Searching for "ready player one"

RPO and education

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-01-16-ready-player-one-science-fiction-s-vision-for-the-future-of-education

 

Whenever I’m doing a virtual-reality demonstration, I ask for 40 minutes to an hour to get all of the students set up with their headsets, oriented in the virtual space, and then the learning can actually begin. It is not just something where you can throw headsets in a classroom and expect everyone to immediately start the learning objectives that you’re aiming for. You do need to do a little of that work explaining how the technology functions and making sure that everyone has the vision requirements, the hearing requirements, the physical requirements.

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more on Ready Player One in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=ready+player+one

storytelling AR and VR tools

Unleash the Power of Storytelling With These New AR and VR Tools

By Jaime Donally (Columnist)     Apr 4, 2018

Teachers can bring VR stories into the classroom in many different ways for meaningful learning experiences. Imagine a scavenger hunt where students narrate a story based on what they find. Or consider using objects they see to identify vocabulary words or recognize letters. Students should have purpose in their viewing and it should directly connect to standards.

Starting with virtual reality, stories in apps such as Google Spotlight Storiesand YouTube 360 videos have been popular from the start.

Similar to the new movie, Ready Player One, they provide an intense experience where the viewer feels like they are in the center of the story.

Using a mobile device or tablet, the student can start the story and look around the scene based on their interest, rather than the cameras focus. New apps such as Baobab VR have continued to appear with more interactions and engagement.

A creative way to have your students create their own virtual stories is using the app Roundme. Upload your 360 image and add directional sound, links and content. Upload portals to walk the viewer into multiple scenes and then easily share the stories by link to the story.

Newer augmented reality apps that work with ARKit have taken another approach to storytelling.  Augmented Stories and My Hungry Caterpillar.Qurious, a company that is working on a release blending gaming, making and storytelling in one app.

Storyfab, turns our students into the directors of the show

A new AR book, SpyQuest, has moved the immersive experience a big step forward as it helps define the story by bringing the images to life. Through the camera lens on a device, the stories make students the agents in an adventure into the world of espionage. The augmented reality experiences on the images use the accompanying app to scan the scene and provide further insight into the story.

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more on storytelling in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+storytelling

more on VR and storytelling in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality+storytelling

 

Video Game Design And Storytelling

The Future Of Mobile Web Design: Video Game Design And Storytelling

As attention spans shorten and visitors just want to get to the good stuff on a website, designers have to get more creative in how they communicate their website’s “story.”

By Suzanne Scacca  June 25, 2018

https://medium.com/@smashingmag/the-future-of-mobile-web-design-video-game-design-and-storytelling-11f5add41d25

What is truly impressive, however, is how we are now able to use design to tell a story. In other words, we no longer need to use long scrolls to set up plots or describe what a company does. This is especially great when designing for the mobile experience, which already sets pretty strict limits on how much we can “tell” versus “show.”

Three Video Game Storytelling Techniques We Need More Of In Web Design

1. Make Your Visitor the Hero

Create User Personas

Develop user personas before you do anything else when strategizing and planning for a website. Your personas should have a key “problem” they face.

Enable Avatar Setup

Use Relatable Content

In video game design, there is something known as “ludonarrative dissonance.”
the unpleasant situation where we’re asking players to do something they don’t want to do… or prevent them from doing what they want.

Spin a Fantasy

Here’s an interesting fact: people are 22 times more likely to remember data when it’s presented in a narrative form.

The brain digests visual content 60% more quickly than written content, so your web designs and other visuals (like video, animation, and so on) are the keys to doing this.

The Airbnb blog always does a great job of this type of visual storytelling.

2. Minimize Distractions by Using Symbols

As of August 2017, 52.64% of all visits to websites were done via a smartphone. And, starting in 2017, the most popular size for a smartphonewas between five and six inches and will only continue to grow in popularity as the years go on.

That’s not a lot of space to fill with content for the majority of site visitors, is it?

Functional minimalism is already something you’re doing in your own web design efforts, but have you thought about how it can tie into the storytelling aspect as well?

Here are some ways in which you might use symbols to declutter your site:

  • Hamburger icon (for the navigation)
  • Profile photo icon (for account details)
  • Pencil icon (for an editing interface)
  • Gear icon (for settings)
  • Shopping cart icon (to checkout)
  • Magnifying glass (to expand the search bar)
  • Connector icon (to open social sharing and RSS feed options)
  • Question mark (to expand live chat, search, or help options)
  • And so on.

3. Be Smart About How You Use Space

Use a Spotlight

In video games, you can use light and darkness to draw attention to important pathways. On websites, it’s not always easy to employ the use of lightness or darkness as too-dark of a design or too-light of text could lead to a bad user experience. What you want to do instead is create a “spotlight” of sorts. You can do this by infusing a key area of your design with a dramatic color or a boldly stylized font.

Add Clues

If you’ve ever played a horror video game before, you know how critical the element of sound can be for it.

That said, while you might not be able to direct visitors down the page with the sound of something playing down below, you can use other elements to lead them. For one, you can use interactive elements like animation to draw their attention to where it needs to go.

Employ a Mascot

For some brands, it might make sense to employ the use of an actual mascot to guide visitors through the story.

Summary

As attention spans shorten and visitors just want to get to the good stuff on a website, designers have to get more creative in how they communicate their website’s “story.” Ideally, your web design will do more showing of that story instead of telling, which is how video game design tends to succeed in this matter.

Remember: Storytelling isn’t just relegated to big brands that can weave bright and shiny tales about how consumers’ lives were changed with their products. Nor is it just for video game designers that have hours of gameplay to develop for their audiences. A story simply needs to convey to the end-user how their problem can be fixed by your site’s solution. Through subtle design strategies inspired by video game storytelling techniques, you can effectively share and shape your own story.

