Searching for "security"

girl scouts, badges for cybersecurity

Girl Scouts to Earn Badges in Cybersecurity

The education program is being developed in a partnership between the Girl Scouts and Palo Alto Networks. Jun 23, 2017

https://securitytoday.com/articles/2017/06/23/girl-scouts-to-earn-badges-in-cybersecurity.aspx

The education program, which aims to reach as many as 1.8 million Girl Scouts in kindergarten through sixth grade, is being developed in a partnership between the Girl Scouts and Palo Alto Networks, a security company, the organization said in a press release.

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more on cybersecurity in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=cybersecurity

cybersecurity and students

You’ve Been Hacked! Explaining Cybersecurity to Students in an Interconnected Era

By Jacob Batchelor 06/01/17

https://thejournal.com/articles/2017/06/01/youve-been-hacked-explaining-cybersecurity-to-students-in-an-interconnected-era.aspx

Here’s an easy way to explain IoT hacks to students:

  • A hacker accesses a device, like a webcam, through its internet connection. Devices with weak security or easy-to-guess passwords make easy targets.
  • The hacker can then infect the device with malware, a type of computer virus that takes control of a device.
  • The hacker now has a number of options. He or she can use the device to spy, infect other devices or attack a target like the servers (centralized computers that store network data) targeted in the October 2016 attack.
  • Research the manufacturer. Are they reputable? Have they previously been hacked? Big, established companies based in developed countries are usually the safest.
  • Read up on security features. Is the device password-protected? Can you set your own password? If so, make it a strong password that uses numbers, letters and symbols — avoid common words or phrases.
  • Regularly check for updates. Good companies will regularly update the software on their devices to protect against vulnerabilities.
  • Ask yourself — do you need it? Make sure internet-connectivity is something you really need on the device you’re using. In many cases, internet-connectivity is not necessary for the device to function properly.

a few tips that students can use to protect their privacy while using smartphones:

  • Research apps before signing up for them. Is it from a reputable developer? Has it had security issues in the past? Use the same approach as when researching IoT devices.
  • Look over the terms of service. What information does it require? Does it track or store your data? Can the developer sell your information? All of these questions are important to consider.
  • Be careful when linking apps to your social media accounts. Giving apps access to your social media accounts makes them vulnerable to hacking. Is there a good reason for the accounts to be linked? Can you sign up without linking to a social media account?
  • Use two-factor authentication. Two-factor authentication requires authorization beyond a password when using unrecognized devices such as entering a code sent to your cellphone. As apps allow, be sure to use two-factor authentication which will make it more difficult for hackers to access the information stored in your apps.

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more on hackers in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=hacker

cybersecurity grants

Grant program would support state, local cybersecurity

By Mark Rockwell Mar 02, 2017

https://fcw.com/articles/2017/03/02/state-cyber-bill-rockwell.aspx

The proposed legislation, said the lawmakers, would set up a cybersecurity grant program that would provide resources for states to develop and implement effective cyber resiliency plans, including efforts to identify, detect, protect, respond, and recover from cyber threats. It also would encourage development of a stronger cybersecurity workforce.

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more on cybersecurity in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=cybersecurity

master program on cybersecurity

Berkeley Launches Online Master of Information and Cybersecurity

By Joshua Bolkan 11/16/16

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/11/16/berkeley-launches-online-master-of-information-and-cybersecurity.aspx

The University of California, Berkeley’s School of Information (I School) has tapped a private partner to help launch a new online program, Master of Information and Cybersecurity (MICS).

Dubbed cybersecurity@berkeley, the new program was developed in collaboration with the university’s Center for Long-Term Cybersecurity and College of Engineering.

The 27-unit course will use 2U’s online learning platform for live, weekly meetings. Between sessions, students will have access to interactive content designed by MICS faculty. Students will also have the opportunity to visit campus to meet faculty and classmates and attend lectures and workshops curated specifically for students in the program.

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more on cybersecurity in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=cybersecurity

educational game on IT ‐ security

IP‐Please, design and development of an educational game on IT‐security
Peter Mozelius, Charlotte Lesley and Ola Olsson
Department of Computer and Systems Sciences, Stockholm University, Sweden

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/308947931_IP-Please_design_and_development_of_an_educational_game_on_IT-security
Abstract:
Game‐based learning is a research field with rich discussions on the use of games in educational contexts. Many of the educational games that exist today focus on subjects such
as Language learning, Mathematics and History, and fewer on subjects in Computer Science
and IT‐security. Dissemination of information about IT‐security is important in today’s digital
society not at least in the industry. As an example many firewalls today are misconfigured
leading to decreased security at the same time as it is hard to motivate students or employees to read long detailed and tedious PDF‐files with security information. Might
things like firewall configuration instead be learnt by an educational game and how to design
a learning game that could be used in university courses on IT‐security?

