Searching for "student privacy"

Data Privacy Lessons in Alternative Reality Games

How Data Privacy Lessons in Alternative Reality Games Can Help Kids In Real Life

https://www.kqed.org/mindshift/51772/how-data-privacy-lessons-in-alternative-reality-games-can-help-kids-in-real-life

Ubiquitous social media platforms—including Facebook, Twitter and Instagram—have created a venue for people to share and connect with others. We use these services by clicking “I Agree” on Terms of Service screens, trading off some of our private and personal data for seemingly free services. While these services say data collection helps create a better user experience, that data is also potentially exploitable.

The news about how third parties obtain and use Facebook users’ data to wage political campaigns and the mounting evidence of election interference have shined a spotlight on just how secure our data is when we share online. Educating youth about data security can fall under the larger umbrella of digital citizenship, such as social media uses and misuses and learning how not to embarrass or endanger oneself while using the internet.

Darvasi’s students in Toronto can pool together 55 faux bitcoins to purchase and launch the BOTTING protocol against an opponent. The student targeted at Fallon’s school in Connecticut would then have 48 hours to record audio of 10 words of Darvasi’s students choosing and send it back to them through an intermediary (Darvasi or Fallon). For a higher price of 65 faux bitcoins, students can launch MORPHLING, which would give the opponent 48 hours to record a one-minute video explaining three ways to stay safe while using Facebook, while making their school mascot (or a close approximation of) appear in the video in some way during the entire minute.

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more on digital citizenship in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+citizenship

AI tracks students writings

Schools are using AI to track what students write on their computers

By Simone Stolzoff August 19, 2018
50 million k-12 students in the US
Under the Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA), any US school that receives federal funding is required to have an internet-safety policy. As school-issued tablets and Chromebook laptops become more commonplace, schools must install technological guardrails to keep their students safe. For some, this simply means blocking inappropriate websites. Others, however, have turned to software companies like GaggleSecurly, and GoGuardian to surface potentially worrisome communications to school administrators
In an age of mass school-shootings and increased student suicides, SMPs Safety Management Platforms can play a vital role in preventing harm before it happens. Each of these companies has case studies where an intercepted message helped save lives.
Over 50% of teachers say their schools are one-to-one (the industry term for assigning every student a device of their own), according to a 2017 survey from Freckle Education
But even in an age of student suicides and school shootings, when do security precautions start to infringe on students’ freedoms?
When the Gaggle algorithm surfaces a word or phrase that may be of concern—like a mention of drugs or signs of cyberbullying—the “incident” gets sent to human reviewers before being passed on to the school. Using AI, the software is able to process thousands of student tweets, posts, and status updates to look for signs of harm.
SMPs help normalize surveillance from a young age. In the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal at Facebook and other recent data breaches from companies like Equifax, we have the opportunity to teach kids the importance of protecting their online data
in an age of increased school violence, bullying, and depression, schools have an obligation to protect their students. But the protection of kids’ personal information is also a matter of their safety

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more on cybersecurity in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=cybersecurity

more on surveillance  in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=surveillance

more on privacy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=privacy

Privacy & Security in Today’s Library

Privacy & Security in Today’s Library by Amigos Library Services

The virtuality of privacy and security on the from Plamen Miltenoff

From: Jodie Borgerding [mailto:Borgerding@amigos.org]
Sent: Wednesday, July 05, 2017 3:07 PM
To: Miltenoff, Plamen <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Cc: Nicole Walsh <WALSH@AMIGOS.ORG>
Subject: Proposal Submission for Privacy & Security Conference

Hi Plamen,

Thank you for your recent presentation proposal for the online conference, Privacy & Security in Today’s Library, presented by Amigos Library Services. Your proposal, The role of the library in teaching with technology unsupported by campus IT: the privacy and security issues of the “third-party,” has been accepted. I just wanted to confirm that you are still available to present on September 21, 2017 and if you have a time preference for your presentation (11 am, 12 pm, or 2 pm Central). If you are no longer able to participate, please let me know.

Nicole will be touch with you shortly with additional details and a speaker’s agreement.

Please let me know if you have any questions.

Thanks!
___________________

Jodie Borgerding Consulting & Education Services Manager Amigos Library Services 1190 Meramec Station Road, Suite 207 | Ballwin, MO  63021-6902 800-843-8482 x2897 | 972-340-2897(direct) http://www.amigos.org | borgerding@amigos.org

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Bio

Dr. Plamen Miltenoff is an Information Specialist and Professor at St. Cloud State University. His education includes several graduate degrees in history and Library and Information Science and terminal degrees in education and psychology.