 

Fortnite is Instagram of gaming

The Most Important Video Game on the Planet

How Fortnite became the Instagram of gaming

https://medium.com/new-york-magazine/the-most-important-video-game-on-the-planet-c26988a8f497  Jan 11 2019,Brian Feldman

http://nymag.com/intelligencer/2018/07/how-fortnite-became-the-most-popular-video-game-on-earth.html

Every number released in conjunction with Fortnite is staggering, even within the context of a $137 billion industry. On the same day as its Fortnite Pro-Am tournament at E3, the video-game industry’s largest convention, the game was released for the Nintendo Switch, and within 24 hours it had been downloaded more than 2 million times. Analysts estimate that Fortnite is currently raking in more than $300 million a month, and has made its maker, Epic Games, more than $1.2 billion since its battle royale mode launched in late September.

Fortnite is virtually identical on every platform, and players can move from their PlayStation to their phone and back without missing a beat. Milligan first heard about the game back in September. “It was the next new game, like when Minecraft came out, but way more popular.”

The cadence of a Fortnite game is that nothing is happening and then, very suddenly, everything is happening. The game has three main modes: solo (every player for themselves), duos (teams of two), and squads (teams of three or four), but there are consistently around 100 players in every session.

Even when kids aren’t playing Fortnite, they’re talking about Fortnite or finding ways to profit from it.

Video games pioneered the dopamine-rush cycle. Using bright graphics and sound effects to make players feel continual accomplishment, arcade games were honed to make players feel like they needed to feed in just one more quarter over and over again — slot machines that kept people entranced without ever having to pay out. The addictive core of video-gaming never went away, even as games became more complicated: Every win, every high score, every 100 percent completion, every secret and Easter egg was a chance for a little rush of accomplishment and satisfaction.

And then mobile products learned to do the same thing. Give people goals, reward them with flashes of color, and you could entrance them into something resembling addiction. This was called, tellingly and unsurprisingly, “gamification”: Treat every app and every activity as a video game, with scores, prizes, and leaderboards. Snapchat rewarded users who talked every day with “streaks”; the exercise app Strava allowed you to compete with other joggers and earn badges; Foursquare turned the entire world into a game of king of the hill.

The process has come full circle. Fortnite is a gamified video game.

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more on FortNite in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=fortnite

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/03/31/ready-player-one/

smart classroom

Are ‘Smart’ Classrooms the Future?

Indiana University explores that question by bringing together tech partners and university leaders to share ideas on how to design classrooms that make better use of faculty and student time.

By Julie Johnston 10/31/18 https://campustechnology.com/articles/2018/10/31/are-smart-classrooms-the-future.aspx

  • Untether instructors from the room’s podium, allowing them control from anywhere in the room;
  • Streamline the start of class, including biometric login to the room’s technology, behind-the-scenes routing of course content to room displays, control of lights and automatic attendance taking;
  • Offer whiteboards that can be captured, routed to different displays in the room and saved for future viewing and editing;
  • Provide small-group collaboration displays and the ability to easily route content to and from these displays; and
  • Deliver these features through a simple, user-friendly and reliable room/technology interface.

Key players from CrestronGoogleSonySteelcase and Spectrum met with Indiana University faculty, technologists and architects to generate new ideas related to current and emerging technologies. Activities included collaborative brainstorming focusing on these questions:

  • What else can we do to create the classroom of the future?
  • What current technology exists to solve these problems?
  • What could be developed that doesn’t yet exist?
  • What’s next?

top five findings:

  • Screenless and biometric technology will play an important role in the evolution of classrooms in higher education. We plan to research how voice activation and other Internet of Things technologies can streamline the process for faculty and students.
  • The entire classroom will become a space for student activity and brainstorming; walls, windows, desks and all activities are easily captured to the cloud, allowing conversations to continue outside of class or at the next class meeting.
  • Technology will be leveraged to include advance automation for a variety of tasks, so the faculty member is released from duties to focus on teaching.
  • The technology will become invisible to the process and enhance and customize the experience for the learner.
  • Virtual assistants could play an important role in providing students with a supported experience throughout their entire campus career.

A full report on the summit findings is available here.

Further, this article

Kelly, B. R., & 10/11/17. (n.d.). Faculty Predict Virtual/Augmented/Mixed Reality Will Be Key to Ed Tech in 10 Years -. Retrieved October 31, 2018, from https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/10/11/faculty-predict-virtual-augmented-mixed-reality-will-be-key-to-ed-tech-in-10-years.aspx

My note:

In September 2015, the back-then library dean (they change every 2-3 years) requested a committee of librarians to meet and discuss the remodeling of Miller Center 2018. By that time the SCSU CIO was asserting the BYOx as a new policy for SCSU. BYOx in essence means the necessity for stronger (wider) WiFI pipe. Based on that assertion, I, Plamen Miltenoff, was insisting to shift the cost of hardware (computers, laptops) to infrastructure (more WiFi nods in the room and around it) and prepare for the upcoming IoT by learning to remodel our syllabi for mobile devices and use those (students) mobile devices, rather squander University money on hardware. At least one faculty member from the committee honestly admitted she has no idea about IoT and respectively the merit of my proposal. Thus, my proposal was completely disregarded by the self-nominated chair of the committee of librarians, who pushed for her idea to replace the desktops with a cart of laptops (a very 2010 idea, which by 2015 was already passe). As per Kelly (2018) (second article above), it is obvious the failure of her proposal to the dean to choose laptops over mobile devices, considering that faculty DO see mobile devices completely replacing desktops and laptops; that faculty DO not see document cameras and overhead projectors as a tool to stay.
Here are the notes from September 2015 http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/09/25/mc218-remodel/
As are result, my IoT proposal as now reflected in the Johnston (2018) (first article above), did not make it even formally to the dean, hence the necessity to make it available through the blog.
The SCSU library thinking regarding physical remodeling of classrooms is behind its times and that costs money for the university, if that room needs to be remodeled again to be with the contemporary times.

FCC and netneutrality

https://hackernoon.com/more-than-a-million-pro-repeal-net-neutrality-comments-were-likely-faked-e9f0e3ed36a6

Jeff Kao Data Scientist, Software Engineer, Language Nerd, Biglaw Refugee. jeffykao.com

More than a Million Pro-Repeal Net Neutrality Comments were Likely Faked

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The Federal Communications Commission released a plan on Tuesday to dismantle landmark regulations that ensure equal access to the internet, clearing the way for internet service companies to charge users more to see certain content and to curb access to some websites.

