Searching for "security"

Open Source: why are we not allowed to use it?

Why Aren’t More Schools Using Free, Open Tools?

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/06/why-arent-more-schools-using-free-open-education-resources/

Teachers were complaining that they wanted a simple way to share files and links within the classroom, like a private Twitter app. Rather than having IT professionals respond to the request, Reisinger’s students programmed a solution that they call Paper Plane. ”Those kids have code up on GitHub [a site for open-source code] right now that they’re sharing out,” Reisinger said. Students also designed the help ticketing software that their peers use to request IT support.

oh, my, what a blasphemy; what do we do about SECURITY?…

A lot of people are scared away from open-source software or operating systems like Linux because of the belief that they are harder for teachers and students to use, and are more challenging to support.

a bigger reason people don’t go open-source is that the devices and software aren’t as shiny and exciting as iPads or Chromebooks.

recent concerns regarding third party providers and privacy are less of an issue

 

10 technology hallmarks for every campus

10 technology hallmarks for every campus

http://www.ecampusnews.com/technologies/technology-hallmarks-campus-099

1. High-speed wireless broadband.

According to the Center for Digital Education’s recent “2013 Yearbook: Technology Innovation in Education,” over 80 percent of education institutions surveyed said that wireless broadband was their “top priority for IT investment.”

2. 24/7 IT support.

We have 24/7 support for emergencies and much of our staff, just like at a hospital, are on call. That’s not a perk for the campus, it’s a necessity.

3. The cloud.

The cloud can also: acquire and implement the latest software and application updates; streamline enrollment and admissions processes; and turn to subscriptions that are scalable and provide options, says Edudemic.

4. Digital textbooks.

Planning for digital textbooks means not only boosting mobile device capabilities on campus, but helping faculty learn to implement digital resources into their course.

5. 21st Century PD for faculty and admin.

From offering a MOOC on classroom management online solutions, to hosting a PD session on Twitter, campus admin should offer multiple options for PD delivery, just like how faculty should offer students multiple options for learning–there’s no better way to teach something than to model it first!

6. MOOCs.

[Read: “3 pros and 3 cons of MOOCs.”]

7. Online course management system.

From sending in-class emails to checking grades, course management systems, like Blackboard, offer faculty and students a fairly intuitive way to manage courses more efficiently.

8. Big Data…

Future-proofing universities are beginning to deploy storage solutions to help manage the unstructured data in physical, virtual and cloud environments. More modern storage solutions are also open source for a high learning curve but low cost.

9…security.

precautions can range from scanning existing databases on the university’s servers to determine where personal information is located and then, depending on the database, destroy the personal information or add more digital security; as well as put cybersecurity systems through a series of penetration tests to highlight security shortcomings.

[Read: “University data breach prompts ‘top-to-bottom’ IT review.”]

10. Social media done well.

of the major ways campuses use social media well is by serving up both “cake” and “broccoli,” or balancing the content that is important and good for the school (broccoli) and the content that is fun and delicious (cake). “If you share enough cake, your audience will consume the occasional broccoli,” she advises.

What is plagiarism?

Martine Herzog-Evans

Follow Martine

What is plagiarism?

Law Professor at the University of Reims, FranceTop Contributor

A colleague of mine is asking us to organise a disciplinary commission for a student who, during a test (home test) quoted an author at great length. I disagree with his judgement. This in my opinion is youth caution (I’m not too sure about what I think so I protect myself with very long quotes). She did refer to the author in question and did not steal his ideas as her own. The risk for the student (who happens to be a very good one) is that she may lose the right to pass any national exam of any sort for x years. I intend to defend her at the disciplinary hearing as I happen to have supervised her for a research last year and am supervising her this year for another and know what she’s made of. The question to you all is : what constitutes plagiarism in your opinion and practice?

 

179 comments

  • Shaun JamisonShaun

    Shaun Jamison

    Law Professor & Librarian

    @ Gregg, another clue is when they don’t bother to take out the hyperlinks from the original source they didn’t credit.

  • Gregg

    Gregg Etter

    Associate Professor at University of Central Missouri

    @Shawn. the sad part is if they would have credited the source it would have been research, not plagiarism!

  • John HainsJohn

    John Hains

    Associate Professor at Clemson University

    Gregg, I get the ‘lazy’ student part. How common is it for courses to be so redundant that a paper like this could be ‘re-cycled’?

