Searching for "physics"

Open Education Southern Symposium

Opening Education: Using Open Education & Open Pedagogy to Transform Learning and the Educational Experience

The Open Education Southern Symposium at the University of Arkansas is accepting proposals for its day and a half conference on Monday, Oct. 1 and Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018. Proposals should fall into one of three categories:

o    Presentations: 15-20 minutes (Please allow 10 to 15 minutes for Q&A after presentations.)

o    Panel Discussions: 45 minutes (Please allow 10 to 15 minutes for Q&A after panel discussions.)

o    Lightning Talks: 7 minutes (A short 5 to 10 minute Q&A will follow all lightning presentations.)

We welcome proposals from organizations, including colleges and universities of all sizes, community colleges, special libraries, and any others involved in open education and open pedagogy. We’re particularly interested in proposals with topics centering around:

o    Adoption and creation of resources

o    Publishing platforms

o     Best practices and the impact of Open Education

o    Creative Commons, copyright, and other licensing

o    Marketing and advocacy

o    Pedagogy and student success, including K-12 highlights

o    Instructional design strategies for OER

o    Trends and innovation

o    OER in community colleges

o    Tenure, promotion, and OER

o    OER community building

o    Assessment

o    Inclusion and diversity in Open Education

Submission Details:

  • The deadline for submissions is May 31, 2018 at 11:59 p.m. Central Time. The submission form can be found on our eventwebsite under the Call for Proposals page.
  • Proposal social media summaries should not exceed 240 characters (spaces included).
  • Proposal abstracts should not exceed 2000 characters or approximately 500 words.
  • All submissions will be evaluated based on the relevance of the topic and potential to advance the thinking or practice of Open Education and Open Pedagogy. Proposal reviewers will use similar proposal criteria to those being used by the Open Education Conference and OER18.
  • The planning committee will deliver decisions by June 29, 2018.
  • Presenters will be asked to accept or decline invitation to present by July 13, 2018.
  • All presenters will be required to register for the symposium.

If you have any questions, please contact Stephanie Pierce, Head of the Physics Library at the University of Arkansas (sjpierc@uark.edu), or the Open Education Southern Symposium Planning Committee.

Registration

Registration is $99 for our day and a half event on October 1 & 2, 2018 at the University of Arkansas. Registration covers full participation for both days, shuttle service between the hotel and event location, lunch on the first day, snacks and beverages, and event goodies.

Register now!

For more information, check out the symposium website:

https://openedss.uark.edu

Fortnite Craze

https://www.npr.org/2018/05/05/608164530/the-fortnite-craze-might-be-here-to-stay

In April, a PLAYlive Nation lounge in Tracy, Calif., hosted its first Fortnite tournament and sold out. Hundreds of players bought tickets to play against one another and win prizes.

Joost van Dreunen, the CEO of Superdata Research, a video game analytics firm, says most shooter games are serious and simulate violence. Fortnite, he says, is more like a friendly game of tag.

His company estimates the game has made about $223 million across all platforms in March alone. In lifetime sales, it had made about $614 million. The game is free to play, but Epic Games, the company that owns Fortnite, makes money through microtransactions. Players can spend real money to make cosmetic changes to their characters in the game. They can buy things like skins, which are like costumes, for their characters or emotes, which are celebratory dance moves their characters can do after winning or killing another player in the game.

Ninja, the gamer name taken by 26-year-old Tyler Blevins, is now a legend in the Fortnite world. He is a master at the game and rocketed into popularity after playing in an online battle with rap artists Drake and Travis Scott on March 14. That battle has been watched more than 9 million times.

++++++++++++++++++++

Educators Battle ‘Fortnite’ for Students’ Attention

https://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2018/05/03/educators-battle-fortnite-for-students-attention.html

Many educators want to ban the game from their classrooms, but some are taking the opposite approach, attempting to weave students’ interest in Fortnite into class discussions and assignments.

