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analytics in education

ACRL e-Learning webcast series: Learning Analytics – Strategies for Optimizing Student Data on Your Campus

This three-part webinar series, co-sponsored by the ACRL Value of Academic Libraries Committee, the Student Learning and Information Committee, and the ACRL Instruction Section, will explore the advantages and opportunities of learning analytics as a tool which uses student data to demonstrate library impact and to identify learning weaknesses. How can librarians initiate learning analytics initiatives on their campuses and contribute to existing collaborations? The first webinar will provide an introduction to learning analytics and an overview of important issues. The second will focus on privacy issues and other ethical considerations as well as responsible practice, and the third will include a panel of librarians who are successfully using learning analytics on their campuses.

Webcast One: Learning Analytics and the Academic Library: The State of the Art and the Art of Connecting the Library with Campus Initiatives
March 29, 2016

Learning analytics are used nationwide to augment student success initiatives as well as bolster other institutional priorities.  As a key aspect of educational reform and institutional improvement, learning analytics are essential to defining the value of higher education, and academic librarians can be both of great service to and well served by institutional learning analytics teams.  In addition, librarians who seek to demonstrate, articulate, and grow the value of academic libraries should become more aware of how they can dovetail their efforts with institutional learning analytics projects.  However, all too often, academic librarians are not asked to be part of initial learning analytics teams on their campuses, despite the benefits of library inclusion in these efforts.  Librarians can counteract this trend by being conversant in learning analytics goals, advantages/disadvantages, and challenges as well as aware of existing examples of library successes in learning analytics projects.

Learn about the state of the art in learning analytics in higher education with an emphasis on 1) current models, 2) best practices, 3) ethics, privacy, and other difficult issues.  The webcast will also focus on current academic library projects and successes in gaining access to and inclusion in learning analytics initiatives on their campus.  Benefit from the inclusion of a “short list” of must-read resources as well as a clearly defined list of ways in which librarians can leverage their skills to be both contributing members of learning analytics teams, suitable for use in advocating on their campuses.

my notes:

open academic analytics initiative
https://confluence.sakaiproject.org/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=75671025

where data comes from:

  • students information systems (SIS)
  • LMS
  • Publishers
  • Clickers
  • Video streaming and web conferencing
  • Surveys
  • Co-curricular and extra-curricular involvement

D2L degree compass
Predictive Analytics Reportitng PAR – was open, but just bought by Hobsons (https://www.hobsons.com/)

Learning Analytics

IMS Caliper Enabled Services. the way to connect the library in the campus analytics https://www.imsglobal.org/activity/caliperram

student’s opinion of this process
benefits: self-assessment, personal learning, empwerment
analytics and data privacy – students are OK with harvesting the data (only 6% not happy)
8 in 10 are interested in personal dashboard, which will help them perform
Big Mother vs Big Brother: creepy vs helpful. tracking classes, helpful, out of class (where on campus, social media etc) is creepy. 87% see that having access to their data is positive

librarians:
recognize metrics, assessment, analytics, data. visualization, data literacy, data science, interpretation

INSTRUCTION DEPARTMENT – N.B.

determine who is the key leader: director of institutional research, president, CIO

who does analyics services: institutional research, information technology, dedicated center

analytic maturity: data drivin, decision making culture; senior leadership commitment,; policy supporting (data ollection, accsess, use): data efficacy; investment and resourcefs; staffing; technical infrastrcture; information technology interaction

student success maturity: senior leader commited; fudning of student success efforts; mechanism for making student success decisions; interdepart collaboration; undrestanding of students success goals; advising and student support ability; policies; information systems

developing learning analytics strategy

understand institutional challenges; identify stakeholders; identify inhibitors/challenges; consider tools; scan the environment and see what other done; develop a plan; communicate the plan to stakeholders; start small and build

ways librarians can help
idenfify institu partners; be the partners; hone relevant learning analytics; participate in institutional analytics; identify questions and problems; access and work to improve institu culture; volunteer to be early adopters;

questions to ask: environmental scanning
do we have a learning analytics system? does our culture support? leaders present? stakeholders need to know?

questions to ask: Data

questions to ask: Library role

learning analytics & the academic library: the state of the art of connecting the library with campus initiatives

questions:
pole analytics library

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

literature

causation versus correlation studies. speakers claims that it is difficult to establish causation argument. institutions try to predict as accurately as possible via correlation, versus “if you do that it will happen what.”

