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Open Education Southern Symposium

Opening Education: Using Open Education & Open Pedagogy to Transform Learning and the Educational Experience

The Open Education Southern Symposium at the University of Arkansas is accepting proposals for its day and a half conference on Monday, Oct. 1 and Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018. Proposals should fall into one of three categories:

o    Presentations: 15-20 minutes (Please allow 10 to 15 minutes for Q&A after presentations.)

o    Panel Discussions: 45 minutes (Please allow 10 to 15 minutes for Q&A after panel discussions.)

o    Lightning Talks: 7 minutes (A short 5 to 10 minute Q&A will follow all lightning presentations.)

We welcome proposals from organizations, including colleges and universities of all sizes, community colleges, special libraries, and any others involved in open education and open pedagogy. We’re particularly interested in proposals with topics centering around:

o    Adoption and creation of resources

o    Publishing platforms

o     Best practices and the impact of Open Education

o    Creative Commons, copyright, and other licensing

o    Marketing and advocacy

o    Pedagogy and student success, including K-12 highlights

o    Instructional design strategies for OER

o    Trends and innovation

o    OER in community colleges

o    Tenure, promotion, and OER

o    OER community building

o    Assessment

o    Inclusion and diversity in Open Education

Submission Details:

  • The deadline for submissions is May 31, 2018 at 11:59 p.m. Central Time. The submission form can be found on our eventwebsite under the Call for Proposals page.
  • Proposal social media summaries should not exceed 240 characters (spaces included).
  • Proposal abstracts should not exceed 2000 characters or approximately 500 words.
  • All submissions will be evaluated based on the relevance of the topic and potential to advance the thinking or practice of Open Education and Open Pedagogy. Proposal reviewers will use similar proposal criteria to those being used by the Open Education Conference and OER18.
  • The planning committee will deliver decisions by June 29, 2018.
  • Presenters will be asked to accept or decline invitation to present by July 13, 2018.
  • All presenters will be required to register for the symposium.

If you have any questions, please contact Stephanie Pierce, Head of the Physics Library at the University of Arkansas (sjpierc@uark.edu), or the Open Education Southern Symposium Planning Committee.

Registration

Registration is $99 for our day and a half event on October 1 & 2, 2018 at the University of Arkansas. Registration covers full participation for both days, shuttle service between the hotel and event location, lunch on the first day, snacks and beverages, and event goodies.

Register now!

For more information, check out the symposium website:

https://openedss.uark.edu

open educational resources

A Librarian’s Guide to OER in the Maker Space

http://www.slj.com/2015/10/technology/a-librarians-guide-to-oer-in-the-maker-space

OER are teaching, learning, and research resources that reside in the public domain or have been released under an intellectual property license that permits sharing, accessing, repurposing—including for commercial purposes—and collaborating with others. They include educational materials, such as lesson plans, games, textbooks, tests, audio, and video. In addition to being free, these no-cost teaching and learning materials are available online for anyone to use, modify or share with others.This use, reuse, and remixing of instructional materials is a powerful way to gain and share knowledge. Because OER are customizable and flexible, they can be used very effectively to support students to achieve their learning goals.

OER Commons is a digital library where educators can find resources to develop, support and amplify their maker space practices. The site is searchable by subject, grade level or standard. Users can also filter results to include topics, such as activities and labs, games, videos, lesson plans, and interactive tools.

Related blog entry:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/02/22/libraries-and-learning/

How Open Badges Could Really Work In Education

How Open Badges Could Really Work In Education

http://www.edudemic.com/open-badges-in-education/

Higher education institutions are abuzz with the concept of Open Badges. The concept was presented to SCSU CETL some two years ago, but it remained mute on the SCSU campus. Part of the presentation to the SCSU CETL included the assertion that “Some advocates have suggested that badges representing learning and skills acquired outside the classroom, or even in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), will soon supplant diplomas and course credits.”

For higher education institutions interested in keeping pace, establishing a digital ecosystem around badges to recognize college learning, skill development and achievement is less a threat and more an opportunity. Used properly, Open Badge systems help motivate, connect, articulate and make transparent the learning that happens inside and outside classrooms during a student’s college years.

Educational programs that use learning design to attach badges to educational experiences according to defined outcomes can streamline credit recognition.

The badge ecosystem isn’t just a web-enabled transcript, CV, and work portfolio rolled together. It’s also a way to structure the process of education itself. Students will be able to customize learning goals within the larger curricular framework, integrate continuing peer and faculty feedback about their progress toward achieving those goals, and tailor the way badges and the metadata within them are displayed to the outside world.

 

MOOCOW (Massive Open Online Course Or Whatever) to explore John Sener’s book “ The Seven Futures of American Education: Improving Learning & Teaching in a Screen-Captured World.

announcement for conference http://tltgroup.roundtablelive.org/ViewEvent.ashx?eventId=677435

FridayLive!

First Session of MOOCOW

May 17, 2013  2:00-3:00 pm ET – free to all.                 Presenter; John Sener

This MOOCOW (Massive Open Online Course Or Whatever) to explore John Sener’s book “ The Seven Futures of American Education: Improving Learning & Teaching in a Screen-Captured World.”

NOTE:  Login instructions for the session will be sent in the Registration Confirmation Email. Please check your Junk folder as sometimes these emails get trapped there. We will also send an additional login reminder 24 hours prior to the start of the event.

Learning analytics adoption in Higher Education

SoLAR Webinar “Learning analytics adoption in Higher Education: Reviewing six years of experience at Open University UK”

presented by Prof. Bart Rienties from the Open University, The United Kingdom.

