Searching for "mobile use"

mobile use by students

Students’ Mobile Learning Practices in Higher Education: A Multi-Year Study

Figure 9. Reasons students cited for NOT wanting instructors to use mobile devices, 2012 and 2014

Figure 10. Device use for learning, 2012 and 2014

++++++++++++++
more about mobile use in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mobile+use

video for mobile users

Content May Be King, But Branded Video Content Rules Marketing Tactics

http://www.inc.com/kelly-hoey/content-may-be-king-but-branded-video-content-rules-marketing-tactics.html

According to a study by Cisco:

  • The number of mobile-connected devices exceeded the world’s population in 2014 and by 2019 there will be nearly 1.5 mobile devices per capita
  • By 2019, more than half of all devices connected to the mobile network will be “smart” devices.
  • Mobile video viewing was responsible for 55% of total mobile data traffic in 2014 and 72% of the world’s mobile data traffic will be video by 2019.

VoozaRadimparency

Pizza Hut’s “Danger of Self Sticks PSA” which has been viewed nearly 4 million times on YouTube as well as Vooza’s “Startup Class” video

  1. Start with the audience. Figure out who you’re trying to reach with your content and then reverse engineer from there. For example, we like going after Apple because Apple fans are so insane about their products.
  1. Expect to roll out a lot of content consistently over time. It takes a while to build up an audience.
  1. Get an email list going–it’s still the best way to reach fans.
  1. Answer this question: “Why would people want to share this?” Because if people don’t share it organically, it probably won’t go far. For example, designers love sharing this CEO video with each other because they can all relate to the know-it-all CEO who thinks he/she knows best how to design a logo.
  1. The more heavy-handed you are with the sales pitch, the less likely people are to share it. Let the funny lead the way whenever possible.
  1. Don’t be so fearful to push people’s buttons. Have some edge. Make fun of people. HBO is great because there are no advertisers who say, “Don’t say that.”
  1. Find your intersection. What’s the thing that you can make that no one else can? That’s your island. For Vooza, it’s funny plus tech.
  1. Make it findable. Think about how people search for things online and get into that stream with the right headlines, keywords, etc.

SMUG (smart mobile users’ group)

Good day everyone,

The rising prominence of mobile devices in education and our private lives prompts us to revisit the “tablets” group of 2012/2013. Back then LRS and ITS faculty and staff, who were given iPads and Android tablets, met monthly to share ideas and experience.

With Dean Vargas’s support we plan to reconvene this group. We recognize that many more of us now have mobile devices, including tablets and smart phones, so we invite anyone who has a mobile device (not only a tablet and not only using iOS or Android, but any mobile device or operating system) to meet with us and:

a. share experience and knowledge,

b. seek answers to questions and/or

c. brainstorm and develop ideas as to how we can use these tools more effectively at work and in our private lives.

The group is initially christened as SMUG (smart mobile users’ group, not for our attitude, but for fun). We expect the group to create its own personality and name.

Please contact us if you’re interested. Please have the Doodle poll https://doodle.com/2uaytxbth728sa9b for the initial meeting.

Thanks,

Tom Hergert and Plamen Miltenoff

 

2019 Educause Horizon Report

2019 Horizon Report

Tuesday, April 23, 2019 https://library.educause.edu/resources/2019/4/2019-horizon-report

https://library.educause.edu/-/media/files/library/2019/4/2019horizonreport.pdf

p. 8 Modularized and Disaggregated Degrees

Only 2% of institutions have deployed digital microcredentials (including badging) institution-wide, but 29% are expanding or planning their use. —EDUCAUSE Strategic Technologies, 2019

p. 15 Increasing Demand for Digital Learning Experience and Instructional Design Expertise

A driving factor for mobile learning is the ownership of mobile devices, particularly the smartphone. In 2018, the Pew Research Center reported that 59% of adults globally own a smartphone, and research from the EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research indicated that 95% of undergraduate students own smartphones. As mobile device ownership and usage have increased, mobile learning is no longer just focused on asynchronous interaction, content creation, and reference. More emphasis is emerging on content that is responsive instead of adaptive and on creating microlearning experiences that can sync across multiple devices and give learners the flexibility to learn on the device of their choice

p. 25 Mixed Reality

p. 36 Fail or Scale: AR and MR –
In 2016, the Horizon Expert Panel determined that augmented reality and virtual reality were two to three years from widespread adoption. By 2018, the notion of mixed reality was, at four to five years from adoption, even further out.

p. 38 Bryan Alexander: Gaming and Gamification (Fail or Scale)