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More on analytics in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=analytics&submit=Search

digital literacy for SOE students

Digital literacy for SOE students

Class ED 610 Introduction to Curriculum and Instruction Summer 2018

Instructor:     Hsuehi(Martin) Lo

short link to this session: http://bit.ly/edad829

for online participation, please use the following Zoom or Adobe Connect session (your instructor will direct you which one:

  1. For Zoom, please use the following URL to login:
    https://zoom.us/j/4684903124

My name is Plamen Miltenoff and I will be leading your digital literacy instruction today: Here is more about me: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/ and more about the issues we will be discussing today: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/
As well as my email address for further contacts: pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu

Here is a preliminary plan. We will not follow it strictly; it is just an idea about the topics we would like to cover. Shall there be points of interest, please feel free to contribute prior and during the session.

Keeping in mind the ED 610 Learning Goals and Objectives, namely:

  1. Understand and demonstrate how to write literature review in the field of the C&I research
  2. Understand the related research methods in both quantitative and qualitative perspectives from the explored research articles
  3. Understand how to use searching engine to find meaningful articles
  4. Interpret and do critical thinking in C&I research articles

lets review our search and research skills:

  1. How do we search?
    1. Google and Google Scholar (more focused, peer reviewed, academic content)
    2. Digg http://digg.com/, Reddit https://www.reddit.com/ , Quora https://www.quora.com/
    3. SCSU Library search, Google, Professional organization, (NASSP), Stacks of magazines, csu library info, but need to know what all of the options mean on that page
  2. Custom Search Engine:
    http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/11/17/google-custom-search-engine/
  3. Basic electronic (library) search information and strategies. Library research services

https://www.semanticscholar.org/

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PICO framework to structure a question:
Population, Patient, Problem
Intervention
Comparison
Outcome

prepare systematic review

  1. Subject Guides
    Please locate theEducation (Elementary)
    Education (Secondary)
    Educational Administration and Leadership (Doctoral)
    Educational Administration and Leadership (Masters)
    at the LRS web page:
    http://lrts.stcloudstate.edu/library/default.asp
    library research guide
    Look for “Research Assistance” and scroll to
    Educational Administration and Leadership or any of the four links related to education
    http://research.stcloudstate.edu/rqs.phtml?subject_id=122
  2. Electronic Journals & the DOI System

    What is a DOI? A Digital Object Identifier (DOI) is assigned to electronic journal articles (and selected other online content) to specifically and permanently identify and access that article. Most of the standard academic citation formats now require the inclusion of DOIs within a citation when available.

    How to find a DOI:   Most current academic journal articles include a DOI (usually listed on the first page of the article).  Most library databases list a DOI with the record for recent academic journal articles.  Most non-academic articles (including magazine and newspaper articles) as well as many older academic journal articles do not have a DOI.  Crossref.org provides a DOI Lookup service that will search for a DOI based on citation information (author’s last name, journal name, article title, etc.).

    How to access an article via a DOI: Use the CSU Stanislaus Library DOI Look-up for options provided by the library, including access to the full-text via the publisher’s site or a library database service when available. Other, general DOI look-up systems (CrossRef & DOI.org) usually link to the article’s “homepage” on the publisher’s site (which usually include a free abstract but full-text access is restricted to subscribers).

  3. What is ORCID: http://orcid.org/register

shall more info be needed and or “proper” session with a reference librarian be requested. http://stcloud.lib.mnscu.edu/subjects/guide.php?subject=EDAD-D

-Strategies for conducting advanced searches (setting up filters and search criteria)

Filters

filters

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Search criteria

search_criteria

 

 

 

 

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  1. Books and Video
  2. Articles and databases
  3. Journal Title and Citation Finder
  4. Reference and Facts
  5. Institutional Repository
SCSU library web page snapshot with link to repository

