Searching for "student privacy"

Find, vet and implement edtech

Find, vet and implement edtech – painlessly!

By Nicole Krueger 12/13/2018
https://www.iste.org/explore/articleDetail?articleid=2325

Pre-vetted tools are rated in several categories

Educators seeking new technology can start by consulting a database of pre-vetted edtech tools, rated based on alignment with both child data privacy laws and the district’s instructional vision. Each entry includes notes about what the software does, how it can be used in the classroom, and the appropriate age level. Kaye is also working on aligning the database to the ISTE Standards so teachers can see at a glance which standards each tool can help them meet.

Every app falls into one of four categories:

  • Tools the district approves, supports, pays for, and will train teachers to use.
  • Tools that are approved and can be freely used on an independent basis.
  • Tools that are approved with stipulations, such as age or parental permission requirements.
  • Tools that are not approved because they don’t align with the district’s vision or data privacy needs.

Teachers can request to have a tool vetted

Teachers who choose a pre-vetted app from the approved list can start using it right away, without any further action needed. Educators who have a specific tool in mind that hasn’t yet been vetted can submit a request form that asks questions such as:

  • How does the tool connect to the curriculum?
  • Will students be consumers or producers when using it?
  • How easy is it to learn and use?
  • What are some of the things they plan on doing with it?

Media Literacy Digital Citizenship

Making Media Literacy Central to Digital Citizenship

Tanner Higgin, Common Sense Education

https://www.kqed.org/mindshift/49607/making-media-literacy-central-to-digital-citizenship

While we often get distracted by the latest device or platform release, video has quietly been riding the wave of all of these advancements, benefiting from broader access to phones, displays, cameras and, most importantly, bandwidth. In fact, 68 percent of teachers are using video in their classrooms, and 74 percent of middle schoolers are watching videos for learning. From social media streams chock-full of video and GIFs to FaceTime with friends to two-hour Twitch broadcasts, video mediates students’ relationships with each other and the world. Video is a key aspect of our always-online attention economy that’s impacting voting behavior, and fueling hate speech and trolling. Put simply: Video is a contested civic space.

We need to move from a conflation of digital citizenship with internet safety and protectionism to a view of digital citizenship that’s pro-active and prioritizes media literacy and savvy. A good digital citizen doesn’t just dodge safety and privacy pitfalls, but works to remake the world, aided by digital technology like video, so it’s more thoughtful, inclusive and just.

1. Help Students Identify the Intent of What They Watch

equip students with some essential questions they can use to unpack the intentions of anything they encounter. One way to facilitate this thinking is by using a tool like EdPuzzle to edit the videos you want students to watch by inserting these questions at particularly relevant points in the video.

2. Be Aware That the Web Is a Unique Beast

Compared to traditional media (like broadcast TV or movies), the web is the Wild West.

Mike Caulfield’s e-book is a great deep dive into this topic, but as an introduction to web literacy you might first dig into the notion of reading “around” as well as “down” media — that is, encouraging students to not just analyze the specific video or site they’re looking at but related content (e.g., where else an image appears using a reverse Google image search).

3. Turn Active Viewing into Reactive Viewing

Active viewing

For this content, students shouldn’t just be working toward comprehension but critique;

using aclassroom backchannel, like TodaysMeet, during video viewings

4. Transform Students’ Video Critiques into Creations

Digital citizenship should be participatory, meaning students need to be actively contributing to culture. Unfortunately, only 3 percent of the time tweens and teens spend using social media is focused on creation.

facilitating video creation and remix, but two of my favorites are MediaBreaker and Vidcode.

5. Empower Students to Become Advocates

Young people face a challenging and uncertain world, currently run by people who often do not share their views on key issues

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more on Media Literacy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=media+literacy

more on digital citizenship in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+citizenship

ELI Annual Meeting 2019

ELI Annual Meeting 2019

https://events.educause.edu/eli/annual-meeting/2019/programs-and-tracks

  • What new kinds of leadership are required for this new teaching and learning landscape?
  • What are the best methods and techniques that promote innovation and creative thinking to support student learning?
  • What new educational technologies seem most promising?
  • What role should data and analytics play, and what are the trade-offs between analytics and privacy?
  • How can we best determine the efficacy of our learning innovations and technologies?
  • What learning spaces and environments best promote active learning

2019 ELI Annual Meeting Tracks

  • Accessibility and Universal Design for Learning (UDL)
  • Analytics: Privacy, Learning Data, Student Advising, and Interventions
  • Digital and Information Literacy
  • Faculty Development and Engagement
  • Innovation in Instructional Design and Course Models
  • Leadership and Academic Transformation
  • Learning Efficacy: Impact Evaluation, Learning Research and Science
  • Learning Environments and Spaces
  • Learning Horizons: Emerging Technology, Ground-Breaking Practices, and Educational Futures
  • Open Education
  • Student Success

ELI 2018 Key Issues Teaching Learning

Key Issues in Teaching and Learning

https://www.educause.edu/eli/initiatives/key-issues-in-teaching-and-learning

A roster of results since 2011 is here.

