Searching for "royalty free"

music sounds multimedia royalty free

Five Places to Find Free Music and Sounds for Multimedia Projects

https://www.freetech4teachers.com/2018/11/five-places-to-find-free-music-and.html

Dig CC Mixter is Creative Commons licensed.

Musopen’s collection of free recordings contains performances of the works of hundreds of composers.
The Free Music Archive provides free, high-quality, music in a wide range of genres.

FMA seeks to maintain a high-quality resource through the use of selected curators who approve or deny all submissions to the collection.

The National Jukebox is an archive of more than 10,000 recordings made by the Victor Talking Machine Company between 1901 and 1925.

Sound Bible is a resource for finding and downloading free sound clips, sound effects, and sound bites.

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more on royalty free multimedia in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=royalty+free

free multimedia sources

Sources of Free Sound Effects and Music for Multimedia Projects

http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2014/09/sources-of-free-sound-effects-and-music.html

Royalty Free Music
Musopen’s collection
The Internet Archive
The Free Music Archive
FMA

Quality Videos Quickly

By

http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/video-production-how-to-create-quality-videos-quickly-roberto-blake/

https://www.youtube.com/c/robertoblakepsd

Adobe Premiere Pro CC : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AxkXrPzEGtI

Whether you’re using a smartphone or a DSLR camera, one thing Roberto recommends before recording is to check the environment. Look for and remove any distractions from the background. For example, if there’s noise from cars driving by you can change your location. If there’s a part of your office that needs to be cleaned, you can tidy up.

He also says you should think about the context of your background. For instance, when Roberto does personal vlogs as motivation for creatives and entrepreneurs who might be thinking about giving up, he uses his bookshelf as the backdrop. It’s appropriate because there is literally a collection of people behind him who put something out there and could have quit just as easily.

Roberto also notes you should consider audio, the lighting in the room, and take a photo of the shot, to check framing and composition, before you film. The photo gives you a way to make sure the video will be shot at the angle you want. Roberto shares that if he’s filming with his camera, he’ll use the remote or a timer to take a photo of him in the shot. With a smartphone, he says you can use a selfie stick, or tripod, or the timer feature.

Smartphone teleprompter apps include PromptSmart on iTunes and Teleprompter Pro on iTunes and Google Play.

Most of the smartphone apps are free or $5.

Adobe Premiere Clip, which is simple to use. All you need is a free Adobe account, which you can sign up for via email. It can upload video directly to YouTube and Facebook for you. It also has color grading filters, lets you loop background audio (they have a few tracks which are royalty free), mix down the audio, edit clips together, cut things out, and more.

Plus, if you have professional software, like Adobe Premiere Pro at home, you can do a rough cut of everything in Premiere Clip from your phone, and then save it to Creative Cloud, go back to your desktop, and then tweak and do all the advanced editing there.

If you have an iPhone, you have iMovie. There’s also FilmoraGo (iPhone and Android) and CyberLink Power Director, which is Android only.

Free video editing programs such as HitFilm 4, DaVinci Resolve, iMovie, and the Windows MovieMaker

Prisma, available on iOS and Android, takes your images, whether you take the photos in the app or import them, and applies artistic filters.

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more on video editing in this blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=video+editing

video editing

Public Service Announcements using visuals

Troy Shafer’s Health class.

Steps to promote your own brand versus using generic visuals:

  • Plan your project by considering the following items
    • create a very basic script and timeline
    • take footage (pictures and movie)

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/10/21/handout-videos-on-mobile-devices/

Here is more information on apps and video tips for video editing using mobile devices:

video editing for mobile devices


http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/06/19/how-to-use-the-free-youtube-video-editor/

more information on video recording and editing tools
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/12/21/tools-video-creation/ (for Android devices)

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more info for Health classes:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/02/18/digital-literacy-instruction-for-scsu-health-class/

Design social media images

How to Easily Design Social Media Images: 4 Free Tools

October 3, 2018 https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/social-media-images-free-tools

Preview Text Styles With One Touch via Adobe Spark

  • Adobe Spark is part of Adobe’s suite of creative products, bringing social media image and video creation to the web.

remove the Adobe Spark watermark with a paid Adobe Spark plan or Creative Cloud subscription, both starting at $9.99 a month.

