_else.php

http://guides.is.uwa.edu.au/c.php?g=380288&p=3109460
use them sparingly:
http://www.apastyle.org/learn/faqs/cite-another-source.aspx
Please take a look at “Paraphrasing sources: in
http://www.roanestate.edu/owl/usingsources_mla.html
it gives you a good idea why will distance you from a possibility of plagiarizing.
n example of resolution by this peer-reviewed journal article
https://doi.org/10.19173/irrodl.v17i5.2566
Ungerer, L. M. (2016). Digital Curation as a Core Competency in Current Learning and Literacy: A Higher Education Perspective. The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning17(5). https://doi.org/10.19173/irrodl.v17i5.2566
Dunaway (2011) suggests that learning landscapes in a digital age are networked, social, and technological. Since people commonly create and share information by collecting, filtering, and customizing digital content, educators should provide students opportunities to master these skills (Mills, 2013). In enhancing critical thinking, we have to investigate pedagogical models that consider students’ digital realities (Mihailidis & Cohen, 2013). November (as cited in Sharma & Deschaine, 2016), however warns that although the Web fulfils a pivotal role in societal media, students often are not guided on how to critically deal with the information that they access on the Web. Sharma and Deschaine (2016) further point out the potential for personalizing teaching and incorporating authentic material when educators themselves digitally curate resources by means of Web 2.0 tools.
p. 24. Communities of practice. Lave and Wenger’s (as cited in Weller, 2011) concept of situated learning and Wenger’s (as cited in Weller, 2011) idea of communities of practice highlight the importance of apprenticeship and the social role in learning.
criteria to publish a paper

Originality: Does the paper contain new and significant information adequate to justify publication?

Relationship to Literature: Does the paper demonstrate an adequate understanding of the relevant literature in the field and cite an appropriate range of literature sources? Is any significant work ignored?

Methodology: Is the paper’s argument built on an appropriate base of theory, concepts, or other ideas? Has the research or equivalent intellectual work on which the paper is based been well designed? Are the methods employed appropriate?

Results: Are results presented clearly and analyzed appropriately? Do the conclusions adequately tie together the other elements of the paper?

Implications for research, practice and/or society: Does the paper identify clearly any implications for research, practice and/or society? Does the paper bridge the gap between theory and practice? How can the research be used in practice (economic and commercial impact), in teaching, to influence public policy, in research (contributing to the body of knowledge)? What is the impact upon society (influencing public attitudes, affecting quality of life)? Are these implications consistent with the findings and conclusions of the paper?

Quality of Communication: Does the paper clearly express its case, measured against the technical language of the field and the expected knowledge of the journal’s readership? Has attention been paid to the clarity of expression and readability, such as sentence structure, jargon use, acronyms, etc.

mixed method research

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3deric%26AN%3dEJ971947%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

Stanton, K. V., & Liew, C. L. (2011). Open Access Theses in Institutional Repositories: An Exploratory Study of the Perceptions of Doctoral Students. Information Research: An International Electronic Journal16(4),

We examine doctoral students’ awareness of and attitudes to open access forms of publication. Levels of awareness of open access and the concept of institutional repositories, publishing behaviour and perceptions of benefits and risks of open access publishing were explored. Method: Qualitative and quantitative data were collected through interviews with eight doctoral students enrolled in a range of disciplines in a New Zealand university and a self-completion Web survey of 251 students. Analysis: Interview data were analysed thematically, then evaluated against a theoretical framework. The interview data were then used to inform the design of the survey tool. Survey responses were analysed as a single set, then by disciple using SurveyMonkey’s online toolkit and Excel. Results: While awareness of open access and repository archiving is still low, the majority of interview and survey respondents were found to be supportive of the concept of open access. The perceived benefits of enhanced exposure and potential for sharing outweigh the perceived risks. The majority of respondents were supportive of an existing mandatory thesis submission policy. Conclusions: Low levels of awareness of the university repository remains an issue, and could be addressed by further investigating the effectiveness of different communication channels for promotion.

