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Reading Digesting Scholarly Research

ELI Webinar | Reading & Digesting Scholarly Research: Tips to Save Time While Increasing Understanding

Tuesday, February 26 | 1:00p.m. – 2:00p.m. ET | Online

Reading and digesting scholarly research can be challenging when new journal issues, reports, and books are being released every day. Join Katie Linder, director of research for Oregon State University Ecampus, to learn some tips that will help you find scholarly research that’s applicable to your work, read that research more efficiently, evaluate the quality of scholarly research, and decide on the applicability of the research you’re reading to your day-to-day work. You’ll also have the opportunity to ask any questions you might have about reading and digesting scholarly research.

Outcomes

  • Find the scholarly research that is of most importance to your work
  • Read scholarly research efficiently
  • Evaluate the quality of scholarly research
  • Decide when and how to apply scholarly research results in your work

Katie Linder Research Director, Ecampus Oregon State University https://members.educause.edu/kathryn-linder

dealing with research

Dealing with Research Frustrations

Kimberly Schveder

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/dealing-research-frustrations-kimberly-schveder/

a quick list of some items to consider when you are researching:

Keep a research journal. It can be virtually or on paper, or both. keep track of all of the following: different section(s) with all of your ideas and thoughts, what you have accomplished, your goals on what you want to accomplish in the project in increments, your references and citations, your research meeting notes, your literature review notes, and topics that you wish to explore in further research. Also, write down everything: what you used, when you used it, what you tested on what day.

Stick with your research, even when things don’t go as planned or if you get unexpected results.
Research may feel awkward and confusing at first, even in the literature review phase when you are trying to find a research question or researching more methods that will help you in your research.
Don’t over think your research. have a clear, concise research question that you can always go back to stay on task. But, if you get side-tracked, right down any other related research questions that you can potentially go back to for future studies.

Always have a research mentor.

Use your resources that are in front of you. The internet is your friend. if you are having trouble finding a topic, article, or technical issue, seek out help, starting with a simple Google search. You can connect with research and reference librarians, freelance writers, ghost writers, potential references, authors and editors, local libraries and their catalogs

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more on research in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=research

social media for research

Using Social Media for Research – November 16
12:00 – 1:00 p.m.
1314 Social Sciences

Professor Lee-Ann Kastman Breuch (Writing Studies) and Michael Beckstrand (Mixed-Methods Research Associate, LATIS) will discuss how to retrieve, prepare, and analyze social media data for research projects. Using two case studies, Lee-Ann will share examples of a grounded theory analysis of blog, Twitter, and Facebook data.  Michael will speak about the technical aspects of retrieving and managing social media data. Pizza will be provided. Learn more and register here.
This event is part of the 2018-19 Research Development Friday Roundtable Series organized by the CLA Research Development Team.

Social media and Data Visualization

Workshop materials

Number of participants: 10
Prerequisites: None
Duration: 2 days

Technologies
Software

Online

Agenda

All workshop sessions will take place 9:00 a.m. – noon, with lab time and office hours 1:30 -3:30 p.m.

Tuesday, August 22

  • Introduction to web-scraping
  • Introduction to APIs
  • Facepager
  • Activities
  • Work & get help on your own projects

Wed, August 23

  • Recap
  • Introduction to OpenRefine
  • Cleaning social media data with OpenRefine
  • Analyzing/Visualizing the social media data
    • Atlas.TI
    • Voyant
    • Gephi

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more on social media for research in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media+research

User Research and Usability (UX) Lab

Positioning UX as a Library Service

University of Toronto Libraries opened a User Research and Usability (UX) Lab in September 2017, the first space of its kind on campus. The UX Lab is open to students, staff, and faculty by appointment or during weekly drop in hours.

In this 90-minute webinar, our presenter will discuss:

  • The rationale behind building a physical usability lab and why a physical space isn’t always needed (or recommended)
  • Experience with community building efforts
  • How to raise awareness of UX as a service to staff and the University community at large
  • The evolution of the lab’s services
  • Next steps

Presenter: Lisa Gayhart, User Experience Librarian, University of Toronto Libraries
Thursday November 15, 2018, 1:00 – 2:30 pm Central Time

View details and Register here

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more on usability in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=usability

research grant WWI

Research Grants Programme: 2018 Call for Submissions (Open)

Deadline: 5 October 2018 23:59 CET Theme: The First World War.

https://pro.europeana.eu/post/research-grants-programme-2018-call-for-submissions-open

Eligibility

The Research Grants Programme is intended for early career scholars of all nationalities and in any field of the Humanities. They must have a particular interest in cultural heritage and take a digital humanities approach. Applicants must hold a PhD, with no more than 7 years of experience after the completion of their PhD. With duly justified exceptions, their projects must be hosted by institutions, i.e. a university, a research centre, a library lab or a museum, working in one of the European Union member states.

transforming liaison roles in research libraries

!*!*!*!*! — this article was pitched by Mark Vargas in the fall of 2013, back then dean of LRS and discussed at a faculty meeting at LRS in the same year—- !*!*!*!

