Searching for "student privacy"

convocation winter 2016

Short link the information below on the IMS blog: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?p=4441 and even shorter one: http://scsu.mn/1RsQErr

Weds 6th

Session I 10-11:15         Voyageurs North (Atwood)

Title
Engage your students: connect CMS (D2L) to social media to enhance the learning process.

Plamen Miltenoff and Emil Towner

Join us online via Adobe Connect: http://scsuconnect.stcloudstate.edu/ims (please login as a “guest” and use your real name)

Outline

In this rapid succession of examples, one can experience a showcase how to enhance students’ engagement by modernizing D2L experience through connection with social media. Bring your own examples and participate in a discussion, which aims finding the right tools for your class and field of study.

Audience:
beginners to advanced

Prerequisite:
come with your own social media accounts: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Vine

Outcomes:

By the end of this session, the participants will have an idea about peculiarity of each of the social media tools: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Vine

By the end of the session, the participants will be familiar with the integration of each of the social media tool into D2L

By the end of the session, the participants will be able to asses to what extent each particular tool fits their field of study

By the end of the session, the participants will be able to compare the pedagogical advantages and disadvantages of the social media tools compared to D2L

Useful links to contact us via social media:
IMS blog: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims
IMS Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/InforMediaServices?ref=hl
IMS Twitter: https://twitter.com/SCSUtechinstruc
IMS Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/scsutechnology/
IMS Instagram: http://instagram.com/scsutechinstruct
IMS YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_UMIE5r6YB8KzTF5nZJFyA
IMS Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/115966710162153290760/posts/p/pub
IMS LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/scsuinstructionaltechnology

Plan – Plamen Miltenoff:

 Please consider the following survey about your opinion regarding social media in education:

*http://aidemoreto.polldaddy.com/s/social-media-in-education*
please have the short link: http://scsu.mn/1Z8EFFx

most recent contemplations about blogs and social media in general:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/01/01/4507/

  • D2L and Vine
    Vine is a social media services, which provides the ability to share 7 sec videos. Vine is becoming more popular then Instagram (15 sec videos), with the simplicity to create short videos. Students can take sequence of short videos, which amount to 7 sec to reflect the main points of a project. E.g.: chemical reaction, biology dissection, progress of engineering planning, solving a math formula.
    URL to the vine can be posted in the D2L discussion area for further collaborative effort or for peers’ and instructions evaluation
    Vines are a click away from a FB group page or, with the right handle and hashtag, to a Twitter discussion
    The bottom-line to evaluate if fitting your field of study is: can the content be narrated or is it much better if visualized. If the latter, Vine can be your salvation.
    How to Create Social Videos With Your Smartphone http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/01/10/social-videos-with-your-smartphone/
  • D2L and YouTube, EdPuzzle (https://edpuzzle.com/), etc
    YouTube Unveils New Trending Tab
    http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/12/13/improvements-in-social-media-tools/

    Per SCSU IT disclaimer: MediaSpace (Kaltura) is a free, cloud-based video repository solution for campus that allows faculty and staff to upload and distribute video and audio content for academic or administrative purposes. Facilitators will discuss potential uses of MediaSpace for campus, demonst rate how to create Webcam and screen recordings, upload audio/video, and embed or link to MediaSpace content from D2L or a web site.  YouTube is owned by Google and the integration, including statistics and analytics by Google are way beyond MediaSpace. The only selling point of MediaSpace is the FERPA requirement by MnSCU to host privacy data on a MnSCU owned server
  • Google+
    Google+ is indirect competition with any CMS, D2L included, with its GOogle Classroom platform (https://classroom.google.com/ineligible). K12 and higher institutions are outsourcing to GMAIL and with Google Hangouts (Skype also), one can share video, audio and desktops, which makes Adobe Connect + D2L way behind in integration even before Google Drive is mentioned.
    Google Introduces Shared Albums in Google Photos:
    http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/12/13/improvements-in-social-media-tools/
    8 Ways to Use Google+ Hangouts for Your Business http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/09/23/google-hangouts/You can record hangouts directly to your YouTube channel for future use.For private Google+ Hangouts, choose Google+ Video Hangouts, which allow you to have up to 10 participants in a video chat that is accessible only to the people invited.

Plan – Emil Towner:

  1. General stats on integrating social media and things to consider
  1. Integrating LinkedIn Assignments
  1. Integrating Facebook Groups
  • I will show a couple of groups that I have used
  • I can also come up with an “exercise” that participants can do, just let me know: (1) if you want me to and (2) if participants are suppose to have a Facebook account that they can log into during the session

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Session K 2-3:15: 2PM Wed, Jan 8.  Location: CH455

Title
Engage your students: gaming and gamification in the learning process.

Outline

As part of the broader discussion, a short discussion segment to form and agree on definitions and terms regarding games and gamification. Another short segment to seek consensus if this SCSU campus is ready to departure on the path of gamifying education. After several examples, of how games are used in education and gamification techniques, a discussion on how gaming and gamification can be streamlined amidst shrinking budget and increasing workload. More details and information about gaming and gamification at: http://scsu.mn/1F008Re

Audience:
beginners to advanced

Outcomes:

By the end of this session, the participants will have a working definitions on play, games, serious games, game-based learning, digital game-based learning, gaming, gamification and badges. (more at http://scsu.mn/1F008Re)

By the end of the session, the participants will be familiar with the possibilities for integration of games in the educational process and for gamification of the educational process.