His professional interests encompass social media, multimedia, Web development and design, gaming and gamification, and learning environments (LEs).

Dr. Miltenoff organized and taught classes such as LIB 290 “Social Media in Global Context” (http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/lib290/) and LIB 490/590 “Digital Storytelling” (http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/lib490/) where issues of privacy and security are discussed.

Twitter handle @SCSUtechinstruc

Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/InforMediaServices/

The virtuality of privacy and security on the modern campus:

The role of the library in teaching with technology unsupported by campus IT: the privacy and security issues of the “third-party software” teaching and learning

Abstract/Summary of Your Proposed Session

The virtualization reality changes rapidly all aspects of learning and teaching: from equipment to methodology, just when faculty have finalized their syllabus, they have to start a new, if they want to keep abreast with content changes and upgrades and engagement of a very different student fabric – Millennials.

Mainframes are replaced by microcomputers, microcomputers by smart phones and tablets, hard drives by cloud storage and wearables by IoT. The pace of hardware, software and application upgrade is becoming unbearable for students and faculty. Content creation and methodology becomes useless by the speed of becoming obsolete. In such environment, faculty students and IT staff barely can devote time and energy to deal with the rapidly increasing vulnerability connected with privacy and security.

In an effort to streamline ever-becoming-scarce resources, campus IT “standardizes” campus use of applications. Those are the applications, which IT chooses to troubleshoot campus-wide. Those are the applications recommended to faculty and students to use.

In an unprecedented burgeoning amount of applications, specifically for mobile devices, it is difficult to constraint faculty and students to use campus IT sanctioned applications, especially considering the rapid pace of such applications becoming obsolete. Faculty and students often “stray” away and go with their own choice. Such decision exposes faculty and students, personally, and the campus, institutionally, at risk. In a recent post by THE Journal, attention on campuses is drown to the fact that cyberattacks shift now from mobile devices to IoT and campus often are struggling even with their capability to guarantee cybersecurity of mobile devices on campus. Further, the use of third-party application might be in conflict with the FERPA campus-mandated policies. Such policies are lengthy and complex to absorb, both by faculty and students and often are excessively restrictive in terms of innovative ways to improve methodology and pedagogy of teaching and learning. The current procedure of faculty and students proposing new applications is a lengthy and cumbersome bureaucratic process, which often render the end-users’ proposals obsolete by the time the process is vetted.

Where/what is the balance between safeguarding privacy on campus and fostering security without stifling innovation and creativity? Can the library be the campus hub for education about privacy and security, the sandbox for testing and innovation and the body to expedite decision-making?

Abstract

The pace of changes in teaching and learning is becoming impossible to sustain: equipment evolves in accelerated pace, the methodology of teaching and learning cannot catch up with the equipment changes and atop, there are constant content updates. In an even-shrinking budget, faculty, students and IT staff barely can address the issues above, less time and energy left to address the increasing concerns about privacy and security.

In an unprecedented burgeoning amount of applications, specifically for mobile devices, it is difficult to constraint faculty and students to use campus IT sanctioned applications, especially considering the rapid pace of such applications becoming obsolete. Faculty and students often “stray” away and go with their own choice. Such decision exposes faculty and students, personally, and the campus, institutionally, at risk. In a recent post by THE Journal (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/06/06/cybersecurity-and-students/), attention on campuses is drawn to the fact of cyberattacks shifting from mobile devices to IoT but campus still struggling to guarantee cybersecurity of mobile devices on campus. Further, the use of third-party applications might be in conflict with the FERPA campus-mandated policies. Such policies are lengthy and complex to absorb, both by faculty and students and often are excessively restrictive in terms of innovative ways to improve methodology and pedagogy of teaching and learning. The current procedure of faculty and students proposing new applications is a lengthy and cumbersome bureaucratic process, which often render the end-users’ proposals obsolete by the time the process is vetted.

Where/what is the balance between safeguarding privacy on campus and fostering security without stifling innovation and creativity? Can the library be the campus hub for education about privacy and security, the sandbox for testing and innovation and the body to expedite decision-making?