SCSU library web page snapshot with link to repository

  1. Simple versus Advanced Search
  2. Interlibrary Loan ILL http://lrts.stcloudstate.edu/library/services/illrequest.asp
  3. Ways to find research specific to doctoral student needs (ie: Ways to find dissertations, peer reviewed research sources, research-related information, etc.)
  4. Understand the responsibilities of authorship including copyright, intellectual property, and discipline-based expectations
  5. Basic Research Resources-Jan 2015 version edit pmConcept mapping:
    http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=concept+map
  6. Explore and select citation management software to organize bibliographic information
  7. Refworks: https://www.refworks.com/refworks2/default.aspx?r=authentication::init&groupcode=RWStCloudSU
  8. Alternatives to Refworks (currently retired):
    1. Zotero, Mendeley, Endnote
    2. Fast and easy bibliographic tools:
      http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/12/06/bibliographic-tools-fast-and-easy/
  1. -Setting up social networking to gather articles and other research information
    slide 9 of the PPT Basic Research Resources

Social media and its importance for the topic research and the dissertation research:

Small business owners use social media primarily as a marketing and search engine optimization tool. However, more and more small businesses are using social media to get answers for business related questions. Specific industry related articles, and statistics are found useful for small business owners in 80% of the cases.
https://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20140331225132-25026422-small-business-owners-turning-to-social-media

Altmetricshttp://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/10/23/altmetrics-library-lily-troia/

  1. Collaborative Tools
  2. Apps Anywhere (need installation of Citrix Receiver):

 

  1. File/Web space: https://webfs.stcloudstate.edu/main/default.aspx
  2. Dropbox:  https://www.dropbox.com/
  3. Web 2.0 tools: e.g. Diigo.com; Evernote.com
  4. Facebook, Twitter
  5. Blog.stcloudstate.edu

Other sources for information:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/01/27/research-how-to/

Academic.com and ResearchGate

  1. -Saving articles, saving quotes and other article information

Blogs – use tags

hands-on exercise:

learn how to use Zotero and/or Refworks in Microsoft Word

dissertation zotero
and/or
Refworks and/or Mendeley in Google Docs RefWorks ProQuest

 

 

Google Doc ProQuest RefWorks

 

Login into ProQuest Refworks AddOn for Google Doc:

login refworks google doc-y80ulf

Zotero, Mendeley, Refworks
Evernote, Diigo

If Twitter, Facebook or LinkedIn, use hashtags

  1. Share any other research-related resources available through the library or other sources

—————-
Plamen Miltenoff, Ph.D., MLIS
Professor
320-308-3072
pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/
pedagogues under a minute: http://www.pinterest.com/pin/178173728981990450/

Save

EDAD 646 tech instruction

EDAD 646 tech instruction with Dr. Roger Worner

Based on the documents attached above, and the discussion and work already surrounding these documents, please consider the following flowchart:

study >>> systems theory >>> cybermetrics >>>

SWOT >>> strategic planning >>> task force >>> architect >>>

CM >>> public adviser >>> public polling >>> referendum

During the exercises surrounding the documents above, you have been introduced to various speakers / practitioners, who presented real-life cases regarding:

  1. business
  2. transportation  https://www.edulog.com/, http://www.tylertech.com/solutions-products/school-solutions/transportation, http://www.busboss.com/
  3. food service (http://www.foodservicedirector.com/research/big-picture/articles/impact-technology-foodservice)
  4. building grounds (http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED499142.pdf)
  5. HR (http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dkeh%26AN%3d89941160%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite)
  6. others

– the first goal of this technology instruction is to figure out the current state of technology in K12 settings.
assignment:
* split in groups * using each group member’s information and experience about technology in general and technology in school settings, use the flow chart above and identify any known technology, which can improve the process of each step in the flow chart.
* reconvene and compare results among groups. Find similarities and discrepancies and agree on a pool of applicable technology tools and concepts, which can improve the process reflected in the flow chart.

Example how to meet the requirements for the first goal:  1. based on your technological proficiency, how can you aid your study using system thinking/systems approach? the work ahead of you is collaborative. What collaborative tools do you know, which can help the team work across time and space? Skype, Google Hangouts for audio/video/desktopsharing. Google Drive/Docs for working on policies and similar text-based documents.