By the end of the session, the participants will be able to asses to what extent games and gamification fit their field of study

Plan:

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Friday 8th

Session M 10-11:15: CH 455

Title
Present and be presented: engage your students with modern ways to share information

Outline

Two trends plague education: the swamp of PowerPoint presentations and the lack of visual literacy. In this rapid succession of examples, one can experience a showcase of various cloud-based tools, which brings visual presentations way beyond PowerPoint and align with the Millennials demand for current social interaction. A discussion on how relevant these tools are to various disciplines and details on improving the interaction among instructors and students during the presentation. Ongoing discussion about design as part of visual literacy and the difference between blended learning and technology integration.

Audience:
beginners to advanced

Outcomes:

By the end of this session, the participants will have understand the movement “Death by PowerPoint” and will understand the advantage of cloud-based presentation tools to MS PowerPoint

By the end of the session, the participants will be familiar with several tools, which successfully replace PowerPoint and well beyond.

By the end of the session, the participants will be able to asses to what extent games and gamification fit their field of study

By the end of the session, the participants will be able to discriminate between technology integration and blended learning.

Plan:

 

sociology and social media

Plan for presentation on social media impact in a “sociology and family” class.

Zuo, Jiping <jzuo@stcloudstate.edu>

“Media, Technology, Market, and Cosmopolitan Communities”

https://kahoot.it

Valentini, C. (2015). Is using social media “good” for the public relations profession? A critical reflection. Public Relations Review, 41(2), 170-177. doi:10.1016/j.pubrev.2014.11.009

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dkeh%26AN%3d108299204%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0363811114001817

p. 172 there is no doubt that digital technologies and social media have contributed to a major alteration in people’s interpersonal communications and relational practices. Inter- personal communications have substantially altered, at least in Western and developed countries, as a result of the culture of increased connectivity that has emerged from social media’s engineering sociality (van Dijck, 2013 ), which allows anyone to be online and to connect to others. Physical presence is no longer a precondition for interpersonal communication.

The Pew Research Center ( Smith & Duggan, 2013 , October 21) indicates that one in every ten American adults has used an online dating site or mobile dating app to seek a partner, and that in the last eight years the proportion of Americans who say that they met their current partner online has doubled. Another study conducted by the same organization ( Lenhart & Duggan, 2014 , February 11) shows that 25% of married or partnered adults who text, have texted their partner while they were both home together, that 21% of cell-phone owners or internet users in a committed relationship have felt closer to their spouse or partner because of exchanges they had online or via text message. Another 9% of adults have resolved online or by text message an argument with their partner that they were having difficulty resolving person to person ( Lenhart & Duggan, 2014 , February 11). These results indicate that digital technologies are not simply tools that facilitate communications: they have a substantial impact on the way humans interact and relate to one another. In other words, they affect the dynamics of interpersonal relations

the impact of social media on dating patterns (e.g. more like shopping around for a commodity) and dating relations (e.g. more temporary, unstable), along with many positive effects as well

1. Goal: introduce students to” a) social media b) the sociological impact of social media on family and dating issues

2. Learning outcomes: a) at the end of the session, students will have firm grasp of popular versus peer-reviewed (academic resources). b) students will be able allocate sources for information c) students will be able to evaluate [and compile? Zotero] information d) students will be able to discuss the impact of social media in general e) students will be able to discuss and evaluate the impact of social media on family and dating f) at the end of the session, students will understand the concepts of netiquette and privacy (digital citizenship, digital anthropology)

3. Possible q/s for the class:
a) why Tinder, Hinge, etc.?

These are the best pickup lines with the highest success rates, according to dating app Hinge

http://www.businessinsider.com/best-pickup-lines-with-highest-success-rates-according-to-hinge-2015-9

what other social media? Can Instagram, Twitter and FB be counted in this mix?

Is Instagram Flirting Really So Bad?

http://www.askmen.com/dating/dating_advice/social-media-dating-advice.html

b) what is so different in the dating scene? how did social media changed the scene?

If you’re single, these are the 10 best cities to find new love; http://www.businessinsider.com/zillow-best-cities-for-love-2015-9

“I’ve been surprised at what a real impact Facebook has on romantic relationships,” Galena Rhoades, clinical psychologist at the University of Denver, said in Allison McCann’s BuzzFeed article, How Facebook Ruined Dating (And Breaking Up Too). “And I do think Facebook is playing a bigger role in relationship formation and relationship disillusions.” http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2013/05/11/dating-and-the-impact-of-social-media/

c) how do family values change, based on the changes in [online] dating?

d) how does online dating differ across race, gender, sexual orientation, age and cultures

e) privacy, security, surveillance

f) mail brides on steroids? how does online dating apps change dubious practices?

g) does online dating impact marriages? are marriages better or weaker after online dating?

Finkel, et al. (2012).Online Dating: A Critical Analysis From the Perspective of Psychological Science. Psychological Science in the Public Interest. 13(1), pp. 3–66. http://www3.nd.edu/~ghaeffel/OnineDating_Aron.pdf
the authors say “yes” to online dating but “we see substantial opportunities for improving the way online dating is practiced. Some of this improvement can come from closer collaboration between scholars and service providers.”