ELI 2018 key issues

1. Academic Transformation

2. Accessibility and UDL

3. Faculty Development

4. Privacy and Security

5. Digital and Information Literacies

https://cdn.nmc.org/media/2017-nmc-strategic-brief-digital-literacy-in-higher-education-II.pdf
Three Models of Digital Literacy: Universal, Creative, Literacy Across Disciplines

United States digital literacy frameworks tend to focus on educational policy details and personal empowerment, the latter encouraging learners to become more effective students, better creators, smarter information consumers, and more influential members of their community.

National policies are vitally important in European digital literacy work, unsurprising for a continent well populated with nation-states and struggling to redefine itself, while still trying to grow economies in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis and subsequent financial pressures

African digital literacy is more business-oriented.

Middle Eastern nations offer yet another variation, with a strong focus on media literacy. As with other regions, this can be a response to countries with strong state influence or control over local media. It can also represent a drive to produce more locally-sourced content, as opposed to consuming material from abroad, which may elicit criticism of neocolonialism or religious challenges.

p. 14 Digital literacy for Humanities: What does it mean to be digitally literate in history, literature, or philosophy? Creativity in these disciplines often involves textuality, given the large role writing plays in them, as, for example, in the Folger Shakespeare Library’s instructor’s guide. In the digital realm, this can include web-based writing through social media, along with the creation of multimedia projects through posters, presentations, and video. Information literacy remains a key part of digital literacy in the humanities. The digital humanities movement has not seen much connection with digital literacy, unfortunately, but their alignment seems likely, given the turn toward using digital technologies to explore humanities questions. That development could then foster a spread of other technologies and approaches to the rest of the humanities, including mapping, data visualization, text mining, web-based digital archives, and “distant reading” (working with very large bodies of texts). The digital humanities’ emphasis on making projects may also increase

Digital Literacy for Business: Digital literacy in this world is focused on manipulation of data, from spreadsheets to more advanced modeling software, leading up to degrees in management information systems. Management classes unsurprisingly focus on how to organize people working on and with digital tools.

Digital Literacy for Computer Science: Naturally, coding appears as a central competency within this discipline. Other aspects of the digital world feature prominently, including hardware and network architecture. Some courses housed within the computer science discipline offer a deeper examination of the impact of computing on society and politics, along with how to use digital tools. Media production plays a minor role here, beyond publications (posters, videos), as many institutions assign multimedia to other departments. Looking forward to a future when automation has become both more widespread and powerful, developing artificial intelligence projects will potentially play a role in computer science literacy.

6. Integrated Planning and Advising Systems for Student Success (iPASS)

7. Instructional Design

8. Online and Blended Learning

In traditional instruction, students’ first contact with new ideas happens in class, usually through direct instruction from the professor; after exposure to the basics, students are turned out of the classroom to tackle the most difficult tasks in learning — those that involve application, analysis, synthesis, and creativity — in their individual spaces. Flipped learning reverses this, by moving first contact with new concepts to the individual space and using the newly-expanded time in class for students to pursue difficult, higher-level tasks together, with the instructor as a guide.

Let’s take a look at some of the myths about flipped learning and try to find the facts.

Myth: Flipped learning is predicated on recording videos for students to watch before class.

Fact: Flipped learning does not require video. Although many real-life implementations of flipped learning use video, there’s nothing that says video must be used. In fact, one of the earliest instances of flipped learning — Eric Mazur’s peer instruction concept, used in Harvard physics classes — uses no video but rather an online text outfitted with social annotation software. And one of the most successful public instances of flipped learning, an edX course on numerical methods designed by Lorena Barba of George Washington University, uses precisely one video. Video is simply not necessary for flipped learning, and many alternatives to video can lead to effective flipped learning environments [http://rtalbert.org/flipped-learning-without-video/].

Myth: Flipped learning replaces face-to-face teaching.

Fact: Flipped learning optimizes face-to-face teaching. Flipped learning may (but does not always) replace lectures in class, but this is not to say that it replaces teaching. Teaching and “telling” are not the same thing.

Myth: Flipped learning has no evidence to back up its effectiveness.

Fact: Flipped learning research is growing at an exponential pace and has been since at least 2014. That research — 131 peer-reviewed articles in the first half of 2017 alone — includes results from primary, secondary, and postsecondary education in nearly every discipline, most showing significant improvements in student learning, motivation, and critical thinking skills.

