Searching for "stress"

calming strategies against stress

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-12-26-teaching-is-as-stressful-as-an-er-these-calming-strategies-can-help

researchers from Penn State say can be as stress-inducing as an emergency room. Teachers enter such an an environment every day, which sometimes feels like life-or-death.

nonprofit program Cultivating Awareness and Resilience in Education (CARE)

half of the students in schools across America have experienced some form of trauma, violence or chronic stress.

After collecting data on those educators’ well-being, observations of classrooms and student behavioral reports over the course of a year, we found that teachers who received emotional regulation training were more emotionally supportive, demonstrated greater sensitivity to student needs, and provided more positive and productive classroom environments. Furthermore, when assessing teachers’ stress levels, those teachers noted considerably less distress, and an improved ability to manage their emotions.

In the face of stressful situations, I instead used techniques like deep breathing and mindful walking to calm my body and mind, gaining that heightened self-awareness to thoughtfully respond to the issue at hand.

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more on stress in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=stress

stress educators

Educators Are More Stressed at Work Than Average People, Survey Finds

By Madeline Will on October 30, 2017 3:25 PM

http://blogs.edweek.org/teachers/teaching_now/2017/10/educator_stress_aft_bat.html

The survey, released by the American Federation of Teachers and the advocacy group Badass Teachers Association on Monday, included responses from about 5,000 educators. It follows a 2015 survey on educator stress—and finds that stress levels have grown and mental health has declined for this group in the past two years.

 

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more on stress, mindfulness in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=stress

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mindfulness

Reducing teacher stress multiple strategies

Harper, A. (2019, April 2). Reducing teacher stress may require multiple strategies. Retrieved April 2, 2019, from Education Dive website: https://www.educationdive.com/news/reducing-teacher-stress-may-require-multiple-strategies/551604/?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Issue:%202019-04-02%20K-12%20Education%20Dive%20Newsletter%20%5Bissue:20185%5D&utm_term=Education%20Dive:%20K12

  • In the face of mounting testing pressures, rapidly changing reform efforts and student circumstances over which teachers feel little control, more than half of teachers consider their jobs to be highly stressful, which is affecting teacher absenteeism rates, retention and student achievement, according to The Hechinger Report.
  • There is a growing trend to address teachers’ mental health through stress-reduction and resiliency-building exercises. These include yoga and programs such as those offered by the Center for ResilienceBreathe for Change and mindfulness training offered through Cultivating Awareness and Resilience in Education. However, these efforts are mere triage and only offer short-term solutions, some experts say.
  • Education leaders can offer longer-term solutions that address root issues by providing mentoring support in schools rather than bringing in outside experts, rolling out new initiatives in a more teacher-centered way, and involving teachers in discussions about what works best for students.

But principals also need to build relationships with teachers themselves to create a sense of trust and more open and honest lines of communication. Good teachers are hard to find and losing them to stress is not a good option. Finding ways to solve the issues that are causing them stress and helping them deal with the inevitable pressures along the way is well worth the effort in the long run.

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more on stress
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=stress

Secondary Traumatic Stress for Educators

Secondary Traumatic Stress for Educators: Understanding and Mitigating the Effects

Roughly half of American school children have experienced at least some form of trauma — from neglect, to abuse, to violence. In response, educators often find themselves having to take on the role of counselors, supporting the emotional healing of their students, not just their academic growth.
The condition has numerous names: secondary traumatic stress (STS), vicarious trauma, compassion fatigue.
The symptoms are similar in some ways to post-traumatic stress disorder: withdrawing from friends and family; feeling unexplainably irritable or angry or numb; inability to focus; blaming others; feeling hopeless or isolated or guilty about not doing enough; struggling to concentrate; being unable to sleep; overeating or not eating enough; and continually and persistently worrying about students, when they’re at home and even in their sleep.
One of the handful of studies of STS in schools found that more than 200 staff surveyed from across six schools reported very high levels of STS.
STS can affect teachers’ happiness, health and professional practice. But Betsy McAlister Groves, a clinical social worker and former faculty member at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, says that she has often been surprised by the number of teachers, school counselors and administrators who recognized the cumulative stressors that they faced in their schools but did not realize that their symptoms were a common reaction to working with traumatized children — and that these symptoms had a name.

