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360 video issues

Issues with displaying 360 video on mobiles and regular computers

this is time sensitive information; it can change at any moment. Please enter in the comment section your most recent findings and I will update the list

Finding:
360 video does not display properly in Mozilla Firefox and Internet Explorer. The only known browser to display properly is Google Chrome.
Reason:
360 video needs HMTL5 Player and does not play on the Flash platform
Sources:
Web support isn’t quite so good for a couple of reasons. One is that only certain web browsers support such content. Chrome and Opera are compatible, for example, whilst Safari and Firefox are not.
Arguably the best way to experience YouTube’s 360-degree content, however, is through Google Cardboard.
Facebook is the other major portal through which 360-degree video content can be enjoyed, though it came to the game far later than Google.
Unlike Google’s YouTube implementation, however, there’s no Google Cardboard support on the VR side. Rather, Facebook recently opened out support to Samsung’s Gear VR ahead of the inevitable support from its own Oculus Rift when that launches early in 2016.
http://www.trustedreviews.com/opinions/how-can-i-watch-facebook-360-videos-1
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360° video only works when you use the HTML5 player. Currently it’s available on Android devices and Chrome browsers. Go here –> http://youtube.com/html5 to check if you’re using the HTML5 player.
https://productforums.google.com/forum/#!topic/youtube/7sk92Fs1juk
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How do you get html5 to work with Firefox?
https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/questions/958124
Videos to test:
in browser: http://bit.ly/VRlib
in YouTube: http://bit.ly/SCSULIB
Panorama to test:
http://bit.ly/scsuvrlib

Finding:
360 video does not display properly on Apple and Android mobile devices neither through Google Chrome browser for mobile devices nor through YouTube
Reason:
360 video needs HMTL5 Player and does not play on the Flash platform
Sources:
Arguably the best way to experience YouTube’s 360-degree content, however, is through Google Cardboard.
Facebook is the other major portal through which 360-degree video content can be enjoyed, though it came to the game far later than Google.
Unlike Google’s YouTube implementation, however, there’s no Google Cardboard support on the VR side. Rather, Facebook recently opened out support to Samsung’s Gear VR ahead of the inevitable support from its own Oculus Rift when that launches early in 2016.
http://www.trustedreviews.com/opinions/how-can-i-watch-facebook-360-videos-1
Videos to test:
in browser: http://bit.ly/VRlib
in YouTube: http://bit.ly/SCSULIB

Conclusion/Resolutions:
– make sure desktop/laptop has installed Google Chrome browser. – if instructor’s station and you cannot and/or don’t have time to install, Chrome, bring your own laptop
– if possible, identify which of the students’ phones are displaying correctly (HTML5) 360 video and panorama and collaborate with students to use their phones and demonstrate to other students the Google Cardbox experience.

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more on 360 video in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=360

Ethical Considerations For Using Virtual Reality

Five Ethical Considerations For Using Virtual Reality with Children and Adolescents

Five Ethical Considerations For Using Virtual Reality with Children and Adolescents

G+ link https://plus.google.com/+TessPajaron/posts/8YYgjoPrQvq

In an address to the VRX conference in San Francisco, noted game developer and tech wizard, Jesse Schell predicted that over 8 million VR gamer headsets will be sold in 2016. Facebook purchased Oculus Rift, presumably laying the groundwork for a future where friends and family will interact in rich virtual spaces. All the major players, including Microsoft, Sony, Samsung, Google and an HTC and Valve partnership are jostling for the consumer headset market.

Experimenting with VR in his classes as part of a project piloted by Seattle-based foundry10, a privately funded research organization that creates partnerships with educators to implement, research and explore the various intersections of emerging technologies and learning, including VR..

And the technology’s potential for good is vast. It has already been used to help with autism, improve personal financial management, treat PTSD and manage pain. More and more news outlets, including the New York Times, are adopting immersive journalism, where news stories can be experienced through VR.