4. possible collaborations. The topic of online dating, social media in particular, is of interest to specialists from Communication Studies (Usera, Fullick), Anthropology (Bocanete), Nursing (Couch), Gender Studies (Robinson), SCSU Counseling and Psychological Services (Houdet) .
E.g.:
Usera, D. (2014). Online Dating Interactions: A discursive look (Dissertation). Graduate College of The University of Iowa, The University of Iowa. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/13255554/Online_Dating_Interactions_A_discursive_look
Fullick, M. (2013). “Gendering” the Self in Online Dating Discourse. Canadian Journal Of Communication, 38(4). Retrieved from http://www.cjc-online.ca/index.php/journal/article/view/2647
Bocanete, A. C. (2013). All-male Mobile Dating Apps and their Users in London… After the Magic Wears Out (Dissertation). DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY, UNIVERSITY COLLEGE LONDON. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/12884810/All-male_Mobile_Dating_Apps_and_their_Users_in_London…_After_the_Magic_Wears_Out
Couch, D. (2006). Online dating and mating: the use of the internet to meet sexual partners (Master of Public Health). La Trobe University, Victoria, Australia. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/12639192/Online_dating_and_mating_the_use_of_the_internet_to_meet_sexual_partners
Robinson, B. (2015). “Personal Preference” as the New Racism: Gay Desire and Racial Cleansing in Cyberspace. Sociology of Race and Ethnicity, 1(2), 317–330. http://doi.org/10.1177/2332649214546870 http://sre.sagepub.com/content/1/2/317
Houdet, A. (2014, August 11). Online Dating Services and McGill: A Study of Usage and Perception (POLI 311: Techniques of Empirical Rsearch Paper). Mcgill, Montreal, Canada. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/7935047/Online_Dating_Services_and_McGill_A_Study_of_Usage_and_Perception

bibliography:

Right swiping on Tinderellas: Exploring a mobile dating app’s regulation of identity performances from Stefanie Duguay

and http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/09/25/online-dating/

Synopsis
UWire and The Guardian have a long list of reports. Academia.edu has also plenty of serious academic research. While UWire and the Guardian are explicitly centered on the Anglo-Saxon world (with one exception of report on Iran), Academia.edu presents a great choice of cases from around the world (different cultures) in mostly serious academic research

useful definitions and comparisons here:
Digital dating: a week with Kik, Tinder and OkCupid. (2014, July 30). UWIRE Text, p. 1. Retrieved from http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CA376503724&v=2.1&u=stcloud_main&it=r&p=PROF&sw=w&asid=873df6af8e0f1cea1a22a33ca17f2d12
about online dating:
Toma, C. L., Hancock, J. T., & Ellison, N. B. (2008). Separating Fact From Fiction: An Examination of Deceptive Self-Presentation in Online Dating Profiles. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 34(8), 1023–1036. http://doi.org/10.1177/0146167208318067
Wong AnKee, A., & Yazdanifard, R. (2015). The Review of the Ugly Truth and Negative Aspects of Online Dating. Global Journal of Management and Business Research, 15(14). Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/12317015/The_Review_of_the_Ugly_Truth_and_Negative_Aspects_of_Online_Dating
Fact Sheet 37:  The Perils and Pitfalls of Online Dating: How to Protect Yourself. (2015). Privacy Rights Clearninghouse. Retrieved from https://www.privacyrights.org/perils-and-pitfalls-online-dating-how-protect-yourself
sociology peer-reviewed paper on online dating:
Rosenfeld, M., & Thomas, R. (2012). Searching for a Mate: The Rise of the Internet as a Social Intermediary. American Sociological Review, 77(4), 523–547.

http://web.stanford.edu/~mrosenfe/Rosenfeld_How_Couples_Meet_Working_Paper.pdf

The Tinder-Is-Satan Arms Race Heats Up Further http://nymag.com/scienceofus/2015/08/tinder-is-satan-arms-race-heats-up-further.html

The History of Digital Desire, vol. 1: An Introduction  http://saq.dukejournals.org/content/110/3/583.short

Stampler, L. (2014). The New Dating Game. Time, 183(6), 40.  http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3daph%26AN%3d94317888%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

Kite, M. (2015). Click and flick: romance is being killed off by the brutal marketplace of dating apps such as Tinder. Spectator, (9729). 12.  http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dedsgao%26AN%3dedsgcl.401492069%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

Hobson, T. (2015). Tinder feelings: Can mobile dating apps move beyond the promise of a one-night stand?. Spectator, (9740). 22. http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dedsgao%26AN%3dedsgcl.411742748%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

(2015). My Tinder date wants to be friends with benefits. I want to be serious. What now? Swipe Right is our advice column that tackles the tricky world of online dating. This week: weighing the benefits of casual liaisonsGet help making your profile work: forward screenshots to askevaguardian@gmail.com for a personal critique and upgrade; Swipe Right is our advice column that tackles the tricky world of online dating. This week: weighing the benefits of casual liaisonsGet help making your profile work: forward screenshots to askevaguardian@gmail.com for a personal critique and upgrade. theguardian.com. http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dedsgao%26AN%3dedsgcl.409945005%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite
http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2015/apr/16/swipe-right-online-dating-friends-with-benefits-relationships

