Searching for "social media"

social media accessibility standards

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2019-08-28-colleges-face-investigations-over-whether-their-use-of-social-media-follows-accessibility-regulations

Nearly 200 colleges face federal civil rights investigations opened in 2019 about whether they are accessible and communicate effectively to people with disabilities.

As a result, colleges are rolling out social media accessibility standards and training communications staff members to take advantage of built-in accessibility tools in platforms including YouTube, Facebook and Twitter.

For example, last fall, a blind man filed 50 lawsuits against colleges whose websites he said didn’t work with his screen reader. And on August 21, in Payan v. Los Angeles Community College District, the Federal District Court for the Central District of California ruled that Los Angeles Community College failed to provide a blind student with “meaningful access to his course materials” via MyMathLab, software developed by Pearson, in a timely manner.

YouTube and Facebook have options to automatically generate captions on videos posted there, while Twitter users with access to its still-developing Media Studio can upload videos with captions. Users can provide alt-text, or descriptive language describing images, through Facebook, TwitterInstagram and Hootsuite.

California State University at Long Beach, for instance, advises posting main information first and hashtags last to make messages clear for people using screen readers. The University of Minnesota calls for indicating whether hyperlinks point to [AUDIO], [PIC], or [VIDEO]. This summer, leaders at the College of William & Mary held a training workshopfor the institution’s communications staff in response to an Office for Civil Rights investigation.

an online website accessibility center.

+++++++++
more on SM in education
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+m+edia+education

social media and students

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2019-01-16-here-s-what-happened-when-students-solved-social-media-problems-with-design-thinking

“Social: The New Media.” So I got to work, curating a playlist of videos on topics I wanted them to explore—such as the well-publicised problems with social media platforms and false news

the Stanford History Education Group (SHEG), Google’s Applied Digital Skills and the archives of The Sift from the News Literacy Project.

certification with Future Design School, and equipped with their curriculum app,

+++++++++++++
more on social media and education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media+education

more on fake news in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=FAKE+NEWS

Gen Z and social media

Under Employers’ Gaze, Gen Z Is Biting Its Tongue On Social Media

April 13, 20195:00 AM ET

https://www.npr.org/2019/04/13/702555175/under-employers-gaze-gen-z-is-biting-its-tongue-on-social-media

The oldest members of Generation Z are around 22 years old — now entering the workforce and adjusting their social media accordingly. They are holding back from posting political opinions and personal information in favor of posting about professional accomplishments.

only about 1 in 10 teenagers say they share personal, religious or political beliefs on social media, according to a recent survey from Pew Research Center.

70 percent of employers and recruiters say they check social media during the hiring process, according to a survey conducted by CareerBuilder

Generation Z, nicknamed “iGen,” is the post-millennial generation responsible for ‘killing’ Facebook and for the rise of TikTok.

Curricula like Common Sense Education’s digital citizenship program are working to educate the younger generation on how to use social media, something the older generations were never taught.

Some users are regularly cleaning up — “re-curating” — their online profiles. Cleanup apps, like TweetDelete,

Gen Zers also use social media in more ephemeral ways than older generations — Snapchat stories that disappear after 24 hours, or Instagram posts that they archive a couple of months later.

Gen Zers already use a multitude of strategies to make sure their online presence is visible only to who they want: They set their account to private, change their profile name or handle, even make completely separate “fake” accounts.

+++++++++++++++
more on social media in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media

and privacy
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=privacy

politics and social media

‘Bye Bye Twitter Und Facebook’: German Green Party Chief Quits Social Media

Twitter lost 9 million users worldwide in the third quarter of 2018, according to the latest company earnings report.

Facebook grew during the same period in every market except Europe, where it lost a million monthly active users. But it has faced a backlash since a whistle-blower revealed in March 2018 that some 87 million people had their data improperly shared with Cambridge Analytica. It was the beginning of a months-long scandal that revealed the network was slow to respond when Russian operatives used it to spread misinformation to influence U.S. elections.

social media for research

Using Social Media for Research – November 16
12:00 – 1:00 p.m.
1314 Social Sciences

Professor Lee-Ann Kastman Breuch (Writing Studies) and Michael Beckstrand (Mixed-Methods Research Associate, LATIS) will discuss how to retrieve, prepare, and analyze social media data for research projects. Using two case studies, Lee-Ann will share examples of a grounded theory analysis of blog, Twitter, and Facebook data.  Michael will speak about the technical aspects of retrieving and managing social media data. Pizza will be provided. Learn more and register here.
This event is part of the 2018-19 Research Development Friday Roundtable Series organized by the CLA Research Development Team.