As an educational tool, VR might prove transformative. Google Expeditions allows students to take over 100 virtual journeys from ancient Rome to the surface of Mars. It might also have a big impact on social emotional learning (SEL), as VR’s unique ability to produce empathy recently led Wired magazine to explore its potential as “the ultimate empathy machine”. Addressing a persistent anxiety, Suter used Samsung Gear’s Public Speaking Simulator to successfully prepare a few nervous students for class presentations, reporting they felt “much more calm” during the live delivery.

Ethical Considerations

In a recently published article, researchers Michael Madary and Thomas K. Metzinger from Johannes Gutenberg University in Germany review a series of ethical considerations when implementing VR. The illusion of embodiment may provide VR’s greatest value to education, but also lies at the heart of its ethical implementation. Madary and Metzinger believe that VR is not just an evolution from television and video game screens, but a revolution that will have an enormous social impact. In their paper, they claim that:

VR technology will eventually change not only our general image of humanity but also our understanding of deeply entrenched notions, such as “conscious experience,” “selfhood,” “authenticity,” or “realness.”

It’s important to remember that many current VR uses in schools, like Google Expeditions, are not interactive VR, but simply 360-degree video experiences. In these cases, students experience immersive 3D pictures or panoramas, but do not deeply interact with the content. The illusion of embodiment is a product of interactive content and motion tracking, where users can alter and affect their environment and engage with others who share their virtual space. Headsets like the Vive and Occulus Rift fall under this latter category, but it won’t be long before most, if not all, consumer oriented VR technology will be completely immersive and interactive.

1. Long-Term Effects and Prolonged Exposure

2. The Impact of Environment on Agency and Behavior

3. Aggravating Preexisting Psychological or Emotional Issues

4. (Un)Reality and Diminished Real World Interactions

5. Privacy and Data Gathering

 

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more on virtual reality in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality

thatcamp

http://twincities2016.thatcamp.org/

virtual scatchnoting sharing

confluence as a service.

notability versus evernote http://www.gingerlabs.com/

Virtual Reality

put the horse before the cart.

immersive augmented (elements 4D, comes with iPAD) reality. MS Hololens

Google imcardboard.com
HTC Vive (comes with two handheld controllers), Oculus (special relation in front of user), OSVR, laser towers, spacial awareness in the room,

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=holo

what is available now and what will be available.

how do you distinguish VR from gaming and gamification: when the latter lets us be in control and try again and again

and when it is digital storytelling.

hearts and minds. immersive environment. based on PTSD ethnography

virtual reality as recreating lost reality. whereas CL is more of creating new reality.

MS Hololens incorporates Skype

Rise of the Videogame Zinesters: How Freaks … – Seven Stories Press

Agisoft PhotoScan

cheating in virtual environment versus cheating in real environment.

computer archaeology. just a tool, but not something will solve all problems.

virtual reality

Three really real questions about the future of virtual reality

http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/jan/07/virtual-reality-future-oculus-rift-vr

  1. How mainstream is this technology really going to be?Facebook sees VR as the next big computing platform, but that will depend on it becoming a truly mainstream device
  2. Will VR really be about more than gamesSome of the educational projects already unveiled – the British Museum’s use of VR to transport visitors back to the bronze age; Irish startup VR Education’s VR app based on the Apollo 11 moon landing; David Attenborough’s work with a special VR exhibit at London’s Natural History Museum; and NASA’s PlayStation VR demo of how VR could help its operators practise using robotic arms on the International Space Station – are among the more convincing arguments for modern VR being about more than just games or gimmicks.
  3. Can our bodies and minds really cope with VR?

More on Oculus in this IMS blog: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=oculus&submit=Search

VR is the future and it’s officially here

http://www.businessinsider.com/vr-is-the-future-2016-1

Midwest AV Summit

Midwest AV Summit

av summit 2015  2
 av summit  7
 3  4

5

 

Matthew Clay : Active Learning Spaces

partners across campus for IT/AV: CETL
What is the most important key for creating active learning spaces (ALS).

Mathew shared his work with CETL and his understanding of the importance of faculty being brought to the table. Faculty as equal stakeholder in the process.

