Searching for "social media library"

reading online bibliography

Request from Plovdiv University faculty and teachers from the Plovdiv school district for literature on the issue of online reading for K4 students

 

  • Putman, S. M. (2014). Exploring Dispositions Toward Online Reading: Analyzing the Survey of Online Reading Attitudes and Behaviors. Reading Psychology, 35(1), 1-31. doi:10.1080/02702711.2012.664250

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p. 25

Research continues to emerge that pro-vides us with information about the cognitive skills and strategies relevant to the proficient use of the new literacies of the Internet, but conclusions regarding dispositions and affective variables are notably limited. For this reason, it is important that researchers  begin to focus concurrently on both areas to inform the educational community regarding how to meet the rapidly changing needs of our current and future students.
  • Coiro, J. (2011). Talking About Reading as Thinking: Modeling the Hidden Complexities of Online Reading Comprehension. Theory Into Practice, 50(2), 107-115. doi:10.1080/00405841.2011.558435

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  • Hutchison, A. C., Woodward, L., & Colwell, J. (2016). What Are Preadolescent Readers Doing Online? An Examination of Upper Elementary Students’ Reading, Writing, and Communication in Digital Spaces. Reading Research Quarterly, 51(4), 435-454. doi:10.1002/rrq.146

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he performance of 1,262 fourth and fifth graders on the Survey of Internet Use and Online Reading.
(c) despite reporting a preference for using the Internet, preadolescent students believe that it is more difficult to use it than to read a book, and believe that they would learn
more from a book than from the Internet;
  • Huang, S., Orellana, P., & Capps, M. (2016). U.S. and Chilean College Students’ Reading Practices: A Cross-Cultural Perspective. Reading Research Quarterly, 51(4), 455-471. doi:10.1002/rrq.144

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My note: this may seem peripheral study to the request in terms of age, but the cross-cultural study can help the Bulgarian research
Due to the impact of the Internet on reading resources, students’ reading patterns today are different from how they were in the past. College students’ reading practices have moved to different venues with the advent of Internet technology, and the modality has migrated to online reading.
  • Naumann, J. (2015). A model of online reading engagement: Linking engagement, navigation, and performance in digital reading. Computers In Human Behavior, 53263-277. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2015.06.051

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model of online reading engagement is outlined. This model proposes that online reading engagement predicts dedication in digital reading. Dedication in digital reading according to the model is reflected in task-adaptive navigation, and task-adaptive navigation predicts digital reading performance over and above print reading skill. Information engagement is assumed to positively predict task-adaptive navigation, while social engagement is assumed to negatively predict task-adaptive navigation. These hypotheses were tested using OECD PISA 2009 Digital Reading Assessment data from 17 countries and economies ( N = 29,395).

  • Alvermann, D. E., & Harrison, C. (2016). Are Computers, Smartphones, and the Internet a Boon or a Barrier for the Weaker Reader?. Journal Of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 60(2), 221-225. doi:10.1002/jaal.569

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If boys are spending nine hours a day media multitasking and prefer computers to books, shouldn’t they be successful at online learning? Online learning requires online reading, which means that boys, who are significantly poorer readers than girls in every nation in the world, may well be struggling to keep up. an online student may not have access to the learning that can come from group interaction, nor to the social and emotional support that can come from peers or a teacher, and the online reader could be heading for a learning apocalypse

  • Park, H., & Kim, D. (2017). English language learners’ strategies for reading online texts: Influential factors and patterns of use at home and in school. International Journal Of Educational Research, 8263-74. doi:10.1016/j.ijer.2017.01.002

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five fourth and fifth-grade English language learners’ (ELLs) strategy use when they read online texts at home and in school. We also identify factors that play a role when these learners read online texts, as well as similar and different patterns in reading strategies at home and in school. The findings show that three factors influence the ELLs’ selection of online texts and use of reading strategies. In addition, the ELLs used nine reading strategies to enhance their reading online texts. Based on these findings, we discuss (a) the ELLs’ online reading strategies in different contexts, (b) the multidimensional zone of proximal development, and (c) collaboration between parents and teachers.