Social media and Data Visualization

Workshop materials

Number of participants: 10
Prerequisites: None
Duration: 2 days

Technologies
Software

Online

Agenda

All workshop sessions will take place 9:00 a.m. – noon, with lab time and office hours 1:30 -3:30 p.m.

Tuesday, August 22

  • Introduction to web-scraping
  • Introduction to APIs
  • Facepager
  • Activities
  • Work & get help on your own projects

Wed, August 23

  • Recap
  • Introduction to OpenRefine
  • Cleaning social media data with OpenRefine
  • Analyzing/Visualizing the social media data
    • Atlas.TI
    • Voyant
    • Gephi

+++++++++++++
more on social media for research in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media+research

Design social media images

How to Easily Design Social Media Images: 4 Free Tools

October 3, 2018 https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/social-media-images-free-tools

Preview Text Styles With One Touch via Adobe Spark

  • Adobe Spark is part of Adobe’s suite of creative products, bringing social media image and video creation to the web.

remove the Adobe Spark watermark with a paid Adobe Spark plan or Creative Cloud subscription, both starting at $9.99 a month.

  • Design Basic Social Media Images Quickly With Pablo

    Pablo by Buffer is a no-frills online image editor that lets you make basic social media images in seconds. So while it doesn’t have some of the features of other image editors on this list, it works in a pinch. This tool is free to use without registration, making it perfect for when you or your team needs to create a quick image. My note: not on mobiles yet, only desktop

  • Design Automatically Resizable Social Media Images With Snappa

    Snappa is a user-friendly online image maker that has templates for every social media network. In addition to social post templates, it offers banner, story, and infographic templates. This makes Snappa your one-stop shop for creating all sorts of social media content.

  • Add Simple Data Visualization Charts to Social Media Images in CanvaCanva is a free online image editor with a huge library of free templates and royalty-free images. The app has built-in templates for all of the major social networks, and you can even post directly to your social media accounts from the app.

+++++++++++
more on social media images in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media+images

WeChat and blog combining social media

Parallel running of two social media from different countries: WeChat and blog for international students

Our work with Chinese students from the Confucius Institute (CI) at St. Cloud State University (SCSU) shed light on an interesting development: in the last several years, the popular Chinese social media platform WeChat dominates the social life of Chinese people, Chinese students in particular.

WeChat, like WhatsApp in Europe, Vkontakte in Russia, Weibo in China, or before its 2014 Orkut in Brazil (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/07/05/social-media-orkut-the-and-of-an-era/ seeks to create its own users’ momentum, and no differently from Facebook, expand that membership momentum from the host country to a global dominance (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/08/06/psychology-of-social-networks/;  more citation comes here).

Based on the WeChat affinity of the Chinese students at the SCSU CI program, the program organizers faced difficulty applying other social media platforms, as part of the curricula of the host country. Namely, blog, as one of the widely used SM platform for creative writing (citation comes here), was contemplated as a SM platform for the Chinese students to journal their experience at the SCSU CI program. Since WeChat behaves rather like Facebook and Snapchat, the lack of opportunity to utilize widely available platform for rather lengthy narration (versus SMS/texting abilitis of Twitter and WeChat) convince the SCSU CI program organizers to seek the buy in by Chinese students into the blog initiative.

Pang (2018) builds a theory based on Ellison (2007) theory of “maintained social capital,” namely the ability of individuals to maintain values of social ties when geographically disconnected. Ping (2018) further narrows her research on Chinese students in Germany using Li and Chen (2014) findings about Ellison’s theory on students in a foreign environment and the necessity for these students to build a new circle of friends in the host country. According to Basilisco an Cha (2015), such environment was provided for Filipino students by using Facebook and Twitter.

Bibliography:

