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mobile apps education

5 questions to ask before your university goes mobile

Here’s how to evaluate the potential for mobile solutions

Before they set foot in their first class, incoming college students face a maze of requirements and resources that will be critical to their success. So-called “student supports” abound. Yet forty percent of first-year students don’t return the following year, and a growing number report information overload as they navigate campus life amid newfound independence.

The nine in 10 undergraduates who own smartphones are probably familiar with the xkcd about it. College-aged Americans check their devices more than 150 times per day. So it should be no surprise that a growing body of research suggests that mobile solutions can play a critical role in enhancing the student experience.

1. Is the mobile app native?
We’ve all had the frustrating experience of using a smartphone to navigate a page that was designed for a computer. But when designing native mobile apps, developers start with the small screen, which leads to simpler, cleaner platforms that get rid of the clutter of the desktop browsing experience.

As smartphones overtake laptops and desktops as the most popular way for young people to get online, native design is critical for universities to embrace.

2. Is there a simple content management system?

It’s also critical to explore whether mobile apps integrate with an institution’s existing LMS, CMS, and academic platforms. The most effective apps will allow you to draw upon and translate existing content and resources directly into the mobile experience.
My note: this is why it is worth experimenting with alternatives to LMS, such as Facebook Groups: they allow ready-to-use SIMPLE mobile interface.

3. Does it allow you to take targeted action?

At-risk or disengaged students often require more targeted communication and engagement which, if used effectively, can prevent them falling into those categories in the first place.

Unlike web-based tools, mobile apps should not only communicate information, but also generate insights and reports, highlighting key information into how students use the platform.

4. Does it offer communication and social networking opportunities?

Teenagers who grew up with chatbots and Snapchat expect instant communication to be part of any online interaction. Instead of making students toggle between the student affairs office and conversations with advisors, mobile platforms that offer in-app messaging can streamline the experience and keep users engaged.

5. Does it empower your staff?

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more on mobile in education in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mobile+education

mobile apps for libraries

Apps for Librarians: Empower Your Users with Mobile App Literacy eCourse
Nicole Hennig
Item Number: 1541-9076  Publisher: ALA Editions Price: $250.00

http://www.alastore.ala.org/detail.aspx?ID=11270&zbrandid=4634&zidType=CH&zid=42706629&zsubscriberId=1026665847&zbdom=http://ala-publishing.informz.net

Estimated Hours of Learning: 28
Certificate of Completion available upon request

Learning outcomes

After participating in this eCourse, you will:

  • Gain experience using some of the best apps available and understand how they enable learning
  • Learn how to evaluate and review mobile apps
  • Learn how tablets complement laptops, and how their capabilities are creating new learning opportunities
  • Learn how apps are being used by people with special needs, and where to find additional resources for learning more
  • Receive guidance for creating your own app guides, offering workshops, and advising colleagues

In this 5-week eCourse, you’ll learn about the most useful apps available on tablet and mobile devices and how they can be applied in your library to create the best learning experiences for your patrons and students.

Mobile apps are empowering for people of all ages and abilities. Contrary to the popular idea that apps are only useful for “consumption,” the best apps are being used effectively as tools to enable learning and knowledge creation. In this eCourse, Nicole Hennig will show you how to incorporate apps as learning tools at your library.

eCourse Outline

Week 1 – E-Reading

The Apps

  • Book reading
  • Magazine reading
  • Apps for Reading PDFs, web pages, and news feeds
  • Individual book apps

Readings & Discussion

  • Readings about e-reading & future of the book
  • Your thoughts on the readings (discussion forum)
  • Optional app review assignment

Week 2 – Productivity & Writing

The Apps

  • Productivity
    • Cloud storage, passwords, to do lists, notes
    • Handwriting, speech recognition, scanning, barcodes
  • Writing & Presenting
    • Word processing, spreadsheets, slides
    • More presentation apps

Readings & Discussion

  • Readings about security, writing, mobile apps in academia
  • Your thoughts on the readings (discussion forum)
  • Optional app review assignment

Week 3 – Reference

The Apps

  • Dictionaries, encyclopedias
  • Unit converters, maps, languages
  • Specialized reference apps
  • Subscription databases & citations

Readings & Discussion

  • Readings about jailbreaking, platforms, & mobile web
  • Apple’s iOS Human Interface Guidelines
  • Your thoughts on the readings (discussion forum)
  • Optional app review assignment

Week 4 – Multimedia

The Apps

  • Art viewing
  • Art creation
  • Photography and photo editing
  • Music listening
  • Music creation
  • Video viewing and editing

