Searching for "soft skills"

teaching and assessing soft skills

Teaching & Assessing Soft Skills

http://catlintucker.com/2017/09/teaching-assessing-soft-skills/

Communication in Person & Online (available in PDF format here: Communication in Person Online Rubric)

https://docs.google.com/document/d/16JVAivizIysXdmUVXzC2BP2NiclbJ21N9cOZQ6NdqxU/edit

1 2 3 4
Limited, to no, participation in discussions.

 

Does not come to discussions prepared. As a result, fails to support statements with evidence from texts and other research.

 

Few attempts to ask questions or build on ideas shared.

 

Frequently violates the “dos and don’ts of online communication.”

Limited participation in discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with various partners.

 

Does not consistently come to discussions prepared. Limited preparation and inability to support statements with evidence from texts and other research reflects lack of preparation.

 

Limited attempts to ask questions, build on ideas shared, or invite quieter voices into the conversation.

 

Hesitant to respond to other perspectives and fails to summarize points or make connections.

 

Occasionally violates the “dos and don’ts of online communication.”

Participates in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners.

 

Comes to discussions prepared, having read and researched material. Draws on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic.

 

Attempts to drive conversations forward by asking questions, building on ideas shared, and inviting quieter voices into the conversation.

Responds to diverse perspectives, summarizes points, and makes connections.

 

Respects the “dos and don’ts for online communication.”

Initiates and participates effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners.

Comes to discussions prepared with a unique perspective, having read and researched material; explicitly draws on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic.

Propels conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate to the current discussion. (Adds depth by providing a new, unique perspective to the discussion.)

Responds thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarizes points of agreement and disagreement, and makes new connections. Leans in and actively listens.

Makes eye contact, speaks loud enough to be heard, and body language is strong.

Respects the “dos and don’ts for online communication.”

Critical Thinking & Problem Solving,  (available in PDF format here: Critical Thinking Problem Solving Rubric)

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1fjlODmLvrVZyrKnzz54LbVa7CqfbAJvLfb98805fjuY/edit

1 2 3 4
Reflects surface level understanding of information.

 

Unable or unwilling to evaluate quality of information or draw conclusions about information found.

Does not try to solve problems or help others solve problems. Lets others do the work.

 

Does not actively seek answers to questions or attempt to find information. Does not seek out peers or ask teacher for guidance or support.

Attempts to dive below the surface when analyzing information but work lacks depth.

Struggles to evaluate the quality of information and does not draw insightful conclusions about information found.

Does not suggest or refine solutions, but is willing to try out solutions suggested by others.

Asks teachers or other students for answers but does not use online tools, like Google and YouTube, to attempt to answer questions or find information.

Demonstrates a solid understanding of the information.

 

Evaluates the quality of information and makes inferences/draws conclusions.

 

Refines solutions suggested by others.

 

Attempts to use online tools, like Google and YouTube, to seek answers and find information.

Demonstrates a comprehensive understanding of the information.

 

Effectively evaluates the quality of information and makes inferences/draws conclusion that are insightful.

 

Actively looks for and suggests solutions to problems.

 

Uses online tools, like Google and YouTube, to proactively seek answers and find information.

 

 

Collaboration & Contributions in a Team Dynamic  (available in PDF format here: Collaboration Contributions in a Team Dynamic Rubric)

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1ucjgylXWz8nOM5Vq8FpTByur8smsbov3mR8pX-7n1SE/edit

1 2 3 4
Fails to listen to, share with, and support the efforts of team members making accomplishing a task more difficult for the team.

Frequently inattentive or distracting when team members talk. Requires frequent redirection by team members and/or teacher.

Body language does not reflect engagement in the process. Focus on leaning in, asking questions, actively listening (e.g. make eye contact).

Rarely offers feedback. Frequently becomes impatient, frustrated, and/or disrespectful.

 

Limited attempts to move between roles.

Does not use resources to support the team’s work.

Attempts to listen to, share with, and support the efforts of team members are limited or inconsistent.

Does not always listen when team members talk and requires redirection by team members and/or teacher.

Body language does not reflect engagement in the process. Focus on leaning in, asking questions, actively listening (e.g. make eye contact).

Occasionally offers feedback. At times, becomes impatient or frustrated with the process making teamwork more challenging.

Limited attempts to move between roles.

Does not consistently use resources to support the team’s work.

Listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of team members.

Listens when team members talk.

Attempts to engage in group tasks; however, body language does not consistently communicate interest or attention. Body language reflects engagement in the process, but there is room for improvement.

Offers feedback and treats team members with respect. At times, becomes impatient or frustrated with the process making teamwork more challenging.