Myth: Flipped learning is a fad.

Fact: Flipped learning has been with us in the form defined here for nearly 20 years.

Myth: People have been doing flipped learning for centuries.

Fact: Flipped learning is not just a rebranding of old techniques. The basic concept of students doing individually active work to encounter new ideas that are then built upon in class is almost as old as the university itself. So flipped learning is, in a real sense, a modern means of returning higher education to its roots. Even so, flipped learning is different from these time-honored techniques.

Myth: Students and professors prefer lecture over flipped learning.

Fact: Students and professors embrace flipped learning once they understand the benefits. It’s true that professors often enjoy their lectures, and students often enjoy being lectured to. But the question is not who “enjoys” what, but rather what helps students learn the best.They know what the research says about the effectiveness of active learning

Assertion: Flipped learning provides a platform for implementing active learning in a way that works powerfully for students.

9. Evaluating Technology-based Instructional Innovations

Transitioning to an ROI lens requires three fundamental shifts
What is the total cost of my innovation, including both new spending and the use of existing resources?

What’s the unit I should measure that connects cost with a change in performance?

How might the expected change in student performance also support a more sustainable financial model?

The Exposure Approach: we don’t provide a way for participants to determine if they learned anything new or now have the confidence or competence to apply what they learned.

The Exemplar Approach: from ‘show and tell’ for adults to show, tell, do and learn.

The Tutorial Approach: Getting a group that can meet at the same time and place can be challenging. That is why many faculty report a preference for self-paced professional development.build in simple self-assessment checks. We can add prompts that invite people to engage in some sort of follow up activity with a colleague. We can also add an elective option for faculty in a tutorial to actually create or do something with what they learned and then submit it for direct or narrative feedback.

The Course Approach: a non-credit format, these have the benefits of a more structured and lengthy learning experience, even if they are just three to five-week short courses that meet online or in-person once every week or two.involve badges, portfolios, peer assessment, self-assessment, or one-on-one feedback from a facilitator

The Academy Approach: like the course approach, is one that tends to be a deeper and more extended experience. People might gather in a cohort over a year or longer.Assessment through coaching and mentoring, the use of portfolios, peer feedback and much more can be easily incorporated to add a rich assessment element to such longer-term professional development programs.

The Mentoring Approach: The mentors often don’t set specific learning goals with the mentee. Instead, it is often a set of structured meetings, but also someone to whom mentees can turn with questions and tips along the way.

The Coaching Approach: A mentor tends to be a broader type of relationship with a person.A coaching relationship tends to be more focused upon specific goals, tasks or outcomes.

The Peer Approach:This can be done on a 1:1 basis or in small groups, where those who are teaching the same courses are able to compare notes on curricula and teaching models. They might give each other feedback on how to teach certain concepts, how to write syllabi, how to handle certain teaching and learning challenges, and much more. Faculty might sit in on each other’s courses, observe, and give feedback afterward.

The Self-Directed Approach:a self-assessment strategy such as setting goals and creating simple checklists and rubrics to monitor our progress. Or, we invite feedback from colleagues, often in a narrative and/or informal format. We might also create a portfolio of our work, or engage in some sort of learning journal that documents our thoughts, experiments, experiences, and learning along the way.

The Buffet Approach:

10. Open Education

Figure 1. A Model for Networked Education (Credit: Image by Catherine Cronin, building on
Interpretations of
Balancing Privacy and Openness (Credit: Image by Catherine Cronin. CC BY-SA)

11. Learning Analytics

12. Adaptive Teaching and Learning

13. Working with Emerging Technology

In 2014, administrators at Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC) in Charlotte, North Carolina, began talks with members of the North Carolina State Board of Community Colleges and North Carolina Community College System (NCCCS) leadership about starting a CBE program.

Building on an existing project at CPCC for identifying the elements of a digital learning environment (DLE), which was itself influenced by the EDUCAUSE publication The Next Generation Digital Learning Environment: A Report on Research,1 the committee reached consensus on a DLE concept and a shared lexicon: the “Digital Learning Environment Operational Definitions,

Figure 1. NC-CBE Digital Learning Environment

AI and ethics

Live Facebook discussion at SCSU VizLab on ethics and technology:

Join our discussion on #technology and #ethics. share your opinions, suggestions, ideas

Posted by InforMedia Services on Thursday, November 1, 2018

Heard on Marketplace this morning (Oct. 22, 2018): ethics of artificial intelligence with John Havens of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, which has developed a new ethics certification process for AI: https://standards.ieee.org/content/dam/ieee-standards/standards/web/documents/other/ec_bios.pdf

Ethics and AI

***** The student club, the Philosophical Society, has now been recognized by SCSU as a student organization ***

https://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-ethical-dilemma-of-self-driving-cars-patrick-lin