  • Design Basic Social Media Images Quickly With Pablo

    Pablo by Buffer is a no-frills online image editor that lets you make basic social media images in seconds. So while it doesn’t have some of the features of other image editors on this list, it works in a pinch. This tool is free to use without registration, making it perfect for when you or your team needs to create a quick image. My note: not on mobiles yet, only desktop

  • Design Automatically Resizable Social Media Images With Snappa

    Snappa is a user-friendly online image maker that has templates for every social media network. In addition to social post templates, it offers banner, story, and infographic templates. This makes Snappa your one-stop shop for creating all sorts of social media content.

  • Add Simple Data Visualization Charts to Social Media Images in CanvaCanva is a free online image editor with a huge library of free templates and royalty-free images. The app has built-in templates for all of the major social networks, and you can even post directly to your social media accounts from the app.

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more on social media images in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media+images

compensation for online

Compensation for creation of online courses

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I absolutely echo Kimber’s notion that a team approach to course development can actually take longer, even when one of the team members is an instructional designer. Perhaps because faculty members are used to controlling all aspects of their course development and delivery, the division of labor concept may feel too foreign to them. An issue that is similar in nature and referred to as ‘unbundling the faculty role’ is discussed at length in the development of competency-based education (CBE) courses and it is not typically a concept that faculty embrace.

Robin

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I will also confirm that the team approach to course development can take longer.  Indeed it does in my experience.  It requires much more “back and forth”, negotiating of who is doing what, ensuring that the overall approach is congruent, etc.  That’s not to say that it’s not a worthwhile endeavor in some cases where it makes pedagogical sense (in our case we are designing courses for 18-22 year-old campus-based learners and 22+ year-old fully online learners at the same time), but if time/cost savings is the goal, you will be sorely disappointed, in my experience.  The “divide and conquer” approach requires a LOT of coordination and oversight.  Without that you will likely have a cobbled together, hodgepodge of a course that doesn’t meet expectations.

Best, Carine  Director, Office of Instructional Design & Academic Technology Ottawa University 1001 S. Cedar St. * Ottawa, KS 66067 carine.ullom@ottawa.edu * 785-248-2510

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Breaking up a course and coming up with a cohesive design and approach, could make the design process longer. At SSC, we generally work with our faculty over the course of a semester for each course. When we’ve worked with teams, we have not seen a shortened timeline.
The length of time it takes to develop a course depends on the content. Are there videos? If so, they have to be created, which is time-consuming, plus they either need to have a transcript created or they need subtitles. Both of those can be time-consuming. PowerPoint slides take time, plus, they need more content to make them relevant. We are working with our faculty to use the Universal Design for Learning model, which means we’re challenging them to create the content to benefit the most learners
I have a very small team whose sole focus is course design and it takes us 3-4 weeks to design a course and it’s our full-time job!

Linda
Linda C. Morosko, MA Director, eStarkState Division of Student Success 330-494-6170 ext. 4973 lmorosko@starkstate.edu

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Kelvin, we also use the 8-week development cycle, but do occasionally have to lengthen that cycle for particularly complex courses or in rare cases when the SME has had medical emergencies or other major life disruptions.  I would be surprised if multiple faculty working on a course could develop it any more quickly than a single faculty member, though, because of the additional time required for them to agree and the dispersed sense of responsibility. Interesting idea.

-Kimber

Dr. Kimberly D. Barnett Gibson, Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs and Online Learning Our Lady of the Lake University 411 SW 24th Street San Antonio, TX 78207 Kgibson@ollusa.edu 210.431.5574 BlackBoard IM kimberly.gibson  https://www.pinterest.com/drkdbgavpol@drkimberTweets

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Hello everyone. As a follow-up to the current thread, how long do you typically give hey course developer to develop a master course for your institution? We currently use an eight week model but some faculty have indicated that that is not enough time for them although we have teams of 2 to 4 faculty developing such content. Our current assumption is that with teams, there can be divisions of labor that can reduce the total amount time needed during the course development process.

Kelvin Bentley, PhD Vice President of Academic Affairs, TCC Connect Campus Tarrant County College District

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At Berkeley College, full-time faculty may develop online courses in conjunction with an instructional designer.   The course is used as a master template for other sections to be assigned from. Once the course has been scheduled and taught, the faculty member receives a stipend.  The faculty member would receive their normal pay to teach the developed course as part of their semester course load, with no additional royalties assigned for it or any additional sections that may be provided to students.

