Searching for "minecraft"

effective presentations

Plan

  1. effective presentations
    1. reality: more dynamic environment/two way conversation
    2. conversation does not stop with the end of the presentation
    3. data-mining
    4. communities and connectivity
  2. PowerPoint (the Death of)
  3. Alternatives to PowerPoint

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More on presentations in this IMS blog:

free image sources:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/06/01/social-media-and-presentations-free-image-sources/

Presentation tools for teachers:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/09/30/the-5-best-free-slideshow-presentation-and-creation-tools-for-teachers/

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/07/09/2014-best-educational-web-sites/

Basics of design:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/01/22/basics-of-design/

 

quests in education

Pursuing Quests: How Digital Games Can Create a Learning Journey

http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2015/12/04/pursuing-quests-how-digital-games-can-create-a-learning-journey

Paul Darvasi

Completing missions for rewards is a core mechanic in many video games, including best-sellers like “World of Warcraft,” “Grand Theft Auto,” “Fallout” and “Skyrim.” Quests are diverse and optional, and players can undertake them on their own schedule.

A good quest-based curriculum meets the needs of many students by offering a multiplicity of choices that cover standards

We began looking for ways to meta-game curricular activities,” said Haskell. “We built 3D GameLab to allow us to deliver any curriculum with game-based mechanics

When he first waded into quest-based learning, Isaacs created one central quest path that his students followed at slightly varied paces, and he added some optional side quests that could be completed for extra credits.

“Reluctant or disenfranchised students are very likely to demonstrate renewed interest and engagement when presented with the game-infused option,” she said. “Once the kids were granted some agency in the trajectory of their learning, they really wanted to succeed.” But she also recognizes that games may not be for everybody.

More on Minecraft in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=minecraft&submit=Search

 

Recommendations for games and gaming at LRS

Gaming and Gamification in academic and library settings (paper)
Short URL: http://scsu.mn/1F008Re 

Based on the literature regarding games, gaming, gamification, game-based learning, and serious games, several clear trends emerge:

  1. Gaming and gamification in the sense of game-based learning is about using games and game-like tactics in the education process, for greater engagement and better learning outcomes. However, this is only the first level of such initiative. The second and higher level is about involving students in the game-building and gamification of the learning process (as per Vygotsky’s Zone of…) thus achieving student-centered and experiential learning.
  2. When hosting games and gaming in any library, “in-person” or electronic/online games are welcome but not sufficient to fulfill their promise, especially in an academic library. Per (1), an academic library has the responsibility to involve students and guide them in learning how to engage in the building process required in true game-based learning.
  3. Game-based learning, gaming and gamification in particular, in educational (academic library) settings must consider mobile devices and the BYOD movement in particular as intrinsic parts of the entire process. Approaching the initiative primarily by acquiring online “in-person” games, or game consoles has the same limited educational potential as only hosting games, rather than elevating the students to full guided engagement with game-based learning. If public relations and raised profile are the main goals for the academic library, such an approach is justified. If the academic library seeks to maximize the value of game-based learning, then the library must consider: a. gaming consoles, b. mobile devices as part of a BYOD initiative and c. cloud-based / social games, such as MineCraft, SimCity etc.
  4. Design for game-based learning, gaming and gamification in educational (academic library) settings must include multiple forms of assessment and reward, e.g. badges, leaderboards and/or certificates as an intrinsic part of the entire process. Merely hosting games in the academic library cannot guarantee true game-based learning. The academic library, as the forefront of a game-based learning initiative on campus, must work with faculty on understanding and fine tuning badges and similar new forms of assessment and reward, as they effectively implement large scale game-based learning, focused on the students’ learning gains.