Wood, M. (2015). Led by Tinder, the Mobile Dating Game Surges. The New York Times. p. 8. http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dedsgao%26AN%3dedsgcl.400230809%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

http://www.lexisnexis.com/lnacui2api/api/version1/getDocCui?lni=5F7B-R7N1-DXY4-X3K7&csi=6742&hl=t&hv=t&hnsd=f&hns=t&hgn=t&oc=00240&perma=true   http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/05/technology/personaltech/led-by-tinder-the-mobile-dating-game-surges.html

(2015). Tinder hooks up with Instagram to woo new users to the dating app; Dating app overhauls its user profiles with photo app integration, and extended information pulled from Facebook. theguardian.com. http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dedsgao%26AN%3dedsgcl.409944725%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

(2015). Brand love in the time of Tinder; Thanks to dating apps such as Tinder, relationships are changing, but does that include the ones we form with brands too?. theguardian.com. http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dedsgao%26AN%3dedsgcl.409800099%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

(2015). A look at modern day dating – Tinder and Match.com. UWIRE Text. http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CA401448144&v=2.1&u=stcloud_main&it=r&p=PROF&sw=w&asid=4b52e991d97812282b4651b5c2276ca9

Right swipe on Tinder proves lucky for Bruin. (2015, February 13). UWIRE Text, p. 1. Retrieved from http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CA401365769&v=2.1&u=stcloud_main&it=r&p=PROF&sw=w&asid=50627eab0b22cfef4795c03ff71f9872
Tinder isn’t just for dating — it’s also a game. (2015, February 8). UWIRE Text, p. 1. Retrieved from http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CA400682488&v=2.1&u=stcloud_main&it=r&p=PROF&sw=w&asid=dfde7717895bda12f4d3337a0785d31c
Tinder: Matchmaker or dating disaster? (2015, March 14). UWIRE Text, p. 1. Retrieved from http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CA405561590&v=2.1&u=stcloud_main&it=r&p=PROF&sw=w&asid=53e7a3eeae14aa02f237e1b38a7877c8
Dating app Tinder craze on campus. (2015, April 29). UWIRE Text, p. 1. Retrieved from http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CA411697728&v=2.1&u=stcloud_main&it=r&p=PROF&sw=w&asid=c00d190c4790e2ec0b35016e676d6727
Tinder is comparable to traditional dating. (2014, September 29). UWIRE Text, p. 1. Retrieved from http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CA383934895&v=2.1&u=stcloud_main&it=r&p=PROF&sw=w&asid=0690ccb6861c5fd27b457cbfcc221169
(2015). 42% of people using dating app Tinder already have a partner, claims report; Research firm GlobalWebIndex also claims that 62% of the app’s users are men, while hinting that Tinder’s new premium tier could catch on. theguardian.com. http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2015/may/07/dating-app-tinder-married-relationship
Curington, C. V., Lin, K.-H., & Lundquist, J. H. (2015). Positioning multiraciality in cyberspace: treatment of multiracial daters in an online dating website. American Sociological Review, 80(4), 764+. Retrieved from http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CA425674423&v=2.1&u=stcloud_main&it=r&p=PROF&sw=w&asid=7fdadb5f53a7acc0219b8a37c986a8f5
PotarcA, G., Mills, M., & Neberich, W. (2015). Relationship Preferences Among Gay and Lesbian Online Daters: Individual and Contextual Influences. Journal of Marriage and Family, 77(2), 523+. Retrieved from http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CA403937092&v=2.1&u=stcloud_main&it=r&p=PROF&sw=w&asid=73d2386ffbd902de46bf3f081854fce3
(2014). Scissr dating app: the new Tinder for lesbians; It’s the latest dating app for women seeking women, but what’s the app, named after a lesbian sex position, all about?. theguardian.com.
Constructing identities on a Japanese gay dating site: Hunkiness, cuteness and the desire for heteronormative masculinity. (n.d.). Retrieved August 18, 2015, from https://www.academia.edu/12807514/Constructing_identities_on_a_Japanese_gay_dating_site_Hunkiness_cuteness_and_the_desire_for_heteronormative_masculinity
Sinclair, H. C., Felmlee, D., Sprecher, S., & Wright, B. L. (2015). Don’t tell me who I can’t love: a multimethod investigation of social network and reactance effects on romantic relationships. Social Psychology Quarterly, 78(1), 77+. Retrieved from http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CA408508799&v=2.1&u=stcloud_main&it=r&p=PROF&sw=w&asid=d06ca248fc000a2c7bc55a868815b93e
Berlin, R. (2014). The professional ethics of online dating: need for guidance. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 53(9), 935+. Retrieved from http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CA382846474&v=2.1&u=stcloud_main&it=r&p=PROF&sw=w&asid=c9ef33658f8c48557c2db8e5bd91a7e4
“4 ways Asian dating apps are anti-Tinder.” CNN Wire. (March 23, 2015 Monday 1:29 AM GMT ): 679 words. LexisNexis Academic. Web. Date Accessed: 2015/08/18. http://www.lexisnexis.com/lnacui2api/api/version1/getDocCui?oc=00240&hnsd=f&hgn=t&lni=5FK4-K601-JBSS-S0M1&hns=t&perma=true&hv=t&hl=t&csi=385157&secondRedirectIndicator=true

ROBBINS, A. (2015). Sex and the (Newly!) Single Girl. Washingtonian Magazine, 50(8), 68.