Could it be the case that a random decision is still better then predetermined one designed to minimize harm?

similar ethical considerations are raised also:

in this sitcom

https://www.theatlantic.com/sponsored/hpe-2018/the-ethics-of-ai/1865/ (full movie)

This TED talk:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/09/19/social-media-algorithms/

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/10/02/social-media-monopoly/

 

 

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IoT (Internet of Things), Industry 4.0, Big Data, BlockChain,

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IoT (Internet of Things), Industry 4.0, Big Data, BlockChain, Privacy, Security, Surveilance

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=internet+of+things

peer-reviewed literature;

Keyword search: ethic* + Internet of Things = 31

Baldini, G., Botterman, M., Neisse, R., & Tallacchini, M. (2018). Ethical Design in the Internet of Things. Science & Engineering Ethics24(3), 905–925. https://doi-org.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/10.1007/s11948-016-9754-5

Berman, F., & Cerf, V. G. (2017). Social and Ethical Behavior in the Internet of Things. Communications of the ACM60(2), 6–7. https://doi-org.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/10.1145/3036698

Murdock, G. (2018). Media Materialties: For A Moral Economy of Machines. Journal of Communication68(2), 359–368. https://doi-org.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/10.1093/joc/jqx023

Carrier, J. G. (2018). Moral economy: What’s in a name. Anthropological Theory18(1), 18–35. https://doi-org.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/10.1177/1463499617735259

Kernaghan, K. (2014). Digital dilemmas: Values, ethics and information technology. Canadian Public Administration57(2), 295–317. https://doi-org.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/10.1111/capa.12069

Koucheryavy, Y., Kirichek, R., Glushakov, R., & Pirmagomedov, R. (2017). Quo vadis, humanity? Ethics on the last mile toward cybernetic organism. Russian Journal of Communication9(3), 287–293. https://doi-org.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/10.1080/19409419.2017.1376561

Keyword search: ethic+ + autonomous vehicles = 46

Cerf, V. G. (2017). A Brittle and Fragile Future. Communications of the ACM60(7), 7. https://doi-org.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/10.1145/3102112

Fleetwood, J. (2017). Public Health, Ethics, and Autonomous Vehicles. American Journal of Public Health107(4), 632–537. https://doi-org.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/10.2105/AJPH.2016.303628

HARRIS, J. (2018). Who Owns My Autonomous Vehicle? Ethics and Responsibility in Artificial and Human Intelligence. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics27(4), 599–609. https://doi-org.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/10.1017/S0963180118000038

Keeling, G. (2018). Legal Necessity, Pareto Efficiency & Justified Killing in Autonomous Vehicle Collisions. Ethical Theory & Moral Practice21(2), 413–427. https://doi-org.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/10.1007/s10677-018-9887-5

Hevelke, A., & Nida-Rümelin, J. (2015). Responsibility for Crashes of Autonomous Vehicles: An Ethical Analysis. Science & Engineering Ethics21(3), 619–630. https://doi-org.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/10.1007/s11948-014-9565-5

Getha-Taylor, H. (2017). The Problem with Automated Ethics. Public Integrity19(4), 299–300. https://doi-org.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/10.1080/10999922.2016.1250575

Keyword search: ethic* + artificial intelligence = 349

Etzioni, A., & Etzioni, O. (2017). Incorporating Ethics into Artificial Intelligence. Journal of Ethics21(4), 403–418. https://doi-org.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/10.1007/s10892-017-9252-2

Köse, U. (2018). Are We Safe Enough in the Future of Artificial Intelligence? A Discussion on Machine Ethics and Artificial Intelligence Safety. BRAIN: Broad Research in Artificial Intelligence & Neuroscience9(2), 184–197. Retrieved from http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3daph%26AN%3d129943455%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

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http://www.cts.umn.edu/events/conference/2018

2018 CTS Transportation Research Conference

Keynote presentations will explore the future of driving and the evolution and potential of automated vehicle technologies.

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http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/02/26/philosophy-and-technology/

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more on AI in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/09/07/limbic-thought-artificial-intelligence/

AI and autonomous cars as ALA discussion topic
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/01/11/ai-autonomous-cars-libraries/

and privacy concerns
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/09/14/ai-for-education/

the call of the German scientists on ethics and AI
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/09/01/ethics-and-ai/

AI in the race for world dominance
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/04/21/ai-china-education/

media literacy backfire

Did Media Literacy Backfire?

Jan 5, 2017danah boyd

https://points.datasociety.net/did-media-literacy-backfire-7418c084d88d

Understanding what sources to trust is a basic tenet of media literacy education.