Recommendations for LRS

  1. In regard to LRS, the gaming and gamification process must be organized and led by faculty, including housing and distributing the hardware, software and applications, when needed.
  2. The attached paper and the respective conclusions summarized in four points demand educational and experiential background, which is above the limits of the LRS staff. In addition, the LRS staff has clearly admitted that the pedagogical value of gaming and gamification is beyond their interest. This recommendation is not contradicting to the fact and opportunity for LRS staff to participate in the process and contribute to the process; it just negates the possibility of staff mandating and leading the process, since it will keep the gaming and gamification process on a very rudimentary level.
  3. The process must be further led by faculty with a terminal degree in education (Ph.D.) and experience in the educational field, since, as proved by the attached paper and 4 point conclusion, the goal is not a public-library type of hosting activities, but rather involving students in a pedagogically-sound creative process, with the respective opportunity for assessment and future collaboration with instructors across campus. This recommendation is not contradicting the fact and opportunity for LRS library faculty to participate actively in the process and contribute to the process. It just safeguards from restricting the process to the realm of “public-library” type of hosting activities, but failing to elevate them to the needs of an academic campus and connecting with instructors across campus.
  4. This conclusions adhere to and are derived from the document recommended by the LRS dean, discussed and accepted by LRS faculty in 2013 about new trends and directions in academic libraries, namely diversification of LRS faculty; breaking from the traditional library mold of including faculty from different disciplines with different opinions and ideas.

games for building and exploration

Beyond Minecraft: Games That Inspire Building and Exploration

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/11/beyond-minecraft-games-that-inspire-building-and-exploration/

1. Garry’s Mod 

garryscreenshotGarry’s Mod (GMod) is a sandbox game like Minecraft but instead of building and exploring, students use a fun physics engine that simulates things like gravity and mass. They also use a virtual toy box of assets from Valve Software’s popular games. The tool is a step up in complexity from the elegant simplicity of Minecraft, but with Garry’s Mod, students are exposed to physics concepts while having madcap fun.

2. Kerbal Space Program

kerbal_screenshotKerbal Space Program has a robust physics engine too, but it’s more focused than Garry’s Mod. Players purchase rocket parts, put them together, and then see if they can get a ship into orbit, to one of two moons, or even to another planet. These aren’t easy tasks, so play is focused on trial and error testing, and, like Minecraft, seeking help from the community is part of a successful strategy.

3. Sound Shapes 

soundshapes_screenshotSound Shapes is a visually stunning platform puzzle game set to a rich musical soundscape. Even better: students can create and share their own levels – like interactive sheet music — using sounds and objects unlocked by playing the platform game. It’s an accessible entry point into musical composition as well as game design, and provides an experience that builds on the creativity of Minecraft while offering something wholly unique for music lovers.

4. DIY

DIYFor creative kids who want to get their hands dirty, check out DIY, a site where students can find things to build, instructions for how to build them, and ways to share their creations with others. All projects are aligned to 50 skills that run the gamut from outdoors to indoors, and feature various challenges to complete and cool badges to earn and display.

5. STENCYL

screen568x568Computer programming is a great next step for students who love to mod Minecraft or toy around with the redstone resource (which simulates basic logic and circuitry). One solid entry-level tool is Stencyl, a game creation program focused on codeless, cross-platform game making. By snapping blocks of code together, students can create games that can be published and played on a variety of platforms including mobile phones.

6. CODECADEMY

Codecademy is a web-based, self-paced site that teaches actual industry-standard languages like PHP, Javascript, Python, Ruby, HTML, and CSS. While students don’t create publishable games like they would in Stencyl, their learning is purpose-driven and contextualized, e.g. JavaScript for web development or Ruby for app development. And students do get to see their code’s output directly onscreen.

Minecraft has introduced a lot of youth to games as well as the critical thinking, problem solving, and creation skills necessary for self-motivated learning. The games and sites on this list have the potential to extend that learning, providing fresh outlets for self-expression in the digital world and beyond.

More on gaming in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=minecraft

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=games

Gaming and Education: Resources

Gaming Learning Society
https://www.gameslearningsociety.org/

Report from the intersection of Games, Learning, and Society
http://remakelearning.org/blog/2014/06/19/games-learning-society-recap/
Games, Learning and Society conference in Madison, Wisconsin. practical ideas and arguments from GLS to help you get through the roadblocks that stand between you and learning or teaching through games.

keywords: gamification + library in Twitter:
Readers Save Legacy Library Content by Crowdsourcing Metadata Games
http://www.gamification.co/2014/05/12/readers-save-legacy-content-by-crowdsourcing-metadata-games/What is Gamification and Why Use It in Teaching?
http://ii.library.jhu.edu/2014/05/13/what-is-gamification-and-why-use-it-in-teaching/What Does the Next-Generation School Library Look Like?
http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/06/what-does-the-next-generation-school-library-look-like/
The library now also has reading lounge areas with comfortable modular seating, as well as tables with chairs and stools that students are free to move around; two music studios; a HackerSpace (with high-tech equipment such as a microscope, 3D printer, gaming hardware and software, and a green screen for filming) and a Maker Space that also houses a 3D printer and serves as a “hands-on” craft room where old technology can be disassembled and re-configured with other materials. In short, the Monticello Library Media Center has become a “Learning Commons.”