Attempts to be flexible and move between roles; at times dominates a particular role. This is an area of potential growth.

Uses resources to support the team’s work.

Consistently listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of team members.

 

Leans in and actively listens when team members talk.

 

Body language communicates interest in team tasks and engagement in the process.

 

Offers constructive feedback, treats team members with respect, and is patient with the process.

 

Creates balance on the team moving between responsibilities without dominating any one role.

 

Uses resources effectively to support the team’s work.

\++++++++++++++++++++++
more on soft skills in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=soft+skills

20 Digital Skills Every 21st Century Teacher should Have

The 20 Digital Skills Every 21st Century Teacher should Have

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2012/06/33-digital-skills-every-21st-century.html

1- Create and edit  digital audio
2- Use Social bookmarking to share resources with and between learners
3- Use blogs and wikis to create online platforms for students
4- Exploit digital images for classroom use
5- Use video content to engage students
6- Use infographics to visually stimulate students
7- Use Social networking sites to connect with colleagues and grow professionally

8- Create and deliver asynchronous presentations and training sessions
9- Compile a digital e-portfolio for their own development
10- be able to detect plagiarized works in students assignments
11- Create screen capture videos and tutorials
12- Curate web content for classroom learning
13- Use and provide students with task management tools to organize their work and plan their learning
14- Use polling software to create a real-time survey in class
15- Understand issues related to copyright and fair use of online materials
16- Use digital assessment tools to create quizzesHere are some tools for teachers to develop this skill
17- Find and evaluate authentic web based content
18- Use digital tools for time management purposes
19- Use note taking tools to share interesting content with your students
20- Use of online sticky notes to capture interesting ideas

Five Apps To Test Your Physics Skills

Beyond Angry Birds, Five Apps That Test Your Physics Skills

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/01/beyond-angry-birds-five-apps-that-test-your-physics-skills/

1. Crayon Physics Deluxe worldofgoo

2.  World of Goo                  coaster_crafter

3. Coaster Crafter               602196_434936999916746_2105602860_n-1

4. Amazing Alex                  tinkerbox

5. Tinkerbox

All the above games have physics in common but they’re also all in 2D. If students love these games, consider challenging them with 3D and even 4D games that put physics knowledge to the test. Valve’s Portal series is a great choice, or look into the equally mind-bending first-person games Antichamber or Quantum Conundrum, both of which go beyond the boundaries of Newtonian physics and Euclidean geometry.

microcredentialing and students abilities

Badge breakthroughs

Micro-credentials awarded for in-demand skills give employers deeper detail about a student’s abilities.Matt Zalaznick. June 7, 2017
While employers increasingly demand that new hires have college degrees, the transcripts supporting those hard-earned credentials are no longer the most informative tool students have to exhibit their skills.

An estimated 1 in 5 institutions issue digital badges, which can be posted to social media, stored on digital portfolios and displayed by other specially designed platforms. When clicked on, the badge lists a range of skills a student has demonstrated beyond grades.

“The reason they’re taking off in higher education is most employers are not getting the information they need about people emerging from higher ed, with previous tools we’ve been using,” says Jonathan Finkelstein, founder and CEO of the widely used badging platform Credly. “The degree itself doesn’t get to level of describing particular competencies.”

For instance, a Notre Dame student who goes on a trip to Ecuador to build bridges can earn a badge for mastering the calculations involved in the construction, says G. Alex Ambrose, associate program director of e-portfolio assessment at the Indiana university’s Kaneb Center for Teaching & Learning.

Students can be pretty certain when they have passed calculus or creative writing, but they don’t always recognize when they’ve excelled in demonstrating soft skills such as critical thinking, communication and work ethic, says MJ Bishop, director of the system’s William E. Kirwan Center for Academic Innovation.

Badges have been most popular in the school of education—including with student teachers who, in turn, have created badges for the elementary and secondary classrooms where they’ve apprenticed, says Anna Catterson, the university’s educational technology director.

The campus library is another badging hotspot. Students there have earned microcredentials for research, 3D printing and other skills. These badges are being shared on LinkedIn and other platforms to obtain internships and scholarships.

The university runs faculty training sessions on badging and has established a review process for when faculty submit ideas for microcredentials.

One pothole to avoid is trying to create a schoolwide badge that’s standardized across a wide range of courses or majors. This can force the involvement of committees that can bog down the process, so it’s better to start with skills within single courses, says Ambrose at Notre Dame.

When creating a badge, system faculty have to identify a business or industry interested in that credential.

Badges that have the backing of a college or university are more impressive to job recruiters than are completion certificates from skill-building websites like Lynda.com.