The proposal, made by the F.C.C. chairman, Ajit Pai, is a sweeping repeal of rules put in place by the Obama administration. The rules prohibit high-speed internet service providers, or I.S.P.s, from stopping or slowing down the delivery of websites. They also prevent the companies from charging customers extra fees for high-quality streaming and other services.

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FCC chairman defends net neutrality repeal plan

“All we are simply doing is putting engineers and entrepreneurs, instead of bureaucrats and lawyers, back in charge of the internet,” Pai said on Fox News’s “Fox & Friends,”

Pai on Tuesday confirmed his plan to fully dismantle the Obama-era net neutrality rules, which were approved by the FCC’s previous Democratic majority in 2015. His order would remove bans on blocking and throttling web traffic and allow internet service providers to charge for internet “fast lanes” to consumers. The move sparked a barrage of criticism from Democrats and public interest groups who call it a giveaway to big telecom companies.

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What Everyone Gets Wrong in the Debate Over Net Neutrality

DATE OF PUBLICATION: 06.23.14TIME OF PUBLICATION: 6:30 AM.

The only trouble is that, here in the year 2014, complaints about a fast-lane don’t make much sense. Today, privileged companies—including Google, Facebook, and Netflix—already benefit from what are essentially internet fast lanes, and this has been the case for years. Such web giants—and others—now have direct connections to big ISPs like Comcast and Verizon, and they run dedicated computer servers deep inside these ISPs. In technical lingo, these are known as “peering connections” and “content delivery servers,” and they’re a vital part of the way the internet works.

in today’s world, they don’t address the real issue with the country’s ISPs, and if we spend too much time worried about fast lanes, we could hurt the net’s progress rather than help it.

The real issue is that the Comcasts and Verizons are becoming too big and too powerful. Because every web company has no choice but to go through these ISPs, the Comcasts and the Verizons may eventually have too much freedom to decide how much companies must pay for fast speeds.

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FAKE AMERICANS ARE INFLUENCING THE DEBATE OVER NET NEUTRALITY, SAYS NEW YORK’S ATTORNEY GENERAL

http://www.newsweek.com/bots-influencing-debate-over-net-neutrality-says-new-york-attorney-general-719454
An analysis of the millions of comments conducted by the data company Gravwell in October found that just 17.4 percent of the comments to the FCC on the net neutrality rules came from real people.
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Finley, K. (2017, November 22). Here’s How the End of Net Neutrality Will Change the Internet. WIRED. Retrieved from https://www.wired.com/story/heres-how-the-end-of-net-neutrality-will-change-the-internet/
Because many internet services for mobile devices include limits on data use, the changes will be visible there first. In one dramatic scenario, internet services would begin to resemble cable-TV packages, where subscriptions could be limited to a few dozen sites and services. Or, for big spenders, a few hundred. Fortunately, that’s not a likely scenario. Instead, expect a gradual shift towards subscriptions that provide unlimited access to certain preferred providers while charging extra for everything else.
Even Verizon’s “unlimited” plans impose limits. The company’s cheapest unlimited mobile plan limits video streaming quality to 480p resolution, which is DVD quality, on phones and 720p resolution, the lower tier of HD quality, on tablets. Customers can upgrade to a more expensive plan that enables 720p resolution on phones and 1080p on tablets, but the higher quality 4K video standard is effectively forbidden.
Meanwhile, Comcast customers in 28 states face 1 terabyte data caps. Going over that limit costs subscribers as much as an additional $50 a month. As 4K televisions become more common, more households may hit the limit. That could prompt some to stick with a traditional pay-TV package from Comcast.
Republican FCC Chair Ajit Pai argues that Federal Trade Commission will be able to protect consumers and small business from abuses by internet providers once the agency’s current rules are off the books. But that’s not clear.
The good news is the internet won’t change overnight, if it all. Blake Reid, a clinical professor at Colorado Law, says the big broadband providers will wait to see how the inevitable legal challenges to the new FCC order shakeout. They’ll probably keep an eye on 2018 and even 2020 elections as well.

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more on netneutrality in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=netneutrality

SCSU library digitizing VHS

SCSU library digitizing VHS tapes

  1. plan
    1. hardware and software
    2. digitizing process
    3. archiving process
    4. issues
  2. correspondence among Greg J, Tom H and Plamen
  3. correspondence on the LITA listserv regarding “best practices for in house digital conversion”
  4. Plan
  • collecting (Identifying VHS to digitize)
  • clearing (Digitize or not digitize?):
    • duplicates (Checking collection for content in other formats)
    • establishing if DVD can be purchased (Availability for sale new)
    • clearing copyrights etc. (Copyright / fair use review )
  • Digitizing the tapes
  • Adobe Premiere CC
    • Capture
    • metadata
      Metadata screen
    • this why  metadata was entered in the post-processed MP4 file using the VLC player

metadata VLC-

 

  • export
    H.264 . /   iPAD 480p 29.9 fps

Shortcuts:

If you are using Premiere CC: 1. File/New/Sequence. 2. Ctrl M is the shortcut to export (M is for media)

Issues
the two Apple/Macs will deliver error messages with both the export to the MP4 format and for burning the CDs and DVDs.
e.g.

  • other issues
    regular restart required for new capture
    error messages e.g.
    error message Premiere CC

 

 

 

 

 

 

other issues:

audio. Audio synchronization during the digitization is off. Solution: possible solution is the last of this thread : https://forums.adobe.com/thread/2217377

open in in QT Pro copy an segment then past it into a new QT file and save. It then plays normally in Adobe products. 

old Apple desktops. needed to be rebuild and reformatted.
Apple burner issues. issues with Premiere license (bigger organization, bigger bureaucracy – keep the licenses within the library, not with IT or the business department)

old VCRs – one of the VCRs was recording bad audio signal

old VHS tapes: the signal jump makes the digital recording stop, thus requiring a constant attendance of the digitization, instead of letting it be digitized and working on something else

burn CD error

Upon upload to MediaSpace,

upload MediaSpace

 

 

the person who is uploading the digitized VHS movies can “Add Collaborator”

add collaborator

 

 

 

The collaborator can be “co-editor” and / or “co-publisher”

co editor

Thus, at the moment, Tom Hegert has been designated to a digitized VHS video as Co-:Publisher and Rhonda Huisman as “Co-Editor.”