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/06/06/cybersecurity-and-students/

Anything else you would like to add

3 take-aways from this session:

  • Discuss and form an opinion about the education-pertinent issues of privacy and security from the broad campus perspective, versus the narrow library one
  • Discuss and form an opinion about the role of the library on campus in terms of the greater issues of privacy and security

Re-examine the thin red line of the balance between standardization and innovation; between the need for security and privacy protection a

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presentation:
https://www.slideshare.net/aidemoreto/the-virtuality-of-privacy-and-security-on-the 

chat – slide 4, privacy. please take 2 min and share your definition of privacy on campus. Does it differ between faculty and students?  what are the main characteristics to determine privacy

chat – slide 5, security. please take 2 min and share your definition of security on campus regarding electronic activities. Who’s responsibility is security? IT issue [only]?

poles: slide 6, technology unsupported by campus IT, is it worth considering? 1. i am a great believer in my freedom of choice 2. I firmly follow rules and this applies to the use of computer tools and applications 3. Whatever…

chat –  slide 6, why third party applications? pros and cons. E.g. pros – familiarity with third party versus campus-required

pole, slide 6, appsmashing. App smashing is the ability to combine mobile apps in your teaching process. How do you feel about it? 1. The force is with us 2. Nonsense…

pole slide 7 third party apps and the comfort of faculty. How do you see the freedom of using third party apps? 1. All I want, thank you 2. I would rather follow the rules 3. Indifference is my middle name

pole slide 8 Technology standardization? 1. yes, 2. no, 3. indifferent

chat slide 9 if the two major issues colliding in this instance are: standardization versus third party and they have impact on privacy and security, how would you argue for the one or the other?

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notes from the conference

 

 

Measuring Library Vendor Cyber Security: Seven Easy Questions Every Librarian Can Ask

http://journal.code4lib.org/articles/11413

Bill Walker: http://www.amigos.org/innovating_metadata

 

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more on security in education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=security

more on privacy in education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=privacy

cybersecurity and students

You’ve Been Hacked! Explaining Cybersecurity to Students in an Interconnected Era

By Jacob Batchelor 06/01/17

https://thejournal.com/articles/2017/06/01/youve-been-hacked-explaining-cybersecurity-to-students-in-an-interconnected-era.aspx

Here’s an easy way to explain IoT hacks to students:

  • A hacker accesses a device, like a webcam, through its internet connection. Devices with weak security or easy-to-guess passwords make easy targets.
  • The hacker can then infect the device with malware, a type of computer virus that takes control of a device.
  • The hacker now has a number of options. He or she can use the device to spy, infect other devices or attack a target like the servers (centralized computers that store network data) targeted in the October 2016 attack.
  • Research the manufacturer. Are they reputable? Have they previously been hacked? Big, established companies based in developed countries are usually the safest.
  • Read up on security features. Is the device password-protected? Can you set your own password? If so, make it a strong password that uses numbers, letters and symbols — avoid common words or phrases.
  • Regularly check for updates. Good companies will regularly update the software on their devices to protect against vulnerabilities.
  • Ask yourself — do you need it? Make sure internet-connectivity is something you really need on the device you’re using. In many cases, internet-connectivity is not necessary for the device to function properly.

a few tips that students can use to protect their privacy while using smartphones:

  • Research apps before signing up for them. Is it from a reputable developer? Has it had security issues in the past? Use the same approach as when researching IoT devices.
  • Look over the terms of service. What information does it require? Does it track or store your data? Can the developer sell your information? All of these questions are important to consider.
  • Be careful when linking apps to your social media accounts. Giving apps access to your social media accounts makes them vulnerable to hacking. Is there a good reason for the accounts to be linked? Can you sign up without linking to a social media account?
  • Use two-factor authentication. Two-factor authentication requires authorization beyond a password when using unrecognized devices such as entering a code sent to your cellphone. As apps allow, be sure to use two-factor authentication which will make it more difficult for hackers to access the information stored in your apps.

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more on hackers in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=hacker

privacy and social media

Yik Yak Users Not So Anonymous After All

By Dian Schaffhauser 10/20/16

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/10/20/yik-yak-users-not-so-anonymous-after-all.aspx

yakkers had add personal handles and profiles starting last August. users of mobile app Yik Yak face the ignominy of being truly discoverable. At least that’s what a research team at New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering suggests in a new paper.

You Can Yak but You Can’t Hide: Localizing Anonymous Social Network Users,” being presented at the upcoming ACM Internet Measurements Conference next month, describes how the research team was able to determine the geographical origin of a comment or “yak” and possibly even the person who made the post, thereby making the program susceptible to “localization attacks,” putting the user at risk of being identified.

if a student posted a disparaging remark about a fellow student or a faculty member, “it wouldn’t be difficult” for the victim of the insult to figure out where the offensive commentary was posted from and then pinpoint the probable yakker from there.