To register, go to https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/learning-analytics-adoption-in-higher-education-reviewing-six-years-of-experience-at-open-registration-105611406560

Time and date: Thursday, Jun 11, 2020, 5:00 PM – 6:00 PM Central European time

(11:00 AM–12:00 PM Eastern US time, 8:00 AM–9:00 AM Pacific US time, 4:00 PM–5:00 PM London, UK Time)

Location: Zoom (meeting URL provided in the registration email)

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more on learning analytics in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=learning+analytics

Colleges’ Plans for Reopening

Here’s a List of Colleges’ Plans for Reopening in the Fall

APRIL 23, 2020
https://www.chronicle.com/article/Here-s-a-List-of-Colleges-/248626

Beloit College — shifting to a “module based semester” to allow flexibility to move toward either online or in-person classes

Boston University — leaning toward in-person classes

Brown University — leaning toward in-person classes

California State University at Fullerton — starting fall semester online

Centre College — block-scheduling courses in shorter segments to allow flexibility to shift toward either in-person or remote learning

Clemson University — exploring a range of scenarios, from in-person classes to entirely online

Cornell University — no decision expected until June

Montana State University — planning for the return of students in the fall, subject to guidance from a task force

Ohio State University — leaning toward in-person classes, with a final decision by late June

Purdue University — planning to start fall semester in person if testing and contact tracing allows

San Jose State University — planning to conduct classes mostly or entirely online

Southern New Hampshire University — planning to allow students to move into dorms, and is offering full tuition scholarships to incoming freshmen

Stanford University  expects to make a decision in May, but might delay fall quarter till winter

University of Arizona — planning to hold in-person classes

University of Central Florida — leaning toward in-person classes

University of Maine system — planning for in-person classes

University of Maryland system — planning to start in-person, but some larger classes may be online

University of Michigan — hoping to hold classes in-person

University of Missouri — planning for in-person classes

Washington State University — planning for in-person classes

Wayne State University — leaning toward starting fall classes online

West Virginia University — exploring a range of scenarios, from in-person to entirely online

William Jewell College — intends to open for fall semester

Revolution In Education?

The Coronavirus Pandemic Has Unleashed A Revolution In Education: From Now On, Blended Learning Will Be The Benchmark

Enrique Dans  ITORS’ PICK|28,492 views|

https://www.forbes.com/sites/enriquedans/2020/04/13/the-coronavirus-pandemic-has-unleashed-a-revolution-in-education-from-now-on-blended-learning-will-be-the-benchmark/#6e96f38a536f

Classes that will continue as best they can, voluntarism, online teaching seen simply as a side dish, students without access to computers or an internet connection, teachers who simply assign essays based on reading material, or measures such as a universal pass have become sadly common.

The change will be permanent: educational activity will no longer be face-to-face or online but a blendable to move from one to another immediately fluidly, continually, through a student’s life, way beyond the school, college or university years.

Firstly, we need to resolve the so-called digital divide

Secondly, this will mean that teachers must reconsider all their methodologies and prepare them for this new, blended learning environment.

Thirdly, institutions, both educational and normative, must understand that, in this new context, some ways of teaching no longer make sense.

Online teaching will not consist of turning a handle while students learn on their own. On the contrary: it will require teachers to engage more than ever, who will spend many hours in forums moderating conversations and opening new threads.

political divide education corona virus

https://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/campaign-k-12/2020/04/many-parents-coronavirus-impact-learning-shrug-off.html

Two important caveats: The ability to access the internet is crucial for the survey respondents. And the poll has a relatively significant margin of error.

The coronavirus pandemic has forced the vast majority of schools nationwide to close for several weeks; several states and U.S. territories have closed their schools’ doors for the rest of the 2019-20 academic year. At the same time, states and districts have rushed to get remote learning sessions up and running, with varying success.

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more on education and politics in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=education+politics

questions about online education

https://nepc.colorado.edu/blog/does-it-work

One of the most frequently and persistently asked questions about online education is “does it work” or “is it effective.”
The question is meaningless because there cannot be any definitive answer for a number of reasons.

First, online education (and its variants such a online instruction, online teaching, distance education and distance learning) is a big umbrella that covers a wide array of different practices, which vary a great deal in terms of quality. Comparing the effectiveness of online education with face-to-face education has been the most common research approach to examine the effectiveness of online education. And the answer has been, for a long time, that there is no significant difference between the two. This answer, however, does not mean online is effective or not, it simply means there are plenty of effective and ineffective programs in both online and face-to-face education. In other words, the within variation is larger than the between variation.

Second, another reason that there cannot be a definitive answer to this question is the diversity of stakeholders in online education.
And unfortunately what works for one stakeholder may not work for the others.

Third, even within the same program and with only students as the stakeholder, there cannot be a definitive answer because no program can possibly have the same effects on all students equally.

Fourth, yet another reason that the question cannot have a definitive answer is the multiplicity of outcomes. Education outcomes include more than what has been typically measured by grades or tests.

Fifth, the rapid changes in technology that can be used to deliver online education add to the elusiveness of a definitive answer to the question. While pedagogy, design, and human actors certainly paly a significant role in the experiences of online education, so does technology.

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more on online education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+education

2019 Year in Education

five of the biggest education stories of the year

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https://www.politics-prose.com/event/book/diane-ravitch-slaying-goliath-passionate-resistance-to-privatization-and-fight-to-save

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