Work on the following assignment:
Trends in technology cannot be taken separately from other issues and are closely intertwined with other “big” trends :

e.g., mobile workspaces (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/12/03/mobile-workspaces-on-campus/ ) are part of the larger picture, namely active learning spaces (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=learning+spaces&submit=Search), which involves, furniture, building construction, etc.

keeping in mind this interdependence / balance, please work in groups on the following questions. Using the available links above and the literature they lead to, as well as your own findings, please provide your best opinion to these questions:

  • when planning for a new building and determining learning spaces, what is the percentage of importance, which we place on technology, in relation to furniture, for example?
  • how much do teachers have a say in the planning of the building, considering that they had worked and prefer “their type” of learning space?
  • who decides what technology and how? how one rationalizes the equation technology = learning spaces = available finances?
  • how much outsourcing (consulting) on any of the components of the equation above one can afford / consider? How much weight the strategic planning puts on the consulting (outsourcing) versus the internal opinion (staff and administrators)?
  • how “far in the future” your strategic plan is willing / able to look at, in terms of technology – learning spaces?

How to stay current with the technology developments:

– the second goal of this technology instruction is to become acquainted with future technological trends and developments.
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/11/25/future-trends-in-education/

 

The New Horizon Report 2015 K12 Edition:
http://k12.wiki.nmc.org/

https://www.graphite.org/ – reviews and ratings for educational materials

ideas:

Are Schools Wasting Moneys on Computers?

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/12/04/computers-in-education/

big data

big-data-in-education-report

Center for Digital Education (CDE)

real-time impact on curriculum structure, instruction delivery and student learning, permitting change and improvement. It can also provide insight into important trends that affect present and future resource needs.

Big Data: Traditionally described as high-volume, high-velocity and high-variety information.
Learning or Data Analytics: The measurement, collection, analysis and reporting of data about learners and their contexts, for purposes of understanding and optimizing learning and the environments in which it occurs.
Educational Data Mining: The techniques, tools and research designed for automatically extracting meaning from large repositories of data generated by or related to people’s learning activities in educational settings.
Predictive Analytics: Algorithms that help analysts predict behavior or events based on data.
Predictive Modeling: The process of creating, testing and validating a model to best predict the probability of an outcome.

Data analytics, or the measurement, collection, analysis and reporting of data, is driving decisionmaking in many institutions. However, because of the unique nature of each district’s or college’s data needs, many are building their own solutions.

For example, in 2014 the nonprofit company inBloom, Inc., backed by $100 million from the Gates Foundation and the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, closed its doors amid controversy regarding its plan to store, clean and aggregate a range of student information for states and districts and then make the data available to district-approved third parties to develop tools and dashboards so the data could be used by classroom educators.22

Tips for Student Data Privacy

Know the Laws and Regulations
There are many regulations on the books intended to protect student privacy and safety: the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), the Protection of Pupil Rights Amendment (PPRA), the Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA), the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)
— as well as state, district and community laws. Because technology changes so rapidly, it is unlikely laws and regulations will keep pace with new data protection needs. Establish a committee to ascertain your institution’s level of understanding of and compliance with these laws, along with additional safeguard measures.
Make a Checklist Your institution’s privacy policies should cover security, user safety, communications, social media, access, identification rules, and intrusion detection and prevention.
Include Experts
To nail down compliance and stave off liability issues, consider tapping those who protect privacy for a living, such as your school attorney, IT professionals and security assessment vendors. Let them review your campus or district technologies as well as devices brought to campus by students, staff and instructors. Finally, a review of your privacy and security policies, terms of use and contract language is a good idea.
Communicate, Communicate, Communicate
Students, staff, faculty and parents all need to know their rights and responsibilities regarding data privacy. Convey your technology plans, policies and requirements and then assess and re-communicate those throughout each year.

“Anything-as-a-Service” or “X-as-a-Service” solutions can help K-12 and higher education institutions cope with big data by offering storage, analytics capabilities and more. These include:
• Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS): Providers offer cloud-based storage, similar to a campus storage area network (SAN)

• Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS): Opens up application platforms — as opposed to the applications themselves — so others can build their own applications
using underlying operating systems, data models and databases; pre-built application components and interfaces

• Software-as-a-Service (SaaS): The hosting of applications in the cloud

• Big-Data-as-a-Service (BDaaS): Mix all the above together, upscale the amount of data involved by an enormous amount and you’ve got BDaaS

Suggestions:

Use accurate data correctly
Define goals and develop metrics
Eliminate silos, integrate data
Remember, intelligence is the goal
Maintain a robust, supportive enterprise infrastructure.
Prioritize student privacy
Develop bullet-proof data governance guidelines
Create a culture of collaboration and sharing, not compliance.

more on big data in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=big+data&submit=Search

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