How Schools Can Acknowledge Secondary Trauma:
Building a Culture of Awareness
Create Peer Groups
Trauma-Informed Schools: School leaders should take a school-wide approach. There is a growing movement around creating trauma-informed schools — schools that recognize and are prepared to support community members affected by trauma and traumatic stress. Such schools deeply integrate social-emotional learning into their teaching, culture and approach, understanding that the holistic health and wellbeing of their charges is essential for achieving academic success.

Resource for teachers and schools

  • Assess how your work as an educator might be affecting you (both positively and negatively) by using the Professional Quality of Life (ProQOL) self-assessment tool and exploring the toolkit created by Teaching Tolerance to learn self-care strategies.
  • Learn how, as an educator, you can begin to identify secondary traumatic stress and learn strategies for self care through the tip sheet created by the National Child Traumatic Stress Network.
  • Explore the resources created by the Trauma and Learning Policy Initiative, a collaboration between the Massachusetts Advocates for Children and the Harvard Law School.
  • How strong are your school’s trauma-responsive programs and policies? Take the 20-minute evidence-informed Trauma Responsive Schools Implementation Assessment to find out — and learn ways to grow your school’s work.
  • Learn about additional individual and organization strategies for addressing secondary traumatic stress, compiled by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
  • Stay tuned for a new online curriculum for preK–12 teachers, named STAT (Support for Teachers Affected by Trauma), being created by experts in the fields of secondary traumatic stress, education, and technology. The curriculum, due for a 2019 launch, will feature five modules on risk factors, the impact of STS, and self-assessment, among related topics.

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more on mindfulness in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mindful

VR and stress reduction project

#Video360

Posted by InforMedia Services on Tuesday, August 7, 2018

taking video with Vuze: considering different scenes:

  • in the river, with sound of river and geese
  • in the woods lower level camera

discussion about the length of the video segment

contact SCSU faculty: https://www.stcloudstate.edu/cpcf/faculty-staff.aspx

kaschulze@stcloudstate.edu ,nmmerchant@stcloudstate.edu memayhew@stcloudstate.edu kpmayhew@stcloudstate.edu dpmacari@stcloudstate.edu smhoover@stcloudstate.edu tlestrem@stcloudstate.edu

end of year burnout

End of Year Burnout: How to Finish the Marathon in Stride

Four tips for how to keep going strong all the way to the end of the year.
By Maurice J. Elias May 20, 2014

https://www.edutopia.org/blog/end-of-year-burnout-how-to-finish-stride-maurice-elias

Cary Cherniss, whose book Beyond Burnout

1. Reconnect your kids and with your kids: Not your students—your kids.

2. Share your interests: Talk to them about things that interest you.

3. Talk about the summer

4. Engage and encourage their aspirations and dreams

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Ready to quit? Practical advice for when burnout takes hold

By: Lauren Hamby

https://newspring.cc/articles/ready-to-quit-practical-advice-for-when-burnout-takes-hold

Five Ways to Fight Burnout at Work

1. Remember your purpose.

2. Be intentional about who you spend time with.

3. Ask for help if you need it.

4. Be a lifelong learner.

5. Rest.

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5 Things You Can Do To Avoid Teacher Stress And Burnout

https://topnotchteaching.com/classroom-management-organisation/tips-to-avoid-teacher-stress-and-burnout/

1. Bust Teacher Burnout with a Mental Health Day

2. Better Boundaries Help Stop Teacher Burnout

3. Be Realistic to Avoid Burnout

4. Practice Good Mental Health Habits Daily

5. Be Aware of Your Stress and Stop It Fast

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10 Steps for Avoiding Teacher Burnout

By Ben Johnson April 22, 2014
https://www.edutopia.org/blog/ten-tips-to-avoid-teacher-burnout-ben-johnson

STEP #1) HAVE FUN DAILY WITH YOUR STUDENTS

STEP #2) TAKE CARE OF YOUR HEALTH

STEP #3) LEARN SOMETHING NEW AND SHARE IT WITH YOUR STUDENTS

STEP #4) HELP ANOTHER TEACHER

STEP #5) MAKE SOMEONE’S DAY

STEP #6) LIGHTEN UP

STEP #7) BE A SCIENTIST

STEP #8) LOOK FOR THE POSITIVE

STEP #9) REDECORATE

STEP #10) TRUST STUDENTS MORE

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more on burnout in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=burnout

toxic leadership

The Mediation Role of Toxic Leadership in the Effect of Job Stress on Job Satisfaction
H. Tezcan Uysal Department of Management and Organization
Zonguldak Vocational College Bülent
Ecevit University, Turkey