Readings & Discussion

  • Readings about technology & children
  • Your thoughts on the readings (discussion forum)
  • Optional app review assignment

Week 5 – Accessibility & More

Accessibility features of mobile devices

Readings & Discussion

  • Readings about assistive technology
  • Your thoughts on the readings (discussion forum)

Idea generation assignment

  • Ideas for using apps in library programs & services
  • Apps that wow

How this eCourse Works

The eCourse begins on June 5, 2017. Your participation will require approximately five to six hours a week, at times that fit your schedule. All activities take place on the website, and you will be expected to:

  • Read, listen to or view online content
  • Post to online discussion boards
  • Complete weekly assignments or activities

Instructor Nicole Hennig will monitor discussion boards regularly during the five-week period, lead group discussions, and will also answer individual questions. All interaction will take place on the eCourse site, which will be available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. It’s recommended that students log into the site on the first day of class or within a few days for an overview of the content and to begin the first lesson.

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more on mobile apps in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mobile+apps

IMS list of mobile apps (please contribute with yours) in education

 IMS list of mobile apps for education

(please enter your apps of preference)

If you need additional information, pls do not hesitate to contact us
If you have additional informatin and/or experience with any of these apps, pls do share on this blog entry.

http://www.teachthought.com/apps-2/10-apps-for-more-organized-project-based-learning/

App iOS Android Windows  Other
 OmniFocus  y
 GoodReader  y
 Any.DO To-do List & Task List y  y
 Penultimate  y
 Evernote  y  y
 Edmodo  y  y
 Teach  y
 Show Me  y
 Educreations Interactive Whiteboard  y
 Doodlecast Pro  y
 Pixntell  y  y
 ScreenChomp  y
Doceri  y

Please check also our old IMS blog postings:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/01/29/your-list-of-mobile-apps-for-ipad-andor-android-and-windows/
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/10/22/7-important-traits-of-a-great-mobile-learning-app/

Fundamental Teacher Apps


http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/10/24/whiteboard-screencasting-apps-please-enter-your-choices-and-suggestions/

How Teens Deal With Privacy and Mobile Apps

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/08/how-teens-deal-with-privacy-and-mobile-apps/

Seeking outside advice about how to manage privacy settings is a big indicator of whether a teen is taking steps to protect his or her privacy; 70 percent of teens have sought privacy advice from an adult or outside source. Of those “advice-seekers” who have mobile devices, 50 percent turned off location tracking features, as compared to 37 percent of teens who did not seek advice on privacy.

apps online learning

20 essential apps to include in online courses

By Meris Stansbury June 9th, 2017

Online learning apps are broken down into specific categories to maximize production and streamline online communication..

20 essential apps to include in online courses

From attending class to talking with peers and professors, and from going to the local bookstore to having everything on a laptop in a dorm room, students on campus typically have a more “organic” learning experience than an online student who may not know how to best access these features of a higher education in an entirely mobile setting.

The essentials for getting started

Computer terms (Android) (Apple): Online learning means you’ll need to know basic computer technology terms. Both apps are free and break down terms ranging from words like “cache” to “hex code,” all in layman’s language.

Mint (Android) (Apple): Online learning students are usually financially savvy, looking for less expensive alternatives to traditional four-year tuition. This app allows students to keep careful track of personal finances and spending.

Study Tracker (Android) (Apple): These paid apps help track the time spent on courses, tasks and projects to help online students better manage their time and be able to visualize unique study patterns with the aim of ultimately improving efficiency.

Wi-Fi Finder (Android) (Apple): It’s a no-brainer: If you’re learning online and on-the-go, you’ll probably need to find a connection!

To access actual courses (LMS)

Blackboard Mobile (Android) (Apple): Access all courses that are integrated with Blackboard’s LMS.

Canvas (Android) (Apple). Access all courses integrated with Canvas by Instructure.

Moodle (Android) (Apple): Access all courses integrated with this open-source learning platform.

My note: No D2L in this list, folks; choose carefully in 2018, when MnSCU renews its D2L license

For access to files and remote annotation

Documents to Go (Android) (Apple): Students can access the full Microsoft Office suite, as well as edit and create new files without requiring a cloud app for syncing.

Dropbox (Android) (Apple): This app allows students to access any-size files from their computer anytime, anywhere. My Note: Google Drive, SCSU File space as alternatives.

iAnnotate (Android) (Apple): Read, edit and share PDFs, DOCs, PPTs, and image files.

Instapaper (Android) (Apple): Recall websites for research purposes; strip away clutter for an optimized view of content; and read anywhere, since no internet connection is needed.