  • Gregg

    Gregg Etter

    Associate Professor at University of Central Missouri

    @ John. That’s the point. The class I was teaching was policing in a democratic society. The paper was from a juvenile justice class that was taught by another professor. The content of the two courses does not match. It becomes real obvious when you get a re-cycled criminal law paper in a hate crimes or organized crime class. Some things will transfer and all knowledge is collective. However, in organized crime if you wanted to talk about criminal law, you might talk about the application of R.I.C.O., not Marbury v Madison or Estelle v. Gamble. A person wanting to apply the principles of juvenile justice might talk about the extended rights of a juvenile under Mirranda v. Arizona, not about juvenile holding facilities or juvenile courts.

  • Dr. Murphy NmeziDr. Murphy

    Dr. Murphy Nmezi

    Professor/Academic Mentor, Pathology/Pharmacology/Biostatistics

    Apropos Howard’s response to Mihail’s question:

    I once conducted an initial interview, in virtual space, to fill one of two biostatistics faculty positions that we had. And, it is important to note that success at this interview requires that the candidate be able to answer key questions in biostatistics analysis.

    With each question, (believe me, these are basic questions that anyone with an advanced degree in a related field should be able to answer), I could distinctly hear this individual “banging away” at the keyboard in search of the answer. Obviously, this candidate wasn’t prepared for the interview, nor did s/he possess the foundational knowledge that a degree holder in a field of study must have to succeed. Was it plagiarism or not?

    Perhaps, this candidate plagiarized his/her way through college and graduate school. Who knows? But, I can confidently bet my retirement that some of these jokers are slipping, undetected, through our educational system. I will also bet that this is happening, even to a greater extent, worldwide.

    Mihails Ņ. likes this

  • Harold KatcherHarold

    Harold Katcher

    Professor at University of Maryland

    John, I for one teach four classes, human biology, human health and disease (a watered-down patho-physiology course), the biology of aging and neuroscience. Someone could submit a paper say on Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, any of the dementias to any of these courses, a paper on atherosclerosis to three of them etc. But what is the point of writing the papers? To present their fellow students with new information (assuming they read it) or to give the student an opportunity to learn something new and demonstrate their comprehension? For me it’s mostly the latter, and allowing recycled papers doesn’t accomplish that.
    And Dr. Nmezi I totally agree with you – for everyone we catch, how many slip through undetected?
    Most countries in the world have constitutions that when examined closely, provide all the safeguards needed by a society – but in many places those laws are not upheld (for national security’s sake – a US excuse). So all’s I’m saying is uphold those rules that are in place – softening them may help those who otherwise might not be able to complete or compete successfully in a course or program, but you a hurting the society that expects that graduates of a program will be competent in what they do.

    Dr. Murphy N. likes this

  • John HainsJohn

    John Hains

    Associate Professor at Clemson University

    Harold, I guess I was thinking in terms of courses taught by different teachers. However, four of the five lecture courses I teach are strongly related and with that in mind, I make sure that I am in control of both the content and the assessment. So I make sure that if there is some overlap in content, I do not make an assignment which allows ‘recycling’. If someone has taken a similar course at another institution and ‘recycles’ a report, I have no way to detect that. So as far as I can tell I have never had a problem with this. But my assignments are structured so that they simply can’t support ‘recycling’.

Center for Democracy & Technology

Big Data and Privacy

April 17, 2014

Big data has been generating big hype for a while. In January, the White House jumped into the fray, launching a big data and privacy review. CDT participated in all three public workshops convened in connection with the review and submitted written comments.

CDT’s Big Data and Privacy Comments

In our comments, we focused on three main areas: applying the Fair Information Practice Principles (FIPPs) to both private sector and government big data programs; exploring technical measures such as de-identification to safeguard privacy; and reforming existing privacy laws, most notably the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, to account for rapid changes in the ways that digital data is collected, stored, and used.

CDT stressed that, as entities collect more data to offer innovative products and more efficient services, they must still be guided by purpose specification, consent, security, and the other elements of the FIPPs framework.

Government and Big Data

“Strong consensus is forming that the bulk collection of phone records should end.”

-Harley Geiger

The Administration says that it will end its bulk collection of telephony metadata, although the details of what will replace it remain unsettled. Meanwhile, CDT is pointing out that the laws the government has used to justify bulk collection are not limited just to phone records. Instead, they could be used to justify collection of location data, Internet browsing history, financial records, and more. CDT has been vocal in advocating the end of all forms of bulk collection, and we endorse the USA FREEDOM Act as the best legislation to do just that.