Think about how this might play out in communities where the “liberal media” is viewed with disdain as an untrustworthy source of information…or in those where science is seen as contradicting the knowledge of religious people…or where degrees are viewed as a weapon of the elite to justify oppression of working people. Needless to say, not everyone agrees on what makes a trusted source.

Students are also encouraged to reflect on economic and political incentives that might bias reporting. Follow the money, they are told. Now watch what happens when they are given a list of names of major power players in the East Coast news media whose names are all clearly Jewish. Welcome to an opening for anti-Semitic ideology.

In the United States, we believe that worthy people lift themselves up by their bootstraps. This is our idea of freedom. To take away the power of individuals to control their own destiny is viewed as anti-American by so much of this country. You are your own master.

Children are indoctrinated into this cultural logic early, even as their parents restrict their mobility and limit their access to social situations. But when it comes to information, they are taught that they are the sole proprietors of knowledge. All they have to do is “do the research” for themselves and they will know better than anyone what is real.

Combine this with a deep distrust of media sources.

Many marginalized groups are justifiably angry about the ways in which their stories have been dismissed by mainstream media for decades.It took five days for major news outlets to cover Ferguson. It took months and a lot of celebrities for journalists to start discussing the Dakota Pipeline. But feeling marginalized from news media isn’t just about people of color.

Keep in mind that anti-vaxxers aren’t arguing that vaccinations definitively cause autism. They are arguing that we don’t know. They are arguing that experts are forcing children to be vaccinated against their will, which sounds like oppression. What they want is choice — the choice to not vaccinate. And they want information about the risks of vaccination, which they feel are not being given to them. In essence, they are doing what we taught them to do: questioning information sources and raising doubts about the incentives of those who are pushing a single message. Doubt has become tool.

Addressing so-called fake news is going to require a lot more than labeling. It’s going to require a cultural change about how we make sense of information, whom we trust, and how we understand our own role in grappling with information. Quick and easy solutions may make the controversy go away, but they won’t address the underlying problems.

In the United States, we’re moving towards tribalism (see Fukuyama), and we’re undoing the social fabric of our country through polarization, distrust, and self-segregation.

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boyd, danah. (2014). It’s Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens (1 edition). New Haven: Yale University Press.
p. 8 networked publics are publics that are reconstructed by networked technologies. they are both space and imagined community.
p. 11 affordances: persistence, visibility, spreadability, searchability.
p. technological determinism both utopian and dystopian
p. 30 adults misinterpret teens online self-expression.
p. 31 taken out of context. Joshua Meyrowitz about Stokely Charmichael.
p. 43 as teens have embraced a plethora of social environment and helped co-create the norms that underpin them, a wide range of practices has emerged. teens have grown sophisticated with how they manage contexts and present themselves in order to be read by their intended audience.
p. 54 privacy. p. 59 Privacy is a complex concept without a clear definition. Supreme Court Justice Brandeis: the right to be let alone, but also ‘measure of th access others have to you through information, attention, and physical proximity.’
control over access and visibility
p. 65 social steganography. hiding messages in plain sight
p. 69 subtweeting. encoding content
p. 70 living with surveillance . Foucault Discipline and Punish
p. 77 addition. what makes teens obsessed w social media.
p. 81 Ivan Goldberg coined the term internet addiction disorder. jokingly
p. 89 the decision to introduce programmed activities and limit unstructured time is not unwarranted; research has shown a correlation between boredom and deviance.
My interview with Myra, a middle-class white fifteen-year-old from Iowa, turned funny and sad when “lack of time” became a verbal trick in response to every question. From learning Czech to trakc, from orchestra to work in a nursery, she told me that her mother organized “98%” of her daily routine. Myra did not like all of these activities, but her mother thought they were important.
Myra noted that her mother meant well, but she was exhausted and felt socially disconnected because she did not have time to connect with friends outside of class.
p. 100 danger
are sexual predators lurking everywhere
p. 128 bullying. is social media amplifying meanness and cruelty.
p. 131 defining bullying in a digital era. p. 131 Dan Olweus narrowed in the 70s bulling to three components: aggression, repetition and imbalance on power. p. 152 SM has not radically altered the dynamics of bullying, but it has made these dynamics more visible to more people. we must use this visibility not to justify increased punishment, but to help youth who are actually crying out for attention.
p. 153 inequality. can SM resolve social divisions?
p. 176 literacy. are today’s youth digital natives? p. 178 Barlow and Rushkoff p. 179 Prensky. p. 180 youth need new literacies. p. 181 youth must become media literate. when they engage with media–either as consumers or producers–they need to have the skills to ask questions about the construction and dissemination of particular media artifacts. what biases are embedded in the artifact? how did the creator intend for an audience to interpret the artifact, and what are the consequences of that interpretation.
p. 183 the politics of algorithms (see also these IMS blog entries http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=algorithms) Wikipedia and google are fundamentally different sites. p. 186 Eli Pariser, The Filter Bubble: the personalization algorithms produce social divisions that undermine any ability to crate an informed public. Harvard’s Berkman Center have shown, search engines like Google shape the quality of information experienced by youth.
p. 192 digital inequality. p. 194 (bottom) 195 Eszter Hargittai: there are signifficant difference in media literacy and technical skills even within age cohorts. teens technological skills are strongly correlated with socio-economic status. Hargittai argues that many youth, far from being digital natives, are quite digitally naive.
p. 195 Dmitry  Epstein: when society frames the digital divide as a problem of access, we see government and industry as the responsible party for the addressing the issue. If DD as skills issue, we place the onus on learning how to manage on individuals and families.
p. 196 beyond digital natives