  • Leu, D. J., Forzani, E., Timbrell, N., & Maykel, C. (2015). Seeing the Forest, Not the Trees. Reading Teacher, 69(2), 139-145. doi:10.1002/trtr.1406

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a primary goal is to develop the ability to read in order to learn with online information. Technologies that support this goal, especially the Internet, and instructional practices that support the development of online reading should be our primary consideration for reading and literacy education, beginning in the primary grades.

  • Brynge, E., Case, H., Forsyth, E., Green, G., & Hölke, U. (2015). Libraries: Sustaining the Digital Reader Experience. Scholarly & Research Communication, 1-10.

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my note: role of the library

  • Leu, D. J., Forzani, E., & Kennedy, C. (2015). Income Inequality and the Online Reading Gap. Reading Teacher, 68(6), 422-427. doi:10.1002/trtr.1328

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my note: when you make a decision about a textbook, income and social inequality are factors needed to be considered.

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http://bibliosphere.eu/?p=238

anxiety and academia

Surprising ways to beat anxiety and become mentally strong – according to science

http://theconversation.com/surprising-ways-to-beat-anxiety-and-become-mentally-strong-according-to-science-77978

Anxiety can present as fear, restlessness, an inability to focus at work or school, finding it hard to fall or stay asleep at night, or getting easily irritated. In social situations, it can make it hard to talk to others; you might feel like you’re constantly being judged, or have symptoms such as stuttering, sweating, blushing or an upset stomach.

Research shows that if it’s left untreated, anxiety can lead to depression, early death and suicide. And while it can indeed lead to such serious health consequences, the medication that is prescribed to treat anxiety doesn’t often work in the long-term. Symptoms often return and you’re back where you started.

People often want to do something “perfectly” or to wait for the “perfect time” before starting. But this can lead to procrastination, long delays or even prevent us from doing it at all. And that causes stress – and anxiety.

Are you particularly critical of yourself and the blunders you make? people with anxiety often do this to themselves so frequently that they don’t even realize it anymore. They’re just not kind to themselves.

Another effective strategy is to “wait to worry”. If something went wrong and you feel compelled to worry (because you think you screwed up), don’t do this immediately. Instead, postpone your worry – set aside 10 minutes each day during which you can worry about anything.

Find purpose in life by helping others

Being connected to people has regularly been shown to be one of the most potent buffers against poor mental health.
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more on anxiety in education
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=anxiety

history Becker

Digital Literacy and History

Plamen Miltenoff – http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/
with Heather Abrahamson, Becker High School Social Studies, 763-261-4501 (Ext. 3507)
9:50-11:15; 11:20-11:45;  12:20-1:20 |
link to this blog entry: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/05/01/history-becker/
short link – http://bit.ly/histbecker

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list of web sites with images for the students’ projects:

  • Holocaust

https://www.ushmm.org/collections/the-museums-collections/about/photo-archives

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/holocaust-photographs

https://go.fold3.com/holocaust_records/

https://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Photographs

https://www.thoughtco.com/large-collection-of-holocaust-pictures-1779703

http://www.yadvashem.org/yv/en/holocaust/resource_center/item.asp?gate=4-2

http://www.history.com/topics/world-war-ii/the-holocaust/pictures/holocaust-concentration-camps/poland-auschwitz-birkenau-death-camp

  • Cold War

http://www.gettyimages.com/photos/cold-war

http://www.coldwar.org/museum/photo_gallery.asp

http://www.cnn.com/2014/03/04/world/gallery/cold-war-history/

http://time.com/3879870/berlin-wall-photos-early-days-cold-war-symbol/

http://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/theme/cold-war-history

http://archive.millercenter.org/academic/dgs/primaryresources/cold_war

  • others

http://www.loc.gov/pictures/

http://www.gettyimages.com/editorialimages/archival

https://www.archives.gov/research/alic/reference/photography.html

 

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Defining my interests. Narrowing a topic. How do I collect information? How do I search for information?