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more on privacy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=privacy

classroom discussions on privacy

Dear colleagues,

the topics of privacy pertaining technology is becoming ubiquitous.
If you feel that the content of your class material can benefit of such discussions, please let us know.

Please have  some titles, which can help you brainstorm topics for discussions in your classes:

Power, Privacy, and the Internet
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/12/03/power-privacy-internet/

Privacy groups slam Department of Homeland Security social media proposal
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/08/24/dhs-social-media-proposal/

FBI quietly changes its privacy rules for accessing NSA data on Americans
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/03/09/surveillance-and-privacy/

Facebook canceled a student’s internship after he highlighted a massive privacy issue
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/08/17/facebook-and-privacy/

Samsung’s Privacy Policy Warns Customers Their Smart TVs Are Listening
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/02/10/privacy-smart-devices/

Teenagers, The Internet, And Privacy
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/11/05/teenagers-the-internet-and-privacy/

Online privacy: It’s time for a new security paradigm
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/09/25/online-privacy-its-time-for-a-new-security-paradigm/

On social media, privacy, etc.
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/03/14/on-social-media-privacy-etc/

Hacking the Future: Privacy, Identity, and Anonymity On the Web
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/12/03/hacking-the-future-privacy-identity-and-anonymity-on-the-web/

Are We Puppets in a Wired World?
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/10/23/pro-domo-sua-are-we-puppets-in-a-wired-world-surveillance-and-privacy-revisited/

How Teens Deal With Privacy and Mobile Apps
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/08/28/how-teens-deal-with-privacy-and-mobile-apps/

If you seek  more tangible, hands-on assistance with similar and/or any topics regarding technology, please do not hesitate to contact us.

facebook and privacy

Facebook canceled a student’s internship after he highlighted a massive privacy issue

 http://www.businessinsider.com/facebook-aran-khanna-internship-rescinded-marauders-map-messenger-privacy-2015-8#ixzz3j5nwM8yw
not the first time Facebook has such issues; please read other IMS blog posts:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/07/03/research-and-ethics-if-facebook-can-tweak-our-emotions-and-make-us-vote-what-else-can-it-do/

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/02/13/facebook-censorship/

How Students and Schools Use Snapchat

College students love snapchat!

It’s personal, creative, quick, fun, and free.

snapchat

 “According to research by Sumpto…as much as 77 percent of college students use Snapchat every day.

37 percent of the study respondents cited “creativity” as their main use of the app. “Keeping in touch” and “easier than texting” were reasons for 27 percent and 23 percent, respectively.”

Reasons young adults ages 18-26 use snapchat:

  • “I like sharing weird things I see when I’m out…When you get ugly selfies from someone, that’s how you know you’re good friends.”
  • “I only ever use it for funny pictures or to show what I’m doing to my friends, but I have people that use it as a replacement for texting.”
  • “Snapchat is the ultimate social media tool — users want to share their lives to anyone they choose to elicit possible feedback, but without the necessity of it being stored…Snapchat provides an easier answer to Facebook’s ‘What are you doing right now?’ I use it personally to stay in touch with friends and show people what I’m doing.”

Colleges are also starting to get on the bandwagon — Snapchat launched Our Campus Story in October 2014 to four schools.

How Colleges are using snapchat:

  • Orientation: (Tennessee Wesleyan College)  “Where’s Wesley” scavenger hunt
  • Updates: (Tennessee Wesleyan College) Sharing updates about events and activities on campus
  • Recruiting: (Eastern Washington University and the University of Kansas) communicating with young athletes interested in joining their teams

Read more:

http://www.businessinsider.com/why-millennials-use-snapchat-2015-2
http://sproutsocial.com/insights/how-to-use-snapchat-for-colleges/

NPR Marketplace: Snapchat, a $19 Billion Company?

http://www.briansolis.com/2015/02/npr-marketplace-snapchat-19-billion-company/

More IMS blog entries on Snapchat and its use in education:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=snapchat

Peer-reviewed and popular literature:

Robbins, S. P., & Singer, J. B. (2014). From the editor—The medium is the message: Integrating social media and social work education. Journal Of Social Work Education, 50(3), 387-390.

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dpsyh%26AN%3d2014-30405-001%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

Waxman, O. B. (2014). Snapchat Grows Up: How College Officials Are Using the App. Time.Com, 1.