Nick Fisher, a science teacher at Fort Zumwalt North High School in O’Fallon, Mo., said his students like to take screenshots of gameplay and send them to friends over Snapchat. Teenagers want to broadcast their victories, and because the game is on their phones, it’s easy to post updates to social media, making Fortnite “the perfect concoction of addiction,” said Fisher.

North High blocks all social media and gaming sites on its WiFi, said Fisher, but students tell him how they circumvent the restriction: They use virtual private networks, or VPNs, to establish independent internet connections. (Dozens of YouTube videos provide step-by-step tutorials for students looking to get around school WiFi controls.)

“Kids can’t multitask,” she said. “Even having a digital device within sight can cognitively distract the student enough that they can’t focus on the academics.”

Schools and teachers should be guiding parents when it comes to appropriate limits around screen time, said Kolb. Most parents will appreciate research-based recommendations, such as turning off all screens a set amount of time before bed, she said.

Games like Fortnite can even have social benefits, said John Velez, an assistant professor of journalism and electronic media at Texas Tech University. Velez, who studies the positive effects of video games, has found that playing violent games cooperatively with helpful teammates promotes pro-social behavior.

Chris Aviles, the coordinator of innovation, technology, and 21st century skills for the Fair Haven Public Schools in New Jersey, wrote “A Teacher’s Guide to Surviving Fortnite,” an exploration of ways the game can be used for instructional purposes. The guide, posted to his blog Teched Up Teacher, suggests how to integrate the game into writing prompts, math lessons on probability, and physics.

Aviles doesn’t advocate playing the game at school. There isn’t any educational value in letting students engage in virtual combat during a lesson, he said. Instead, teachers can build a lesson around one aspect of the game, such as having students calculate the best angle of approach as they jump from the “Battle Bus,” the floating bus that drops players onto the map at the beginning of each match.

++++++++++++++++++

Instagram, Snapchat, Fortnite: The distractions are endless. Here’s how to help kids cope.

 May 14 at 9:00 AM
In January, two of Apple’s shareholder groups asked the company to look at the addictive effects of iPhones on children. Google’s recent developer conference highlighted tools to help users better control smartphone usage.
2015 survey of more than 1,800 teachers and 400 principals in Alberta, B.C., found that nearly three-fourths of teachers frequently or very frequently observed students multitasking with technology, and 67 percent of teachers believed that the number of students negatively distracted by digital technologies in the classroom was growing.
2017 study published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science tracked college students’ progress on their goals over the course of a semester and found that successful goal attainment was less about self-control and more about blocking and eliminating potential distractions.
The best approach is to use empathy, compassion and collaboration to help the young people in your life find ways to manage their digital workflow.
Encourage visualization for inspiration and motivation. The first step is getting students to buy in and to want to make behavioral changes.
Focus on compartmentalization. A 2009 study from Stanford researchers found that people who juggled several streams of electronic information were not able to pay attention, remember key information or switch tasks as effectively as those who completed one task at a time.
Using the Pomodoro technique of spending 25 minutes focused on one task followed by a five-minute break can be an easy way to have students begin to shift from a multitasking to a monotasking mind-set.
Make focus fun. There are now numerous ways to use technology to help us be more productive with technology, and it doesn’t have to be arduous. Students in my office use apps such as Forest or Flipd to motivate them to stay off their phones during class or when doing homework. Forest has a simple interface that will build a digital tree for users who stay off their phones. Flipd allows users to hide certain apps, allot time off their phone based on their schedule and, for a premium, track their progress over time.
Provide structured support as needed. A middle school student with whom I worked recently was relieved when his mother used the Mac OS app SelfControl to block YouTube and ESPN while he was doing his homework (Cold Turkey is a similar PC-based app).
Allow opportunities for regrouping. Even the best plans can go awry (for adults and kids alike). It’s important to focus on progress rather than perfection. Create time daily or weekly for students to think about what went well in terms of managing distractions and improving productivity, and what they would like to do better. Ask open-ended questions without judgment or expectation