++++++++++++++
more on the Horizon reports in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=horizon+report

multi-user reference support experiences

https://www.emeraldinsight.com/eprint/AU2Q4SJGYQG5YTQ5A9RU/full

Hahn, J. (2018). Virtual reality learning environments | Development of multi-user reference support experiences | Information and Learning Science | Ahead of Print. EmeraldInsight. Retrieved from https://www.emeraldinsight.com/eprint/AU2Q4SJGYQG5YTQ5A9RU/full
case study: an undergraduate senior projects computer science course collaboration whose aim was to develop textual browsing experiences, among other library reference functionality, within the HTC Vive virtual reality (VR) headset. In this case study, readers are introduced to applied uses of VR in service to library-based learning through the research and development of a VR reading room app with multi-user support. Within the VR reading room prototype, users are able to collaboratively explore the digital collections of HathiTrust, highlight text for further searching and discovery and receive consultative research support from a reference specialist through VR.
Library staff met with the project team weekly over the 16 weeks of both semesters to first scope out the functionality of the system and vet requirements.
The library research team further hypothesized that incorporating reference-like support in the VR environment can support library learning. There is ample evidence in the library literature which underscores the importance of reference interactions as learning and instructional experiences for university students
Educational benefits to immersive worlds include offering a deeper presence in engagement with rare or non-accessible artifacts. Sequeira and Morgado (2013, p. 2) describe their Virtual Archeology project as using “a blend of techniques and methods employed by historians and archaeologists using computer models for visualizing cultural artefacts and heritage sites”.
The higher-end graphics cards include devices such as the NVIDIA GeForceTM GTX 1060 or AMD RadeonTM RX 480, equivalent or better. The desktop system that was built for this project used the GeForce GTX 1070, which was slightly above the required minimum specifications.

Collaboration: Library as client.

Specific to this course collaboration, computer science students in their final year of study are given the option of several client projects on which to work. The Undergraduate Library has been a collaborator with senior computer science course projects for several years, beginning in 2012-2013 with mobile application design and chat reference software re-engineering (Hahn, 2015). (My note: Mark Gill, this is where and how Mehdi Mekni, you and I can collaborate)

The hurdles the students had the most trouble with was code integration – e.g. combining various individual software parts towards the end of the semester. The students also were challenged by the public HathiTrust APIs, as the system was developed to call the HathiTrust APIs from within the Unity programming environment and developing API calls in C#. This was a novel use of the HathiTrust search APIs for the students and a new area for the research team as well.

There are alternatives to Unity C# programming, notably WebVR, an open source specification for VR programming on the open web.

A-Frame has seen maturation as a platform agnostic and device agnostic software programming environment. The WebVR webpage notes that the specification supports HTC Vive, Oculus Rift, Samsung Gear VR, Google Daydream and Google Cardboard (WebVR Rocks, 2018). Open web platforms are consistent with library values and educational goals of sharing work that can be foundational in implementing VR learning experience both in VR environments and shareable on the web, too.

++++++++++++++
more on VR in libraries in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality+library

teen use of phones

Teens worry they use phones too much

Andrew M. Seaman

https://www.linkedin.com/feed/news/teens-worry-they-use-phones-too-much-2251987/

Roughly half of U.S. teens say they spend too much time on their cellphones, according to research from Pew. About the same proportion of teens report taking steps to limit their use of the devices. Another survey found that about two-thirds of parents also worry their children spend too much time in front of screens; nearly 60% of parents report setting screen time restrictions for their children. The findings come as some technology companies introduce features to cut back on phone addiction.

https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn%3Ali%3Aactivity%3A6438043256424054784?lipi=urn%3Ali%3Apage%3Ad_flagship3_profile_view_base%3BK6U2j7wPTx2kZp6R0t9WBg%3D%3D&licu=urn%3Ali%3Acontrol%3Ad_flagship3_profile_view_base-view_activity_details

http://www.pewinternet.org/2018/08/22/how-teens-and-parents-navigate-screen-time-and-device-distractions/

Amid roiling debates about the impact of screen time on teenagers, roughly half of those ages 13 to 17 are themselves worried they spend too much time on their cellphones. Some 52% of U.S. teens report taking steps to cut back on their mobile phone use, and similar shares have tried to limit their use of social media (57%) or video games (58%), a new Pew Research Center survey finds.

Overall, 56% of teens associate the absence of their cellphone with at least one of these three emotions: loneliness, being upset or feeling anxious. Additionally, girls are more likely than boys to feel anxious or lonely without their cellphone.

The vast majority of teens in the United States have access to a smartphone, and 45% are online on a near constant basis. The ubiquity of social media and cellphones and other devices in teens’ lives has fueled heated discussions over the effects of excessive screen time and parents’ role in limiting teens’ screen exposure. In recent months, many major technology companies, including Google and Apple, have announced new products aimed at helping adults and teens monitor and manage their online usage.