How do we search for “serious” information?

https://www.google.com/; https://scholar.google.com/ (3 min); http://academic.research.microsoft.com/http://www.dialog.com/http://www.quetzal-search.infohttp://www.arXiv.orghttp://www.journalogy.com/ 
  • Digg, Reddit , Quora, Medium,
http://digg.com/, https://www.reddit.com/, https://www.quora.com/ StackExchange http://stackexchange.com/Kngine.com; AskScience https://www.reddit.com/r/askscience/, ,  and similar, https://medium.com/ (5 min)
YouTube, SlideShare https://www.slideshare.net/  and similar https://www.slideshare.net/search/slideshow?searchfrom=header&q=modern+history
  • Professional organization and social media
(10 min)
Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modern_history
blogs, listservs http://www.bestcollegesonline.com/blog/100-awesome-blogs-for-history-junkies/
Facebook  history
Twitter  twitter
LinkedIn Groups https://www.linkedin.com/groups/my-groups  
team work using your social media accounts (e.g. Facebook, Twitter), search for information related to your topic of interest (5 min)

  • Other search engines
https://www.semanticscholar.org/
  • University Library Search
(20 min)
every university library has subject guides for different disciplines. here are the ones from SCSU http://stcloud.lib.mnscu.edu/subjects/guide.php?subject=HIST-WOR Kahoot game (5 min)
basic electronic (library) search information and strategies. Library research services (5 min)

using the library database, do a search on a topic of your interest.

compare the returns on your search. make an attempt to refine the search.

retrieve the following information about the book of interest: is it relevant to your topic (check the subjects); is it timely (check the published date); is it available

 books
Strategies for conducting advanced searches (setting up filters and search criteria)
Articles and databases (10 min)  
Kahoot competition use your smart phones to find the best researcher among you
https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/c376c27a-d39a-4825-8541-1c1ae728e1bc
https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/5e6d126f-be4d-47d0-9b6e-dfc3f2c90e61
https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/89706729-3663-4ec3-a351-173bf1bf4ed7history:
https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/7510e6d8-170f-4c0c-b7bd-6d7dd60c3f6e
Reference and Facts
Streaming and Video http://www.stcloudstate.edu/library/research/video.aspx
Journal Title and Citation Finder
shall more info be needed and or “proper” session with a reference librarian be requested http://stcloud.lib.mnscu.edu/subjects/guide.php?subject=EDAD-D
Institutional Repository http://repository.stcloudstate.edu/
  • additional academic resources
Academic.com and ResearchGate

academia


  • VR tour SCSU library
http://bit.ly/360lib and http://bit.ly/360lib2;  http://bit.ly/VRlib (15 min)

  • bibliographic tools
Refworks https://www.refworks.com/refworks2/default.aspx?r=authentication::init&
Zotero, Mendeley, Endnote
Fast and easy bibliographic tools: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/12/06/bibliographic-tools-fast-and-easy/
 Primary and secondary sources video

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more on history in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=history

Save

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Digital Storytelling for EDAD 652

Community Relations for Administrators EDAD 652

Instructor Kay Worner

A discussion with Kay’s class of school administrators about the use of digital storytelling as a tool for community relations.

discussion based on LIB 490/590
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/lib490/

  • Introduction (5-10 min)
    Plamen: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/
    students: interests and related information
  • Group assignment (5-10 min)
    Effective communication strategies. List 3-5 and discuss the pros and cons (what makes them effective and are there any impediments, limitations)
  • Class discussion on effective communication strategies: based on the group work findings, how do you think digital storytelling may be [can it be] an effective communication tool

What is Storytelling? How does it differ from Digital Storytelling?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_storytelling

Rossiter & Garcia (2010)  consider “digital stories are short vignettes that combine the art of telling stories with multimedia objects including images, audio, and video” (p. 37)

Is Digital Storytelling more then just storytelling on technology steroids?

What is Digital Storytelling (DS) for school leadership? A bibliographic research reveals a plenitude of research on DS in the classroom, for educators, but not much for educational leaders.
Guajardo, Oliver, Rodrigez, Valcez, Cantu, & Guajardo (2011) view digital storytelling for emerging educational leaders as “as a process for data creation, analysis, and synthesis.”

There is information for corporate leaders or community leaders and DS, but not much for ed leaders.

Let’s create our own understanding of digital storytelling for educational leaders.

Basic definitions, concepts and processes.