following now @valibrarian because of MineCraft http://t.co/RnwW7ahOK2
Minecraft and the library: http://blogs.curtin.edu.au/gamification/news/minecraft-and-the-library/

Library Quest Wrap-Up and Post-Game Assessment
https://babeltech.wordpress.com/2014/03/25/library-quest-wrap-up-and-post-game-assessment/

If you build it …? One campus’ firsthand account of gamification in the academic library
http://crln.acrl.org/content/74/4/208.full
Straight from CRL News
SCVNGR as a platform was attractive to us for several reasons, including UCSD’s experience. First, it incorporated gaming into students’ experience of the library, which has been widely explored and recommended as a way to engage library patrons.2,3 Second, it would enable us to connect with students early in the year without needing to commit personnel to lengthy tours and other scheduled services during a busy time.

Pls consider former IMS blog entries. Keyword: “game”:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=game

 

Finland Eyes Programming Classes for Elementary School Students

http://mashable.com/2013/11/16/finland-tech-education-schools/?utm_cid=mash-prod-email-topstories&utm_emailalert=daily&utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=daily

Finland Eyes Programming Classes for Elementary School Students

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Beyond Mindcraft: Games That Inspire Building and Exploration

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/11/beyond-minecraft-games-that-inspire-building-and-exploration/

1. Garry’s Mod 

garryscreenshotGarry’s Mod (GMod) is a sandbox game like Minecraft but instead of building and exploring, students use a fun physics engine that simulates things like gravity and mass. They also use a virtual toy box of assets from Valve Software’s popular games. The tool is a step up in complexity from the elegant simplicity of Minecraft, but with Garry’s Mod,students are exposed to physics concepts while having madcap fun.

2. Kerbal Space Program

kerbal_screenshotKerbal Space Program has a robust physics engine too, but it’s more focused than Garry’s Mod. Players purchase rocket parts, put them together, and then see if they can get a ship into orbit, to one of two moons, or even to another planet. These aren’t easy tasks, so play is focused on trial and error testing, and, like Minecraft, seeking help from the community is part of a successful strategy.

3. Sound Shapes 

soundshapes_screenshotSound Shapes is a visually stunning platform puzzle game set to a rich musical soundscape. Even better: students can create and share their own levels – like interactive sheet music — using sounds and objects unlocked by playing the platform game. It’s an accessible entry point into musical composition as well as game design, and provides an experience that builds on the creativity of Minecraft while offering something wholly unique for music lovers.

4. DIY

DIYFor creative kids who want to get their hands dirty, check out DIY, a site where students can find things to build, instructions for how to build them, and ways to share their creations with others. All projects are aligned to 50 skills that run the gamut from outdoors to indoors, and feature various challenges to complete and cool badges to earn and display.

5. STENYCIL

screen568x568Computer programming is a great next step for students who love to mod Minecraft or toy around with the redstone resource (which simulates basic logic and circuitry). One solid entry-level tool is Stencyl, a game creation program focused on codeless, cross-platform game making. By snapping blocks of code together, students can create games that can be published and played on a variety of platforms including mobile phones.

6. CODECADEMY

Screen Shot 2013-11-18 at 3.31.05 PMCodecademy is a web-based, self-paced site that teaches actual industry-standard languages like PHP, Javascript, Python, Ruby, HTML, and CSS. While students don’t create publishable games like they would in Stencyl, their learning is purpose-driven and contextualized, e.g. JavaScript for web development or Ruby for app development. And students do get to see their code’s output directly onscreen.

Minecraft has introduced a lot of youth to games as well as the critical thinking, problem solving, and creation skills necessary for self-motivated learning. The games and sites on this list have the potential to extend that learning, providing fresh outlets for self-expression in the digital world and beyond.