Please DO log in into MediaSpace with your STAR ID and confirm that you can locate the video and you can, respectively edit its metadata.

If you can edit the video, this means that the proposed system will work, since the Library can follow the same pattern to “distribute” the videos to the instructors, who these videos are used by; and, respectively these instructors can further control the distribution of the videos in their classes.

  • issues:
    sharing the videos from the generic Library account for MediaSpace to the MediaSPace account of the faculty who had requested the digitization either through sending the link to the video or publish in channel (we called our channel “digitized VHS”)

MediaSpace Channel

 

 

 

  •  issue: ripping off content from DVD.
    Faculty (mostly teaching online / hybrid courses) want to place teaching material from DVD to MediaSpace. Most DVDs are DRM protected.
    Handbreak (https://handbrake.fr/) does not allow ripping DRM-ed DVDs.
    handbreak DRMto bypass this Handbreak issue, we use DVD Decrypter before we run the file through Handbreak
    Solutions:

From: “Lanska, Jeremiah K” <Jeremiah.Lanska@ridgewater.edu>
Date: Tuesday, September 11, 2018 at 10:03 AM
I use a software on a MAC called MacX DVD Video Converter Pro.
https://www.macxdvd.com/
I convert videos to MP4 with this and it just works for just about any DVD. Then upload them to MediaSpace.

Jer Lanska  Media Services Ridgewater College Jeremiah.lanska@ridgewater.edu 320-234-8575

From: “Docken, Marti L” <Marti.Docken@saintpaul.edu>
Date: Tuesday, September 11, 2018 at 8:17 AM

Good morning Plamen.  Here at Saint Paul College, we are asked to get permission from owner when we are looking at making any alterations to a video, tape, etc.  This is true of adding closed captioning as well.  The attached are forms given by Minnesota State which they may have an updated form.
Thank you and have a wonderful day.
Marti Docken Instructional Technology Specialist 651.846.1339 marti.docken@saintpaul.edu

Permission Request Form to Add Closed Caption-288flgx

Memo Closed Captioning Copyright FINAL 10 03 2011-1065jox

From: Geri Wilson
Sent: Friday, September 14, 2018 3:23 PM
What I do with DVDs is give a warning to the faculty that the MediaSpace link with the captions I’ve created should not be widely shared and should be treated as if it were still a DVD that can be shown in the classroom, but not posted on D2L. Because even if we use those forms, I don’t believe it gives us the right to use the video in a broader way. However, a safer approach might be to burn a new DVD with captions, so that it’s still in the same format that can’t be misused as easily.

Just my 2 cents. Geri

From: “Hunter, Gary B” <Gary.Hunter@minnstate.edu>
Date: Friday, September 14, 2018 at 2:55 PM
To: Plamen Miltenoff_old <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: RE: Process of ripping DVD video to mount it on MediaSpace

I’ll assume the contents of the DVDs are movies/films unless I hear otherwise from you.  There’s a lot we need to consider from a copyright perspective. Let me know a day and time that we can touch base via a phone call.  Next week my schedule is flexible, so let me know what day and time work for you.  Until we speak, here’s some of the information related to making copies of copyrighted works for nonprofit teaching purposes.

There are two sections of the Copyright Act that authorize “copying” of copyrighted works for nonprofit educational purposes.  It doesn’t matter if the copyrighted works are being copied from DVDs, CDs, flash drives, a computer’s hard drive, etc., the same sections of the Copyright Act apply.

  1. Section 110(2), also known as the TEACH Act, allows nonprofit educational institutions to make a digital copy of a nondramatic copyrighted work and save it to a server for online and hybrid teaching.  I have a TEACH Act checklist on the IP Tools & Forms webpage at http://www.minnstate.edu/system/asa/academicaffairs/policy/copyright/forms.html.  The checklist identifies the few things that may not be copied under this section of the Copyright Act.  If an instructor meets the various requirements on the checklist, than you can make a digital copy of the entire nondramatic copyrighted work and save it to MediaSpace. For nondramatic works, all MinnState instructors should be able to complete the TEACH Act checklist successfully, so I wouldn’t request a completed checklist from them.

Under the TEACH Act, nonprofit educational institutions are only permitted to make a digital copy of reasonable and limited portions of dramatic copyrighted works.  Movies and films are usually dramatic works.   Most people in higher education interpret “reasonable and limited portions” to mean something less than the whole and not the entire movie/film.  There are several guidance documents on the TEACH Act on the IP Tools & Forms webpage that go into greater detail as to what is reasonable and limited portions.  Unfortunately, this section only authorizes the copying of part of the movie/film and not the entire thing.

  1. Section 107 Fair Use of the Copyright Act is the second section that permits copying of copyrighted works for nonprofit educational purposes.  Fair Use is used more than any other section to make copies of copyrighted works for nonprofit educational purposes. An instructor needs to complete a fair Use Checklist showing the proposed copying is authorized by fair use.  An instructor who completes a Fair Use Checklist that ends up being 50/50 or more in support of fair use for their proposed copying of a copyrighted work, should be able to make the digital copy.  Fair Use has some nuances in it for unique situations.  Let’s set up a phone call to further discuss them.  There is also a flow chart that may helpful at http://www.minnstate.edu/system/asa/academicaffairs/policy/copyright/docs/Flow%20Chart-Using%20video%20in%20Online%20-%20D2L%20Courses.pdf.

We also have to consider whether or not the movies/films were purchased with “personal use” rights or “public performance” rights.  Or if an educational license or some similar type of license gives us permission to make copies or publicly perform the movie/film.  More layers of the onion that need peeled back to address the copyright concerns.