  • Learn about Web 1.0 versus Web 2.0; the Cloud; transliteracy and multiliteracy

Multimodal Literacy refers to meaning-making that occurs through the reading, viewing, understanding, responding to and producing and interacting with multimedia and digital texts. It may include oral and gestural modes of talking, listening and dramatising as well as writing, designing and producing such texts. The processing of modes, such as image, words, sound and movement within texts can occur simultaneously and is often cohesive and synchronous. Sometimes specific modes may dominate.

http://guides.library.stonybrook.edu/digital-storytelling

  • Social Media and digital storytelling
    which social media tools would you employ to ensure a digital story happening?

When you hear the term, Digital Storytelling, do you immediately consider Social Media?

IT’S A MINDSET – NOT A SKILL
http://turndog.co/2015/06/16/how-to-use-social-media-in-your-digital-storytelling/

Share Your Brand’s (School?) Story
https://www.postplanner.com/digital-storytelling-techniques-secret-sauce-social-media/

  • group work (15-20) min
    split in groups of 3: an ed leader, a media specialist (or teacher with technology background) and a teacher (to represent a school committee on community relations)
    you have 5 min to research (Internet, access to school resources) and 5-10 min to come up with a strategy for use of digital storytelling for expanding and improving community relationship
    Base your strategy on existing examples.
    E.g.:
    Do the following electronic resources regarding this particular educational institution relay digital story:
    http://strideacademy.org/
    https://www.facebook.com/StrideAcademy/
    https://twitter.com/search?q=Stride%20Academy%20Charter%20School&src=tyah
    https://youtu.be/eekIUqMQ4v0
    What do you like?
    What would you do differently?
  • Digital Storytelling for building, expanding, improving community relations – final thoughts

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literature:
Rossiter, M., & Garcia, P. A. (2010). Digital storytelling: A new player on the narrative field.
New Directions For Adult & Continuing Education, 2010(126), 37-48.
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Guajardo, M., Oliver, J. A., Rodriguez, G., Valadez, M. M., Cantu, Y., & Guajardo, F. (2011). Reframing the Praxis of School Leadership Preparation through Digital Storytelling. Journal Of Research On Leadership Education, 6(5), 145-161.
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more on digital storytelling in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+storytelling

fake news resources

Fake News: A Library Resource Round-Up

February 23, 2017 By  ALA Public Programs Office
http://www.programminglibrarian.org/articles/fake-news-library-round
https://www.pinterest.com/pin/218917231867987168
Evaluating Information,” ALA LibGuide
Fake News,” Indiana University East Campus Library

From
Mike Caulfield’s Web Literacy for Student Fact-Checkers
(https://webliteracy.pressbooks.com/)
Fact-Checking Organizations

There are many fact-checking sites outside the U.S. Here is a small sample.

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An Extremely Helpful List of Fake and Misleading News Sites to Watch Out For

By   

http://nymag.com/selectall/2016/11/fake-facebook-news-sites-to-avoid.html

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/237776055306492834

https://docs.google.com/document/d/10eA5-mCZLSS4MQY5QGb5ewC3VAL6pLkT53V_81ZyitM/preview

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UW professor: The information war is real, and we’re losing it

http://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/politics/uw-professor-the-information-war-is-real-and-were-losing-it/

Starbird argues in a new paper, set to be presented at a computational social-science conference in May, that these “strange clusters” of wild conspiracy talk, when mapped, point to an emerging alternative media ecosystem on the web of surprising power and reach.

It features sites such as Infowars.com, hosted by informal President Donald Trump adviser Alex Jones

There are dozens of other conspiracy-propagating websites such as beforeitsnews.com, nodisinfo.com and veteranstoday.com.

It isn’t a traditional left-right political axis, she found. There are right-wing sites like Danger & Play and left-wing sensationalizers such as The Free Thought Project. Some appear to be just trying to make money, while others are aggressively pushing political agendas.

The true common denominator, she found, is anti-globalism — deep suspicion of free trade, multinational business and global institutions.