Marvin (Apple): A completely customizable eBook reader that includes DRM-free books, customizable formats, layouts, and reading gestures, as well as highlighting and annotations tools. Considered one of the best replacements for the Stanza app, which is now discontinued.

Pocket (Android): An app that allows students to save websites, blog posts, videos, and other online resources to access at a later time. It also saves the information to the device, meaning no internet connection is needed.

Wolfram Alpha (Android) (Apple): Considered the scholar’s version of Google, this app is a search engine that reveals precise information for natural-language searches. For example, if you ask “What is the graduation rate for Harvard?” the engine will bring up exact numbers with citations and suggestions for similar queries.

For online communication with peers and profs

Dragon Dictation (Android) (Apple): Create text messages, social media posts, blog posts and more by using your voice (speech-to-text). According to the company, Dragon Dictation is up to five times faster than typing on the keyboard.

Evernote (Android) (Apple): Whenever you look at a list of education apps, Evernote is usually listed. This app allows students to scribble notes, capture text, send notes to computers and other users, and much more for ultimate multi-media communication.

Hangouts (Android) (Apple): Google’s social network shines for its own online video chat solution, which lets teachers, students and third-party experts easily videoconference in groups—it’s even been used to broadcast presenters live to packed auditoriums. My note: desktopsharing is THE most important part. Alternatives: SCSU subscription for Adobe Connect. Skype also has desktopsharing capabilities

Quora (Android) (Apple): Ask questions to experts including astronauts, police officers, lawyers, and much more to receive industry-insider responses.

Smartsheet (Android) (Apple): An app that allows students to create task lists and assign deadlines to share with remote group/team members.

Tom’s planner (Web): A Gantt chart-based, online planning tool that uses color-coded charts to reveal work completed and many more features for project management.

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more on online learning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+learning

apps for special needs students

Android

Categories
Apps
Android Apps for Learners with Autism
Android Apps for Learners with Dyslexia
Android Apps for Vision Impaired

iOS

Categories
Apps
Apps for Dyslexic Learners
Apps for Autistic Learners
Apps for The Visually Impaired
Apps for Learners with Writing Difficulties

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more on special ed in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=special+education

apps for tutorials

Tools and Apps for Creating Educational Tutorials

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2016/04/a-handy-chart-featuring-some-of-best.html

Categories
Apps
iPad apps for creating tutorials
Android apps for creating tutorials
Chrome apps for creating tutorials and screencasts
Web apps for creating tutorials and screencasts

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more on lecture capture in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=capture

mobile learning tips

Tap into These 5 Tips for Mobile Learning

A master in mobile learning shares his best advice for rebooting your instruction.

By Dian Schaffhauser 12/13/16

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/12/13/tap-into-these-5-tips-for-mobile-learning.aspx

1) Find Out What Devices Are Really in Use

instructors have to take device choices into consideration when they’re choosing apps

2) Teach Not Just for Consumption but for Curation

Students use their phones to capture video or audio interviews and post them to Twitter’s live streaming service, Periscope, at various times throughout the course.

3) Try Texting for Exam Review

As an alternative, he began texting review questions every few hours for the next exam and found that he was getting a “much higher frequency of interaction.” Teacher Text, as he called it, never supplied the answers, just questions — sometimes multiple choice and other times open-ended. To keep students’ interest, he’d use at least a few of those questions on the actual test. “They’re going to be more inclined to pay attention to every question because I may give them 50 questions of review and have four or five of those on the test,” he said.

The result: “Grades started to climb pretty quickly.”

4) Perform Safe Texting, but Try It Everywhere

adopted remind from iKeepSafe, a free service that provides an interface between the teacher and the students for the purposes of texting. The tool has simplified the process of instructor texting, a practice that has overall helped students “to feel more connected.”

5) Fit Your Mobile Approach to Your Subject

[flashcard apps] like Quizlet and StudyBlue that can replicate the ongoing study or rehearsal of learning

might stream a quick lesson on the fly through Periscope or hold a 15-minute class discussion through a chat on Twitter.

“I’ll just say, ‘Here’s my hashtag, and I’m going to be live here at 9 to 9:15 p.m. Central time,'” he explained. He typically intends to broadcast a question about every five minutes and allow people to respond. “It’s interesting. You shoot out one question and you get bombarded. People are putting resources in there. In 15 minutes, I’ve barely gotten two questions off. But they have the hashtag and they can go back and harvest the resources that other people put up.”

6) Channel Your Students

Speak the language your learners listen in.’

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more on mobile learning in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mobile+learning

more on curation in this blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=curation

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