++++++++++++++

  • Issue: confidentiality
    All digitized material is backedup on DVDs, whether faculty wants a DVD or not.
    Some video content is confidential (e.g. interviews with patients) and faculty does not want any extra copies, but the DVD submitted to them. How do we archive / do we archive the content then?

error msg upload MediSpaceBurning (Archiving)

  • where to store the burned DVDs? their shelf life is 12 years.
  • DVD’s must be labeled with soft tip perm marker, not labels. labels glue ages quickly.
  • all our desktops are outdated (5+ years and older). We used two Apple/Macs. OS El Captain, Version 10.11.6, 2.5 Gxz Intel Core i5. 8GB memory, 1333 MHz DDR3, Graphic Card AMD Radeon HD 6750 MD 512 MB

 

Question about the process of archiving the CDs and DVDs after burning. What is the best way to archive the digitized material? Store the CD and DVDs? Keep them in the “cloud?”

Question about the management of working files: 1. Premiere digitizes the original hi-quality file in .mov format and it is in GB. The export is in .mp4 format and it is in MB. Is it worth to store the GB-size .mov format and for how long, considering that the working station has a limited HDD of 200GB

we decided to export two types of files using Adobe Premiere: a) a low end .MP4 file about several hundred megabites, which respectively is uploaded in SCSU Media Space (AKA Kaltura) and b) one high-end (better quality) one the realm of several GBs, which was the archived copy

digital preservation vhs tapes-workflow

We placed a request for two 2TB HDD with the library dean and 10TB file space with the SCSU IT department. Idea being to have the files for MediaSpace readily available on the hardrives, if we have to make them available to faculty and the high-end files being stored on the SCSU file server.

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Nov. 2019: transfer of accounts. The generic SCSULibraryVideo account is discontinued because of the August 2019 transition to the minnstate.edu. Agreed to host the accumulated digitized videos under the private account of one of the team members, who will be assigning the other members and the requesting faculty as co-editors.

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2. correspondence among Greg J, Tom H and Plamen

email correspondence Greg, Tom, Plamen regarding Kaltura account:

From: Greg <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>
Date: Friday, November 17, 2017 at 11:32 AM
To: Plamen Miltenoff <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: RE: Question Kaltura

Plamen,

Channels are not required using this workflow.  Just the collaboration change.

–g–

From: Miltenoff, Plamen
Sent: Friday, November 17, 2017 11:31 AM
To: Jorgensen, Greg S. <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>; Hergert, Thomas R. <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: Question Kaltura

Greg,

About the channel:

Do I create one channel (videos)?

It seems to be a better idea to create separate channels for each of faculty, who’s videotapes are digitized.

Your take?

p

 

From: Greg <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>
Date: Friday, November 17, 2017 at 11:28 AM
To: Plamen Miltenoff <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>, Thomas Hergert <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: RE: Supplemental Account Request Status

Plamen,

You can now sign in here: https://scsu.mediaspace.kaltura.com/  with SCSULibraryVideo as the user and whatever password you selected.

Upload a video.

Click the edit button:

Choose the collaboration ‘tab’:

Add a collaborator:

Just type in part of their name:

Add them as co-editor and co-publisher.

******* any user you wish to collaborate with, will need to first sign in to mediaspace in order to provision their account.****  After they have signed in, you will be able to add them as collaborator.

Once they’ve been added, they will have access to the video in their MedisSpace account.

Like so:

From the My Media area:

Click ‘Filters’:

Then choose either media I can publish, or media I can edit:

If you want to simply change ownership to the requestor (for video available only to a single person), just choose change media owner on the collaboration tab.

The process above will allow for any number of collaborators, in a fashion similar to ‘on reserve’.

–g–

From: Miltenoff, Plamen
Sent: Friday, November 17, 2017 11:19 AM
To: Jorgensen, Greg S. <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>; Hergert, Thomas R. <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: FW: Supplemental Account Request Status

Tom,

I submitted the request to Greg with the “SCSULibraryVideo” name

Greg, I submitted, Tom, Rachel W and Rhonda H (and you) as “owners.”
Pls, if possible, do not assigned to Tom ownership rights yet and add him later on.

I also received your approval, so I am starting to work on it

Txs

p

—————-

 

From: Husky Tech <huskytech@stcloudstate.edu>
Date: Friday, November 17, 2017 at 11:16 AM
To: Plamen Miltenoff <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: Supplemental Account Request Status

Plamen,

This message confirms your request for a new Supplemental Account with the requested username of SCSULibraryVideo. Please allow 2-3 business days for processing. You will be notified by email when your request is approved or denied. You may also check the status of your request by returning to the Supplemental Accounts Maintenance site.

Thank you for your request and please contact us with questions or concerns.

HuskyTech
720 4th Avenue South
St. Cloud, MN 56301
(320) 308-7000
HuskyTech@stcloudstate.edu

From: “Jorgensen, Greg S.” <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>
Date: Friday, November 17, 2017 at 11:11 AM
To: “Miltenoff, Plamen” <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>, Tom Hergert <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: RE: Kaltura’s account for the library

 

Plamen, (or Tom)

 

Go here and request one: https://huskynet.stcloudstate.edu/myHuskyNet/supplemental-acct.asp

Once you’ve done that, just let me know the name of the account.  (LibraryVideoDrop, SCSULibraryVideo, etc….)

I’ll then add it to the Mediaspace access list.

 

If there’s already an account to which you have access, we can use that, too.  Remember, though, credentials will be shared at least between the two of you.

 

–g–

 

From: Miltenoff, Plamen
Sent: Friday, November 17, 2017 11:08 AM
To: Jorgensen, Greg S. <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>; Hergert, Thomas R. <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: Re: Kaltura’s account for the library

Well, that is a good question. Do we need a “STAR ID” type of account for the library?
If so, who will be the person to talk to. After Diane Schmitt, I do not know who to ask

Tom, can you ask the library dean’s office for any “generic” account?

Greg, for the time being, is it possible to have me as the “owner” of that account? Would that conflict with my current Kaltura account/content?

Can I participate for this project with my student account (as you helpled me several weeks ago restore it for D2L usage)?

p

—————-

Plamen Miltenoff, Ph.D., MLIS

Professor

320-308-3072

pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu

http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/

Knowledge is built from active engagement with conflicting and confounding ideas that challenge older, pre-existing knowledge (Piaget, 1952).