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The News Literacy Project

http://www.thenewsliteracyproject.org/

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more on fake news in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=fake+news

Digital Literacy for Anthropology

Upper level anthropology of Native N American class w Kelly Branam Macauley

short link to this presentation: http://bit.ly/lib4anthr

Plamen Miltenoff: I give you the intersection of technology + library and information science = digital literacy + doctoral studies in education and psychology = educational technology.
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/
relevant classes I teach and might be of interest for you:
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/lib290/. if you want to survey the class, here is the FB group page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/LIB290/
and
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/lib490/

the topic is Social Media and research; research in the digital age

  • General issues

#FakeNews

Please pull out your smartphones, go to your Internet browser and and type: kahoot.it or click on the link: https://play.kahoot.it/

Class assignment (you will need a laptop, tablet and/or smart phone. If don’t have one, team up with your peer nearest you): #FakeNews is a very timely and controversial issue. in 2-3 min choose your best source on this issue. 1. Mind the prevalence of resources in the 21st century 2. Mind the necessity to evaluate a) the veracity of your courses b) the quality of your sources (the fact that they are “true” does not mean that they are the best). Be prepared to name your source and defend its quality.
How do you determine your sources? How do you decide the reliability of your sources? Are you sure you can distinguish “good” from “bad?”
Compare this entry https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_fake_news_websites
to this entry: https://docs.google.com/document/d/10eA5-mCZLSS4MQY5QGb5ewC3VAL6pLkT53V_81ZyitM/preview to understand the scope

Do you know any fact checking sites? Can you identify spot sponsored content? Do you understand syndication? What do you understand under “media literacy,” “news literacy,” “information literacy.”  http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/03/28/fake-news-resources/

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/03/28/fake-news-resources/

Need more info? http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/03/28/fake-news-3/
Need even more info? http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=fake+news

  • Academic research

http://www.stcloudstate.edu/library/:
the online dbases, the subject guides,
https://scholar.google.com/
Class assignment (you will need a laptop, tablet and/or smart phone. If don’t have one, team up with your peer nearest you): Research a topic in your class (keyword) using “heavy duty” (peer-reviewed) literature – 2-3 min.

Please pull out your smartphones, go to your Internet browser and and type: kahoot.it or click on the link: https://play.kahoot.it/

Academic research: https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/e2d6a15f-6361-4e21-96f9-d054f1d8e49b
https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/5e09bb66-4d87-44a5-af21-c8f3d7ce23de

  • Research using social media

what is social media (examples). why is called SM? why is so popular? what makes it so popular?

use SM tools for your research and education:

– Determining your topic. How to?
Digg http://digg.com/, Reddit https://www.reddit.com/ , Quora https://www.quora.com
Facebook, Twitter – hashtags (class assignment 2-3 min to search)
LinkedIn Groups
YouTube and Slideshare (class assignment 2-3 min to search)
Flickr, Instagram, Pinterest for visual aids (like YouTube they are media repositories)

Academia.com (https://www.academia.edu/) Academia.edu, a paper-sharing social network that has been informally dubbed “Facebook for academics,” https://www.academia.edu/31942069_Facebook_for_Academics_The_Convergence_of_Self-Branding_and_Social_Media_Logic_on_Academia.edu

ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/

– collecting and managing your resources:
Delicious https://del.icio.us/
Diigo: https://www.diigo.com/
Evernote: evernote.com OneNote (Microsoft)

blogs and wikis for collecting data and collaborating

– Managing and sharing your information:
Refworks,
Zotero https://www.zotero.org/,
Mendeley, https://www.mendeley.com/

– Testing your work against your peers (globally):

Wikipedia:
First step:Using Wikipedia.Second step: Contributing to Wikipedia (editing a page). Third step: Contributing to Wikipedia (creating a page)  https://www.evernote.com/shard/s101/sh/ef743d1a-4516-47fe-bc5b-408f29a9dcb9/52d79bfa20ee087900764eb6a407ec86

– presenting your information


please use this form to cast your feedback. Please feel free to fill out only the relevant questions:
http://bit.ly/imseval

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more on digital literacy for Anthropology classes in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=anthropology

Paul Signorelli

Future Trends Forum with Special Guest Paul Signorelli

 https://events.shindig.com/event/ftf-signorelli

February 23, 2:00 – 3:00pm (EST)

Future Trends Forum hosted by Bryan Alexander will address the most powerful forces of change in academia. The founder of the online blog Future Trends in Technology and Education has begun this weekly forum to enliven the discussion around the pressing issues at the cross roads of education and technology through weekly online video chat conversations where practitioners in the field can contribute and share their most recent experiences.

