Searching for "oer"

OER more proof needed

Open Educational Resources: What We Don’t Know

Regan A. R. Gurung November 14, 2018

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/views/2018/11/14/what-we-dont-yet-know-about-open-educational-resources-opinion

One of the first reviews of OER efficacy tests included 16 studies (Hilton, 2016). The abstract stated that “ … students generally achieve the same learning outcomes when OER are utilized.”

All nine studies had major confounds such as method of instruction (e.g., comparing OER sections that were taught online or blended versus traditional texts used in a face-to-face class). Some studies switched exams between comparisons and some changed course design (e.g., went to a flipped model). Most study authors acknowledged that the type of textbook was not the only factor that changed.

There is promise in the use of OERs. Beyond the “as good as” findings, some studies suggest they could be beneficial. Jhangiani, Dastur, LeGrand and Penner (2018) found students using print OERs (versus digital) did better on one of three exams tested (no differences on the other two, still good news). Is the promise of OER fulfilled? There is not enough to know yet. We have to be tighter in how we assess the efficacy of such materials in particular and higher education innovation in general.

Methodological challenges abound in classroom research on teaching, as learning is complex. Many challenges can be overcome with strong research design. There are benchmarks for conducting research on teaching and learning (Felton, 2013; Wilson-Doenges and Gurung, 2013), and it would be prudent for more educational researchers to use them.

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more on OER in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=oer

MnState OER webinar

Open Textbook Webinar — a 90-minute online meeting to learn about open textbooks.

Peer review of open textbooks is a critical component of assessing quality and supporting faculty looking for resources to use in their own classes.  After the workshop, you’ll be eligible to earn a $200 stipend if you provide a short review of an open textbook from the OpenTextbook Library.  Reviews are due 6-8 weeks following the workshop.

To prepare for the webinar, please take a few minutes and visit the Open Textbook Library (http://open.umn.edu/opentextbooks/). Glance through the Open Textbook Library and look for textbooks in your discipline that may be appropriate for you to review.  In order to receive the $200 stipend, you must 1) participate in the webinar and 2) complete a textbook review.  (Please note: There may not be texts available for review in your areas of expertise.)

When:   Wednesday, November 14, 2018; 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm

Note that additional Open Textbook Webinars are scheduled throughout the academic year.  Please contact Karen Pikula, OER Faculty Development Coordinator, at Karen.Pikula@minnstate.edu if you cannot attend the meeting on Monday. 

How:     Join the webinar through Adobe Connect

My notes:

open.umn.edu

3 models of creating textbooks: 1. write a book on their own 2. commercial model 3. Funder

Creative Common and copyright.

creative commons licenses

CC licenses free to: copy, share, edit, mix, keep, use

reviewing a textbook in the OER. Edit a book in OER

Consortium OER Pilots

ED Accepting Proposals for Consortium OER Pilots

By Dian Schaffhauser 08/02/18

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2018/08/02/ed-accepting-proposals-for-consortium-oer-pilots.aspx?

The U.S. Department of Education has finally made a move on its efforts to fund development of open educational resources. The agency issued a notice this week inviting proposals for an “open textbooks pilot program” with an Aug. 29, 2018 deadline. The program was mandated in an omnibus spending law, H.R. 1625, approved by Congress earlier this year. ED expected to issue between one and three awards.

The winning proposals will be eligible for between $1.5 million and $4.95 million. The latter amount is nearly the entire fund of $5 million stipulated for the pilot in an explanatory document that accompanied the spending bill.

The application has three “absolute priorities” and one “competitive preference” priority. The absolutes are these:

  • The project must involve consortium with at least three institutions participating, along with representation from industry or workforce groups and nonprofit or community organizations;
  • The proposal needs to fill current gaps in the OER “marketplace” and be able to scale beyond the consortium members; and
  • The plan needs to address how the OER will promote degree completion.

For more information, visit the application on the Federal Register.

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more on OER in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=oer

OER resources

The last IRRODL, Volume 19, Issue 3, contains numerous publications on OER (Open Educational Resources) from around the globe:

Arul Chib, Reidinar Juliane Wardoyo
Janani Ganapathi
Stacie L Mason, Royce Kimmons
Robert Schuwer, Ben Janssen
Adrian Stagg, Linh Nguyen, Carina Bossu, Helen Partridge, Johanna Funk, Kate Judith

 

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more on OER in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=open+educational+resources

OER workday librarians

Librarians OER Workday

SCSU ad hoc team on open books from Spring 2015

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/04/06/e-textbook-ad-hoc-team/

Gary Hunter
Creating OER Texbooks using copyright and CC licensed materials.