+++++++++++++++++++
more on gaming in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=gaming

+++++++++++++++
more on social media addiction in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/05/08/social-media-addiction/

proctoring ideas

Digital Proctoring

I great exchange on ideas regarding digital proctoring in the Blended and Online Learning listserv:

STUDENTS

David Huckleberry

Coordinator of Digital Instruction – Physics & Astronomy

Purdue University

Office = PHYS 176

525 Northwestern Avenue

West Lafayette, IN 47907

dhuckleb@purdue.edu

++++++++++++

Proctorio

Scott Robison, Ph.D.
Associate Director, Digital Learning and Design
Portland State University

Portland, OR 97201
503-725-9118
@otterscotter
+++++++++++++++++
At University of Wisconsin – Superior – we have stopped offering proctoring for students.  Faculty, however, have come up with a way for online testing. They ask student to use Kaltura tto record their face and part of the test and then post the video in the dropbox.

Rebecca Graetz, EdD

Instructional Program Manager II

UW – Superior

rgraetz@uwsuper.edu

++++++++++++

ProctorU, an online proctoring service, with online courses that offered online exams and BioSig ID for courses that did not require exams.

Kelvin Bentley
Email: timelord33@gmail.com
Twitter: blacktimelord
++++++++++++++

+++++++++++++
more on proctoring in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=proctoring

International Conference on Learning Athens Greece

Twenty-fifth International Conference on Learning

2018 Special Focus: Education in a Time of Austerity and Social Turbulence  21–23 June 2018 University of Athens, Athens, Greece http://thelearner.com/2018-conference

Theme 8: Technologies in Learning

  • Technology and human values: learning through and about technology
  • Crossing the digital divide: access to learning in, and about, the digital world
  • New tools for learning: online digitally mediated learning
  • Virtual worlds, virtual classrooms: interactive, self-paced and autonomous learning
  • Ubiquitous learning: using the affordances of the new mediaDistance learning: reducing the distance

Theme 9: Literacies Learning

  • Defining new literacies
  • Languages of power: literacy’s role in social access
  • Instructional responses to individual differences in literacy learning
  • The visual and the verbal: Multiliteracies and multimodal communications
  • Literacy in learning: language in learning across the subject areas
  • The changing role of libraries in literacies learning
  • Languages education and second language learning
  • Multilingual learning for a multicultural world
  • The arts and design in multimodal learning
  • The computer, internet, and digital media: educational challenges and responses

++++++++++
PROPOSAL: Paper presentation in a Themed Session

Title

Virtual Reality and Gamification in the Educational Process: The Experience from an Academic Library

short description

VR, AR and Mixed Reality, as well as gaming and gamification are proposed as sandbox opportunity to transition from a lecture-type instruction to constructivist-based methods.

long description

The NMC New Horizon Report 2017 predicts a rapid application of Video360 in K12. Millennials are leaving college, Gen Z students are our next patrons. Higher Education needs to meet its new students on “their playground.” A collaboration by a librarian and VR specialist is testing the opportunities to apply 360 degree movies and VR in academic library orientation. The team seeks to bank on the inheriting interest of young patrons toward these technologies and their inextricable part of a rapidly becoming traditional gaming environment. A “low-end,” inexpensive and more mobile Google Cardboard solution was preferred to HTC Vive, Microsoft HoloLens or comparable hi-end VR, AR and mixed reality products.

The team relies on the constructivist theory of assisting students in building their knowledge in their own pace and on their own terms, rather than being lectured and/or being guided by a librarian during a traditional library orientation tour. Using inexpensive Google Cardboard goggles, students can explore a realistic set up of the actual library and familiarize themselves with its services. Students were polled on the effectiveness of such approach as well as on their inclination to entertain more comprehensive version of library orientation. Based on the lessons from this experiment, the team intends to pursue also a standardized approach to introducing VR to other campus services, thus bringing down further the cost of VR projects on campus. The project is considered a sandbox for academic instruction across campus. The same concept can be applied for [e.g., Chemistry, Physics, Biology) lab tours; for classes, which anticipate preliminary orientation process.