Serjoie, K. A. (2015). Iranian ‘Tinder’ Seeks to Encourage Marriage But Not Dating. Time.Com, N.PAG. http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dmih%26AN%3d108327379%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

Rhodan, M. (2015). Meet Willow, the Dating App That Won’t Judge You By Your Looks. Time.Com, N.PAG. http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3df5h%26AN%3d100947723%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

Rutkin, A. (2015). Hackers can see your dating pics and chat. New Scientist, 226(3022), 20. http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dulh%26AN%3d102818153%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

Grigoriadis, V. (2014). Inside the Hookup Factory. Rolling Stone, (1221), 24-26. http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3daph%26AN%3d98976542%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

Jamie, N. (2015, July 9). London launch for US dating app that rivals Tinder. Evening Standard. p. 55. http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dkeh%26AN%3d103711119%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

Internet and the Male Homosexual Identity: A Critical Reading of the Online Dating Space for Homosexual Men in Bengaluru. (n.d.). Retrieved August 18, 2015, from https://www.academia.edu/14656772/Internet_and_the_Male_Homosexual_Identity_A_Critical_Reading_of_the_Online_Dating_Space_for_Homosexual_Men_in_Bengaluru
Going Offline: An Exploratory Cultural Artifact Analysis of An Internet Dating Site’s Development Trajectories. (n.d.). Retrieved August 18, 2015, from https://www.academia.edu/14184813/Going_Offline_An_Exploratory_Cultural_Artifact_Analysis_of_An_Internet_Dating_Site_s_Development_Trajectories
Five Tips for Dating Online. (n.d.). Retrieved August 18, 2015, from https://www.academia.edu/14078925/Five_Tips_for_Dating_Online
Old and New Methods for Online Research: The Case of Online Dating. (n.d.). Retrieved August 18, 2015, from https://www.academia.edu/13924873/Old_and_New_Methods_for_Online_Research_The_Case_of_Online_Dating
Remediating the Matchmaker: Arranging Marriage Online in the South Asian Diaspora in America. (n.d.). Retrieved August 18, 2015, from https://www.academia.edu/13897347/Remediating_the_Matchmaker_Arranging_Marriage_Online_in_the_South_Asian_Diaspora_in_America
Stranger Stranger or Lonely Lonely? Young Chinese and dating apps between the locational, the mobile and the social. (n.d.). Retrieved August 18, 2015, from https://www.academia.edu/13895551/Stranger_Stranger_or_Lonely_Lonely_Young_Chinese_and_dating_apps_between_the_locational_the_mobile_and_the_social
Roeffen, C. (2014). Mobile dating: Romance is just a swipe away Tinders’ Romantic and sexual interactions (Bachellor’s Degree). Urbane Technologieen, Netherlands. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/8899473/Mobile_dating_Romance_is_just_a_swipe_away_Tinders_Romantic_and_sexual_interactions
Lemke, R. (2014). Sexual Liberation on the Internet? Sexual Internet Use of MSM in 50 Different Countries. Mainz: Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/8662454/Sexual_Liberation_on_the_Internet_Sexual_Internet_Use_of_MSM_in_50_Different_Countries
Kogovsek, T., Svab, A., & Kuhar, R. (2011). Intimacy Transformed? : Perceptions of Love, Intimacy and Partnership Among On-line Daters in Slovenia. Annales, 21(1), 177–186. https://www.academia.edu/7988186/Intimacy_Transformed_Perceptions_of_Love_Intimacy_and_Partnership_Among_On-line_Daters_in_Slovenia
Cacioppo, J. T., Cacioppo, S., Gonzaga, G. C., Ogburn, E. L., & VanderWeele, T. J. (2013). Marital satisfaction and break-ups differ across on-line and off-line meeting venues. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 110(25), 10135–10140. http://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1222447110
Fullick, M. (2013). “Gendering” the Self in Online Dating Discourse. Canadian Journal Of Communication, 38(4). Retrieved from http://www.cjc-online.ca/index.php/journal/article/view/2647
Phillips, J. (n.d.). Online Dating: How Culture Affects Self-Presentation of Match.com Users. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/3845104/Online_Dating_How_Culture_Affects_Self-Presentation_of_Match.com_Users
Chow, E., Coulombe, D., Garcia, V., Vuu, D., & Wade, J. (2009, May 23). Culture, Power, Cyberspace: Age and Gender in Online Dating Websites: An Analysis of User Profiles on Mingles.com. Retrieved from http://anthrocyber.blogspot.com/2009/05/age-and-gender-in-online-dating.html
Masden, C., & Edwards, W. K. (n.d.). Understanding the Role of Community in Online Dating. In Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (pp. 535–544). Seoul, Korea. http://doi.org/10.1145/2702123.2702417

snapchat and education

The author erroneously focuses on Snapchat as a service and university administration, monitoring and censorship; it is a basic issue of education. Educating the Millennials and Gen Z about privacy, netiquette and digital humanity.