From: Greg <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>
Date: Friday, November 17, 2017 at 11:04 AM
To: Thomas Hergert <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>, Plamen Miltenoff <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: RE: Kaltura’s account for the library

Tom – I think we can accommodate that, too….

I like Plamen’s idea of a test.

Plamen – is there a library dept supplemental account we should also use as part of the test?

–g–

From: Hergert, Thomas R.
Sent: Friday, November 17, 2017 10:50 AM
To: Jorgensen, Greg S. <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>; Miltenoff, Plamen <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: Re: Kaltura’s account for the library

Yes, except that there may be needs for multiple faculty to access the files. Think of it as analogous to DVDs on reserve or even in the general collection.

Tom

From: “Jorgensen, Greg S.” <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>
Date: Friday, November 17, 2017 at 10:29 AM
To: Tom Hergert <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>, “Miltenoff, Plamen” <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: RE: Kaltura’s account for the library

Hmmm…..

Would this be the process:

  • VHS digitized
  • File placed in Mediaspace (SCSULibrary supplemental acct, for example, would be the ‘owner’/uploader)
  • Link sent to original faculty requestor for review of file (if it was edited/correct edits made, CC burned in for open captions, etc…)
  • Ownership transfer to requesting faculty so they can share link/embed, etc… as they need.

–g–

From: Hergert, Thomas R.
Sent: Friday, November 17, 2017 10:24 AM
To: Jorgensen, Greg S. <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>; Miltenoff, Plamen <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: Re: Kaltura’s account for the library

Send someone the link, probably allow downloads by faculty, absolutely stream via MediaSpace

Tom

From: “Jorgensen, Greg S.” <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>
Date: Friday, November 17, 2017 at 10:22 AM
To: Tom Hergert <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>, “Miltenoff, Plamen” <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: RE: Kaltura’s account for the library

Share, as in send someone the link? Or share, as in, let others upload/download from the location?

Do these things need to stream from the location (as in Mediaspace), or is this more of a file drop?

–g–

From: Hergert, Thomas R.
Sent: Friday, November 17, 2017 9:19 AM
To: Jorgensen, Greg S. <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>; Miltenoff, Plamen <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: Re: Kaltura’s account for the library

I think we’re hoping for an account from which we can share Library resources such as the digitized versions of VHS tapes that Plamen and I are creating. As I understand it, a closed channel is probably not the best answer. We need a common repository that can have open access to SCSU Kaltura users.

Tom

From: “Jorgensen, Greg S.” <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>
Date: Thursday, November 16, 2017 at 2:03 PM
To: “Miltenoff, Plamen” <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Cc: Tom Hergert <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: RE: Kaltura’s account for the library

A single account can’t really be shared in the way you’re asking, but we can easily add a dept. supplemental account to Mediaspace.  I just need the name of the account.

Depending on what you intend, maybe a closed channel? Create a closed channel and add individuals as needed?

–g–

From: Miltenoff, Plamen
Sent: Thursday, November 16, 2017 11:41 AM
To: Jorgensen, Greg S. <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>
Cc: Hergert, Thomas R. <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: Kaltura’s account for the library

Greg,

Can you help me create a MediaSpace account for the library use.
How can it be tight up to the STAR ID login specifications?

Is it possible, let’s say Tom and I to use our STAR ID to login into such account?
Any info is welcome…

Plamen

++++++++++++

3. correspondence on the LITA listserv regarding “best practices for in house digital conversion”

 

From: <lita-l-request@lists.ala.org> on behalf of Sharona Ginsberg <lita-l@lists.ala.org>
Reply-To: “lita-l@lists.ala.org” <lita-l@lists.ala.org>
Date: Tuesday, November 21, 2017 at 10:07 AM
To: “lita-l@lists.ala.org” <lita-l@lists.ala.org>
Subject: Re: [lita-l] best practices for in house digital conversion

I’m at an academic rather than public library, but you can see what we offer for digital conversion here: https://www.oswego.edu/library/digital-conversion. We’ve been generally happy with our equipment, and I especially think the Elgato Video Capture device (VHS to digital) is a good tool.

– Sharona

From: <lita-l-request@lists.ala.org> on behalf of Molly Schwartz <mschwartz@metro.org>
Reply-To: “lita-l@lists.ala.org” <lita-l@lists.ala.org>
Date: Tuesday, November 21, 2017 at 10:03 AM
To: “lita-l@lists.ala.org” <lita-l@lists.ala.org>
Subject: Re: [lita-l] best practices for in house digital conversion

Hi Stew,

We are not a public library, but we did recently set up an AV media transfer rack here in METRO’s studio in partnership with the XFR Collective. There is a full list of the media formats we can transfer here on our website, as well as a lot more great information in the documentation.

 

I would also definitely recommend DCPL’s Memory Lab and the project to build a Memory Lab Network, which is more applicable to public libraries.

 

best,

Molly

 

On Tue, Nov 21, 2017 at 10:49 AM, Stewart Wilson <SWilson@onlib.org> wrote:

Hi all,

I know there is a lot of information already out here, but is anyone up for a conversation about media conversion technologies for public library patrons?

 

I’m interested in best practices and recommended technologies or guides that you use in your system.

 

Anything that converts projector slides, 35mm, VHS, photographs, cassette, etc.

 

We are building a new PC for this and 3D rendering, so any recommendations for things like soundcards or video capture cards are also useful.

