Searching for "skills"

video skills digital literacy

Video skills are a valuable gateway to digital literacy

Learning to use the equipment and produce content helps students view the media they consume through a more critical lens

In a world of digital consumption, teaching students how to create what they see, hear and watch is like teaching them the secrets behind a magic trick. Students often spend hours weekly on digital devices, reading stories or looking at images, GIFs and video. They consume vast amounts of digital media without often understanding how it’s created.

Bradley has been teaching the video production class since 2005 as its regional occupational program (ROP) instructor for the Graphic Communications, Video Production, and Computer Animation and Modeling courses. Besides helping students develop technical skills, he also infuses his classes with classic film screenings. Students might come to class and watch “Fantasia,” “High Noon,” “Metropolis” and “Dr. Strangelove,” he says.

He also assigns students work that has a specific focus in mind and brings in local experts to help them learn more about a subject before they create.

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more on digital literacy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy

teaching and assessing soft skills

Teaching & Assessing Soft Skills

http://catlintucker.com/2017/09/teaching-assessing-soft-skills/

Communication in Person & Online (available in PDF format here: Communication in Person Online Rubric)

https://docs.google.com/document/d/16JVAivizIysXdmUVXzC2BP2NiclbJ21N9cOZQ6NdqxU/edit

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Limited, to no, participation in discussions.

 

Does not come to discussions prepared. As a result, fails to support statements with evidence from texts and other research.

 

Few attempts to ask questions or build on ideas shared.

 

Frequently violates the “dos and don’ts of online communication.”

Limited participation in discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with various partners.

 

Does not consistently come to discussions prepared. Limited preparation and inability to support statements with evidence from texts and other research reflects lack of preparation.

 

Limited attempts to ask questions, build on ideas shared, or invite quieter voices into the conversation.

 

Hesitant to respond to other perspectives and fails to summarize points or make connections.

 

Occasionally violates the “dos and don’ts of online communication.”

Participates in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners.

 

Comes to discussions prepared, having read and researched material. Draws on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic.

 

Attempts to drive conversations forward by asking questions, building on ideas shared, and inviting quieter voices into the conversation.

Responds to diverse perspectives, summarizes points, and makes connections.

 

Respects the “dos and don’ts for online communication.”

Initiates and participates effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners.

Comes to discussions prepared with a unique perspective, having read and researched material; explicitly draws on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic.

Propels conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate to the current discussion. (Adds depth by providing a new, unique perspective to the discussion.)

Responds thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarizes points of agreement and disagreement, and makes new connections. Leans in and actively listens.

Makes eye contact, speaks loud enough to be heard, and body language is strong.

Respects the “dos and don’ts for online communication.”

Critical Thinking & Problem Solving,  (available in PDF format here: Critical Thinking Problem Solving Rubric)

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1fjlODmLvrVZyrKnzz54LbVa7CqfbAJvLfb98805fjuY/edit

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Reflects surface level understanding of information.

 

Unable or unwilling to evaluate quality of information or draw conclusions about information found.

Does not try to solve problems or help others solve problems. Lets others do the work.

 

Does not actively seek answers to questions or attempt to find information. Does not seek out peers or ask teacher for guidance or support.

Attempts to dive below the surface when analyzing information but work lacks depth.

Struggles to evaluate the quality of information and does not draw insightful conclusions about information found.

Does not suggest or refine solutions, but is willing to try out solutions suggested by others.

Asks teachers or other students for answers but does not use online tools, like Google and YouTube, to attempt to answer questions or find information.

Demonstrates a solid understanding of the information.

 

Evaluates the quality of information and makes inferences/draws conclusions.

 

Refines solutions suggested by others.

 

Attempts to use online tools, like Google and YouTube, to seek answers and find information.

Demonstrates a comprehensive understanding of the information.

 

Effectively evaluates the quality of information and makes inferences/draws conclusion that are insightful.

 

Actively looks for and suggests solutions to problems.

 

Uses online tools, like Google and YouTube, to proactively seek answers and find information.

 

 

Collaboration & Contributions in a Team Dynamic  (available in PDF format here: Collaboration Contributions in a Team Dynamic Rubric)

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1ucjgylXWz8nOM5Vq8FpTByur8smsbov3mR8pX-7n1SE/edit

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Fails to listen to, share with, and support the efforts of team members making accomplishing a task more difficult for the team.

Frequently inattentive or distracting when team members talk. Requires frequent redirection by team members and/or teacher.