2012 – The Most Favourable Mobile Messaging Apps among II.pdf. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://s3.amazonaws.com/academia.edu.documents/37688928/IJSR_-_The_Most_Favourable_Mobile_Messaging_Apps_among_IIUM_Students.pdf?AWSAccessKeyId=AKIAIWOWYYGZ2Y53UL3A&Expires=1540148395&Signature=pZjdzuflg16cWzOIeSacfFIJAHE%3D&response-content-disposition=inline%3B%20filename%3DThe_Most_Favourable_Mobile_Messaging_App.pdf
Agur, C., Belair-Gagnon, V., & Frish, N. (2018). Mobile sourcing: A case study of journalistic norms and usage of chat apps. Mobile Meida and Communication, 6(1), 53–70. https://doi.org/DOI: 10.1177/2050157917725549
Borgerson, J. L. (2016). Scalable Sociality and 'How the World Changed Social Media': conversation with Daniel Miller. Consumption, Markets & Culture. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10253866.2015.1120980
Chen, Y. (2017). WeChat use among Chinese college students: Exploring gratifications and political engagement in China. Journal of International and Intercultural Communication, 10(1), 25–43. https://doi.org/10.1080/17513057.2016.1235222
de Seta, G. (n.d.-a). Old people’s emoticons and generational distinction: Chinese families on social media. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/27563550/Old_peoples_emoticons_and_generational_distinction_Chinese_families_on_social_media
de Seta, G. (n.d.-b). The infrastracturalization of Chinese digital platforms: A case study of WeChat. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/36409988/The_infrastracturalization_of_Chinese_digital_platforms_A_case_study_of_WeChat
Deng, S. (n.d.). A history and analysis of CALA's social media. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/26815484/A_history_and_analysis_of_CALAs_social_media
Gu, B., & Wang, X. B. (2015). The Communication Design of WeChat: Ideological as Well as Technical Aspects of Social Media. Communication Design Quarterly, 4(1). Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/28318543/The_Communication_Design_of_WeChat_Ideological_as_Well_as_Technical_Aspects_of_Social_Media
Guo, L. (2017). WeChat as a Semipublic Alternative Sphere: Exploring the Use of WeChat Among Chinese Older Adults. International Journal of Communication, 21(11). Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/33858373/WeChat_as_a_Semipublic_Alternative_Sphere_Exploring_the_Use_of_WeChat_Among_Chinese_Older_Adults
Mao – 2014 – Friends and Relaxation Key Factors of Undergradua.pdf. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://file.scirp.org/pdf/CE_2014051513263716.pdf
Mao, C. (2014). Friends and Relaxation: Key Factors of Undergraduate Students’ WeChat Using. Creative Education, 05(08), 636–640. https://doi.org/10.4236/ce.2014.58075
Marian, R. (1916). Wechat comparison with its western competitors. University of Edinburgh Business School. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/37368406/Wechat_comparison_with_its_western_competitors
Masi, V. D. (n.d.). The world of the Chinese apps and their influence on the new generation. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/36122804/The_world_of_the_Chinese_apps_and_their_influence_on_the_new_generation
Odini, L. (n.d.). Can WeChat become a world-beating app? Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/6843324/Can_WeChat_become_a_world-beating_app
Pang – 2016 – Understanding key factors affecting young people’s.pdf. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Hua_Pang3/publication/305361365_Understanding_key_factors_affecting_young_people’s_WeChat_usage_An_empirical_study_from_uses_and_gratifications_perspective/links/587f3f9508aed3826af5bafd/Understanding-key-factors-affecting-young-peoples-WeChat-usage-An-empirical-study-from-uses-and-gratifications-perspective.pdf
Pang, H. (2016). Understanding key factors affecting young people’s WeChat usage: an empirical study from uses and gratifications perspective. International Journal of Web Based Communities, 12(3), 262. https://doi.org/10.1504/IJWBC.2016.077757
Pang, H. (2018). Understanding the effects of WeChat on perceived social capital and psychological well-being among Chinese international college students in Germany. Aslib Journal of Information Management, 70(3), 288–304. https://doi.org/DOI 10.1108/AJIM-01-2018-0003
Proksell, M., & Seta, G. de. (n.d.). A cabinet of moments: Collecting and displaying visual content from WeChat. Membrana. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/37536436/A_cabinet_of_moments_Collecting_and_displaying_visual_content_from_WeChat
Ranjan, R. (2017, July 26). In China, social media is shaping the public discourse on Doklam stand-off A peek into the discussions on Weibo and WeChat. China Online. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/34293813/In_China_social_media_is_shaping_the_public_discourse_on_Doklam_stand-off_A_peek_into_the_discussions_on_Weibo_and_WeChat
Ruan, L. Y., Knockel, J., Ng, J., & Crete-Nishihata, M. (n.d.). One App, Two Systems: How WeChat uses one censorship policy in China and another internationally. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/32650543/One_App_Two_Systems_How_WeChat_uses_one_censorship_policy_in_China_and_another_internationally
Run Zhi Zhu – 2015 – The Influence of Social Media on Sleep Quality A .pdf. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Xianglong_Xu/publication/281359220_The_Influence_of_Social_Media_on_Sleep_Quality_A_Study_of_Undergraduate_Students_in_Chongqing_China/links/55eff7cd08aef559dc44f450.pdf
Run Zhi Zhu, X. L. X. (2015). The Influence of Social Media on Sleep Quality: A Study of Undergraduate Students in Chongqing, China. Journal of Nursing & Care, 04(03). https://doi.org/10.4172/2167-1168.1000253
Seta, G. de. (n.d.). Biaoqing: The circulation of emoticons, emoji, stickers, and custom images on Chinese digital media platforms. First Monday. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/37326623/Biaoqing_The_circulation_of_emoticons_emoji_stickers_and_custom_images_on_Chinese_digital_media_platforms
Sun, S. (2017). Enhancing International Students' Engagement via Social Media – A Case Study of WeChat and Chinese Students at a UK University. In INTED Proceedings. Valencia, Spain. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/31992169/Enhancing_International_Students_Engagement_via_Social_Media_A_Case_Study_of_WeChat_and_Chinese_Students_at_a_UK_University
The Most Favourable Mobile Messaging Apps among IIUM Students. (2012), 3(12), 6.
Unpacking and describing interaction on Chinese WeChat: A methodological approach. (n.d.). Retrieved October 21, 2018, from https://www.academia.edu/37325358/Unpacking_and_describing_interaction_on_Chinese_WeChat_A_methodological_approach
Wang et al. – 2016 – Exploring the affordances of WeChat for facilitati.pdf. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Yuping_Wang5/publication/304814233_Exploring_the_affordances_of_WeChat_for_facilitating_teaching_social_and_cognitive_presence_in_semi-synchronous_language_exchange/links/57b3896908aeac3177849c2e/Exploring-the-affordances-of-WeChat-for-facilitating-teaching-social-and-cognitive-presence-in-semi-synchronous-language-exchange.pdf
Wang, Y., Fang, W.-C., Han, J., & Chen, N.-S. (2016). Exploring the affordances of WeChat for facilitating teaching, social and cognitive presence in semi-synchronous language exchange. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology. https://doi.org/10.14742/ajet.2640
Wei, H., & Ke, L. (2014). “New Weapons” of Ideological and Political Education in Universities—WeChat. SHS Web of Conferences, 6, 04001. https://doi.org/10.1051/shsconf/20140604001