New Roles for New Times: Transforming Liaison Roles in Research Libraries

https://conservancy.umn.edu/bitstream/handle/11299/169867/TransformingLiaisonRoles.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

(p. 4) Building strong relationships with faculty and other campus professionals, and establishing collaborative partnerships within and across institutions, are necessary building blocks to librarians’ success. In a traditional liaison model, librarians use their subject knowledge to select books and journals and teach guest lectures.

“Liaisons cannot be experts themselves in each new capability, but knowing when to call in a colleague, or how to describe appropriate expert capabilities to faculty, will be key to the new liaison role.

six trends in the development of new roles for library liaisons
user engagement is a driving factor
what users do (research, teaching, and learning) rather than on what librarians do (collections, reference, library instruction).
In addition, an ALA-accredited master’s degree in library science is no longer strictly required.
In a networked world, local collections as ends in themselves make learning fragmentary and incomplete. (p. 5)
A multi-institutional approach is the only one that now makes sense.
Scholars already collaborate; libraries need to make it easier for them to do so.
but they also advise and collaborate on issues of copyright, scholarly communication, data management, knowledge management, and information literacy. The base level of knowledge that a liaison must possess is much broader than familiarity with a reference collection or facility with online searching; instead, they must constantly keep up with evolving pedagogies and research methods, rapidly developing tools, technologies, and ever-changing policies that facilitate and inform teaching, learning, and research in their assigned disciplines.
In many research libraries, programmatic efforts with information literacy have been too narrowly defined. It is not unusual for libraries to focus on freshman writing programs and a series of “one-shot” or invited guest lectures in individual courses. While many librarians have become excellent teachers, traditional one-shot, in-person instructional sessions can vary in quality depending on the training librarians have received in this arena; and they neither scale well nor do they necessarily address broader curricular goals. Librarians at many institutions are now focusing on collaborating with faculty to develop thoughtful assignments and provide online instructional materials that are built into key courses within a curriculum and provide scaffolding to help students develop library research skills over the course of their academic careers.
And many libraries stated that they lack instructional designers and/or educational technologists on their staff, limiting the development of interactive online learning modules and tutorials. (my note: or just ignore the desire by unites such as IMS to help).

(p. 7). This move away from supervision allows the librarians to focus on their liaison responsibilities rather than on the day-to-day operations of a library and its attendant personnel needs.

effectively support teaching, (1.) learning, and research; (2.) identify opportunities for further development of tools and services; (3.) and connect students, staff, and faculty to deeper expertise when needed.

At many institutions, therefore, the conversation has focused on how to supplement and support the liaison model with other staff.

At many institutions, therefore, the conversation has focused on how to supplement and support the liaison model with other staff.

the hybrid exists within the liaison structure, where liaisons also devote a portion of their time (e.g., 20% or more) to an additional area of expertise, for example digital humanities and scholarly communication, and may work with liaisons across all disciplinary areas. (my note: and at the SCSU library, the librarians firmly opposed the request for a second master’s degree)

functional specialists who do not have liaison assignments to specific academic departments but instead serve as “superliaisons” to other librarians and to the entire campus. Current specialist areas of expertise include copyright, geographic information systems (GIS), media production and integration, distributed education or e-learning, data management, emerging technologies, user experience, instructional design, and bioinformatics. (everything in italics is currently done by IMS faculty).

divided into five areas of functional specialization: information resources and collections management; information literacy, instruction, and curriculum development; discovery and access; archival and special collections; scholarly communication and the research enterprise.

E-Scholarship Collaborative, a Research Support Services Collaborative (p. 8).

p. 9. managing alerts and feeds, personal archiving, and using social networking for teaching and professional development

p. 10. new initiatives in humanistic research and teaching are changing the nature and frequency of partnerships between faculty and the Libraries. In particular, cross-disciplinary Humanities Laboratories (http://fhi.duke.edu/labs), supported by the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation-funded Humanities Writ Large project, have allowed liaisons to partner with faculty to develop and curate new forms of scholarship.

consultations on a range of topics, such as how to use social media to effectively communicate academic research and how to mark up historical texts using the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) guidelines

p. 10. http://www.rluk.ac.uk/news/rluk-report-the-role-of-research-libraries-in-the-creation-archiving-curation-and-preservation-of-tools-for-the-digital-humanities/
The RLUK report identified a wide skills gap in nine key areas where future involvement of liaisons is considered important now and expected to grow

p. 11. Media literacy, and facilitating the integration of media into courses, is an area in which research libraries can play a lead role at their institutions. (my note: yet still suppressed or outright denied to IMS to conducts such efforts)