Following the VR orientation, the traditional students’ library instruction, usually conducted in a room, is replaced by a dynamic gamified library instruction. Students are split in groups of three and conduct a “scavenger hunt”; students use a jQuery-generated Web site on their mobile devices to advance through “hoops” of standard information literacy test. E.g., they need to walk to the Reference Desk, collect specific information and log their findings in the Web site. The idea follows the strong interest in the educational world toward gaming and gamification of the educational process. This library orientation approach applies the three principles for gamification: empowers learners; teaches problem solving and increases understanding.
Similarly to the experience with VR for library orientation, this library instruction process is used as a sandbox and has been successfully replicated by other instructors in their classes.

Keywords

academic library

literacies learning

digitally mediated learning

 

pedagogically sound Minecraft examples

FridayLive!! Oct 27 THIS WEEK 2:00 PM EDT 

Minecraft for Higher Ed? Try it. Pros, Cons, Recommendations? 

Description: Why Minecraft, the online video game? How can Minecraft improve learning for higher education?
We’ll begin with a live demo in which all can participate (see “Minecraft for Free”).
We’ll review “Examples, Not Rumors” of successful adaptations and USES of Minecraft for teaching/learning in higher education. Especially those submitted in advance
And we’ll try to extract from these activities a few recommendations/questions/requests re Minecraft in higher education.

++++++++++
Examples:

Minecraft Education Edition: https://education.minecraft.net/
(more info: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/05/23/minecraft-education-edition/)

K12: 

Minecraft empathy skillshttp://www.gettingsmart.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/How-Minecraft-Supports-SEL.pdf 

coding w MineCraft

Minecraft for Math

Higher Ed: 

Minecraft Higher Education?

Using MCEE in Higher Education

Why NOT to use minecraft in education:

https://higheredrevolution.com/why-educators-probably-shouldn-t-use-minecraft-in-their-classrooms-989f525c6e62

College Students Get Virtual Look at the Real World with ‘Minecraft’

Carnegie Mellon University uses the game-based learning tool to help students demonstrate engineering skills. SEP182017

https://edtechmagazine.com/higher/article/2017/09/college-students-get-virtual-look-real-world-minecraft

Using Minecraft in Higher Education

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/minecraft-teachers/cED6MM0E0bQ

Using MinecraftEdu – Part 1 – Introduction

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lsfd9J5UgVk

Physics with Minecraft example

Chemistry with Minecraft example

Biology

other disciplines

+++++++++++

Does learning really happen w Minecraft?

Callaghan, N. (2016). Investigating the role of Minecraft in educational learning environments. Educational Media International53(4), 244-260. doi:10.1080/09523987.2016.1254877

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dkeh%26AN%3d119571817%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

Noelene Callaghan dissects the evolution in Australian education from a global perspective. She rightfully draws attention (p. 245) to inevitable changes in the educational world, which still remain ignored: e.g., the demise of “traditional” LMS (Educase is calling for their replacement with digital learning environments http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/07/06/next-gen-digital-learning-environment/ and so does the corporate world of learning: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/03/28/digital-learning/ ), the inevitability of BYOD (mainly by the “budget restrictions and sustainability challenges” (p. 245); by the assertion of cloud computing, and, last but not least, by the gamification of education.

p. 245 literature review. In my paper, I am offering more comprehensive literature review. While Callaghan focuses on the positive, my attempt is to list both pros and cons: http://scsu.mn/1F008Re

 

  1. 246 General use of massive multiplayer online role playing games (MMORPGs)

levels of interaction have grown dramatically and have led to the creation of general use of massive multiplayer online role playing games (MMORPGs)

  1. 247 In teaching and learning environments, affordances associated with edugames within a project-based learning (PBL) environment permit:
  • (1)  Learner-centered environments
  • (2)  Collaboration
  • (3)  Curricular content
  • (4)  Authentic tasks
  • (5)  Multiple expression modes
  • (6)  Emphasis on time management
  • (7)  Innovative assessment (Han & Bhattacharya, 2001).