PLEASE NOTE:

the researchers use the qualitative approach: by interviewing participants and analyzing their responses thematically, they build the survey.
Then then administer the survey (the quantitative approach)

How do you intend to use a mixed method? Please share

paraphrasing quotes

statement of the problem

Problem statement – Wikipedia

 
Metaphors: A Problem Statement is like… 
metaphor — a novel or poetic linguistic expression where one or more words for a concept are used outside normal conventional meaning to express a similar concept. Aristotle l 
The DNA of the research l A snapshot of the research l The foundation of the research l The Heart of the research l A “taste” of the research l A blueprint for the study
 
 
 
Here is a good exercise for your writing of the problem statement:
Chapter 3
several documents, which can be helpful in two different ways:
– check your structure and methodology
– borrow verbiage
http://education.nova.edu/Resources/uploads/app/35/files/arc_doc/writing_chpt3_quantitative_research_methods.pdf 
http://education.nova.edu/Resources/uploads/app/35/files/arc_doc/writing_chpt3_qualitative_research_methods.pdf
http://www.trinitydc.edu/sps/files/2010/09/APA-6-BGS-Quantitative-Research-Paper-August-2014.pdf

digital object identifier, or DOI

digital object identifier (DOI) is a unique alphanumeric string assigned by a registration agency (the International DOI Foundation) to identify content and provide a persistent link to its location on the Internet. The publisher assigns a DOI when your article is published and made available electronically.

Why do we need it?

2010 Changes to APA for Electronic Materials Digital object identifier (DOI). DOI available. If a DOI is available you no longer include a URL. Example: Author, A. A. (date). Title of article. Title of Journal, volume(number), page numbers. doi: xx.xxxxxxx

http://www.stcloudstate.edu/writeplace/_files/documents/working-with-sources/apa-electronic-material-citations.pdf

Mendeley (vs Zotero and/or RefWorks)

https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/11355/226845?utm_campaign=Mendeley%20Webinars%202&utm_campaignPK=271205324&utm_term=OP28019&utm_content=271205712&utm_source=99&BID=799935188&utm_medium=email&SIS_ID=46360

Online Writing Tools: FourOnlineToolsforwriting

social media and altmetrics

Accodring to Sugimoto et al (2016), the Use of social media platforms for by researchers is high — ranging from 75 to 80% in large -scale surveys (Rowlands et al., 2011; Tenopir et al., 2013; Van Eperen & Marincola, 2011) .
There is one more reason, and, as much as you want to dwell on the fact that you are practitioners and research is not the most important part of your job, to a great degree, you may be judged also by the scientific output of your office and/or institution.
In that sense, both social media and altimetrics might suddenly become extremely important to understand and apply.
Shortly altmetrics (alternative metrics) measure the impact your scientific output has on the community. Your teachers and you present, publish and create work, which might not be presented and published, but may be widely reflected through, e.g. social media, and thus, having impact on the community.
How such impact is measured, if measured at all, can greatly influence the money flow to your institution
For more information:
For EVEN MORE information, read the entire article:
Sugimoto, C. R., Work, S., Larivière, V., & Haustein, S. (2016). Scholarly use of social media and altmetrics: a review of the literature. Retrieved from https://arxiv.org/abs/1608.08112
related information:
In the comments section on this blog entry,
I left notes to
Thelwall, M., & Wilson, P. (2016). Mendeley readership altmetrics for medical articles: An analysis of 45 fields. Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, 67(8), 1962–1972. https://doi.org/10.1002/asi.23501
Todd Tetzlaff is using Mendeley and he might be the only one to benefit … 🙂
Here is some food for thought from the article above:
Doctoral students and junior researchers are the largest reader group in Mendeley ( Haustein & Larivière, 2014; Jeng et al., 2015; Zahedi, Costas, & Wouters, 2014a) .
Studies have also provided evidence of high rate s of blogging among certain subpopulations: for example, approximately one -third of German university staff (Pscheida et al., 2013) and one fifth of UK doctoral students use blogs (Carpenter et al., 2012) .
Social data sharing platforms provide an infrastructure to share various types of scholarly objects —including datasets, software code, figures, presentation slides and videos —and for users to interact with these objects (e.g., comment on, favorite, like , and reuse ). Platforms such as Figshare and SlideShare disseminate scholars’ various types of research outputs such as datasets, figures, infographics, documents, videos, posters , or presentation slides (Enis, 2013) and displays views, likes, and shares by other users (Mas -Bleda et al., 2014) .
Frequently mentioned social platforms in scholarly communication research include research -specific tools such as Mendeley, Zotero, CiteULike, BibSonomy, and Connotea (now defunct) as well as general tools such as Delicious and Digg (Hammond, Hannay, Lund, & Scott, 2005; Hull, Pettifer, & Kell, 2008; Priem & Hemminger, 2010; Reher & Haustein, 2010) .
qualitative research
“The focus group interviews were analysed based on the principles of interpretative phenomenology”
 
1. What are  interpretative phenomenology?
Here is an excellent article in ResarchGate:
 
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/263767248_A_practical_guide_to_using_Interpretative_Phenomenological_Analysis_in_qualitative_research_psychology
 
and a discussion from the psychologists regarding the weaknesses when using IPA (Interpretative phenomenological analysis)

https://thepsychologist.bps.org.uk/volume-24/edition-10/methods-interpretative-phenomenological-analysis