Students won’t be motivated to earn a badge that’s a stock blue ribbon downloaded off the internet. Many institutions put a lot work into the design, and this can include harnessing expertise from the marketing department and graphic designers

+++++++++++
more on micro-credentialing in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=microcredentialing

2018 NMC Horizon Report

2018 NMC Horizon Report

Cross-Institution & Cross-Sector Collaboration Long-Term Trend: Driving Ed Tech adoption in higher education for five or more years

Although a variety of collaborations between higher education and industry have emerged, more-explicit frameworks and guidelines are needed to define how these partnerships should proceed to have the greatest impact.

links to the Webinar on the report:
https://events.educause.edu/educause-live/webinars/2018/exploring-the-2018-horizon-report

link to the transcript: https://events.educause.edu/~/media/files/events/educause-live/2018/live1808/transcript.docx

Proliferation of Open Educational Resources Mid-Term Trend: Driving Ed Tech adoption in higher education for the next three to five years

The United States lags on the policy front. In September 2017, the Affordable College Textbook Act was once again introduced in both the US House of Representatives and the Senate “to expand the use of open textbooks
It is unlikely that ACTA will pass, however, as it has been unsuccessfully introduced to two previous Congresses.

The Rise of New Forms of Interdisciplinary Studies

Faculty members, administrators, and instructional designers are creating innovative pathways to college completion through interdisciplinary experiences, nanodegrees, and other alternative credentials, such as digital badges. Researchers, along with academic technologists and developers, are breaking new ground with data structures, visualizations, geospatial applications, and innovative uses of opensource tools.

Growing Focus on Measuring Learning

As societal and economic factors redefine the skills needed in today’s workforce, colleges and universities must rethink how to define, measure, and demonstrate subject mastery and soft skills such as creativity and collaboration. The proliferation of data-mining software and developments in online education, mobile learning, and learning management systems are coalescing toward learning environments that leverage analytics and visualization software to portray learning data in a multidimensional and portable manner

Redesigning Learning Spaces

upgrading wireless bandwidth and installing large displays that allow for more natural collaboration on digital projects. Some are exploring how mixed-reality technologies can blend 3D holographic content into physical spaces for simulations, such as experiencing Mars by controlling rover vehicles, or how they can enable multifaceted interaction with objects, such as exploring the human body in anatomy labs through detailed visuals. As higher education continues to move away from traditional, lecture-based lessons toward more hands-on activities, classrooms are starting to resemble real-world work and social environments

Authentic Learning Experiences

An increasing number of institutions have begun bridging the gap between academic knowledge and concrete applications by establishing relationships with the broader community; through active partnerships with local organizations

Improving Digital Literacy Solvable Challenge: Those that we understand and know how to solve

Digital literacy transcends gaining discrete technological skills to generating a deeper understanding of the digital environment, enabling intuitive and discerning adaptation to new contexts and cocreation of content.107 Institutions are charged with developing students’ digital citizenship, promoting the responsible and appropriate use of technology, including online communication etiquette and digital rights and responsibilities in blended and online learning settings. This expanded concept of digital competence is influencing curriculum design, professional development, and student-facing services and resources. Due to the multitude of elements of digital literacy, higher education leaders must obtain institution-wide buy-in and provide support for all stakeholders in developing these competencies.

Despite its growing importance, it remains a complex topic that can be challenging to pin down. Vanderbilt University established an ad hoc group of faculty, administrators, and staff that created a working definition of digital literacy on campus and produced a white paper recommending how to implement digital literacy to advance the university’s mission: https://vanderbilt.edu/ed-tech/committees/digital-literacy-committee.php

Adapting Organizational Designs to the Future of Work

Technology, shifting information demands, and evolving faculty roles are forcing institutions to rethink the traditional functional hierarchy. Institutions must adopt more flexible, teambased, matrixed structures to remain innovative and responsive to campus and stakeholder needs.

Attempts to avoid bureaucracy also align with a streamlined workforce and cost elimination. Emphasis has been placed on designing better business models through a stronger focus on return on investment. This involves taking a strategic approach that connects financial practice (such as analyzing cost metrics and resource allocation) with institutional change models and goals.124

Faculty roles have been and continue to be impacted by organizational change, as well as by broader economic movements. Reflective of today’s “gig economy,” twothirds of faculty members are now non-tenure, with half working part-time, often in teaching roles at several institutions. This stands as a stark contrast to 1969, when almost 80 percent of faculty were tenured or tenuretrack; today’s figures are nearly inverted. Their wages are applying pressure to traditional organizational structures.Rethinking tenure programs represents another change to organizational designs that aligns with the future of work.