Body language does not reflect engagement in the process. Focus on leaning in, asking questions, actively listening (e.g. make eye contact).

Rarely offers feedback. Frequently becomes impatient, frustrated, and/or disrespectful.

 

Limited attempts to move between roles.

Does not use resources to support the team’s work.

Attempts to listen to, share with, and support the efforts of team members are limited or inconsistent.

Does not always listen when team members talk and requires redirection by team members and/or teacher.

Body language does not reflect engagement in the process. Focus on leaning in, asking questions, actively listening (e.g. make eye contact).

Occasionally offers feedback. At times, becomes impatient or frustrated with the process making teamwork more challenging.

Limited attempts to move between roles.

Does not consistently use resources to support the team’s work.

Listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of team members.

Listens when team members talk.

Attempts to engage in group tasks; however, body language does not consistently communicate interest or attention. Body language reflects engagement in the process, but there is room for improvement.

Offers feedback and treats team members with respect. At times, becomes impatient or frustrated with the process making teamwork more challenging.

Attempts to be flexible and move between roles; at times dominates a particular role. This is an area of potential growth.

Uses resources to support the team’s work.

Consistently listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of team members.

 

Leans in and actively listens when team members talk.

 

Body language communicates interest in team tasks and engagement in the process.

 

Offers constructive feedback, treats team members with respect, and is patient with the process.

 

Creates balance on the team moving between responsibilities without dominating any one role.

 

Uses resources effectively to support the team’s work.

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more on soft skills in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=soft+skills

Minecraft empathy skills

Report: Minecraft Builds Problem-Solving and Empathy Skills in Students

By Sri Ravipati  08/14/17

https://thejournal.com/articles/2017/08/14/minecraft-builds-problem-solving-and-empathy-in-students.aspx

K–12 teachers who use Minecraft: Education Edition during class say their students are experiencing a number of social-emotional learning (SEL) benefits.

How Minecraft Supports Social and Emotional Learning in K–12 Education

Getting Smart site.

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more on empathy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=empathy

workforce skills

These are the top 10 workforce skills students will need by 2020

By Laura Ascione, Managing Editor, Content Services, @eSN_Laura
June 20th, 2017
a recent McGraw-Hill Education survey, just 40 percent of college seniors said they felt their college experience was helpful in preparing for a career. Alarmingly, that percentage plummeted to 19 percent for women answering the same question.
data from the nonprofit Institute for the Future, there are 6 drivers of change in today’s workforce:
1. Extreme longevity: People are living longer–by 2025 the number of Americans older than 60 will increase by 70 percent
2. The rise of smart machines and systems: Technology can augment and extend our own capabilities, and workplace automation is killing repetitive jobs
3. Computational world: Increases in sensors and processing makes the world a programmable system; data will give us the ability to see things on a scale that has never been possible
4. New media ecology: New communication tools require media literacies beyond text; visual communication media is becoming a new vernacular
5. Superstructured organizations: Social technologies drive new forms of production and value creation, and social tools are allowing organizations to work at extreme scales
6. Globally connected world: Diversity and adaptability are at the center of operations–the U.S. and Europe no longer hold a monopoly on job creation, innovation, and political power

The top 10 workforce skills of 2020 include:

1. Sense making: The ability to determine the deeper meaning or significance of what is being expressed. The Drivers: Rise of smart machines and systems

2. Social intelligence: The ability to connect to others in a deep and direct way, to sense and stimulate reactions and desired interactions. The Drivers: Rise of smart machines and systems, globally connected world

3. Novel and adaptive thinking: Proficiency at thinking and coming up with solutions and responses beyond that which is rote or rule-based. The Drivers: Rise of smart machines and systems, globally connected world

4. Cross cultural competency: The ability to operate in different cultural settings. The Drivers: Superstructured organizations, globally connected world

5. Computational thinking: The ability to translate vast amounts of data into abstract concepts and to understand data based reasoning. The Drivers: New media ecology, computational world

6. New media literacy: The ability to critically assess and develop content that uses new media forms, and to leverage these media for persuasive communication. The Drivers: Extreme longevity, new media ecology, Superstructured organizations

7. Transdisciplinary: Literacy in and ability to understand concepts across multiple disciplines. The Drivers: Extreme longevity, computational world

8. Design mindset: The ability to represent and develop tasks and work processes for desired outcomes. The Drivers: Superstructured organizations, computational world