http://www.minnstate.edu/system/asa/academicaffairs/policy/copyright/index.html

http://www.minnstate.edu/system/asa/academicaffairs/policy/ip/index.html

What can be put on the OER textbooks:

D2L upload: every time, it is called “distribution.”

plays, music, prerecorded files such as DVD, music CD.

sculpture or painting on a Web site,

five rights avoid violating. System procedure 3.27.1 copyright clearance

 

Copyright and OER, GRIT May2017 from Esko Lius

DMCA Digital Millennium Copyright Act

there are certain works which are not protected

Dmc aexemptions2010 from dixieyeager

The difference between Plagiarism and copyright infringement

CI is a violation of a federal law. Plagiarism can turn into CI.

creative commons

Creative Commons License Basics 2010 from Sue Gallaway

NC – no competitor can take our work and use it against us.

faculty can use anything in F2F, which is lawfully obtained. Flickr, photo without violating the regulations, it can be used in a PPT, but only on a F2F classroom. In OER, it needs to be revised.

Gary can share a “media release” form (slid 17).

Open Textbook Institute (Kimberly Johnson)

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Shane Nackerud and Matthew Lee
use of Pressbooks (it is open source). Minitex pays a vendor to host it, but it can be hosted locally, because it is open source

https://mlpp.pressbooks.pub/
Minnesota Library Publishing Project – partner ship between Minitex and public libraries.

authoring tool. Platform to edit and publish.

Building an Ebook Platform from Scratch: Are You Daft?

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/03/07/library-technology-conference-2017/ 

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Alex Kent, Digital Initiative Librarian

Islandora

Islandora Overview: PASIG May 2013 from Mark Leggott

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OER stakeholders and critical contacts on your campus: CETL, TLTR

Preparation: as per link above, the libraray (former LRS) met in the spring of 2015

what is the role of the library staff in the OER movement. promote what already exists. Open textbook group https://www.cccoer.org/

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Stephen Kelly, OER Project Grants Manager

https://www.opened.com/

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more on OER in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=open+source

Reimagining Minnesota State

Reimagining Minnesota State: Forum Session 2 – Jan. 14, 2019 reservation

Posted by InforMedia Services on Monday, January 14, 2019

Reimagining Minnesota State 

Monday, January 14, 2019

10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Session 2: The Digital Age: The Impact and Future Possibilities Offered by Data and Technology

Thank you for registering to participate in the second Reimagining Minnesota State forum. The Forums have been designed to spark not only individual reflection but what we hope can serve as catalysts for discussions in a variety of venues. The Forum will be recorded and available for viewing on the Reimagining website.

Below are the directions whether you are attending in person or by live stream.

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notes Plamen Miltenoff

John O’Brien, President and CEO of EDUCAUSE

http://www.minnstate.edu/board/reimagining/docs/PDF_Final-Final-Minnesota-State-OBrien-Remarks-011319.pdf

from ad hoc to systemic institutional innovations

ask Rachel for the two books announced

Bryan Mark GIll AR library tour

Bryan Rachel OER “visit”

Catherine Haslag: Is there any research to show students retention in an online class vs a face-to-face course?

the challenge is not collecting, but integrating, using data.

silos = cylinder of excellence.

technology innovation around advising. iPASS resources.

adaptive learning systems – how students advance through the learning process.

games and simulations Bryan Mark Gill. voice recognition,

next 3 to 5 years AR. by 2023 40% with AR and VR

AI around the controversial. Chatbot and Voice assistants.

Unizin: 13 founding members to develop platform, Canvas, instructional services, data for predictive analytic, consistent data standard among institutions,

University innovation Alliance. Analytics as the linchpin for students’ success. graduation rates increase. racial gap graduation. Georgia State.

digital ethics. Mark Gill and Susana Nuccetelli. digital ethics: Susana Nuccetelli brought her students from the Philosophy Dept to Mark Gill’s SCSu Vizlab so we can discuss ethics and AI, last semester. jobrien@educause.edu

Tiffany Beth Mfume

http://www.minnstate.edu/board/reimagining/docs/Mfume-Minnesota.State.1-14-2019.pdf

assistant vice president for student success and prevention Morgan State U

the importance of training in technology adoption

Dr. Peter Smith, Orkand Endowed Chair and Professor of Innovative Practices in Higher Education at University of Maryland University College 

social disruption, national security issue,
Allan Taft Candadian researcher, 700 hours / year learning something. 14 h/w.
learners deserve recognition
free range learning.
how do we get a value on people from a different background? knowledge discrimination. we value it on where they learned it. then how you learned it and what you can do with it. talent and capacity not recognized.

we, the campus, don’t control the forces for a very first time. MIT undergrad curricula is free, what will happen. dynamics at work here. declining student numbers, legislation unhappy. technology had made college more expensive, not less. doing the right thing, leads to more disruption. local will be better, if done well. workplace can become a place for learning.
learning is a social activity. distance learning: being on the farthest raw of 300 Princeton lecture. there is a tool and there is people; has to have people at the heart.
what will work not only for MN, but for each of the campuses, the personalization.

staying still is death.