 

Thanks for your help; this group is the best.​

 

Stew Wilson

Paralibrarian for Network Administration and Technology

Community Library of Dewitt & Jamesville

swilson@onlib.org

315 446 3578
To maximize your use of LITA-L or to unsubscribe, see http://www.ala.org/lita/involve/email

Molly C. Schwartz

Studio Manager

http://metro.org/services/599studio

mschwartz@metro.org

212-228-7132

esummit 2018 prsentation
https://www.slideshare.net/aidemoreto/scsu-library-digitizing-archiving-vhs-tapes-105758307

SCSU library digitizing/ archiving VHS tapes from Plamen Miltenoff

++++++++
more on digitizing in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digitizing

globalization economy democracy

Caldwell, C. (April, 2017). Sending Jobs Overseas. CRB, 27(2).

http://www.claremont.org/crb/article/sending-jobs-overseas/ 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claremont_Institute

Caldwell’s book review of
Baldwin, Richard E. The Great Convergence: Information Technology and the New Globalization. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2016. not at SCSU library, available through ILL (https://mplus.mnpals.net/vufind/Record/008770850/Hold?item_id=MSU50008770850000010&id=008770850&hashKey=cff0a018a46178d4d3208ac449d86c4e#tabnav)

Globalization’s cheerleaders, from Columbia University economist Jagdish Bhagwati to New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman, made arguments from classical economics: by buying manufactured products from people overseas who made them cheaper than we did, the United States could get rich concentrating on product design, marketing, and other lucrative services. That turned out to be a mostly inaccurate description of how globalism would work in the developed world, as mainstream politicians everywhere are now discovering.

Certain skeptics, including polymath author Edward Luttwak and Harvard economist Dani Rodrik, put forward a better account. In his 1998 book Turbo-Capitalism, Luttwak gave what is still the most succinct and accurate reading of the new system’s economic consequences. “It enriches industrializing poor countries, impoverishes the semi-affluent majority in rich countries, and greatly adds to the incomes of the top 1 percent on both sides who are managing the arbitrage.”

In The Great Convergence, Richard Baldwin, an economist at the Graduate Institute in Geneva, gives us an idea why, over the past generation, globalization’s benefits have been so hard to explain and its damage so hard to diagnose.

We have had “globalization,” in the sense of far-flung trade, for centuries now.

ut around 1990, the cost of sharing information at a distance fell dramatically. Workers on complex projects no longer had to cluster in the same factory, mill town, or even country. Other factors entered in. Tariffs fell. The rise of “Global English” as a common language of business reduced the cost of moving information (albeit at an exorbitant cost in culture). “Containerization” (the use of standard-sized shipping containers across road, rail, and sea transport) made packing and shipping predictable and helped break the world’s powerful longshoremen’s unions. Active “pro-business” political reforms did the rest.

Far-flung “global value chains” replaced assembly lines. Corporations came to do some of the work of governments, because in the free-trade climate imposed by the U.S., they could play governments off against one another. Globalization is not about nations anymore. It is not about products. And the most recent elections showed that it has not been about people for a long time. No, it is about tasks.

his means a windfall for what used to be called the Third World. More than 600 million people have been pulled out of dire poverty. They can get richer by building parts of things.

The competition that globalization has created for manufacturing has driven the value-added in manufacturing down close to what we would think of as zilch. The lucrative work is in the design and the P.R.—the brainy, high-paying stuff that we still get to do.

But only a tiny fraction of people in any society is equipped to do lucrative brainwork. In all Western societies, the new formula for prosperity is inconsistent with the old formula for democracy.

One of these platitudes is that all nations gain from trade. Baldwin singles out Harvard professor and former George W. Bush Administration economic adviser Gregory Mankiw, who urged passage of the Obama Administration mega-trade deals TPP and Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) on the grounds that America should “work in those industries in which we have an advantage compared with other nations, and we should import from abroad those goods that can be produced more cheaply there.”

That was a solid argument 200 years ago, when the British economist David Ricardo developed modern doctrines of trade. In practical terms, it is not always solid today. What has changed is the new mobility of knowledge. But knowledge is a special commodity. It can be reused. Several people can use it at the same time. It causes people to cluster in groups, and tends to grow where those groups have already clustered.

When surgeries involved opening the patient up like a lobster or a peapod, the doctor had to be in physical contact with a patient. New arthroscopic processes require the surgeon to guide cutting and cauterizing tools by computer. That computer did not have to be in the same room. And if it did not, why did it have to be in the same country? In 2001, a doctor in New York performed surgery on a patient in Strasbourg. In a similar way, the foreman on the American factory floor could now coordinate production processes in Mexico. Each step of the production process could now be isolated, and then offshored. This process, Baldwin writes, “broke up Team America by eroding American labor’s quasi-monopoly on using American firms’ know-how.”

To explain why the idea that all nations win from trade isn’t true any longer, Baldwin returns to his teamwork metaphor. In the old Ricardian world that most policymakers still inhabit, the international economy could be thought of as a professional sports league. Trading goods and services resembled trading players from one team to another. Neither team would carry out the deal unless it believed it to be in its own interests. Nowadays, trade is more like an arrangement by which the manager of the better team is allowed to coach the lousier one in his spare time.

Vietnam, which does low-level assembly of wire harnesses for Honda. This does not mean Vietnam has industrialized, but nations like it no longer have to.

In the work of Thomas Friedman and other boosters you find value chains described as kaleidoscopic, complex, operating in a dozen different countries. Those are rare. There is less to “global value chains” than meets the eye. Most of them, Baldwin shows, are actually regional value chains. As noted, they exist on the periphery of the United States, Europe, or Japan. In this, offshoring resembles the elaborate international transactions that Florentine bankers under the Medicis engaged in for the sole purpose of avoiding church strictures on moneylending.

One way of describing outsourcing is as a verdict on the pay structure that had arisen in the West by the 1970s: on trade unions, prevailing-wage laws, defined-benefit pension plans, long vacations, and, more generally, the power workers had accumulated against their bosses.

In 1993, during the first month of his presidency, Bill Clinton outlined some of the promise of a world in which “the average 18-year-old today will change jobs seven times in a lifetime.” How could anyone ever have believed in, tolerated, or even wished for such a thing? A person cannot productively invest the resources of his only life if he’s going to be told every five years that everything he once thought solid has melted into ait.

The more so since globalization undermines democracy, in the ways we have noted. Global value chains are extraordinarily delicate. They are vulnerable to shocks. Terrorists have discovered this. In order to work, free-trade systems must be frictionless and immune to interruption, forever. This means a program of intellectual property protection, zero tariffs, and cross-border traffic in everything, including migrants. This can be assured only in a system that is veto-proof and non-consultative—in short, undemocratic.