Palfrey, J., & Gasser, U. (2008). Born Digital: Understanding the First Generation of Digital Natives (1 edition). New York: Basic Books.

John Palfrey, Urs Gasser: Born Digital
Digital Natives share a common global culture that is defined not by age, strictly, but by certain attributes and experience related to how they interact with information technologies, information itself, one another, and other people and institutions. Those who were not “born digital’ can be just as connected, if not more so, than their younger counterparts. And not everyone born since, say 1982, happens to be a digital native.” (see also http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/04/15/no-millennials-gen-z-gen-x/

p. 197. digital native rhetoric is worse than inaccurate: it is dangerous
many of the media literacy skills needed to be digitally savvy require a level of engagement that goes far beyond what the average teen pick up hanging out with friends on FB or Twitter. Technical skills, such as the ability to build online spaces requires active cultivation. Why some search queries return some content before others. Why social media push young people to learn how to to build their own systems, versus simply using a social media platforms. teens social status and position alone do not determine how fluent or informed they are via-a-vis technology.
p. 199 Searching for a public on their own

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Daum, M. (2018, August 24). My Affair With the Intellectual Dark Web – Great Escape. Retrieved October 9, 2018, from https://medium.com/s/greatescape/nuance-a-love-story-ae6a14991059

the intellectual dark web

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more on media literacy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=media+literacy

fake news in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=fake+news

Cybersecurity Risks in schools

FBI Warns Educators and Parents About Edtech’s Cybersecurity Risks

By Tina Nazerian     Sep 14, 2018

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-09-14-fbi-warns-educators-and-parents-about-edtech-s-cybersecurity-risks

The FBI has released a public service announcement warning educators and parents that edtech can create cybersecurity risks for students.

In April 2017, security researchers found a flaw in Schoolzilla’s data configuration settings. And in May 2017, a hacker reportedly stole 77 million user accounts from Edmodo.

Amelia Vance, the director of the Education Privacy Project at the Future of Privacy Forum, writes in an email to EdSurge that the FBI likely wanted to make sure that as the new school year starts, parents and schools are aware of potential security risks. And while she thinks it’s “great” that the FBI is bringing more attention to this issue, she wishes the public service announcement had also addressed another crucial challenge.

“Schools across the country lack funding to provide and maintain adequate security,” she writes. “Now that the FBI has focused attention on these concerns, policymakers must step up and fund impactful security programs.”

According to Vance, a better approach might involve encouraging parents to have conversations with their children’s’ school about how it keeps student data safe.

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more on cybersecurity in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=cybersecurity

AI for Education

The Promise (and Pitfalls) of AI for Education

Artificial intelligence could have a profound impact on learning, but it also raises key questions.

By Dennis Pierce, Alice Hathaway 08/29/18

https://thejournal.com/articles/2018/08/29/the-promise-of-ai-for-education.aspx

Artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning are no longer fantastical prospects seen only in science fiction. Products like Amazon Echo and Siri have brought AI into many homes,

Kelly Calhoun Williams, an education analyst for the technology research firm Gartner Inc., cautions there is a clear gap between the promise of AI and the reality of AI.

Artificial intelligence is a broad term used to describe any technology that emulates human intelligence, such as by understanding complex information, drawing its own conclusions and engaging in natural dialog with people.

Machine learning is a subset of AI in which the software can learn or adapt like a human can. Essentially, it analyzes huge amounts of data and looks for patterns in order to classify information or make predictions. The addition of a feedback loop allows the software to “learn” as it goes by modifying its approach based on whether the conclusions it draws are right or wrong.

AI can process far more information than a human can, and it can perform tasks much faster and with more accuracy. Some curriculum software developers have begun harnessing these capabilities to create programs that can adapt to each student’s unique circumstances.