Panel discussion

what is the role of faculty in the vendor and discussions about technology. a heat map shows that IT people were testing the vendor web site most, faculty and student much less.

 

writing and publishing

Writing is an Art; Publishing is a Business

Peter DeHaan

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/writing-art-publishing-business-peter-dehaan/

Writing is an Art; Publishing is a Business

Many writers also struggle with the business side of their art. And while I am closer to connecting the two, my struggle is no less real.

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more on OER in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=oer

Blockchain next election

Blockchain Disciples Have a New Goal: Running Our Next Election

Amid vote-hacking fears, election officials are jumping on the crypto bandwagon — but cybersecurity experts are sounding an alarm

At democracy’s heart lies a set of paradoxes: a delicate interplay of identity and anonymity, secrecy and transparency. To be sure you are eligible to vote and that you do so only once, the authorities need to know who you are. But when it comes time for you to mark a ballot, the government must guarantee your privacy and anonymity. After the fact, it also needs to provide some means for a third party to audit the election, while also preventing you from obtaining definitive proof of your choice, which could lead to vote selling or coercion.
Building a system that accomplishes all this at once — and does so securely — is challenging enough in the physical world. It’s even harder online, as the recent revelation that Russian intelligence operatives compromised voting systems in multiple states makes clear.
In the decade since the elusive Satoshi Nakamoto published an infamous white paper outlining the idea behind bitcoin, a “peer-to-peer electronic cash system” based on a mathematical “consensus mechanism,” more than 1,500 new cryptocurrencies have come into being.
definition: Nathan Heller in the New Yorker, in which he compares the blockchain to a scarf knit with a single ball of yarn. “It’s impossible to remove part of the fabric, or to substitute a swatch, without leaving some trace,” Heller wrote. Typically, blockchains are created by a set of stakeholders working to achieve consensus at every step, so it might be even more apt to picture a knitting collective creating that single scarf together, moving forward only when a majority agrees that a given knot is acceptable.
Unlike bitcoin, a public blockchain powered by thousands of miners around the world, most voting systems, including Votem’s, employ what’s known as a “permissioned ledger,” in which a handful of approved groups (political parties, election observers, government entities) would be allowed to validate the transactions.
there’s the issue of targeted denial-of-service (DoS) attacks, in which a hacker directs so much traffic at a server that it’s overwhelmed and ceases to function.
Although a distributed ledger itself would likely withstand such an attack, the rest of the system — from voters’ personal devices to the many servers a vote would pass through on its way to the blockchain — would remain vulnerable.
there’s the so-called penetration attack, like the University of Michigan incursion, in which an adversary gains control of a server and deliberately alters the outcome of an election.
While it’s true that information recorded on a blockchain cannot be changed, a determined hacker might well find another way to disrupt the process. Bitcoin itself has never been hacked, for instance, but numerous bitcoin “wallets” have been, resulting in billions of dollars in losses. In early June 2018, a South Korean cryptocurrency exchange was penetrated, causing the value of bitcoin to tumble and resulting in a loss of $42 billion in market value. So although recording the vote tally on a blockchain introduces a new obstacle to penetration attacks, it still leaves holes elsewhere in the system — like putting a new lock on your front door but leaving your basement windows open.
A blockchain is only as valuable as the data stored on it. And whereas traditional paper ballots preserve an indelible record of the actual intent of each voter, digital votes “don’t produce an original hard-copy record of any kind,”
In the end, democracy always depends on a certain leap of faith, and faith can never be reduced to a mathematical formula. The Economist Intelligence Unit regularly ranks the world’s most democratic counties. In 2017, the United States came in 21st place, after Uruguay and Malta. Meanwhile, it’s now widely believed that John F. Kennedy owed his 1960 win to election tampering in Chicago. The Supreme Court decision granting the presidency to George W. Bush rather than calling a do-over — despite Al Gore’s popular-vote win — still seems iffy. Significant doubts remain about the 2016 presidential race.
While little doubt remains that Russia favored Trump in the 2016 election, the Kremlin’s primary target appears to have been our trust in the system itself. So if the blockchain’s trendy allure can bolster trust in American democracy, maybe that’s a net positive for our national security. If someone manages to hack the system, hopefully they’ll do so quietly. Apologies to George Orwell, but sometimes ignorance really is strength.

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more on blockchain in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=blockchain

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