Education is about letting students explore, fail, learn from their failure and improve. #FinlandPhenomenon

Temporary Messages, Lasting Impact

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2015/02/27/monitoring-student-behavior-snapchat-next-impossible-administrators-say

From the responses under the article:

OccupareVeritas

Still trying to understand the academy’s apparent obsession with monitoring and controlling/influencing every possible aspect of student and faculty behavior, on and off campus. Sometimes I can’t decide if it’s kind of a Stalinist control thing, a guy in the back of a windowless van thing, or some kind of extension of a juvenile obsession with everyone’s behavior but your own. That someone complains does not automatically suggest that someone must “do something,” particularly when “doing something” is often prohibited by law to begin with (in the case of administrators and the university).

 

technology for social workers

Plan for Sylvester Lamin’s course:

  1. introduce myself – 5 min
  2. discuss with students how they see the impact of technology on their work – 5 min
  3. discuss with students the implications of technology on their work – 15
    http://www.socialworklicensure.org/articles/social-media-social-work.html
    http://www.socialworkblog.org/practice-and-professional-development/2011/07/social-work-social-media-where-are-the-ethical-boundaries/
    http://www.theguardian.com/social-care-network/2013/jul/23/social-workers-social-media-challenge-perception
    email as unreliable medium
    privacy
    security
  4. discuss with students the possibilities, which SCSU resources and Internet resources can provide for collaboration, creativity and streamlining the work of the social worker – 15
    File space at SCSU versus other free resources
    keeping data in the cloud
    collaborating on documents and policies
    sharing data with clients
  5. Other issues, ideas – 10

Research and Ethics: If Facebook can tweak our emotions and make us vote, what else can it Do?

If Facebook can tweak our emotions and make us vote, what else can it do?

http://www.businessinsider.com/facebook-calls-experiment-innovative-2014-7#ixzz36PtsxVfL

Google’s chief executive has expressed concern that we don’t trust big companies with our data – but may be dismayed at Facebook’s latest venture into manipulation

Please consider the information on Power, Privacy, and the Internet and details on ethics and big data in this IMS blog entry:http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/07/01/privacy-and-surveillance-obama-advisor-john-podesta-every-country-has-a-history-of-going-over-the-line/

important information:
Please consider the SCSU Research Ethics and the IRB (Institutional Review Board) document:
http://www.stcloudstate.edu/graduatestudies/current/culmProject/documents/ResearchEthicsandQualitative–IRBPresentationforGradStudentsv2.2011.pdf
For more information, please contact the SCSU Institutional Review Board : http://www.stcloudstate.edu/irb/default.asp

The Facebook Conundrum: Where Ethics and Science Collide

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/07/the-facebook-conundrum-where-ethics-and-science-collide

The field of learning analytics isn’t just about advancing the understanding of learning. It’s also being applied in efforts to try to influence and predict student behavior.

Learning analytics has yet to demonstrate its big beneficial breakthrough, its “penicillin,” in the words of Reich. Nor has there been a big ethical failure to creep lots of people out.

“There’s a difference,” Pistilli says, “between what we can do and what we should do.”

Open Source: why are we not allowed to use it?

Why Aren’t More Schools Using Free, Open Tools?

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/06/why-arent-more-schools-using-free-open-education-resources/

Teachers were complaining that they wanted a simple way to share files and links within the classroom, like a private Twitter app. Rather than having IT professionals respond to the request, Reisinger’s students programmed a solution that they call Paper Plane. ”Those kids have code up on GitHub [a site for open-source code] right now that they’re sharing out,” Reisinger said. Students also designed the help ticketing software that their peers use to request IT support.

oh, my, what a blasphemy; what do we do about SECURITY?…

A lot of people are scared away from open-source software or operating systems like Linux because of the belief that they are harder for teachers and students to use, and are more challenging to support.

a bigger reason people don’t go open-source is that the devices and software aren’t as shiny and exciting as iPads or Chromebooks.

recent concerns regarding third party providers and privacy are less of an issue

 

MOOC and Libraries

MOOC and Libraries

http://explore.tandfonline.com/content/bes/moocsandlibraries

New ACRL Discussion Group—Library Support for MOOCs

Libraries in the Time of MOOCs

http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/libraries-time-moocs
issues related to MOOCs, such as intellectual property rights, privacy issues, and state regulations.
MOOCs have arrived on the scene at a time when many institutions of higher learning are in extreme financial crisis
OCLC conference, “MOOCs and Libraries: Massive Opportunity or Overwhelming Challenge? http://www.oclc.org/research/events/2013/03-18.html
The MOOC movement might change this copyright-ownership contract between university and faculty.

Stephens, M. m., & Jones, K. L. (2014). MOOCs as LIS Professional Development Platforms: Evaluating and Refining SJSU’s First Not-for-Credit MOOC. Journal Of Education For Library & Information Science, 55(4), 345-361.
http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dllf%26AN%3d99055676%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite
xMOOCs. Using central­ized learning platforms (e.g., Coursera),they emphasize individual learning usingautomated assessment tools.In contrast, cMOOCs stress the relation­ship between course content and a com­munity of learners. Social learning, in thecase of cMOOCs, is emphasized  through uses of distributed tools (e.g., a combina­tion of a course site, student blogs, andsocial  etworking sites) to build networks of knowledge and learners. Unlike their xMOOC counterparts, the role of an in­ istructor in a cMOOC is to be a “guide on the side,” a facilitator of the knowledge­ making process who uses connectivist learning theory (Siemens, 2004; Siemens,2012)