In a conversation with him after the presentation, he agreed that faculty must be the leading force in in generating ideas what new technology and how to implement technology in the classroom. He agreed that at the present IT/AV staff is the leading force and this is a corrupt statuquo

 

key partnerships:
faculty and academic affairs, students, facilities, architects, engineers, contractors, furniture vendors, IT (networking, support instructional design)

challanges: ITS mindset (conservative), Administration must be on board (money), Funding.

MnSCU is not Google friendly. 60% of the staff is not doing the same tasks as 3 years ago.

Open about challenges, sharing more with faculty. Nice to hear this, but the communication must be much larger, to the point when faculty are equal partners in a relationship, which is not far from equal decision making. 

If faculty is not considered a REAL stakeholder (versus intimated body in a meeting which is controlled by IT people), the entire technology use goes down the drain. Faculty is much stronger relationship with students then IT is with students. The presentation put weight on IT staff and its connection with students’ needs. It is questionable how IT staff can make stronger connection then faculty, who are in a daily contact with students.
The issue is how to assist faculty to catch up with the technology, not how IT staff to rival faculty in their connection with students. What faculty lacks in understanding of technology cannot be replaced by IT staff increasing interaction with students, but rather assisting faculty with coming to terms with technology.

maintaining innovation: fail fast and fail forward; keep up to date with technology (blank statement); always look for new furniture; focus on space design instead of just A/V; Challenge yourself with new ideas; always learn from your mistakes; always get feedback from students and faculty (again, the PERIPHERAL role of faculty. Is feedback all expected from faculty? It faculty and IT staff must be equal partners at the decision table. not faculty being consulted at decision made by IT staff)

Google Glass mentioned, Pebble watches. supposedly to understand students habits. Big data used to profiling students is very fashionable, but is it the egg in the basket?

they have 3d printer, Inoculus. Makerspace mentioned

examples how to use 3d printing for education (LRS archive collections, MN digital library).

the presenter kept asking if there are questions. it makes me wonder how far back (pedagogically or androgogically) IT staff must be to NOT consider backchanneling. Social media is not a novelty and harvesting opinions and questions using social media should not be neglected

 

digital classroom breakdown session

digital classroom breakdown session

Break down session: Digital Classroom

technical, very IT. I am not versed enough to draw impression on how it projects over real faculty work. HDMI cables.
relating to the previous presentation: I really appreciate the IT / AV staff handling all this information, which is complex and important; but during my 15 years tenure at SCSU I learned to be suspicious of when the complexity and the importance of the techy matter starts asserting itself as leading when the pedagogy in the classroom is determined.

HD flow and other hardware and software solutions

VLAN 3. lecture capture.

BYOD support in the classroom: about half of the room raised their hands.

Microsoft’s HoloLens

Microsoft’s HoloLens explained: How it works and why it’s different

http://www.cnet.com/news/microsoft-hololens-explained-how-it-works-and-why-its-different/

Microsoft’s HoloLens prototype has all the innards of a computer built directly into the headset. That means no cords or even a smartphone required.

Just as VR rivals Oculus (owned by Facebook) and Google are trying to reimagine virtual experiences with their head-worn devices, Microsoft wants us to imagine a world without screens, where information merely floats in front of you.

 

wearables

Virtual Reality Aims for the Mobile Phone

http://www.technologyreview.com/news/532351/virtual-reality-aims-for-the-mobile-phone/

The “Oculus Platform” Marketplace For Virtual Reality App Launches This Fall

http://techcrunch.com/2014/09/20/oculus-platform/

more at:

https://www.google.com/search?q=marketplace+tech+samsung+virtual+reality&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a&channel=fflb

virtual reality game

How do you make a good virtual reality game? Oculus developers meet to find out

http://www.cnet.com/news/how-do-you-make-a-good-virtual-reality-game-oculus-developers-gather-to-find-out/

Oculus has teamed with Samsung to make a VR headset for mobile devices

Avoiding making people sick is one of the key struggles in producing VR games. Developers large and small have said games need to be made in new ways to protect players from motion sickness.

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