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more on gaming and gamification in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=gaming
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=gamification

millennials and cybersecurity

Survey: Growing Interest in Cyber Security Careers Among Millennials

By Leila Meyer 10/12/16

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/10/12/survey-growing-interest-in-cyber-security-careers-among-millennials.aspx

new report from Raytheon and the National Cyber Security Alliance

The report, “Securing Our Future: Closing the Cybersecurity Talent Gap,” surveyed 3,779 adults aged 18 to 26, from 12 countries around the world, including the United States, Australia, the United Kingdom, and countries in Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

a high-paying career as a cyber security professional requires skills millennials value, such as problem solving, analytical thinking and communication — and employment opportunities are available across a wide variety of sectors, including start-ups, government and hospitals.

Key findings from the report:

  • 64 percent of young adults in the U.S. heard about cyberattacks in the news last year, up from 36 percent the previous year, and compared to 48 percent of young adults worldwide;
  • 70 percent of millennials in the U.S. said cyber security programs or activities are available to them, up from 46 percent the previous year, and compared to 68 percent worldwide;
  • 21 percent of young men expressed interest in cyber competitions, compared to 15 percent of women;
  • 48 percent or respondents said more information about the specifics of cyber security jobs would help increase interest;
  • 59 percent of young men and 51 percent of young women received formal cyber safety lessons in school, up from 43 percent and 40 percent respectively last year; and
  • 40 percent of respondents said parents are the most influential people helping them with career advice, and 19 percent said no one was influential in helping them with career advice.

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more on cybersecurity in this blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=cybersecurity

Online privacy: It’s time for a new security paradigm

Online privacy: It’s time for a new security paradigm

http://fcw.com/articles/2014/09/23/online-privacy-new-security-paradigm.aspx

Verizon’s 2014 Data Breach Investigations Report,

Fragmentation of online identity means that we as online users are forced to struggle with proliferating accounts and passwords. And we are regularly required to reveal sensitive information about ourselves and repeatedly enter the same information to create accounts that establish new, disparate online identities.

Establishing a system for trust management requires a common infrastructure for specifying policies that can protect yet enable access to data and systems, representing identities and credentials, and evaluating and enforcing an organization’s policies — all while maintaining privacy.

surveillance technology and education

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2019-06-10-is-school-surveillance-going-too-far-privacy-leaders-urge-a-slow-down

New York’s Lockport City School District, which is using public funds from a Smart Schools bond to help pay for a reported $3.8 million security system that uses facial recognition technology to identify individuals who don’t belong on campus

The Lockport case has drawn the attention of national media, ire of many parents and criticism from the New York Civil Liberties Union, among other privacy groups.

the Future of Privacy Forum (FPF), a nonprofit think tank based in Washington, D.C., published an animated video that illustrates the possible harm that surveillance technology can cause to children and the steps schools should take before making any decisions, such as identifying specific goals for the technology and establishing who will have access to the data and for how long.

A few days later, the nonprofit Center for Democracy and Technology, in partnership with New York University’s Brennan Center for Justice, released a brief examining the same topic.

My note: same considerations were relayed to the SCSU SOE dean in regard of the purchase of Premethean and its installation in SOE building without discussion with faculty, who work with technology. This information was also shared with the dean: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/10/31/students-data-privacy/

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more on surveillance in education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=surveillance+education

break up Facebook

https://nyti.ms/2LzRzwq

Facebook’s board works more like an advisory committee than an overseer, because Mark controls around 60 percent of voting shares. Mark alone can decide how to configure Facebook’s algorithms to determine what people see in their News Feeds, what privacy settings they can use and even which messages get delivered. He sets the rules for how to distinguish violent and incendiary speech from the merely offensive, and he can choose to shut down a competitor by acquiring, blocking or copying it.

We are a nation with a tradition of reining in monopolies, no matter how well intentioned the leaders of these companies may be. Mark’s power is unprecedented and un-American.

It is time to break up Facebook.