Learning 2.0 programs, also known as“23 Things,” have offered online technol­ogy-focused  professional development for library staff and could be considered an early version of LIS-focused MOOCs (Stephens, 2013a). Utilizing concepts such as self-directed learning, play, and an emphasis on lifelong learning, these pro­grams have been offered for individual li­braries as well as consortial  and state level iterations to reach thousands of library staff.
The course structure of the MOOCversion of the HL incorporated content updated from the SLIS course by the co­instructors. Ten modules were scheduled over a twelve-week “semester.” Students
could earn a certificate of completion, if they finished three of five artifact-based assignments of their choosing, in addition to blogging and participating in an end-of-course virtual symposium. The weekly schedule is available in Appendix A, and assignment descriptions are available in Appendix B
utilizing concepts such as self-directed learning, play, and an emphasis on lifelong learning, these pro­grams have been offered for individual li­braries as well as consortial and state level iterations to reach thousands of library staff. Benefits to staff include increased comfort with emerging technologies and an increased desire to continue learning (p. 348).

Tablets (iPADs) in the Classroom

From: Perry Bratcher [mailto:bratcher@nku.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, November 06, 2013 9:01 AM
To: ‘lita-l@ala.org’
Cc: Michael Providenti; Michael Wells; Millie Mclemore; Perry Bratcher; Stephen Moon
Subject: [lita-l] RE: Classroom iPads

All – Thanks to each of you for your responses to my email regarding classroom use of iPads (see email at the bottom).  Listed below are is a summary of the comments I received.  I cut/pasted and have reconfigured these comments for this email, so some may be taken out of context.  NOTE: My systems staff have adamantly opposed using the Microsoft Surface.  We have a campus “tech bar” where student/staff can check out new devices for experimentation.  My staff said that the Surface doesn’t work in our particular situation for a variety of reasons and they prefer the iPad tablet option (if we go the tablet route).

Before deciding on implementation of PCs vs. laptops vs. tablet for use in a classroom setting, one needs to consider the motivation for doing so.  Space? Portability? Availability of apps?  Is there a demand for using personal devices for research, etc?  What type of portable device to use (iPad, Microsoft Surface, etc.)

Pros for using iPad/tablets:

  • Keep a few in there to provide examples of how to search on mobile devices.
  • The amount of apps and types of apps out there. Great education apps exist that do not exist elsewhere online or on other platforms (Android or Windows).
  • The iPad is flexible and allows you to regain that floor space you lose with computers and give the user privacy.
  • If setup correctly, the devices can be erased when they are returned so any private data is wiped.
  • Users can download additional apps, even purchase apps if you allow them.
  • They hold a charge much longer then any laptop or ChromeBook on the market.
  • Apple sold 94% of its iPads into education – the reason being that it’s a great education and research tool.
    • Another advantage that I can see boot up time. The iPad is instantly on and connected to the network. Perhaps this most applicable to last-minute library instruction or ad hoc group research?   However, if I had the choice, I would equip a classroom with MacBook Air SSDs
    • Understand how they need to be configured and the tools needed to do so. I created a kit for this not long ago for public libraries: http://www.macprofessionals.com/new-library-ipad-checkout-solution/   Thank you Chris Ross, Macprofessionals
    • UVA has been using iPads for instruction for about 2 years.  They have been very pleased with the results.
    • Our electronic classroom is very small, so we purchased 30 iPads over a year ago to allow teaching in our larger meeting room. There are definitely distinct advantages: flexibility, mobility, lack of technical infrastructure needed (wires, ports, etc.), and the myriad possibilities of apps.

 

Cons for using iPad/tablets:

  • Most mobile devices have not become “workhorse” devices as of yet, so much of the students’ research will still need to be done on a computer.
  • We haven’t seen any advantage to having them either – but our librarians use them sporadically for instruction.
  • Charging, syncing, configuring, Apple ID’s, erasing, cases, restrictions, printing, presenting, etc. For example if you want to present with these, you will need an Apple TV or an adapter. If you want to print you will need AirPrint supported printers or software. If you want to configure and erase you will need a Mac.
  • The challenge I have found is trying to use an inherently personal device in the typical one shot classroom environment. There are lots of things you need to consider. How will they access the wireless? What about taking notes? What about apps that require login? And much more.
  • Someone on staff is equipped and has the time to manage them.
  • We have a pool of 30 loan laptops, recently we have supplemented this with 11 loan iPads. The iPads have generally been very popular but wouldn’t work as a substitute for laptops. As many have mentioned when it comes to getting real work done they are inferior to laptops and people have commented as such.
  • As a complement to laptops though they are great – they are more portable and our nursing students love being able to carry them around and quickly access medical apps, take notes, check calculations etc. I definitely see them as being a valuable resource but if it’s an either/or proposition then I would go on the side of laptops.
  • My personal opinion is that it’s not a bad idea as a supplement to existing systems, but I’d be wary of  replacing more flexible with more limited ones, and am particularly wary of committing to one operating system/vendor (particularly one that tends to charge half-again to twice as much as their competitors with only limited advantages).
  • In a classroom setting (e.g. instruction room) I see little advantage of tablets;  their sole advantage from I can figure out is their portability.   Why force people into a limited device if it is only going to be in one room anyway?