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Paul Signorelli, co-author of Workplace Learning & Leadership with Lori Reed, helps clients and colleagues explore, foster, and document innovations in learning to produce concrete results. He also is heavily engaged in supporting team-building and communities of collaboration. As a San Francisco-based writer, trainer, instructional designer, and consultant, he designs and facilitates learning opportunities for a variety of clients, helps others become familiar with e-learning, social media, MOOCs, mobile technology, innovations in learning spaces, and community partnerships (onsite and online) to creatively facilitate positive change within organizations. He has served on advisory boards/expert panels for the New Media Consortium Horizon Project documenting educational technology trends and challenges since 2010; remains active locally and nationally in the Association for Talent Development (formerly the American Society for Training & Development); and facilitates webinars for the American Library Association and other learning organizations. His most recent work remains focused on connectivist MOOCs (massive open online courses) and building sustainable onsite and online communities and partnerships. Signorelli earned an MLIS through the University of North Texas (with an emphasis on online learning) and an M.A. in Arts Administration at Golden Gate University (San Francisco); blogs at http://buildingcreativebridges.wordpress.com; and can be reached at paul@paulsignorelli.com.

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First-time users: upon entering the room, click “Allow” to the Flash prompt requesting access to your webcam. (Chrome users may need to click Allow a second time).

Note: The Shindig app currently only supports interacting with the featured speakers through text. To fully enjoy the Shindig experience and be enabled to ask video chat questions of the speaker or video chat privately with other participants, please log in from a computer with webcam and microphone capabilities.

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more on Bryan Alexander in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=bryan+alexander

research how to

also: http://bit.ly/edad829

Are Q&A startups a threat to Google?

search

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– The Internet

– Google Scholar https://scholar.google.com/

  • web sites (Web 1.0)

– blogs, listservs etc (Web 2.0)

– social media

– YouTube https://www.youtube.com/ and similar

– e.g. SCSU streaming : http://www.stcloudstate.edu/library/research/video.aspx

– Q&A plaforms such as Quora https://www.quora.com/, AskScience https://www.reddit.com/r/askscience/, Medium, PeerPong and similar

– Reddit https://www.reddit.com/, Digg http://digg.com/ , StackExchange http://stackexchange.com/ , Mahalo CompanyKngine.com   and similar

– Google Search, Yahoo Answers and similar

– Wikipedia

– Facebook groups, LinkedIn groups and similar

– SlideShare https://www.slideshare.net/  and similar

 

 

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more on the research process in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=search 

Save

digital literacy for GLST 495

Digital Literacy for GLST 495

short link: http://bit.ly/glst495

Prof. Misha Blinnikov

What is Digital Fluency and how does it differ from Digital Literacy? Information Literacy? http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/11/01/preparing-learners-for-21st-century-digital-citizenship/

  1. How do we search?
    1. SCSU Resources
      1. https://stcloud.lib.mnscu.edu/subjects/guide.php?subject=GEOG
    2. Google and/vs. Google Scholar (more focused, peer reviewed, academic content)
    3. SCSU online dbases
    4. Academia.com and ResearchGate.com
    5. Digg http://digg.com/, Reddit https://www.reddit.com/ ,
      http://smallbusiness.chron.com/difference-between-digg-reddit-68203.html
      Quora https://www.quora.com/
    6. Interlibrary Loan ILL http://lrts.stcloudstate.edu/library/services/illrequest.asp
    7. OER (Open Educational Resources)
    8. Big Data
  2. Basic Research Resources
    1. Concept mapping (???)
      http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=concept+map
    2. Fast and easy bibliographic tools:
      http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/12/06/bibliographic-tools-fast-and-easy/
      Refworks: https://www.refworks.com/refworks2/default.aspx?r=authentication::init&groupcode=RWStCloudSU
      EasyBib: http://www.easybib.com/
      Zotero: https://www.zotero.org/
      Mendeley: https://www.mendeley.com/
    3. Setting up social networking to gather articles and other research information
      LinkedIn Groups
      Facebook Groups
      Pinterest Boards
  3. Social media and its importance for the topic research and the dissertation research:
    1. Web 2.0 tools: e.g. Diigo.com; Evernote.com
    2. Facebook, Twitter
    3. blog.stcloudstate.edu
  4. Academic Social Sites:
    http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/11/13/scsu-edad-scopus-vs-academia-vs-researchgate/