Regards, Gina   Gina Okun Assistant Dean, Online Berkeley College  64 East Midland Avenue, Suite 2, Paramus, NJ 07652 (973)405-2111  x6309 gina-okun@berkeleycollege.edu

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We operate with nearly all adjunct faculty where >70% of enrollment credits are onlinez
With one exception that I can recall, the development contract includes the college’s outright ownership, with no royalty rights. One of the issues with a royalty based arrangement would be what to do when the course is revised (which happens nearly every term, to one degree or another). At what point does the course begin to take on the character of another person’s input?
What do you do if the course is adapted for a shorter summer term, or a between-term intensive? What if new media tools or a different LMS are used? Is the royalty arrangement based on the syllabus or the course content itself? What happens if the textbook goes out of print, or an Open resource becomes available? What happens if students evaluate the course poorly?
I’m not in position to set this policy — I’m only reporting it. I like the idea of a royalty arrangement but it seems like it could get pretty messy. It isn’t as if you are licensing a song or an image where the original product doesn’t change. Courses, the modes of delivery, and the means of communication change all the time. Seems like it would be hard to define what constitutes “the course” after a certain amount of time.

Steve Covello Rich Media Specialist/Instructional Designer/Online Instructor Chalk & Wire e-Portfolio Administrator Granite State College 603-513-1346 Video chat: https://appear.in/id.team  Scheduling: http://meetme.so/stevecovello

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I’ve worked with many institutions that have used Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) to develop or provide the online course content. Most often, the institutions also provide a resource in the form of an Instructional Designer (ID) to take the content and create the actual course environment.

The SME is paid on a contract basis for provision of the content. This is a one-time payment, and the institution then owns the course content (other than integrated published materials such as text books, licensed online lab products, etc.). The SME may be an existing faculty member at the institution or not, or the SME may go on to teach the course at the institution. In any event, whoever teaches the course would be paid the standard faculty rate for the course. If the course requires revisions to the extent that a person will need to be engaged for content updates, then that can be a negotiated contract. Typically it is some fraction of the original development cost. No royalties are involved.

Hap Aziz, Ed.D. @digitalhap http:hapaziz.wordpress.com

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Within SUNY, there is some variance regarding whether a stipend is paid for development or not. In either case, since we are unionized there is policy regarding IP. IP resides with the faculty developer unless both parties agree in writing in the form of a contract to assign or share rights.

Policy statement: http://uupinfo.org/reports/reportpdf/IntellectualPropertyUpdated2016.pdf

Thank you for your feedback on this issue. Our institution does does not provide a royalty as we consider course development as a fee-for-service arrangement. We pay teams of 2-4 faculty $1000 each to develop master course shells for our high-enrollment courses.  Instead of a royalty fee, I think an institution can simply provide course developers the perk of first right of refusal to teach the course when it offered as well as providing course developers with the first option to make revisions to the course shell over time.

Kelvin

Kelvin Bentley, Ph.D. Vice President of Academic Affairs, TCC Connect Campus Tarrant County College District

Once upon a time, and several positions ago, we set up a google doc for capturing all kinds of data points across institutions, like this. I’m sure it’s far out of date, but may still have some ideas or info in there – and could possibly be dusted off and oiled up for re-use… I present the Blend-Online Data Collector. This tab is for course development payment.

Kind regards,

Clark

Clark Shah-Nelson

Assistant Dean, Instructional Design and Technology
University of Maryland School of Social Work—Twitter … LinkedIn —voice/SMS: (646) 535-7272fax: 270.514.0112

Hi Jenn,

Just want to clarify…you say faculty “sign over all intellectual property rights of the course to the college.” but later in the email say “Faculty own all intellectual property and can take it with them to teach at another institution”, so is your policy changing to the former? Or, is it the later and that is what you are asking about?

I’ll send details on our policy directly to your email account.