2. What is Constant Comparative Method?

http://www.qualres.org/HomeCons-3824.html

Nvivo shareware

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/01/11/nvivo-shareware/

Qualitative and Quantitative research in lame terms
podcast:
https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/how-scientific-method-works/id278981407?i=1000331586170&mt=2
if you are not podcast fans, I understand. The link above is a pain in the behind to make work, if you are not familiar with using podcast.
Here is an easier way to find it:
1. open your cell phone and go find the podcast icon, which is pre-installed, but you might have not ever used it [yet].
2. In the app, use the search option and type “stuff you should know”
3. the podcast will pop up. scroll and find “How the scientific method works,” and/or search for it if you can.
Once you can play it on the phone, you have to find time to listen to it.
I listen to podcast when i have to do unpleasant chores such as: 1. walking to work 2. washing the dishes 3. flying long hours (very rarely). 4. Driving in the car.
There are bunch of other situations, when you may be strapped and instead of filling disgruntled and stressed, you can deliver the mental [junk] food for your brain.
Earbuds help me: 1. forget the unpleasant task, 2. Utilize time 3. Learn cool stuff
Here are podcasts, I am subscribed for, besides “stuff you should know”:
TED Radio Hour
TED Talks Education
NPR Fresh Air
BBC History
and bunch others, which, if i don’t go a listen for an year, i go and erase and if i peruse through the top chart and something picks my interest, I try.
If I did not manage to convince to podcast, totally fine; do not feel obligated.
However, this podcast, you can listen to on your computer, if you don’t want to download on your phone.
It is one hour show by two geeks, who are trying to make funny (and they do) a dry matter such as quantitative vs qualitative, which you want to internalize:
1. Sometimes at minute 12, they talk about inductive versus deductive to introduce you to qualitative versus quantitative. It is good to listen to their musings, since your dissertation is going through inductive and deductive process, and understanding it, can help you control better your dissertation writing. 
2. Scientific method. Hypothesis etc (around min 17).
While this is not a Ph.D., but Ed.D. and we do not delve into the philosophy of science and dissertation etc. the more you know about this process, the better control you have over your dissertation. 
3. Methods and how you prove (Chapter 3) is discussed around min 35
4. dependent and independent variables and how do you do your research in general (min ~45)
Shortly, listen and please do share your thoughts below. You do not have to be kind to this source offering. Actually, be as critical as possible, so you can help me decide, if I should offer it to the next cohort and thank you in advance for your feedback. 

 

 

digital literacy Confucius Institute

Levi Johnson and students SCSU Confucius Institute

Posted by InforMedia Services on Thursday, August 23, 2018

Plan for Fall 2018

August 23, 2018.

My name is Plamen Miltenoff and I will be assisting in your instruction today: Here is more about me: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/ and more about the issues we will be discussing today: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/
As well as my email address for further contacts: pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu

  1. Social Media for 2018
    1. WeChat and the connection to other social media
      1. building a community on WeChat
    2. SCSU Edublog http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ci/
      1. the idea of a blog. the advantages compared to SM such as WeChat / Facebook
    3. Reflections
      1. Multimedia
    4. Connecting blogs to social media (WeChat and similar)
  2. Digital Literacy instruction
    1. what is digital literacy and how does it differ from other literacies? Why is it important?
      What other literacies must be considered when speaking about DL? E.g. media literacy: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=media+literacy
    2. Internet Resources
        1. How do we search?
          1. Google and Google Scholar (more focused, peer reviewed, academic content)
          2. Digg http://digg.com/, Reddit https://www.reddit.com/ , Quora https://www.quora.com/
          3. SCSU Library search, Google, Professional organization, (NASSP), Stacks of magazines, csu library info, but need to know what all of the options mean on that page
        2. Custom Search Engine:
          http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/11/17/google-custom-search-engine/
        3. Basic electronic (library) search information and strategies. Library research services
          https://www.semanticscholar.org/
        4. subject guide 3
        5. –Strategies for conducting advanced searches (setting up filters and search criteria)Filtersfilters
        6. ++++++++++++++++
          Search criteriasearch_criteria

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    3. citation management software to organize bibliographic information
    4. Refworkhttps://www.refworks.com/refworks2/default.aspx?r=authentication::init&groupcode=RWStCloudSU
    5. Alternatives to Refworks (currently retired):
      1. Zotero, Mendeley, Endnote
      2. Fast and easy bibliographic tools:
        http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/12/06/bibliographic-tools-fast-and-easy/

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