Collecting, Preserving, and Transforming the News

: National Library of Iceland http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/iceland/

Collecting, Preserving, and Transforming the News

Conference website: https://ifla2017.landsbokasafn.is/

Organizers: National Library of Iceland, IFLA News Media Section (http://www.ifla.org/news-media), and IFLA Information Technology Section

(http://www.ifla.org/it)

Theme & sub-themes

From printed newspapers to born-digital news, libraries and other cultural heritage institutions have a central role in ensuring future access to news content. This conference will examine issues and challenges in collecting and preserving the news and making it available to users. Do access and preservation have different prerequisites? In addition, the conference will explore how news media is used and transformed by researchers and the public.

Can we recognize variable user needs? Do we offer the most suitable APIs?

Proposals should address the main theme and related topics, including but not limited to:

Users’ experiences with digital newspaper collections and their usability expectations

Case studies of patron services for digitized and born-digital news (e.g., management systems, reading devices, printout services, etc.)

How digitized news collections are being used in the digital humanities, by researchers, and by the public

The importance and possibilities of citizen science

Long-term sustainability planning for news collections and the role of institutional commitment in preservation and sustainability planning

How institutions make digital newspaper collections freely accessible

Rules, regulations, or legislation for mandatory deposit of news content, paper or otherwise

Legal deposit libraries offering access to in-copyright digitized newspapers

National Libraries co-operating with newspaper publishing houses in digitization, access, etc.

Data research that benefits preservation practice and planning

Changing collection building in a social media and online world

New methods for media monitoring

Harvesting and preservation of web-only news content

Issues around suppression of digitized/digital news content and take down orders

Other proposals relevant to the main conference theme will also be considered.

Note: Papers from this conference will be considered for a special issue of IFLA Journal. All authors will be invited to use feedback from the conference to revise their work and submit it for peer review in collaboration with the IFLA Journal editorial committee and the conference organizing committee.

Submission Guidelines

Proposal abstracts should be submitted as an MS Word file. Proposal abstracts must be submitted by 27 January 2017, must be in English, and should clearly

include:

Title of proposed paper

Abstract of proposed paper (no more than 300 words)

Name(s) of presenter(s) plus position and/or title

Employer / affiliated institution

Contact information including e-mail address and telephone number

Short biographical statement(s) of presenter(s)

Proposal abstracts should be emailed to all conference committee members:

Minna Kaukonen (minna.kaukonen@helsinki.fi)

Edmund Balnaves (ebalnaves@prosentient.com.au)

Mary Feeney (mfeeney@email.arizona.edu)

Örn Hrafnkelsson (orn@landsbokasafn.is)

Ana Krahmer (ana.krahmer@unt.edu)

Kazuo Takehana (k-takeha@ndl.go.jp)

Kopana Terry (kopana.terry@uky.edu)

Selected presenters will be notified by 3 February 2017. To discuss any matter relating to this Call for Papers, please contact the conference committee members listed above.

Accepted papers

Complete accepted papers should be 3000-6000 words in length and be an original submission not published elsewhere.

Complete accepted papers and accompanying presentation slides must be submitted by 17 April 2017.

Final papers should be written in English.

The papers will be made available on the Conference Website and the News Media Section Website under theCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 license.

Approximately 20 minutes will be allowed for the presentation of the paper.

Registration

Registration information will be posted on the Conference Website at the beginning of 2017.

Important dates

27 January 2017 Proposal abstracts due

3 February 2017 Acceptance notices sent to authors

10 February 2017 Start of registration

10 April 2017 Completed papers and presentations submitted

27-28 April 2017 Conference

Please note The Programme Committee regrets that it has no funding to assist prospective authors and the submission of an abstract must be on the understanding that the costs of attending the conference including registration, travel, accommodation and other expenses, are the responsibility of the presenters of the accepted papers, or their institutions. No financial support can be provided by IFLA, but a special invitation can be issued to authors.

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more about “news” in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=news

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