These affordances develop both social and cognitive abilities of students

 

Nebel, S., Schneider, S., Beege, M., Kolda, F., Mackiewicz, V., & Rey, G. (2017). You cannot do this alone! Increasing task interdependence in cooperative educational videogames to encourage collaboration. Educational Technology Research & Development65(4), 993-1014. doi:10.1007/s11423-017-9511-8

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dkeh%26AN%3d124132216%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

Abrams, S. S., & Rowsell, J. (2017). Emotionally Crafted Experiences: Layering Literacies in Minecraft. Reading Teacher70(4), 501-506.

Nebel, S., Schneider, S., & Daniel Rey, G. (2016). Mining Learning and Crafting Scientific Experiments: A Literature Review on the Use of Minecraft in Education and Research. Source: Journal of Educational Technology & Society, 19(192), 355–366. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/jeductechsoci.19.2.355

Cipollone, M., Schifter, C. C., & Moffat, R. A. (2014). Minecraft as a Creative Tool: A Case Study. International Journal Of Game-Based Learning4(2), 1-14.

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3deric%26AN%3dEJ1111251%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

Niemeyer, D. J., & Gerber, H. R. (2015). Maker culture and Minecraft : implications for the future of learning. Educational Media International52(3), 216-226. doi:10.1080/09523987.2015.1075103

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dkeh%26AN%3d111240626%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

Nebel, S., Schneider, S., & Daniel Rey, G. (2016). Mining Learning and Crafting Scientific Experiments: A Literature Review on the Use of Minecraft in Education and Research. Journal of Educational Technology & Society, 19(192), 355–366. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/jeductechsoci.19.2.355

 

Wilkinson, B., Williams, N., & Armstrong, P. (2013). Improving Student Understanding, Application and Synthesis of Computer Programming Concepts with Minecraft. In The European Conference on Technology in the Classroom 2013. Retrieved from http://iafor.info/archives/offprints/ectc2013-offprints/ECTC2013_0477.pdf

Berg Marklund, B., & Alklind Taylor, A.-S. (2015). Teachers’ Many Roles in Game-Based Learning Projects. In Academic Conferences International Limited (pp. 359–367). Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/openview/15e084a1c52fdda188c27b9d2de6d361/1?pq-origsite=gscholar&cbl=396495

Uusi-Mäkelä, M., & Uusi-Mäkelä, M. (2014). Immersive Language Learning with Games: Finding Flow in MinecraftEdu. EdMedia: World Conference on Educational Media and Technology (Vol. 2014). Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved from https://www.learntechlib.org/noaccess/148409/

Birt, J., & Hovorka, D. (2014). Effect of mixed media visualization on learner perceptions and outcomes. In 25th Australasian Conference on Information Systems (pp. 1–10). Retrieved from http://epublications.bond.edu.au/fsd_papers/74

Al Washmi, R., Bana, J., Knight, I., Benson, E., Afolabi, O., Kerr, A., Hopkins, G. (2014). Design of a Math Learning Game Using a Minecraft Mod. https://doi.org/10.13140/2.1.4660.4809
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/267135810_Design_of_a_Math_Learning_Game_Using_a_Minecraft_Mod
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1uch2iC_CGsESdF9lpATGwWkamNbqQ7JOYEu_D-V03LQ/edit?usp=sharing

+++++++++++++
more on Minecraft in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=minecraft