A report from the White House review is due before the end of April, but it is expected to present more questions than answers. In this complex and unsettled space, CDT will continue to work with companies and other stakeholders to develop workable approaches that will protect privacy while pursuing the benefits promised by advanced data analytics.


Check Out CDT’s New Website

CDT has launched a totally revamped website: http://www.cdt.org. It has a fresh new look and tools that should make our content more easily accessible. Thanks to our partners at iStrategy Labs for their creative and technical efforts on the new site.

MnSCU Mediaspace AKA Kaltura

Getting Started with MediaSpace v5 (PDF attachment)

From: Todd Digby <Todd.Digby@so.mnscu.edu>
Date: Thursday, October 31, 2013 10:52 AM
To: Todd Digby <Todd.Digby@so.mnscu.edu>
Subject: MnSCU Mediaspace Update – New Version – New URL

Hello MnSCU Mediaspace user,

We have upgraded MediaSpace systems and now have a new permanent address for MnSCU MediaSpace http://mediaspace.mnscu.edu

You will also see that there have been some changes to this version from the previous version.   Just use your StarID to login, all you existing videos will be available in the site.  There are a few new features in this version of Mediaspace.    I have also updated the getting started document that I originally distributed to make adjustments for the new version.  Once we are confident that you have made the transition to the new version, we will start broadening the use to other campuses and to faculty / staff use.  Expect more announcements to come over the next couple weeks.

New Features

Direct links to videos can now be used.  The steps to follow

  1. Click on your Video title from your My Media listing
  2. Click on the Action button (below the video player box, to the right)
  3. Select “+ Publish”
  4. Chance the privacy settings to “Unlisted”
  5. Click on the “Share” button
  6. Copy link and send out.

Embedding can use an Iframe or the standard legacy embed.  

  • The embedding feature will now have the necessary security measures in place so that the D2L mixed content issues will not be present.

Downloading a copy of the video

  • You can now download a copy of the video from MediaSpace.  If you are the owner of the video, when you select the “Edit” screen for the video, the player will have a “Download” option in the middle of the screen.  This will allow an MPEG moving file to be downloaded to your workstation.  This is only available in the “Edit” screen player, so only the owner of the video will have the ability to download it from MediaSpace.

Thanks,

Todd
_______________________________

Todd R. Digby

System Director of Academic Technology

Minnesota State Colleges and Universities

30 7th St. E., Suite 350 | St. Paul, MN 55101-7804 | 651-201-1812 l 612-803-4922 (cell)

todd.digby@so.mnscu.edu  | http://www.asa.mnscu.edu/academictechnology

Anatomy of a hack: How crackers ransack passwords like “qeadzcwrsfxv1331”

The prowess of these three crackers also underscores the need for end users to come up with better password hygiene. Many Fortune 500 companies tightly control the types of passwords employees are allowed to use to access e-mail and company networks, and they go a long way to dampen crackers’ success.

http://arstechnica.com/security/2013/05/how-crackers-make-minced-meat-out-of-your-passwords

opening documents (e.g. PPT) within D2L

From: Jorgensen, Gregory S.
Sent: Tuesday, May 07, 2013 10:07 AM
To: Miltenoff, Plamen
Subject: RE: Voice Mail from Galler, Robert W. (33 seconds)

When downloading some D2L Content (usually Microsoft Office documents) with Internet Explorer, the security settings don’t allow the document to be edited properly.

The solution is to use a different browser, such as FireFox, Safari or Chrome,  *OR*, choose ‘Save’ (rather than ‘Open’) and save the file.  When it’s opened, the ‘enable editing’ feature will work properly.

3 cyber bills passed in the House

The House is passing 3 bills:

The House passed the Cybersecurity Enhancement Act, which mandates strategic guidance for federal cybersecurity research and development. To establish that guidance, the bill calls for input from public and private stakeholders, and strengthens security automation standards and checklists for federal systems.

How this will impact education and academia? What input can SCSU contribute with?…

http://fcw.com/articles/2013/04/17/cyber-bills-explained.aspx?s=fcwdaily_180413

FISMA – Federal Information Security Management Act of 2002 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federal_Information_Security_Management_Act_of_2002

CISPA- Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyber_Intelligence_Sharing_and_Protection_Act

 

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