Best,

Ellen

On Tue, Dec 6, 2016 at 9:43 AM, Jennifer Stevens <jennifer_stevens@emerson.edu> wrote:

Hello all,

I am tasked with finding out what the going rate is for the following model:
We pay an adjunct faculty member (“teaching faculty”) a set amount in order to develop an online course and sign over all intellectual property rights of the course to the college.
Is anyone doing this? I’ve heard of models that include royalties, but I personally don’t know of any that offer straight payment for IP. I know this can be a touchy subject, so feel free to respond directly to me and I will return and post a range of payment rates with no other identifying data.
For some comparison, we are currently paying full time faculty a $5000 stipend to spend a semester developing their very first online class, and then they get paid to teach the class. Subsequent online class developments are unpaid. Emerson owns the course description and course shell and is allowed to show the course to future faculty who will teach the online course. Faculty own all intellectual property and can take it with them to teach at another institution. More info: http://www.emerson.edu/itg/online-emerson/frequently-asked-questions
I asked this on another list, but wanted to get Blend_Online’s opinion as well. Thanks for any pointers!
Jenn Stevens
Director | Instructional Technology Group | 403A Walker Building  |  Emerson College  |  120 Boylston St  |  Boston MA 02116  |  (617) 824-3093

Ellen M. Murphy

Director of Program Development
Graduate Professional Studies

Brandeis University Rabb School

781-736-8737

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more on compensation for online courses in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+compensation

MnSCU System Office: D2L QA will be unavailable on Wednesday, September 11, 2013

announcement

MnSCU System Office:
D2L testing environment will be unavailable on Wednesday, September 11, 2013

D2L QA (https://stcloudstateqa.ims.mnscu.edu/) will be unavailable on Wednesday, September 11, 2013 for a full refresh.

Any work that has been performed in QA since the last refresh (June 18, 2013) will be overwritten by the course data and files that exist in D2L Production as of September 11.

Status will be posted at http://status.mnscu.edu/desire2learn/

For more information please contact d2l@stcloudstate.edu.

MnSCU System Office: D2L Reserved Downtimes for 2014

announcement

MnSCU System Office:
D2L Reserved Downtimes for 2014

 

2014.  The schedule is available on the MnSCU IMS website at http://mnscuims.mnscu.edu/scheduleddowntime.html

 

These are the reserved downtimes for D2L software updates, and for maintenance to the hardware and software that support the D2L system.  Note that these times are simply reserved, and are only used if necessary.  Please consider these potential periods of unavailability when planning your usage of the D2L system.

 

When a reserved time needs to be used, an email announcement is sent to campuses prior to the downtime.  The message is sent to D2L Campus Site Administrators and D2L Campus Trainers.  Campus Site Admins at each campus are responsible for notifying users at their schools.  Downtimes are also posted at the D2L Status Web Page at http://status.mnscu.edu/desire2learn/

 

By reserving these times, and notifying users in advance, we hope to minimize the impact of the times when D2L is unavailable due to maintenance and upgrades.  On occasion, we need to extend a downtime, or take an unscheduled downtime when a critical update is needed.  As much as possible, we work within the framework of the reserved downtime schedule.

 

WEEKLY RESERVED D2L DOWNTIMES – D2L Hardware and Server Software Maintenance

All Tuesdays 5 AM-7 AM  (reserved—used only when necessary)

All Sundays 5 AM-9 AM    (reserved—used only when necessary)

 

MONTHLY RESERVED D2L DOWNTIMES – D2L Software Updates

Typically first Friday of the month with the exception of MnSCU or D2L Canada holiday weekends.

 

Calendar Year 2014:

Jan 3-4, 2014                (10 PM Fri-10 AM Sat)

Feb 7-8, 2014                (10 PM Fri-10 AM Sat)

Mar 7-8, 2014                (10 PM Fri-10 AM Sat)

Apr 4-5, 2014                (10 PM Fri-10 AM Sat)

May 2-3, 2014               (10 PM Fri-10 AM Sat)

May 30-31, 2014†         (10 PM Fri-10 PM Sat) (24 hours)

July 11-12, 2014            (10 PM Fri-10 AM Sat)

Aug 8-9, 2014               (10 PM Fri-10 AM Sat)

Sept 5-6, 2014               (10 PM Fri-10 AM Sat)

Oct 3-4, 2014                 (10 PM Fri-10 AM Sat)

Nov 7-8, 2014                (10 PM Fri-10 AM Sat)

Dec 5-6, 2014                (10 PM Fri-10 AM Sat)

Jan 2-3, 2015 †              (10 PM Fri-10 PM Sat) (24 hours)

 

†  The reserved downtime for a major software upgrade may need to be extended beyond the designated 24 hours.  When a major D2L software upgrade is released in early spring, we typically upgrade after spring semester.  We reserve additional dates between fall and spring semester (Dec, Jan) to provide options for later software releases.