Robert Paxton

The Cultural Axis

The Nazi-Fascist New Order for European Culture

by Benjamin G. Martin
Harvard University Press, 370 pp., $39.95
“When I hear the word ‘culture,’ I reach for my revolver.”
Kultur, he explains (along with Bildung, or education), denoted in pre-unification Germany those qualities that the intellectuals and professionals of the small, isolated German middle class claimed for themselves in response to the disdain of the minor German nobles who employed them: intellectual achievement, of course, but also simple virtues like authenticity, honesty, and sincerity.
German courtiers, by contrast, according to the possessors of Kultur, had acquired “civilization” from their French tutors: manners, social polish, the cultivation of appearances. As the German middle class asserted itself in the nineteenth century, the particular virtues of Kultur became an important ingredient in national self-definition. The inferior values of “civilization” were no longer attributed to an erstwhile French-educated German nobility, but to the French themselves and to the West in general.
By 1914, the contrast between Kultur and Zivilisation had taken on a more aggressively nationalist tone. During World War I German patriotic propaganda vaunted the superiority of Germany’s supposedly rooted, organic, spiritual Kultur over the allegedly effete, shallow, cosmopolitan, materialist, Jewish-influenced “civilization” of Western Europe. Martin’s book shows how vigorously the Nazis applied this traditional construct.
Goebbels and Hitler were as obsessed with movies as American adolescents are today with social media.
Music was a realm that Germans felt particularly qualified to dominate. But first the German national musical scene had to be properly organized. In November 1933 Goebbels offered Richard Strauss the leadership of a Reich Music Chamber.
Goebbels organized in Düsseldorf in 1938 a presentation of “degenerate music” following the better-known 1937 exhibition of “degenerate art.”
As with music, the Nazis were able to attract writers outside the immediate orbit of the Nazi and Fascist parties by endorsing conservative literary styles against modernism, by mitigating copyright and royalty problems, and by offering sybaritic visits to Germany and public attention.
Painting and sculpture, curiously, do not figure in this account of the cultural fields that the Nazis and Fascists tried to reorganize “inter-nationally,” perhaps because they had not previously been organized on liberal democratic lines. Picasso and Kandinsky painted quietly in private and Jean Bazaine organized an exhibition with fellow modernists in 1941. Nazi cultural officials thought “degenerate” art appropriate for France.
Science would have made an interesting case study, a contrary one. Germany dominated the world of science before 1933. Germans won fifteen Nobel Prizes in physics, chemistry, and physiology or medicine between 1918 and 1933, more than any other nation. Far from capitalizing on this major soft power asset, Hitler destroyed it by imposing ideological conformity and expelling Jewish scientists such as the talented nuclear physicist Lise Meitner. The soft power of science is fragile, as Americans may yet find out.
American soft power thrived mostly through the profit motive and by offering popular entertainment to the young.

+++++++++++++++

The Original Axis of Evil

THE ANATOMY   OF FASCISM By Robert O. Paxton. 321 pp. New York: Alfred A. Knopf. $26.

fascism — unlike Communism, socialism, capitalism or conservatism — is a smear word more often used to brand one’s foes than it is a descriptor used to shed light on them.

World War I and the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917 contributed mightily to the advent of fascism. The war generated acute economic malaise, national humiliation and legions of restive veterans and unemployed youths who could be harnessed politically. The Bolshevik Revolution, but one symptom of the frustration with the old order, made conservative elites in Italy and Germany so fearful of Communism that anything — even fascism — came to seem preferable to a Marxist overthrow.

Paxton debunks the consoling fiction that Mussolini and Hitler seized power. Rather, conservative elites desperate to subdue leftist populist movements ”normalized” the fascists by inviting them to share power. It was the mob that flocked to fascism, but the elites who elevated it.

Fascist movements and regimes are different from military dictatorships and authoritarian regimes. They seek not to exclude, but rather to enlist, the masses. They often collapse the distinction between the public and private sphere (eliminating the latter). In the words of Robert Ley, the head of the Nazi Labor Office, the only private individual who existed in Nazi Germany was someone asleep.

t was this need to keep citizens intoxicated by fascism’s dynamism that made Mussolini and Hitler see war as both desirable and necessary. ”War is to men,” Mussolini insisted, ”as maternity is to women.”