 

http://www.edudemic.com/social-media-in-education/

How Social Media Is Being Used In Education

good graph on the bottom of the article (http://www.edudemic.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/social-media-for-teaching.jpg)

  • The level of personal use of social media among faculty (70.3 percent) mirrors that of the general population
  • 55 percent of faculty use social media in a professional context (any aspect of their profession outside of teaching), up from 44.7 percent last year
  • Only 41 percent of faculty use social media in the classroom, but this use continues to experience steady year-to-year growth
  • Faculty are sophisticated consumers of social media. They match different sites to their varying personal, professional, and teaching needs
  • Concerns remain about privacy, maintaining the class as a private space for free and open discussion, and the integrity of student submissions
  • Most faculty agree that “the interactive nature of online and mobile technologies create better learning environments” and that digital communication has increased communication with students
  • Faculty believe that online and mobile technologies can be distracting, and that they have resulted in longer working hours and more stress

Digital Identity and Digital Citizenship

5 Excellent Videos to Teach Your Students about Digital Citizenship ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

bibliography:

Ramspott’s blog entry best written for my personal taste, but here is a long list of additional and similar opinions:

Bramman, R. (n.d.). Digital Identity Essentials: Understanding Online Etiquette and the Rules Social Media Engagement. Research Personal Branding. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://www.reachpersonalbranding.com/digital-identity-essentials-understanding-online-etiquette-and-the-rules-social-media-engagement/

Braunstein, D. (2013, March 20). Digital Identities: Who Are You When You’re Online? Huffington Post. Retrieved from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/danya-braunstein/digital-identities-who-ar_b_2904211.html
Dalton, J. C., & Crosby, P. C. (2013). Digital Identity: How Social Media Are Influencing Student Learning and Development in College. Journal of College and Character, 14(1), 1–4. doi:10.1515/jcc-2013-0001
Death and the Social Network: The Persistence of Digital Identity. (n.d.). Jed Brubaker. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://www.jedbrubaker.com/death-and-the-social-network-the-persistence-of-digital-identity/
Digital identity. (2013, October 3). In Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Digital_identity&oldid=575355398
Digital Identity – Social Media and You. (n.d.). Altan Khendup. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://altankhendup.com/altankhendupblog/2013/6/6/digital-identity-social-media-and-you
Digital Identity and Social Media CFC. (n.d.). Liquid Learning. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://warburton.typepad.com/liquidlearning/2009/09/digital-identity-and-social-media-cfc.html
Digital Identity, Social Media, Privacy, Balance, and Being Radical. (n.d.). Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://eduniverse.org/digital-identity-social-media-privacy-balance-and-being-radical
fsubeccaramspott. (n.d.). 2013: The Year of Digital Identity Development in Higher Education. CASE Blog. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://blog.case.org/2013/01/15/2013-the-year-of-digital-identity-development-in-higher-education/
Higher Ed Live – Digital Identity Development. (n.d.). Higher Ed Live. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://higheredlive.com/higher-ed-live-digital-identity-development/
Manage Your Digital Identity | Inside Higher Ed. (n.d.). Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/gradhacker/manage-your-digital-identity
News: Social Media Thought Leader Eric Stoller to Speak About Digital Identity and Higher Education at Kent State, Feb. 14. (n.d.). Kent State University. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://www.kent.edu/news/newsdetail.cfm?newsitem=CAB2045F-0159-B0DC-526E15EFB8C5A416
Stewart, B. (n.d.). Digital Identities: Six Key Selves of Networked Publics. The Theoryblog. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://www.reachpersonalbranding.com/digital-identity-essentials-understanding-online-etiquette-and-the-rules-social-media-engagement/
Stroller, E. (n.d.). Digital Identity and Social Media // Speaker Deck. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from https://speakerdeck.com/ericstoller/digital-identity-and-social-media
Warburton, S., & Hatzipanagos, S. (Eds.). (2012). Digital Identity and Social Media: IGI Global. Retrieved from http://www.igi-global.com/book/digital-identity-social-media/63892

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Teach Digital Citizenship with … Minecraft

http://askatechteacher.wordpress.com/2013/10/03/teach-digital-citizenship-with-minecraft/

In the summer, there was an article about physics professor using Minecraft, but that’s not new because an MIT physics professor was using rap in the down of podcasting to teach physics and then another one later on was using Second Life. All of them gone by now…

From: Ewing, M Keith
Sent: Monday, September 30, 2013 4:43 PM
Subject: Eric Stoller on Digital Identity

A couple of interesting links to comments by Eric Stoller on “digital identity” – which he defines as “made up of their online interactions and exchanges.”

Character Clearinghouse – Interview with Eric Stoller, 2013 Jon C. Dalton Institute on College Student Values, Keynote Speaker

https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/jon-c-dalton-institute-on-college-student-values/keynote-speakers/925-stoller

Digital Identity Keynote at Curry College (full video is about 63 minutes; includes transcript of the Twitter stream about his talk)

http://ericstoller.com/blog/2013/06/21/digital-identity-keynote-at-curry-college/

Eric might make a good speaker to students (and faculty) …

my (Plamen) note: Keith’s email and his suggestions for readings, e.g.

http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/jcc.2013.14.issue-1/jcc-2013-0001/jcc-2013-0001.xml

connects with “contemplative computing” and Turkle’s disconnect, so I am entering as tags

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