student centered social media policies

How to Craft Useful, Student-Centered Social Media Policies

By Tanner Higgin  08/09/18

https://thejournal.com/articles/2018/08/09/how-to-craft-useful-student-centered-social-media-policies.aspx

Whether your school or district has officially adopted social media or not, conversations are happening in and around your school on everything from Facebook to Snapchat. Schools must reckon with this reality and commit to supporting thoughtful and critical social media use among students, teachers and administrators. If not, schools and classrooms risk everything from digital distraction to privacy violations.

Key Elements to Include in a Social Media Policy

  • Create parent opt-out forms that specifically address social media use.Avoid blanket opt-outs that generalize all technology or obfuscate how specific social media platforms will be used. (See this example by the World Privacy Forum as a starting point.)
    • Use these opt-out forms as a way to have more substantive conversations with parents about what you’re doing and why.
    • Describe what platforms are being used, where, when and how.
    • Avoid making the consequences of opt-out selections punitive (e.g., student participation in sports, theater, yearbook, etc.).
  • Establish baseline guidelines for protecting and respecting student privacy.
    • Prohibit the sharing of student faces.
    • Restrict location sharing: Train teachers and students on how to turn off geolocation features/location services on devices as well as in specific apps.
    • Minimize information shared in teacher’s social media profiles: Advise teachers to list only grade level and subject in their public profiles and not to include specific school or district information.
  • Make social media use transparent to students: Have teachers explain their social media plan, and find out how students feel about it.
  • Most important: As with any technology, attach social media use to clearly articulated goals for student learning. Emphasize in your guidelines that teachers should audit any potential use of social media in terms of student-centered pedagogy: (1) Does it forward student learning in a way impossible through other means? and (2) Is using social media in my best interests or in my students’?

Moving from Policy to Practice.

Social media policies, like policies in general, are meant to mitigate the risk and liability of institutions rather than guide and support sound pedagogy and student learning. They serve a valuable purpose, but not one that impacts classrooms. So how do we make these policies more relevant to classrooms?

First, it forces policy to get distilled into what impacts classroom instruction and administration. Second, social media changes monthly, and it’s much easier to update a faculty handbook than a policy document. Third, it allows you to align social media issues with other aspects of teaching (assessment, parent communication, etc.) versus separating it out in its own section.

++++++++++
more on social media in education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media+education

more on social media policies in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media+policies

1 2 3 59