For instance, a Seattle-based nonprofit company called Enlearn has developed an adaptive learning platform that uses machine learning technology to create highly individualized learning paths that can accelerate learning for every student. (My note: about learning and technology, Alfie Kohn in http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/09/11/educational-technology/

GoGuardian, a Los Angeles company, uses machine learning technology to improve the accuracy of its cloud-based Internet filtering and monitoring software for Chromebooks. (My note: that smells Big Brother).Instead of blocking students’ access to questionable material based on a website’s address or domain name, GoGuardian’s software uses AI to analyze the actual content of a page in real time to determine whether it’s appropriate for students. (my note: privacy)

serious privacy concerns. It requires an increased focus not only on data quality and accuracy, but also on the responsible stewardship of this information. “School leaders need to get ready for AI from a policy standpoint,” Calhoun Williams said. For instance: What steps will administrators take to secure student data and ensure the privacy of this information?

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more on AI in education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=artifical+intelligence

blockchain and information professions

Blockchain: Recommendations for the Information Profession

Monday, September 24, 2018 12:00 pm
Central Daylight Time (Chicago, GMT-05:00)

Blockchain technology is being discussed widely, but without clear directions for library applications. The Blockchain National Forum, funded by IMLS and held at San Jose State University’s iSchool in Summer 2018, brought together notable experts in the information professions, business, government, and urban planning to discuss the issues and develop recommendations on the future uses of blockchain technology within the information professions. In this free webinar, Drs. Sandy Hirsh and Sue Alman, co-PIs of the project, will present the recommendations made throughout the year in the Blockchain blog, Library 2.0 Conference, Blockchain Applied: Impact on the Information Profession, and the National Forum.

157 – 200 participants in the workshop

 

 

 

 

Basics: What is Blockchain Technology?

IMLS funded project goal
San Jose State U School of Information awarded this grant: https://ischoolblogs.sjsu.edu/blockchains

Blockchain: Apps and Ideas

http://www.youtube.com/c/Library20

now what is blockchain, and not how to implement, but only certain issues will be discussed.

Issues: legal, security and standards and Applications: academic, public and archives

BLockchain and the Law bt Primavera De Felippi and Aaron Wright : http://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674976429

Privacy: https://www.investopedia.com/terms/g/general-data-protection-regulation-gdpr.asp

Is Blockchain (BC) content or provider?

Q/S TO ASK: WHAT KINDS OF DATA AND RECORDS MUST BE STORED AND PRESERVES exactly the way they were created (provenance records, transcripts). what kinds of info are at risk to be altered and compromised by changing circumstances (personally identifiable data)

Security issues: https://www.technologyreview.com/magazine/2018/05/

515 rule: BC can be hacked if attacked by a group of miners controlling more than 50% of the network

Standards Issues: BC systems- open ledger technology for managing metadata. baseline standards will impact future options. can BC make management of metadata worth. Is it worth, or more cautious.

Potential Use cases: archives and special collections where provenance and authenticity are essential for authoritative tracking. digital preservation to track distributed digital assets. BC-based currencies for international financial transactions (to avoid exchange rates ILL and publishing) . potential to improve ownership and first sale record management. credentialing: personal & academic documents (MIT already has transcripts and diplomas of students in BC – personal data management and credentialing electronically).

public libraries: house docs of temporarily displaced or immigrants. but power usage and storage usage became problems.

Victoria Lemieux

a city south of Denver CO is build right now, and will be build on these principles.

benefits for recordkeeping: LOCKSS (lot of copies keeps stuff safe) – Stanford U; chain of custody (SAA Glossary); Trust and Immutability (BC) vs confidentiality and performance (dbase)

Libarians role: need to understand BC (how does it work and what can it do for us; provide BC education for users; use BC in various applications

recommendations from National Forum:

ASIS&T presentation in Vancouver, Nov. 2018; MOOC on BLockchain Basics; Libary Futures Series, BOok3 Alman & Hirsh

https://www.forbes.com/sites/tomvanderark/2018/08/20/26-ways-blockchain-will-transform-ok-may-improve-education/#3b2e442d4ac9

from Miriam Childs to All Participants:
Blockchain is suing Blockchain: https://nulltx.com/blockchain-is-suing-blockchain-things-are-getting-messy-in-crypto-world/

from Lilia Samusenko to All Participants:
Sounds like blockchain also can support the Library-Of-Things initiatives. What do you think?

 

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more on blockchain in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=blockchain

Digital Literacy for SPED 405

Digital Literacy for SPED 405. Behavior Theories and Practices in Special Education.