Organizational structures are continuing to evolve on the administrative side as well. With an emphasis on supporting student success, many institutions are rethinking their student services, which include financial aid, academic advising, and work-study programs. Much of this change is happening within the context of digital transformation, an umbrella term that denotes the transformation of an organization’s core business to better meet customer needs by leveraging technology and data.

+++++++++
added Nov 13, 2018

6 growing trends taking over academic libraries

BY MERIS STANSBURY
March 24th, 2017

Horizon Report details short-and long-term technologies, trends that will impact academic libraries worldwide in the next 5 years.

6 growing trends taking over academic libraries

Short-Term, 1-2 years):

  • Research Data Management: The growing availability of research reports through online library databases is making it easier for students, faculty, and researchers to access and build upon existing ideas and work. “Archiving the observations that lead to new ideas has become a critical part of disseminating reports,” says the report.
  • Valuing the User Experience: Librarians are now favoring more user-centric approaches, leveraging data on patron touchpoints to identify needs and develop high-quality engaging experiences.

(Mid-Term, 3-5 years):

  • Patrons as Creators: Students, faculty, and researchers across disciplines are learning by making and creating rather than by simply consuming content. Creativity, as illustrated by the growth of user-generated videos, maker communities, and crowdfunded projects in the past few years, is increasingly the means for active, hands-on learning. People now look to libraries to assist them and provide tools for skill-building and making.
  • Rethinking Library Spaces: At a time when discovery can happen anywhere, students are relying less on libraries as the sole source for accessing information and more for finding a place to be productive. As a result, institutional leaders are starting to reflect on how the design of library spaces can better facilitate the face-to-face interactions.

(Long-Term, 5 or more years):

  • Cross-Institution Collaboration: Within the current climate of shrinking budgets and increased focus on digital collections, collaborations enable libraries to improve access to scholarly materials and engage in mission-driven cooperative projects.
  • Evolving Nature of the Scholarly Record: Once limited to print-based journals and monographic series, scholarly communications now reside in networked environments and can be accessed through an expansive array of publishing platforms. “As different kinds of scholarly communication are becoming more prevalent on the web, librarians are expected to discern the legitimacy of these innovative approaches and their impact in the greater research community through emerging altmetrics tools,” notes the report.
  • Improving digital literacy: According to the report, digital literacy transcends gaining isolated technological skills to “generate a deeper understanding of the digital environment, enabling intuitive adaptation to new contexts, co-creation of content with others, and an awareness of both the freedom and risks that digital interactions entail. Libraries are positioned to lead efforts to develop students’ digital citizenship, ensuring mastery of responsible and appropriate technology use, including online identity, communication etiquette, and rights and responsibilities.

++++++++++++
more on the NMC Horizon Report in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=horizon+report

adult learners support

How Universities Can Rethink Support For Growing Number Of Adult Learners

https://www.kqed.org/mindshift/51089/how-universities-can-rethink-support-for-growing-number-of-adult-learners

Anya Kamenetz, April 18, 2018

You’ll hear a reasonable amount of discussion about “new traditional” students today. But the common assumption — in Washington at least — seems to be that they require more vocational education to fill a “skills gap,” particularly in STEM or technical fields. Or that they need quicker, cheaper paths to a degree.

if you ask incoming adult community college students about their educational aspirations, more than 70 percent want to get a bachelor’s or beyond.

The problem finding good hires is actually a jumble of different realities. In some sectors (for instance, advanced, digitally driven manufacturing), innovation has outpaced training, and there is truly a shortage of technically skilled workers. Higher ed needs to work with employers and government in these targeted sectors to fill a real “skills gap.”

In other sectors, employers complain they can’t find workers with communications, problem-solving and other soft skills. The solution to that is more liberal learning, not more technical workforce training.

For most nontraditional students, this dimension of “self-authoring” (in the words of psychologist Marcia Baxter Magolda) is not less crucial, but even more. They often feel that they have failed in some way the customary narrative of high-school-to-college that defines successful adulthood.

The obstacles they face are as diverse as their lives. But here’s one key way of understanding what they share: Adult, nontraditional students have to fit their studies into complex lives with multiple roles and stressors, rather than being able to organize their work and social life around a central role as a college student.