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dkeh%26AN%3d95378280%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

JO, M. (2014, March 22). Teacher sees value in online connection. Dominion Post, The. p. A2.

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dpwh%26AN%3dTDP140322A002182985320-BB%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

Couros, G. (n.d.). Snapchat and Education. Retrieved from http://georgecouros.ca/blog/archives/4866
Manjaji, R. (2014, June 4). Six Snapchat Experiments to Engage Students. Retrieved February 23, 2015, from http://www.educationpost.com.hk/resources/education/140604-insight-six-snapchat-experiments-to-engage-students
Wiederman, K. (2014, May 2). Snapchat: The Newest Higher Ed Communication Tool | Merge. Retrieved from http://www.mergeagency.com/digital-marketing/snapchat-newest-higher-ed-communication-tool
Privacy and security:

Stretton, T., & Aaron, L. (2015). Feature: The dangers in our trail of digital breadcrumbs. Computer Fraud & Security, 201513-15. doi:10.1016/S1361-3723(15)70006-0

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YOUNG, D. (2014). NOW YOU SEE IT, NOW YOU DON’T… OR DO YOU?: SNAPCHAT’S DECEPTIVE PROMOTION OF VANISHING MESSAGES VIOLATES FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS. Journal Of Information Technology & Privacy Law, 30(4), 827.
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Ekman, U. (2015). Complexity of the ephemeral – snap video chats. Empedocles: European Journal For The Philosophy Of Communication, 5(1/2), 97-101. doi:10.1386/ejpc.5.1-2.97_1

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Flandez, R., & Wallace, N. (2014). Nonprofits Must Guard Against Imposters. Chronicle Of Philanthropy, (09),

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O’Neil, M. (2014). Oh, Snap! A Q&A With DoSomething.org’s Snapchat Strategists. Chronicle Of Philanthropy, (01),

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MESSITT, M. (2014). Cyberbullying Happens in Code. Break It. Education Digest, 79(9), 51.

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technology for early childhood students

Plan for today, Mon, Nov 17 class session:

Parent involvement in their children’s social emotional and academic development.

  1. Introduce myself, who I am, who do I work with. Why is it good to know IMS and consider working with IMS. How to contact us – 5 min
  2. Start with a video from the following IMS blog entry: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/05/01/on-digital-literacy/ :
    http://youtu.be/d5kW4pI_VQw – 2 min. What is the video about, how do students think it relates to their class (parent involvement in their children’s social emotional and academic development) – about 5 min
  3. Group work assignment – what is digital literacy and why is it important to people of all ages:
    Students work in groups and outline a definition of digital literacy and a list of 5 reasons about the importance – 5 min
    Study and discuss the following infographic (5 min)
    http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/10/16/early-learners-tech-use/
    For and against children spending time with technology. Gaming, social media, and computer use in general as addiction. “Disconnect/Unplugged” (Sherry Turkle) versus contemplative computing and similar meditative and contemplative practices: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/11/05/getting-unplugged/
  4. Discussion on how does digital literacy vary between age groups; how do people from different ages communicate. How do they work together and help each other when learning about digital literacy. Who is the best source for students to learn about digital literacy (hint – IMS ;)) – 10 min
    Suggested source for more information: The SlideShare presentation on the IMS blog entry: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/05/01/on-digital-literacy/: http://www.slideshare.net/dajbelshaw/etmooc-t3-s1-digital-literacies-with-dr-doug-belshaw
  5. Discussion on digital identity, digital citizenship, privacy and security. – 10 min
    http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/10/03/digital-identity-and-digital-citizenship/
  6. Questions and suggestions regarding

On social media, privacy, etc.

Twitter, Rape and Privacy on Social Media – The Cut
http://nymag.com/thecut/2014/03/twitter-rape-and-privacy-on-social-media.html?mid=facebook_nymag

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Three thoughtful and thought-provoking essays about teaching social media use:

“Why students should not be required to publicly participate online” online at http://prpost.wordpress.com/2010/04/25/why-students-should-not-be-required-to-publicly-participate-online/

“Notes on Student Privacy and Online Pedagogy” online at http://joshhonn.com/?p=65

“Why the Loon does not assign public social-media use” online at http://gavialib.com/2014/02/why-the-loon-does-not-assign-public-social-media-use/

I don’t necessarily advocate the point of view expressed in these posts, but I do think they merit both attention and discussion in a course focused on social media.

Keith Ewing

Professor, Library Systems & Digital Projects

 

 

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