Instructor Mark Markell. mamarkell@stcloudstate.edu Mondays, 5:30 – 8:20 PM. SOE A235

Preliminary Plan for Monday, Sept 10, 5:45 PM to 8 PM

Introduction – who are the students in this class. About myself: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty Contact info, “embedded” librarian idea – I am available to help during the semester with research and papers

about 40 min: Intro to the library: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/bi/
15 min for a Virtual Reality tours of the Library + quiz on how well they learned the library:
http://bit.ly/VRlib
and 360 degree video on BYOD:
Play a scavenger hunt IN THE LIBRARY: http://bit.ly/learnlib
The VR (virtual reality) and AR (augmented reality) component; why is it important?
why is this technology brought up to a SPED class?
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/11/18/immersive-journalism/
autism: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/09/10/sound-and-brain/
Social emotional learning
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/05/31/vr-ar-sel-empathy/
(transition to the next topic – digital literacy)

about 50 min:

  1. Digital Literacy

How important is technology in our life? Profession?

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/08/20/employee-evolution/

Do you think technology overlaps with the broad field of special education? How?
How do you define technology? What falls under “technology?”

What is “digital literacy?” Do we need to be literate in that sense? How does it differ from technology literacy?
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy

Additional readings on “digital literacy”
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/08/23/nmc-digital-literacy/

Digital Citizenship: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/10/19/digital-citizenship-info/
Play Kahoot: https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/e844253f-b5dd-4a91-b096-b6ff777e6dd7
Privacy and surveillance: how does these two issues affect your students? Does it affect them more? if so, how?  http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/08/21/ai-tracks-students-writings/

Social Media:
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/lib290/. if you want to survey the class, here is the FB group page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/LIB290/

Is Social Media part of digital literacy? Why? How SM can help us become more literate?

Digital Storytelling:
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/lib490/

How is digital storytelling essential in digital literacy?

about 50 min:

  1. Fake News and Research

Syllabus: Teaching Media Manipulation: https://datasociety.net/pubs/oh/DataAndSociety_Syllabus-MediaManipulationAndDisinformationOnline.pdf

#FakeNews is a very timely and controversial issue. in 2-3 min choose your best source on this issue. 1. Mind the prevalence of resources in the 21st century 2. Mind the necessity to evaluate a) the veracity of your courses b) the quality of your sources (the fact that they are “true” does not mean that they are the best). Be prepared to name your source and defend its quality.
How do you determine your sources? How do you decide the reliability of your sources? Are you sure you can distinguish “good” from “bad?”
Compare this entry https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_fake_news_websites
to this entry: https://docs.google.com/document/d/10eA5-mCZLSS4MQY5QGb5ewC3VAL6pLkT53V_81ZyitM/preview to understand the scope

Do you know any fact checking sites? Can you identify spot sponsored content? Do you understand syndication? What do you understand under “media literacy,” “news literacy,” “information literacy.”  http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/03/28/fake-news-resources/

Why do we need to explore the “fake news” phenomenon? Do you find it relevant to your professional development?

Let’s watch another video and play this Kahoot: https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/21379a63-b67c-4897-a2cd-66e7d1c83027

So, how do we do academic research? Let’s play another Kahoot: https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/5e09bb66-4d87-44a5-af21-c8f3d7ce23de
If you to structure this Kahoot, what are the questions, you will ask? What are the main steps in achieving successful research for your paper?

  • Research using social media

what is social media (examples). why is called SM? why is so popular? what makes it so popular?

use SM tools for your research and education:

– Determining your topic. How to?
Digg http://digg.com/, Reddit https://www.reddit.com/ , Quora https://www.quora.com
Facebook, Twitter – hashtags (class assignment 2-3 min to search)
LinkedIn Groups
YouTube and Slideshare (class assignment 2-3 min to search)
Flickr, Instagram, Pinterest for visual aids (like YouTube they are media repositories)

Academia.com (https://www.academia.edu/Academia.edu, a paper-sharing social network that has been informally dubbed “Facebook for academics,” https://www.academia.edu/31942069_Facebook_for_Academics_The_Convergence_of_Self-Branding_and_Social_Media_Logic_on_Academia.edu

ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/

– collecting and managing your resources:
Delicious https://del.icio.us/
Diigo: https://www.diigo.com/
Evernote: evernote.com OneNote (Microsoft)

blogs and wikis for collecting data and collaborating

– Managing and sharing your information:
Refworks,
Zotero https://www.zotero.org/,
Mendeley, https://www.mendeley.com/

– Testing your work against your peers (globally):

Wikipedia:
First step:Using Wikipedia.Second step: Contributing to Wikipedia (editing a page). Third step: Contributing to Wikipedia (creating a page)  https://www.evernote.com/shard/s101/sh/ef743d1a-4516-47fe-bc5b-408f29a9dcb9/52d79bfa20ee087900764eb6a407ec86

– presenting your information


please use this form to cast your feedback. Please feel free to fill out only the relevant questions:
http://bit.ly/imseval

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