Purdue Academic Course Transformation, or IMPACT (http://www.lib.purdue.edu/infolit/impact). The program’s purpose is to make foundational courses at Purdue more student-centered and participatory. Librarians are key members of interdepartmental teams that “work with Purdue instructors to redesign courses by applying evidence-based educational practices” and offer “learning solutions” that help students engage with and critically evaluate information. (my note: as offered by Keith and myself to Miguel, the vice provost for undergrads, who left; then offered to First Year Experience faculty, but ignored by Christine Metzo; then offered again to Glenn Davis, who bounced it back to Christine Metzo).

p. 15. The NCSU Libraries Fellows Program offers new librarians a two-year appointment during which they develop expertise in a functional area and contribute to an innovative initiative of strategic importance. NCSU Libraries typically have four to six fellows at a time, bringing in people with needed skills and working to find ongoing positions when they have a particularly good match. Purdue Libraries have experimented with offering two-year visiting assistant professor positions. And the University of Minnesota has hired a second CLIR fellow for a two-year digital humanities project; the first CLIR fellow now holds an ongoing position as a curator in Archives and Special Collections. The CLIR Fellowship is a postdoctoral program that hires recent PhD graduates (non-librarians), allowing them to explore alternative careers and allowing the libraries to benefit from their discipline-specific expertise.

design research questions

your quantitative method’s research instrument

5:30 minutes

How do you write survey questions that accurately measure public opinion?

Writing clear and neutral survey questions is much more difficult than it might seem. We spend *a lot* of time thinking about the phrasing and ordering of our survey questions. The second video in our Methods 101 series tackles the many ways writing survey questions can go wrong, and the steps you can take to avoid these pitfalls.

Posted by Pew Research Center on Wednesday, March 21, 2018

brain research distance ed

The Implications of Brain Research for Distance Education

Katrina A. Meyer
Assistant Professor, Department of Educational Leadership
University of North Dakota
katrina_meyer@und.nodak.edu

posted on FB in 2013 https://www.facebook.com/plamen.miltenoff/posts/10100455869591041

The brain is actually three brains: the ancient reptilian brain, the limbic brain, and the cortical brain. This article will focus on the limbic brain, because it may be most important to successfully using interactive video or web-based video. The limbic brain monitors the external world and the internal body, taking in information through the senses as well as body temperature and blood pressure, among others. It is the limbic brain that generates and interprets facial expressions and handles emotions, while the cortical brain handles symbolic activities such as language as well as action and strategizing. The two interact when an emotion is sent from the limbic to the cortical brain and generates a conscious thought; in response to a feeling of fear (limbic), you ask, “what should I do?” (cortical).

The importance of direct eye contact and deciphering body language is also important for sending and picking up clues about social context.

The loss of social cues is important because it may affect the quality of the content of the presentation (by not allowing timely feedback or questions) but also because students may feel less engaged and become frustrated with the interaction, and subsequently lower their assessment of the class and the instructor (Reeves & Nass, 1996). Fortunately, faculty can provide such social cues verbally, once they are aware of the importance of helping students use these new media.

Attachment theory also supports the importance of physical and emotional connections.

As many a struggling teacher knows, students are often impervious to learning new concepts. They may replay the new information for a test, but after time passes, they revert to the earlier (and likely wrong) information. This is referred to as the “power of mental models.” As explained in Marchese (2000), when we view a tree, it is not as if we see the tree in our head, as in photography.

The coping strategies of the two hemispheres are fundamentally different. The left hemisphere’s job is to create a belief system or model and to fold new experiences into that belief system. If confronted with some new information that doesn’t fit the model, it relies on Freudian defense mechanisms to deny, repress or confabulate – anything to preserve the status quo. The right hemisphere’s strategy is to play “Devil’s Advocate,” to question the status quo and look for global inconsistencies. When the anomalous information reaches a certain threshold, the right hemisphere decides that it is time to force a complete revision of the entire model and start from scratch (Ramachandran & Blakeslee, 1998, p. 136).

While much hemispheric-based research has been repudiated as an oversimplification (Gackenbach, 1999), the above description of how new information eventually overwhelms an old world view may be the result of multiple brain functions – some of which work to preserve our models and others to alter – that help us both maintain and change as needed.

Self-talk is the “the root of empathy, understanding, cooperation, and rules that allow us to be successful social beings. Any sense of moral behavior requires thought before action” (Ratey, 2001, p. 255).

Healy (1999) argues that based on what we know about brain development in children, new computer media may be responsible for developing brains that are largely different from the brains of adults. This is because “many brain connections have become specialized for . . . media” (p. 133); in this view, a brain formed by language and reading is different from a brain formed by hypermedia. Different media lead to different synaptic connections being laid down and reinforced, creating different brains in youngsters raised on fast-paced, visually-stimulating computer applications and video games. “Newer technologies emphasize rapid processing of visual symbols . . . and deemphasize traditional verbal learning . . . and the linear, analytic thought process . . . [making it] more difficult to deal with abstract verbal reasoning” (Healy, 1999, p. 142).

 

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more on distance ed in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=distance+education

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