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weakest students and online classes

Weakest students more likely to take online college classes but do worse in them

Protopsalt is is a professor at George Mason University, where he directs Center for Education Policy and Evaluation.  He previously served as a senior official in the U.S. Department of Education.

The paper, “Does Online Education Live Up to Its Promise? A Look at the Evidence and Implications for Federal Policy,” was also written by Sandy Baum, an economist at the Urban Institute, a nonprofit research organization.

At four-year universities, students with high grades often did just as well in an online course, but those with low grades suffered more. Another 2017 study of students at a for-profit university which offers both in-person and online classes found that students who took an online class not only got lower grades in that class but also in future classes. Online students were more likely to drop out of college altogether than similar students who attended in-person classes.

The question is whether we should keep expanding online learning, with generous federal subsidies, to the most vulnerable students before colleges have tested and proven they can educate them adequately outside the classroom.

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more on online learning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+learning

proctoring and online learning

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2017-04-19-online-courses-shouldn-t-use-remote-proctoring-tools-here-s-why

when the option between taking a course online or in-person is provided, studies show students are more likely to stay in college.

Since the early days of online instruction, the response of many new instructors has been to figure out how to transfer elements of their face-to-face class into the online format. In response, education technology companies have been quick to create products that attempt to replicate in-person teaching. Some examples include learning management systems, lecture capture tools, and early online meeting systems.

online proctoring systems, such as ProctorU or Proctorio, replicate a practice that isn’t effective in-person. Exams are only good for a few things: managing faculty workload and assessing low level skill and content knowledge. What they aren’t good at is demonstrating student learning or mastery of a topic. As authors Rena Palloff and Keith Pratt discuss in their book “Assessing the Online Learner: Resources and Strategies for Faculty,” online exams typically measure skills that require memorization of facts, whereas learning objectives are often written around one’s ability to create, evaluate and analyze course material.

Authentic assessments, rather than multiple choice or other online exams, is one alternative that could be explored. For example, in a chemistry course, students could make a video themselves doing a set problems and explain the process. This would allow instructors to better understand students’ thinking and identify areas that they are struggling in. Another example could be in a psychology course, where students could curate and evaluate a set of resources on a given topic to demonstrate their ability to find, and critically analyze online information. (see Bryan Alexander‘s take on video assignments here: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=bryan+alexander+video+assignments

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more on online learning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+learning

more on proctoring in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=proctor

perception of online learning

The Babson Survey Research Group, an organization that tracks online enrollment, notes that between 2012 and 2016 the percent of online enrollment in universities increased 17.2 percent while overall enrollment decreased.

 

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more on online learning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+learning

online discussions activities

What Makes a Question Effective?

Thursday, April 18, 3:00–4:00 p.m. CDT

We answer the question we are asked. Asking good questions improves instructor/student communications and designing successful discussions begin by drafting good questions. Many of us are looking for ways to improve online discussion activities: let’s start with the questions we ask. Through a presentation and a facilitated discussion, we will explore how to get the type of responses we are looking for by looking at what makes a question effective.

About the presenter: Treden Wagoner, Instructional Designer, has an MA in Education and over 20 years’ teaching experience. He has specialized in education technology since 2002. As an instructional designer, Treden works with CEHD instructors to develop effective course sites and the integration of technology for teaching and learning. His interest in asking good questions began when he was an art museum educator.

Webinar details

Webinar link

Date: Thursday, April 18, 2019, 3:00−4:00 p.m. CDT

Code: 746 250 839

Password: MNLC@2019

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previous webinars’ recordings:

youtube iconLearning Commons YouTube Channel
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCL5D8pOXtaGRV512wUQt5Qg

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more on instructional design in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=instructional+design

shifting reality of the online landscape

State Systems Plot Major Online Growth

Public universities across the country are adjusting to the shifting reality of the online landscape. Despite similar goals, approaches vary widely.

Mark Lieberman March 20, 2019

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/article/2019/03/20/how-public-university-systems-missouri-louisiana-and-more-plan

interviewed administrators at systems across the United States for a wide look at how the landscape is shifting.

The University of Missouri System last year signaled plans to increase its total enrollment from 75,000 to 100,000 by 2023. Administrators pointed to online education as a key driver of future growth.

In other ways, the Missouri system’s approach could look similar to Massachusetts’. Administrators in Missouri are pondering the creation of a separate entity within the system that would offer online programs to adult learners.

Administrators have ruled out purchasing or merging with an existing online apparatus, as Purdue University did with the for-profit Kaplan University to enrollment-expanding but controversial effect.

Senior administrators and board members at Louisiana State University began looking at online education in the early 2010s.

From 2016 to 2018, Sasha Thackaberry served as assistant vice president of academic technology, course production and alternative learning models at Southern New Hampshire University. Louisiana State hired her in February 2018 to lead its online growth; three months later, she was promoted from associate vice provost to vice provost of digital and continuing education.

When Kristina Johnson became chancellor of the State University of New York system in 2017, she challenged administrators to consider a wide range of possibilities for growing online capabilities. According to Tod Laursen, SUNY’s senior vice chancellor and provost, the system has just wrapped up an information-gathering process that will inform a soon-to-be-released request for proposals. Johnson has slated for this fall a major online learning initiative, the details of which are still being ironed out.