Digital Identity and Digital Citizenship

5 Excellent Videos to Teach Your Students about Digital Citizenship ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

bibliography:

Ramspott’s blog entry best written for my personal taste, but here is a long list of additional and similar opinions:

Bramman, R. (n.d.). Digital Identity Essentials: Understanding Online Etiquette and the Rules Social Media Engagement. Research Personal Branding. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://www.reachpersonalbranding.com/digital-identity-essentials-understanding-online-etiquette-and-the-rules-social-media-engagement/

Braunstein, D. (2013, March 20). Digital Identities: Who Are You When You’re Online? Huffington Post. Retrieved from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/danya-braunstein/digital-identities-who-ar_b_2904211.html
Dalton, J. C., & Crosby, P. C. (2013). Digital Identity: How Social Media Are Influencing Student Learning and Development in College. Journal of College and Character, 14(1), 1–4. doi:10.1515/jcc-2013-0001
Death and the Social Network: The Persistence of Digital Identity. (n.d.). Jed Brubaker. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://www.jedbrubaker.com/death-and-the-social-network-the-persistence-of-digital-identity/
Digital identity. (2013, October 3). In Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Digital_identity&oldid=575355398
Digital Identity – Social Media and You. (n.d.). Altan Khendup. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://altankhendup.com/altankhendupblog/2013/6/6/digital-identity-social-media-and-you
Digital Identity and Social Media CFC. (n.d.). Liquid Learning. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://warburton.typepad.com/liquidlearning/2009/09/digital-identity-and-social-media-cfc.html
Digital Identity, Social Media, Privacy, Balance, and Being Radical. (n.d.). Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://eduniverse.org/digital-identity-social-media-privacy-balance-and-being-radical
fsubeccaramspott. (n.d.). 2013: The Year of Digital Identity Development in Higher Education. CASE Blog. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://blog.case.org/2013/01/15/2013-the-year-of-digital-identity-development-in-higher-education/
Higher Ed Live – Digital Identity Development. (n.d.). Higher Ed Live. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://higheredlive.com/higher-ed-live-digital-identity-development/
Manage Your Digital Identity | Inside Higher Ed. (n.d.). Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/gradhacker/manage-your-digital-identity
News: Social Media Thought Leader Eric Stoller to Speak About Digital Identity and Higher Education at Kent State, Feb. 14. (n.d.). Kent State University. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://www.kent.edu/news/newsdetail.cfm?newsitem=CAB2045F-0159-B0DC-526E15EFB8C5A416
Stewart, B. (n.d.). Digital Identities: Six Key Selves of Networked Publics. The Theoryblog. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://www.reachpersonalbranding.com/digital-identity-essentials-understanding-online-etiquette-and-the-rules-social-media-engagement/
Stroller, E. (n.d.). Digital Identity and Social Media // Speaker Deck. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from https://speakerdeck.com/ericstoller/digital-identity-and-social-media
Warburton, S., & Hatzipanagos, S. (Eds.). (2012). Digital Identity and Social Media: IGI Global. Retrieved from http://www.igi-global.com/book/digital-identity-social-media/63892

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Teach Digital Citizenship with … Minecraft

http://askatechteacher.wordpress.com/2013/10/03/teach-digital-citizenship-with-minecraft/

In the summer, there was an article about physics professor using Minecraft, but that’s not new because an MIT physics professor was using rap in the down of podcasting to teach physics and then another one later on was using Second Life. All of them gone by now…

From: Ewing, M Keith
Sent: Monday, September 30, 2013 4:43 PM
Subject: Eric Stoller on Digital Identity

A couple of interesting links to comments by Eric Stoller on “digital identity” – which he defines as “made up of their online interactions and exchanges.”

Character Clearinghouse – Interview with Eric Stoller, 2013 Jon C. Dalton Institute on College Student Values, Keynote Speaker

https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/jon-c-dalton-institute-on-college-student-values/keynote-speakers/925-stoller

Digital Identity Keynote at Curry College (full video is about 63 minutes; includes transcript of the Twitter stream about his talk)

http://ericstoller.com/blog/2013/06/21/digital-identity-keynote-at-curry-college/

Eric might make a good speaker to students (and faculty) …

my (Plamen) note: Keith’s email and his suggestions for readings, e.g.

http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/jcc.2013.14.issue-1/jcc-2013-0001/jcc-2013-0001.xml

connects with “contemplative computing” and Turkle’s disconnect, so I am entering as tags

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