Girls are somewhat more likely than boys to say they spend too much time on social media (47% vs. 35%).

Meanwhile, 31% of teens say they lose focus in class because they are checking their cellphone – though just 8% say this often happens to them, and 38% say it never does.

Girls are more likely than boys to express feelings of anxiety (by a 49% to 35% margin) and loneliness (by a 32% to 20% margin) when they do not have their phone with them.

+++++++
more on contemplative computing in this iMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=contemplative+computing

Use of Academic Library Information Technology Lending Programs

Primary Research Group has published the: Survey of American College Students:
Use of Academic Library Information Technology Lending Programs, ISBN 978-
157440-510-1
This study looks at which devices and technologies students check out for loan
from college libraries, presenting detailed statistics on their use of
laptops, tablets, smartphones, cameras and camcorders, mics and audio
recorders, tripods, external hard drives, calculators, headphones and
headsets, student response systems or “clickers”, mobile device chargers,
presentation technology and other devices and technologies.
The study also presents results of an open-ended question through which
students make known their wish lists for technologies and devices that they
would like to see available, or more available, from their academic libraries.
Data in the report is presented in the aggregate and then broken out
separately for fifteen different variables including but not limited to:
college grades, gender, income level, year of college standing, SAT/ACT
scores, regional origin, age, sexual orientation, race & ethnicity, college
major and other personal variables, and by Carnegie class, enrollment size and
public/private status of the survey participants institutions of higher
education.
Just a few of this 110-page report’s many findings are that:
By a ratio of nearly 2:1 females were much more ardent borrowers than men of
student response systems or “tickers” technology: 3.46% of women vs. 1.72% of
men had borrowed them.  Gay students were also more than twice as likely as
straight students to borrow this technology; 6.93% vs. 2.35%. Use also tends
to correlate with high ACT or SAT scores, the higher the score, the greater
the likelihood that a student has borrowed a clicker from their college
library.
The tendency to borrow calculators was lowest among students specializing in
mathematics, computer science, statistics and engineering.
Private college students were four times more likely than those at public
colleges to borrow tripods.
For a table of contents and an excerpt view the product page for this report
on our website at:  https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.primaryresearch.com%2FAddCart.aspx%3FReportID%3D493&data=01%7C01%7Cpmiltenoff%40stcloudstate.edu%7C441e49daa0414c423d7f08d5ab861e17%7C5e40e2ed600b4eeaa9851d0c9dcca629%7C0&sdata=QEdbJmUmy%2BPvdEZYXOZU82a16bZXF52Peo%2BBuIumMT4%3D&reserved=0

mobile apps education

5 questions to ask before your university goes mobile

Here’s how to evaluate the potential for mobile solutions

Before they set foot in their first class, incoming college students face a maze of requirements and resources that will be critical to their success. So-called “student supports” abound. Yet forty percent of first-year students don’t return the following year, and a growing number report information overload as they navigate campus life amid newfound independence.

The nine in 10 undergraduates who own smartphones are probably familiar with the xkcd about it. College-aged Americans check their devices more than 150 times per day. So it should be no surprise that a growing body of research suggests that mobile solutions can play a critical role in enhancing the student experience.

1. Is the mobile app native?
We’ve all had the frustrating experience of using a smartphone to navigate a page that was designed for a computer. But when designing native mobile apps, developers start with the small screen, which leads to simpler, cleaner platforms that get rid of the clutter of the desktop browsing experience.

As smartphones overtake laptops and desktops as the most popular way for young people to get online, native design is critical for universities to embrace.

2. Is there a simple content management system?

It’s also critical to explore whether mobile apps integrate with an institution’s existing LMS, CMS, and academic platforms. The most effective apps will allow you to draw upon and translate existing content and resources directly into the mobile experience.
My note: this is why it is worth experimenting with alternatives to LMS, such as Facebook Groups: they allow ready-to-use SIMPLE mobile interface.

3. Does it allow you to take targeted action?

At-risk or disengaged students often require more targeted communication and engagement which, if used effectively, can prevent them falling into those categories in the first place.

Unlike web-based tools, mobile apps should not only communicate information, but also generate insights and reports, highlighting key information into how students use the platform.

4. Does it offer communication and social networking opportunities?

Teenagers who grew up with chatbots and Snapchat expect instant communication to be part of any online interaction. Instead of making students toggle between the student affairs office and conversations with advisors, mobile platforms that offer in-app messaging can streamline the experience and keep users engaged.