Colorado State University Online serves as an online program manager for the state system — distinct from Colorado State University Global, which has a separate faculty and governance structure, and tends to serve adults at an average age in their 30s. CSU Online, by contrast, tends to serve “less seasoned” students between 24 and 34 years old, according to Amy Smith, senior director of CSU Online.

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more on online education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+education

UPCEA 2019 online education

UPCEA is the leading association for professional, continuing, and online education.

http://conferences.upcea.edu/annual2019/schedule.html

Challenges and Issues: A Conversation Regarding Micro-Credentials
Level: Foundational
Location: Cedar
Alternative Credentials are important to the future of understanding cradle-to-career opportunities in Professional Education. Institutions interested in considering the use of micro-credentialing face many challenges and issues. This session will be presented from the perspective of panelists who are dealing with the issues and challenges of alternative credentials. The panelists will suggest pathways for institutions to consider as they work toward cradle-to-career opportunities.

  • Janet Staker Woemer, University of Wisconsin
  • Linda Kingston, Winona State University
  • Patricia Cook, University of Arizona
  • Asim Ali, Auburn University
  • Jacqui Williams, University of Melbourne

Moderator: Ray Schroeder, University of Illinois Springfield

Online course, storytelling, data

Online Course | A Thousand Words and a Picture: Storytelling with Data

https://events.educause.edu/courses/2019/a-thousand-words-and-a-picture-storytelling-with-data

Part 1: March 13, 2019 | 1:00–2:30 p.m. ET
Part 2: March 20, 2019 | 1:00–2:30 p.m. ET
Part 3: March 27, 2019 | 1:00–2:30 p.m. ET

Overview

A picture is worth a thousand words, but developing a data picture worth a thousand words involves careful thought and planning. IT leaders are often in need of sharing their story and vision for the future with campus partners and campus leadership. Delivering this message in a compelling way takes a significant amount of thought and planning. This session will take participants through the process of constructing their story, how to (and how not to) incorporate data and anecdotes effectively, how to design clear data visualizations, and how to present their story with confidence.

Learning Objectives

During this course, participants will:

  • Develop a story that elicits a specific outcome
  • Identify and effectively use data elements to support a compelling story
  • Learn how to tell your story in a clear and effective way

NOTE: Participants will be asked to complete assignments in between the course segments that support the learning objectives stated below and will receive feedback and constructive critique from course facilitators on how to improve and shape their work.

Facilitator

Leah LangLeah Lang, Director of Analytics Services, EDUCAUSE

Leah Lang leads EDUCAUSE Analytics Services, a suite of data services, products, and tools that can be used to inform decision-making about IT in higher education. The foundational service in this suite is the EDUCAUSE Core Data Services (CDS), higher education’s comprehensive IT benchmarking data service.

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more Educause webinars in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=educause+webinar

Weakest students online college classes

Weakest students more likely to take online college classes but do worse in them

Survey of rigorous academic research on online education finds lower grades and higher drop out rates Column by  February 4, 2019

online share of total enrollment

According to the most recent federal statistics from 2016, roughly one out of every three or 6.3 million college students learned online. That number is growing even as fewer people are going to college.

The paper, “Does Online Education Live Up to Its Promise? A Look at the Evidence and Implications for Federal Policy,” was also written by Sandy Baum, an economist at the Urban Institute, a nonprofit research organization.

Online degrees are also concentrated among a handful of nonprofit universities. Just three — Western Governors University, Liberty University and Southern New Hampshire University — enroll about a third of all online students at private, nonprofit institutions.

overwhelming research evidence that community college students aren’t faring well in online classes

Another 2017 study of students at a for-profit university which offers both in-person and online classes found that students who took an online class not only got lower grades in that class but also in future classes. Online students were more likely to drop out of college altogether than similar students who attended in-person classes.

There are much stronger results for courses that combine supplemental materials online with traditional, face-to-face instruction. But the authors do not consider this hybrid instruction to be “online” learning.

Engagement in Online Schools

Does Presence Equal Progress? Tracking Engagement in Online Schools

By Steven Guttentag     Sep 25, 2016

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2016-09-25-does-presence-equal-progress-tracking-engagement-in-online-schools

Embracing online school requires a new mindset, as well as new criteria for measuring academic success—measures that take into account the nature of teaching and learning online, the types of students online schools serve, and the unique ways in which those students learn.

Teachers interact with students during synchronous learning sessions, and they connect one-on-one through calls, online chats, texts, and interactive whiteboard sessions.

Accountability measures must adapt to and reflect a self-paced, competency-based learning environment. A traditional one-size-fits-all rubric does not translate cleanly with respect to online schools.

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more on online engagement in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+engagement

Interested in Teaching Online

Interested in Teaching Online?

This course is designed to introduce you to teaching online – the concepts, competencies, pedagogies, and practices that are required to plan, develop, and teach an online course. Along with introducing you to these key topics, this course will showcase the perspectives of students, faculty, and instructional designers who have a wide range of experience teaching and learning online.

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more on online teaching in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+teaching

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