Sheltered from democracy, the economy of the free trade system becomes more and more a private space.

+#+#+#+#+#+#+#+#+#+#+#+#+#+#+#+#+#+#+#+

Caldwell, C. (2014, November). Twilight of Democracy. CRB, 14(4).

Caldwell’s book review of
Fukuyama, Francis. The Origins of Political Order: From Prehuman Times to the French Revolution. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2011. SCSU Library: https://mplus.mnpals.net/vufind/Record/007359076  Call Number: JC11 .F85 2011

http://www.claremont.org/crb/article/twilight-of-democracy/

Fukuyama’s first volume opened with China’s mandarin bureaucracy rather than the democracy of ancient Athens, shifting the methods of political science away from specifically Western intellectual genealogies and towards anthropology. Nepotism and favor-swapping are man’s basic political motivations, as Fukuyama sees it. Disciplining those impulses leads to effective government, but “repatrimonialization”—the capture of government by private interests—threatens whenever vigilance is relaxed. Fukuyama’s new volume, which describes political order since the French Revolution, extends his thinking on repatrimonialization, from the undermining of meritocratic bureaucracy in Han China through the sale of offices under France’s Henri IV to the looting of foreign aid in post-colonial Zaire. Fukuyama is convinced that the United States is on a similar path of institutional decay.

Political philosophy asks which government is best for man. Political science asks which government is best for government. Political decline, Fukuyama insists, is not the same thing as civilizational collapse.

Fukuyama is not the first to remark that wars can spur government efficiency—even if front-line soldiers are the last to benefit from it.

Relative to the smooth-running systems of northwestern Europe, American bureaucracy has been a dud, riddled with corruption from the start and resistant to reform. Patronage—favors for individual cronies and supporters—has thrived.

Clientelism is an ambiguous phenomenon: it is bread and circuses, it is race politics, it is doing favors for special classes of people. Clientelism is both more democratic and more systemically corrupting than the occasional nepotistic appointment.

why modern mass liberal democracy has developed on clientelistic lines in the U.S. and meritocratic ones in Europe. In Europe, democracy, when it came, had to adapt itself to longstanding pre-democratic institutions, and to governing elites that insisted on established codes and habits. Where strong states precede democracy (as in Germany), bureaucracies are efficient and uncorrupt. Where democracy precedes strong states (as in the United States but also Greece and Italy), government can be viewed by the public as a piñata.

Fukuyama contrasts the painstaking Japanese development of Taiwan a century ago with the mess that the U.S. Congress, “eager to impose American models of government on a society they only dimly understood,” was then making of the Philippines. It is not surprising that Fukuyama was one of the most eloquent conservative critics of the U.S. invasion of Iraq from the very beginning.

What distinguishes once-colonized Vietnam and China and uncolonized Japan and Korea from these Third World basket cases is that the East Asian lands “all possess competent, high-capacity states,” in contrast to sub-Saharan Africa, which “did not possess strong state-level institutions.”

Fukuyama does not think ethnic homogeneity is a prerequisite for successful politics

the United States “suffers from the problem of political decay in a more acute form than other democratic political systems.” It has kept the peace in a stagnant economy only by dragooning women into the workplace and showering the working and middle classes with credit.

public-sector unions have colluded with the Democratic Party to make government employment more rewarding for those who do it and less responsive to the public at large. In this sense, government is too big. But he also believes that cutting taxes on the rich in hopes of spurring economic growth has been a fool’s errand, and that the beneficiaries of deregulation, financial and otherwise, have grown to the point where they have escaped bureaucratic control altogether. In this sense, government is not big enough.

Washington, as Fukuyama sees it, is a patchwork of impotence and omnipotence—effective where it insists on its prerogatives, ineffective where it has been bought out. The unpredictable results of democratic oversight have led Americans to seek guidance in exactly the wrong place: the courts, which have both exceeded and misinterpreted their constitutional responsibilities.  the almost daily insistence of courts that they are liberating people by removing discretion from them gives American society a Soviet cast.

“Effective modern states,” he writes, “are built around technical expertise, competence, and autonomy.”

http://librev.com/index.php/2013-03-30-08-56-39/discussion/culture/3234-gartziya-i-problemite-na-klientelistkata-darzhava

#+#+#+#+#+#+#+#+#+#+#+#+#+#+#+#+#+#+#+#+#+

Williams, J. (2017, May). The Dumb Politics of Elite Condescension. NYT

https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/05/27/opinion/sunday/the-dumb-politics-of-elite-condescension.html

the sociologists Richard Sennett and Jonathan Cobb call the “hidden injuries of class.” These are dramatized by a recent employment study, in which the sociologists Lauren A. Rivera and Andras Tilcsik sent 316 law firms résumés with identical and impressive work and academic credentials, but different cues about social class. The study found that men who listed hobbies like sailing and listening to classical music had a callback rate 12 times higher than those of men who signaled working-class origins, by mentioning country music, for example.

Politically, the biggest “hidden injury” is the hollowing out of the middle class in advanced industrialized countries. For two generations after World War II, working-class whites in the United States enjoyed a middle-class standard of living, only to lose it in recent decades.

The college-for-all experiment did not work. Two-thirds of Americans are not college graduates. We need to continue to make college more accessible, but we also need to improve the economic prospects of Americans without college degrees.

the United States has a well-documented dearth of workers qualified for middle-skill jobs that pay $40,000 or more a year and require some postsecondary education but not a college degree. A 2014 report by Accenture, Burning Glass Technologies and Harvard Business School found that a lack of adequate middle-skills talent affects the productivity of “47 percent of manufacturing companies, 35 percent of health care and social assistance companies, and 21 percent of retail companies.”

Skillful, a partnership among the Markle Foundation, LinkedIn and Colorado, is one initiative pointing the way. Skillful helps provide marketable skills for job seekers without college degrees and connects them with employers in need of middle-skilled workers in information technology, advanced manufacturing and health care. For more information, see my other IMS blog entries, such ashttp://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/01/11/credly-badges-on-canvas/

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