America was built on the idea that power should not be concentrated in any one person, because we are all fallible. That’s why the founders created a system of checks and balances.

More legislation followed in the 20th century, creating legal and regulatory structures to promote competition and hold the biggest companies accountable.

Starting in the 1970s, a small but dedicated group of economists, lawyers and policymakers sowed the seeds of our cynicism. Over the next 40 years, they financed a network of think tanks, journals, social clubs, academic centers and media outlets to teach an emerging generation that private interests should take precedence over public ones. Their gospel was simple: “Free” markets are dynamic and productive, while government is bureaucratic and ineffective.

American industries, from airlines to pharmaceuticals, have experienced increased concentration, and the average size of public companies has tripled. The results are a decline in entrepreneurshipstalled productivity growth, and higher prices and fewer choices for consumers.

From our earliest days, Mark used the word “domination” to describe our ambitions, with no hint of irony or humility.

Facebook’s monopoly is also visible in its usage statistics. About 70 percent of American adults use social media, and a vast majority are on Facebook products. Over two-thirds use the core site, a third use Instagram, and a fifth use WhatsApp. By contrast, fewer than a third report using Pinterest, LinkedIn or Snapchat. What started out as lighthearted entertainment has become the primary way that people of all ages communicate online.

The F.T.C.’s biggest mistake was to allow Facebook to acquire Instagram and WhatsApp. In 2012, the newer platforms were nipping at Facebook’s heels because they had been built for the smartphone, where Facebook was still struggling to gain traction. Mark responded by buying them, and the F.T.C. approved.

The News Feed algorithm reportedly prioritized videos created through Facebook over videos from competitors, like YouTube and Vimeo. In 2012, Twitter introduced a video network called Vine that featured six-second videos. That same day, Facebook blocked Vine from hosting a tool that let its users search for their Facebook friends while on the new network. The decision hobbled Vine, which shut down four years later.

unlike Vine, Snapchat wasn’t interfacing with the Facebook ecosystem; there was no obvious way to handicap the company or shut it out. So Facebook simply copied it. (opyright law does not extend to the abstract concept itself.)

As markets become more concentrated, the number of new start-up businesses declines. This holds true in other high-tech areas dominated by single companies, like search (controlled by Google) and e-commerce (taken over by Amazon). Meanwhile, there has been plenty of innovation in areas where there is no monopolistic domination, such as in workplace productivity (Slack, Trello, Asana), urban transportation (Lyft, Uber, Lime, Bird) and cryptocurrency exchanges (Ripple, Coinbase, Circle).

The choice is mine, but it doesn’t feel like a choice. Facebook seeps into every corner of our lives to capture as much of our attention and data as possible and, without any alternative, we make the trade.

Just last month, Facebook seemingly tried to bury news that it had stored tens of millions of user passwords in plain text format, which thousands of Facebook employees could see. Competition alone wouldn’t necessarily spur privacy protection — regulation is required to ensure accountability — but Facebook’s lock on the market guarantees that users can’t protest by moving to alternative platforms.

Mark used to insist that Facebook was just a “social utility,” a neutral platform for people to communicate what they wished. Now he recognizes that Facebook is both a platform and a publisher and that it is inevitably making decisions about values. The company’s own lawyers have argued in court that Facebook is a publisher and thus entitled to First Amendment protection.

As if Facebook’s opaque algorithms weren’t enough, last year we learned that Facebook executives had permanently deleted their own messages from the platform, erasing them from the inboxes of recipients; the justification was corporate security concerns.

Mark may never have a boss, but he needs to have some check on his power. The American government needs to do two things: break up Facebook’s monopoly and regulate the company to make it more accountable to the American people.

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We Don’t Need Social Media

The push to regulate or break up Facebook ignores the fact that its services do more harm than good

Colin Horgan, May 13, 2019

https://onezero.medium.com/we-dont-need-social-media-53d5455f4f6b

Hughes joins a growing chorus of former Silicon Valley unicorn riders who’ve recently had second thoughts about the utility or benefit of the surveillance-attention economy their products and platforms have helped create. He is also not the first to suggest that government might need to step in to clean up the mess they made

Nick Srnicek, author of the book Platform Capitalism and a lecturer in digital economy at King’s College London, wrotelast month, “[I]t’s competition — not size — that demands more data, more attention, more engagement and more profits at all costs

 

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more on Facebook in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=facebook

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