9. Cognitive load management: The ability to discriminate and filter information for importance, and to understand how to maximize cognitive functions. The Drivers: Superstructured organizations, computational world, new media ecology

10. Virtual collaboration: The ability to work productively, drive engagement, and demonstrate presence as a member of a virtual team. The Drivers: Superstructured organizations, globally connected world

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more on skills in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=skills

games teach thinking skills

SCHOOL USES VIDEO GAMES TO TEACH THINKING SKILLS


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More on gaming and education in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=games

skills not degrees

LinkedIn CEO: Skills, not degrees, matter most in job market

http://www.educationdive.com/news/linkedin-ceo-skills-not-degrees-matter-most-in-job-market/430651/

My note: naturally, the LinkedIn CEO will make such claim, since it is good for his business. Please take a look at this Chronicle of Higher Ed posting:

university presidents about the university future

Namely,
When it comes to getting students ready for the job market, presidents are not always in agreement with employers and parents on what role the institution should play in the process.

presidents are more divided about whether colleges should provide a broad education or specific training, and one- third of them don’t want to be held accountable for the career outcomes of their students

The LinkedIn CIO claims that:
The notion that an entrepreneur who built his career upon a professional network is now saying that skill level is what matters most in a job search should be a sign to colleges and universities that the era of college as a search for personal discovery is rapidly coming to an end.

Colleges must develop stronger training programs, similar to approaches used in applied science for lab and research exposure, to bolster career readiness in the liberal arts and social sciences. Without it, businesses will soon realize that they can develop these learning outlets on their own, in benefit of their own bottom lines.

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more on LInkedIn in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=linkedin

Millennials lacking skills across board

Shocking data reveals Millennials lacking skills across board

By Meris Stansbury,March 18th, 2016
In 2013, the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC) released the first-ever global data on how the U.S. population aged 16 to 65 compared to other countries in terms of skills in literacy and reading, numeracy, and problem-solving in technology-rich environments (PS-TRE).
Overall, revealed the data, despite having the highest levels of educational attainment of any previous American generation, Millennials, on average, demonstrate relatively weak skills in all skill sets researched compared to their international peers.
In literacy, U.S. millennials scored lower than 15 of the 22 participating countries. Only millennials in Spain and Italy had lower scores.
Our best-educated millennials—those with a master’s or research degree—only scored higher than their peers in Ireland, Poland, and Spain.
“If we expect to have a better educated population and a more competitive workforce, policy makers and other stakeholders will need to shift the conversation from one of educational attainment to one that acknowledges the growing importance of skills and examines these more critically,” writes Kirsch. “How are skills distributed in the population and how do they relate to important social and economic outcomes? How can we ensure that students earning a high school diploma and a postsecondary degree acquire the necessary skills to fully participate in our society?

writing skills

Novelist teaches freshman writing, is shocked by students’ inability to construct basic sentences

Have we lost this essential skill and can it be recovered?

http://hechingerreport.org/novelist-teaches-freshman-writing-is-shocked-by-students-inability-to-construct-basic-sentences/

The First Year Writing program at my university stresses essay-writing skills: developing an arguable thesis, presenting strong supporting arguments, using quotations as evidence.

The prevailing opinion seems to be right: brief lessons don’t accomplish much. A few bright students will quickly absorb the new concepts; the others will fill out their worksheets on subject-verb agreement almost perfectly, and then write things like, The conflict between Sammy and Lengel are mainly about teenage rebellion.

Many of the writing instructors I spoke with shared my frustration. No one enjoys reading final papers that are just as awkwardly written as the first work of the semester. But none of them said what I’ve come to believe: that we should offer more help to students who reach for eloquence, only to trip over their own contorted clauses.

iPad Skills

15 iPad Skills Every Teacher and Student should Have

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2013/01/15-ipad-skills-students-must-have.html

1- My students should be able to create presentations

2- My students should be able to create digital stories.

3- My students should be able to create eBooks

4- My students should be able  to print their docs right from their iPad

5- My students should be able to create videos

6- I want to Improve my students reading skills

7- My students should be able to take notes on their iPad

8- My students should be able to create written content on their iPads

9- My students should be able to use White Boards from their iPads

10-My students should be able to record audio clips

11- My students should be able to screen share

12-My students should be able to do their homework with the help of iPad

13- My students should be able to create mind maps

14-My students should be able to do research using iPad

15-My students should be able to create digital portfolios

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