++++++++++++
more on higher ed in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/04/28/disruption-in-higher-education/

employment interview

9 questions to ask in a job interview that make you look smart

more on employment in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=employment

digital literacy in the NHR 2016

The New Horizon Report, 2016

http://www.nmc.org/nmc-horizon-news/nmc-launches-app-for-the-2016-nmc-horizon-report/

page 24. Improving Digital Literacy

For years educators have leveraged curation tools such as Scoop.it, Storify, and Pinterest to help students critically evaluate online resources.
 (my bold to emphasize the difference between the definition of digital literacy, which I am fighting to establish at SCSU LRS and the continuous “information literacy” trend of the reference librarians )
Mapping Digital Literacy Policy and Practice in the Canadian Landscape
http://mediasmarts.ca/research-policy/mapping-digital-literacy-policy-practice-canadian-education-landscape

A well-rounded digital literacy incorporates print literacy but adds new capacities, competencies and comportments into the mix. Now included is the technical know-how to create a website, produce and upload a video, edit an image, design a functional information architecture for accessing or sharing knowledge – as well as many “soft skills” such as critical thinking and ethical behaviour. One of the primary transformations of the digital era in the 21st Century has been the introduction of end-users as actors in the world of communication, autonomous (producers and consumers of information) who can access and disseminate content in Web 2.0 domains without the regulatory controls of traditional filters and gatekeepers. Given this development, end-users now need greater critical thinking capacities to manage content: to decide what is valid and truthful and be able to incorporate multiple perspectives and voices into expanding worldviews. Additionally, exhibiting ethical behaviour in what may be said or posted online is essential to contemporary civic mindedness whether in a local context or the broader global village.

Getting Started: Multimedia Literacy

http://guides.lib.udel.edu/multimedia

Multimedia literacy is the set of abilities that enables an individual to effectively find, interpret, evaluate, use, and create multimedia.

http://www.deakin.edu.au/library/teach/digital-literacy/elements-of-digital-literacy – too simplistic, too traditional, no significant departure from the conservative information literacy

More on digital literacy in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy

augmented reality by ISTE

4 AR tools to build executive function and engagement

https://www.iste.org/explore/articleDetail?articleid=496

Luis Perez and Kendra Grant 7/23/2015
Topics: Assistive and adaptive technologies, Augmented reality, Learning spaces, Mobile learning, Tools

the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) framework, which aims to develop expert learners. In addition to removing barriers and making learning accessible to the widest varied of learners possible, UDL addresses many of the metacognitive and self-efficacy skills associated with becoming an expert learner, including:

Executive functions. These cognitive processes include initiation, goal setting, attention, planning and organization.

Comprehension skills. This skillset encompasses knowledge construction, making connections, developing strategies and monitoring understanding.

Engagement principles. These soft skills include coping, focus, resilience, effort, persistence, self-assessment and reflection.

QR codes

AR apps : two types of AR apps: those for experience and for creation. Experience AR apps, such as Star Walk, are designed to provide the user with an AR experience within a specific content or context. Creation AR apps, such as BlippAR and Aurasma, allow users to create their own AR experiences.

Posters : To support comprehension and metacognitive skills, images related to classroom topics, or posters related to a process could serve as the trigger image.

iBeacons : Beacon technology, such as iBeacon, shares some similarities with QR codes and AR, as it is a way to call up digital content from a specific spot in the physical world. However, unlike QR codes and AR, you do not have to point your device at a code or use a trigger image to call up content with iBeacon. Your device will automatically sync when it is near a beacon, a small device that emits a low-power Bluetooth signal, if you have an iBeacon-enabled app. The beacon then automatically launches digital content, such as a video, audio file or webpage. Beacon technology is well suited for center-based activities, as you can set up the app to trigger instructions for each center, exemplars of what the finished work will look like and/or prompts for the reflection when the center’s activity has been completed.

++++++++++++++++++++
More on QR codes in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=qr+codes&submit=Search

digital portfolio

Digital Portfolios: Facilitating Authentic Learning and Cultivating Student Ownership

presented on Tuesday, March 3, 2015.

Steve Zimmerman (charter school director), New York

digital porfolio software: open source. Google Sites – free, but too laborious for teachers

must be student owned and intuitive interface (you cannot say this about MN eFolio)

assessment rubrics

easy sharing and feedback

accessible form mobile devices (you cannot say this about MN eFolio)

easy integration with other applications (you cannot say this about MN eFolio)

Tina Holland

she is not a test person. good for her.
writing, critical thinking, creative thinking, soft skills (communication, collaboration, negotiation). team players, problme solvers, prioritize,

education is moving from traditional teaching methods, to inquiry based. self-directed learning. from summative to formative assessment

21st century learning competencies

#DigitalPortfolio

the presentation is now available on-demand at: http://w.on24.com/r.htm?e=936737&s=1&k=93DDFD3EB35B18A080B8EB13DD8FA770.

More on digital portfolio in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=digital+portfolio

1 2 3 8