5. Does it empower your staff?

++++++++
more on mobile in education in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mobile+education

managing phone use in class

3 Tips for Managing Phone Use in Class

Setting cell phone expectations early is key to accessing the learning potential of these devices and minimizing the distraction factor.Liz Kolb September 11, 2017

https://www.edutopia.org/article/3-tips-managing-phone-use-class

Ten is now the average age when children receive their first cell phones

develop a positive mobile mental health in the first weeks of school by discussing their ideas on cell phone use, setting up a stoplight management system, and establishing a class contract
Build a digital citizenship curriculum that includes mobile device use.

Ask your students questions such as:

  • What do you like to do on your cell phone and why? (If they don’t have one, what would they like to do?)
  • What are the most popular apps and websites you use?
  • What do you think are inappropriate ways that cell phones have been used?
  • What is poor cell phone etiquette? Why?
  • How can cell phones help you learn?
  • How can cell phones distract from your learning?
  • How do you feel about your cell phone and the activities you do on your phone?
  • What should teachers know about your cell phone use that you worry we do not understand?
  • Do you know how to use your cell phone to gather information, to collaborate on academic projects, to evaluate websites?
  • How can we work together to create a positive mobile mental health?

Using a Stoplight Management Approach

Post a red button on the classroom door:  the cell phone parking lot.
Post a yellow button on the classroom door
Post a green button on the classroom door

Establishing a Class Contract: Ask them to brainstorm consequences and write them into a class contract.

++++++++++++
more on the use of BYOD in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/04/03/use-of-laptops-in-the-classroom/

Zello for library use

learning from real life experience

Today’s report on the use of Zello (http://www.marketwatch.com/story/houston-residents-and-civilians-turn-to-zello-app-to-coordinate-rescue-efforts-2017-08-29) by Houston residents during Hurricane Harvey has parallels with the organizational efforts of using Zello by the Venezuelan people (https://zello.com/channels/k/b2dDl) in 2014. (https://advox.globalvoices.org/2014/02/23/walkie-talkie-app-zello-blocked-in-venezuela/)

Zello, HeyTell and Voxer Make Your Smartphone a Walkie-Talkie (NYT, 2012) are apps for smart phones and mobile devices.
They are free.
They do much more than a physical walkie-talkie (e.g. send visuals, record messages)
They are more environment friendly, since do not require physical presence and so much battery power: https://www.compareninja.com/tables/single/60573

Yo is a similar messaging app: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/07/09/social-media-yo/

Library and University use:

In 2014, we proposed to the middle management the consideration of Yo as alarm system:

From: Miltenoff, Plamen
Sent: Tuesday, July 08, 2014 9:17 PM
To: ??????, Mark A. <???????@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: FW: Yo at LRS

Good evening Mark

Based on the article below:

http://www.businessinsider.com/yo-updates-on-israel-missile-attacks-2014-7

The upper management might consider fire and/or tornado alarm app for SCSU students similarly to the one, which the Israelis are using to back up their alarm system.

I am confident that some other US school is already thinking about the same and developing probably the app.

Thanks for considering…

Plamen

++++++++++++++++++

From: Miltenoff, Plamen
Sent: Tuesday, July 8, 2014 8:59 PM
To: ???????, Colette ?????????
Cc: ??????, Joseph
Subject: Yo at LRS

Collette,

I am not sure if this news

http://www.businessinsider.com/yo-updates-on-israel-missile-attacks-2014-7

will increase your interest toward “Yo” since you said that you are not interested in politics

As shared with Joe several months ago about “Zello” being used in Venezuela  (http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2014/02/21/venezuela-blocks-zello-ap_n_4830452.html ), ingenuity during political events can give us great ideas how to use social media apps in daily work

I would like to ask you again to consider testing Yo and sharing your ideas how we can apply it at LRS
It is worth checking the penetration of Yo among SCSU students and use it.

Thank you and lkng forward to hearing your opinion

Plamen

+++++++++++++++++++

benefits for the library and potentially for the campus:

  1. reduce financial cost: batteries for the walkie talkies and the wear off of the walkie talkie can be replaced by a virtual app (again, apps for each of the three potential candidates are free)
  2. environmentally friendly. Apps are virtual. Walkie talkies are physical
  3. improve productivity. walkie talkie allow only talk. Apps allow: audio, video (images) and text
  4. raise the level of critical thinking (increase productivity by proxy): the use of several media: text, visuals, audio will allow users to think in a wider diapason when troubleshooting and/or doing their tasks
  5. the library can be the sandbox to smooth out details of the application and lessons learned can help replace walkie talkies across campus with 21st century tools and increase productivity campus wide.

+++++++++++++++++++
previous posts on Zello in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=zello

 

1 2 3 24