For every official American attempt to link Islamic terrorism to fascism, there is an anti-Bush protest that applies the fascist label to Washington’s nationalist rhetoric, assault on civil liberties and warmaking.

+++++++++++++

Is Fascism Back?

https://www.project-syndicate.org/onpoint/is-fascism-back-by-robert-o–paxton-2016-01

++++++++++++

Paxton, R. O. (1998). The five stages of fascism. Journal Of Modern History70(1), 1.

Paxton, R. O. (2012). The Civic Foundations of Fascism in Europe: Italy, Spain and Romania, 1870-1945. New Left Review, (74), 140-144.

Paxton, R. O. (2000). Nationalism, Anti-Semitism and Fascism in France (Book Review). Journal Of Modern History72(3), 814.

++++++++
more on history in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=history

collaboration in academia

International Survey of Research University Faculty: Means of Scholarly Communications and Collaboration (ISBN No:978-157440-446-3 )

http://www.primaryresearch.com/AddCart.aspx?ReportID=397

The survey data is based on a survey of more than 500 scholars drawn from more than 50 major research universities in the USA, Canada, the UK, Australia, New Zealand and Ireland. Data is broken out by various criteria, such as type of university, scholar’s country, gender, political views, academic subject specialty, academic title and other criteria.

  • 50.69% of respondents are currently collaborating or coordinating research with scholars or other researchers from other universities or colleges outside of their country.
  • Web based meetings were most common in the Engineering, Mathematics, Computer Science, Physics, Chemistry and other Science and Technology fields, 33.70, and least common in the Literature and Languages fields, 2.92.
  • 7.72% of respondents routinely use Adobe Connect to communicate with scholars at other locations.
  • 87.52% of respondents have co-authored a journal article with one or more other authors. Co-authorship was most common in Australia/New Zealand, 96.77%, followed by Canada, 93.10%, and the UK/Ireland, 89.83%. It was least common in the USA, 85.07%.

++++++++++++++++++
more on collaboration in academia in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=collaboration

bibliography on Arduino use in education

Bibliography on Arduino use in education:

peer-reviewed
http://scsu.mn/2e8mdNh – permanent link to the SCSU online database search (Arduino + Education)

Almeida Cavalcante, M. (2013). Novas tecnologias no estudo de ondas sonoras. Caderno Brasileiro De Ensino De Física, 30(3), 579-613.

Almeida Cavalcante, M., Tavares Rodrigues, T. T., & Andrea Bueno, D. (2013). CONTROLE REMOTO: PRINCIPIO DE FUNCIONAMENTO (parte 1 de 2). Caderno Brasileiro De Ensino De Física, 30(3), 554-565.

Atkin, K. (2016). Construction of a simple low-cost teslameter and its use with arduino and MakerPlot software. Physics Education, 51(2), 1-1.

Galeriu, C., Edwards, S., & Esper, G. (2014). An arduino investigation of simple harmonic motion. Physics Teacher, 52(3), 157-159.

Galeriu, C., Letson, C., & Esper, G. (2015). An arduino investigation of the RC circuit. Physics Teacher, 53(5), 285-288.

Grinias, J. P., Whitfield, J. T., Guetschow, E. D., & Kennedy, R. T. (2016). An inexpensive, open-source USB arduino data acquisition device for chemical instrumentation. Journal of Chemical Education, 93(7), 1316-1319.

Kuan, W., Tseng, C., Chen, S., & Wong, C. (2016). Development of a computer-assisted instrumentation curriculum for physics students: Using LabVIEW and arduino platform. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 25(3), 427-438.

Kubínová, Š., & Šlégr, J. (2015). Physics demonstrations with the arduino board. Physics Education, 50(4), 472-474.

Kubínová, Š., & Šlégr, J. (2015). ChemDuino: Adapting arduino for low-cost chemical measurements in lecture and laboratory. Journal of Chemical Education, 92(10), 1751-1753.

Kubínova´, S., & S?le´gr, J. (2015). ChemDuino: Adapting arduino for low-cost chemical measurements in lecture and laboratory. Journal of Chemical Education, 92(10), 1751-1753.