(6) (PDF) The Mediation Role of Toxic Leadership in the Effect of Job Stress on Job Satisfaction. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/331249551_The_Mediation_Role_of_Toxic_Leadership_in_the_Effect_of_Job_Stress_on_Job_Satisfaction [accessed May 16 2019].

mental health discussion

Mental health of college students and Lee’s new book: “Delivering College Mental Health”

Join Bryan Alexander and Lee Keyes, executive director, Counseling Center at the University of Alabama, and author of Delivering Effective College Mental Health Services for an engaging live discussion on the future of mental health in higher education.
Bryan plans to ask Lee about unfolding trends in college student mental health and his thoughts around the rise in anxiety and stress. We will explore how universities are changing their approaches to student mental health and what roles technology may play in harming or helping psychological well-being.
What questions or thoughts do you have? Join and take part in the discussion!
Registration at:
https://nam05.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fr20.rs6.net%2Ftn.jsp%3Ff%3D001wXPq-Mkb9ES5TqzpnbEq_kE8DYDepBVxUtrTbcGYDFbe6_cOIQEoQzKZeib2iwvQo7Y9lihL0XiKmPtaTLRXrr1gre1whAiXvgD2bfQq3o-Jd1T6RzoyzExSt_bI0aj9yC9K9yVr8QInpBWvFenbP1Th9LMZSAqCkX3idDvYBhE%3D%26c%3DOm7NHut1tu3xr83fqUbt5JAnaIqgZKFevlP1Qo_Vjb9lkMuzoNtrGQ%3D%3D%26ch%3DI4n_tILQzz-C9RV93BjCwbBVsCY6gpKj7z26S8u5R0LkVD5ly36v6A%3D%3D&data=01%7C01%7Cpmiltenoff%40stcloudstate.edu%7Cca88694f5230470d577c08d6da07f507%7C5e40e2ed600b4eeaa9851d0c9dcca629%7C0&sdata=yzcl7mA4bjSJrPBm494qlCIFlt8Of3MYolRMoJnWbgE%3D&reserved=0
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My notes from the webinar:
we have to understand stress in America. steadily climbing, even if generations experience it differently. https://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/stress/ 
Lee about “Mobile First” – like First Aid. Often by text and email. after Bryan asked how Adjuncts can deal with such situations, if
Counseling Centers need those additions.
Mobile First apps.
most crisis situations are a form of panic. if addressed quickly, one can prevent growing and turning into a major episode.
mindfulness can be different for the different type of issues of students.
libraries as the campus community center.
can be done on
conflation of immaturity and irresponsibility with stress and panic. Latter might be expressed in a way it is immature, but one has to meet them where they are, not judgement and denial, which will make it worse. Tough love will not help. Upholding classroom expectations and rules, but can be supportive at the same time. When pressed by time
Daniel Stanford De Paul. Cohort fundamentals of good teaching. instead of “fail safely”
https://www.mentalhealthfirstaid.org/ it is expensive. local tailor made concept by local program. put together the same concept.
academic hazing hasn’t changed since medieval time. the trauma instructors starts their career with.

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mindfulness teachers

How Mindfulness Can Help Teachers and Students Manage Challenging Situations

Patricia C. Broderick May 1

https://www.kqed.org/mindshift/53306/how-mindfulness-can-help-teachers-and-students-manage-challenging-situations

Mindfulness in the Secondary Classroom: A Guide for Teaching Adolescents,” (c) 2019 by Patricia C. Broderick. Used with permission of the publisher, W. W. Norton & Company.

Many of the risky and potentially dangerous behaviors of adolescents—​procrastination, disruptiveness, disordered eating, cutting, drinking, violence, taking drugs, technological addiction, and so on—​have a common denominator. They likely involve avoiding unpleasant emotional experience by trying to make it go away. The extent to which we do this is a measure of our distress tolerance (García-​Oliva & Piqueras, 2016; Simons & Gaher, 2005). We all have our limits, but individuals who are highly intolerant of distress and unable to cope adaptively have quick triggers and are more likely to suffer from a range of psychological and behavioral problems (Zvolensky & Hogan, 2013).

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more about mindfulness in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mindful

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