López-Rodríguez, F. M., & Cuesta, F. (2016). Andruino-A1: Low-cost educational mobile robot based on android and arduino. Journal of Intelligent & Robotic Systems, 81(1), 63-76.

McClain, R. L. (2014). Construction of a photometer as an instructional tool for electronics and instrumentation. Journal of Chemical Education, 91(5), 747-750.

Musik, P. (2010). Development of computer-based experiment in physics for charging and discharging of a capacitor. Annual International Conference on Computer Science Education: Innovation & Technology, , I111-I116.

Pagliuca, G., Arduino, L. S., Barca, L., & Burani, C. (2008). Fully transparent orthography, yet lexical reading aloud: The lexicality effect in italian. Language and Cognitive Processes, 23(3), 422-433.

Park, S., Kim, W., & Seo, S. (2015). Development of the educational arduino module using the helium gas airship. Modern Physics Letters B, 29(6), -1.

Pereira, A. M., Santos, A. C. F., & Amorim, H. S. (2016). Estatística de contagem com a plataforma arduino. Caderno Brasileiro De Ensino De Física, 38(4), 1-8.

Sulpizio, S., Arduino, L. S., Paizi, D., & Burani, C. (2013). Stress assignment in reading italian polysyllabic pseudowords. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 39(1), 51-68.

Teikari, P., Najjar, R. P., Malkki, H., Knoblauch, K., Dumortier, D., Gronfier, C., et al. (2012). An inexpensive arduino-based LED stimulator system for vision research. Journal of Neuroscience Methods, 211(2), 227-236.

Walzik, M. P., Vollmar, V., Lachnit, T., Dietz, H., Haug, S., Bachmann, H., et al. (2015). A portable low-cost long-term live-cell imaging platform for biomedical research and education. Biosensors & Bioelectronics, 64, 639-649.

Zachariadou, K., Yiasemides, K., & Trougkakos, N. (2012). A low-cost computer-controlled arduino-based educational laboratory system for teaching the fundamentals of photovoltaic cells. European Journal of Physics, 33(6), 1599-1610.

Zubrycki, I., & Granosik, G. (2014). Introducing modern robotics with ros and arduino, including case studies. Journal of Automation, Mobile Robotics & Intelligent Systems, 8(1), 69-75.

Пионкевич, В. А. (2016). ИНСТРУМЕНТЫ ДЛЯ ОБУЧЕНИЯ СОВРЕМЕННЫМ СРЕДСТВАМ ЦИФРОВЫХ СИСТЕМ АВТОМАТИЧЕСКОГО УПРАВЛЕНИЯ НЕТРАДИЦИОННЫМИ ИСТОЧНИКАМИ ЭЛЕКТРИЧЕСКОЙ ЭНЕРГИИ НА ОСНОВЕ МИКРОКОНТРОЛЛЕРОВ. Bulletin of Irkutsk State Technical University / Vestnik of Irkutsk State Technical University, (6), 136-145.

——————————-

popular literature:

http://playground.arduino.cc/Projects/Ideas

http://www.instructables.com/id/20-Unbelievable-Arduino-Projects/

20 Projects To Celebrate Arduino Day

https://www.quora.com/What-would-be-a-good-idea-for-an-Arduino-innovative-project

https://www.element14.com/community/groups/arduino/blog/2014/06/06/10-awesome-arduino-projects

+++++++++++++++++++

more on Arduino in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=arduino

Quantum Internet

Physics: Unite to build a quantum Internet

Stefano Pirandola & Samuel L. Braunstein

http://www.nature.com/news/physics-unite-to-build-a-quantum-internet-1.19716

Quantum network: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_network

China’s new quantum satellite will try to teleport data outside the bounds of space and time

http://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/science/what-is-a-quantum-satellite/article9012342.ece

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/chinese-satellite-is-1-giant-step-for-the-quantum-internet/

1 2 3