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surveillance and privacy

FBI quietly changes its privacy rules for accessing NSA data on Americans

Classified revisions accepted by secret Fisa court affect NSA data involving Americans’ international emails, texts and phone calls

The FBI has quietly revised its privacy rules for searching data involving Americans’ international communications that was collected by the National Security Agency, US officials have confirmed to the Guardian.

Pro Domo Sua: Are We Puppets in a Wired World? Surveillance and privacy revisited…

More on privacy in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/page/2/?s=privacy&submit=Search

more on surveillance in this IMS blog:
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Surveillance Age and Librarians

Privacy in the Surveillance Age: How Librarians Can Fight Back.
Wednesday, December 9, 2015
2pm Eastern (11am Pacific | 12pm Mountain | 1pm Central)
Register: https://goo.gl/6Qelrm
Description:
In the wake of Edward Snowden’s revelations about NSA and FBI dragnet surveillance, many Americans are concerned that their rights to privacy and intellectual freedom are under threat. But librarians are perfectly positioned to help our communities develop strategies to protect themselves against unwanted surveillance. In this webinar, Alison Macrina and April Glaser of the Library Freedom Project will talk about the landscape of surveillance, the work of the LFP, and some tips and tools librarians can use to resist pervasive surveillance in the digital age.
About the Presenters:
 
Alison Macrina is a librarian, privacy rights activist, and the founder and director of the Library Freedom Project, an initiative which aims to make real the promise of intellectual freedom in libraries by teaching librarians and their local communities about surveillance threats, privacy rights and law, and privacy-protecting technology tools to help safeguard digital freedoms. Alison is passionate about connecting surveillance issues to larger global struggles for justice, demystifying privacy and security technologies for ordinary users, and resisting an internet controlled by a handful of intelligence agencies and giant multinational corporations. When she’s not doing any of that, she’s reading.
April Glaser is a writer and an activist with the Library Freedom Project. She currently works as a mobilization specialist at Greenpeace USA, where she focuses on ending oil extraction in the Arctic. Prior to Greenpeace, April was at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, organizing around the net neutrality campaign and EFF’s grassroots programming. April also previously worked with the Prometheus Radio Project, where her efforts helped propel the passage of the Local Community Radio Act, the largest expansion of community radio in U.S. history. She lives in Oakland, California and continues to work with local organizations on a range of digital rights issues.
Can’t make it to the live show? That’s okay. The session will be recorded and available on the Carterette Series Webinars site for later viewing.
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To register for the online event
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1. Go to registration page: https://goo.gl/6Qelrm
2. Complete and submit the form.
3. A URL for the event will be emailed to you immediately after registration.
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Contact a member of the Carterette Series planning team with questions or suggestions:
carteretteserieswebinars@gmail.com
More on privacy in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=privacy&submit=Search
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/10/23/pro-domo-sua-are-we-puppets-in-a-wired-world-surveillance-and-privacy-revisited/

AT&T allows NSA surveillance

New Documents and Reports Confirm AT&T and NSA’s Longstanding Surveillance Partnership

https://www.reddit.com/r/technology/comments/3h64l2/new_documents_and_reports_confirm_att_and_nsas/

Please consider previous IMS blog entries on this topic:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/09/25/online-privacy-its-time-for-a-new-security-paradigm/

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/07/01/privacy-and-surveillance-obama-advisor-john-podesta-every-country-has-a-history-of-going-over-the-line/

Pro Domo Sua: Are We Puppets in a Wired World? Surveillance and privacy revisited…

http://www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/2013/nov/07/are-we-puppets-wired-world/

Are We Puppets in a Wired World?

But while we were having fun, we happily and willingly helped to create the greatest surveillance system ever imagined, a web whose strings give governments and businesses countless threads to pull, which makes us…puppets. The free flow of information over the Internet (except in places where that flow is blocked), which serves us well, may serve others better. Whether this distinction turns out to matter may be the one piece of information the Internet cannot deliver.

 

section 702

4 Big Intelligence Stories You Missed Amid The Comey Headlines This Week

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more on surveillance and privacy in this IMS blog
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student privacy

Report: Tech Companies Are Spying on Children Through Devices and Software Used in Classroom

By Richard Chang 04/17/17

https://thejournal.com/articles/2017/04/17/report-tech-companies-are-spying-on-children-through-devices-and-software-used-in-classroom.aspx

according to a new report from the nonprofit Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), “Spying on Students: School-Issued Devices and Student Privacy

shows that state and federal laws, as well as industry self-regulation, have failed to keep up with a growing education technology industry.

One-third of all K–12 students in the United States use school-issued devices running software and apps that collect far more information on kids than is necessary.

Resource-poor school districts can receive these tools at deeply discounted prices or for free, as tech companies seek a slice of the $8 billion ed tech industry. But there’s a real, devastating cost — the tracking, cataloging and exploitation of data about children as young as 5 years old.

Our report shows that the surveillance culture begins in grade school, which threatens to normalize the next generation to a digital world in which users hand over data without question in return for free services

EFF surveyed more than 1,000 stakeholders across the country, including students, parents, teachers and school administrators, and reviewed 152 ed tech privacy policies.

“Spying on Students” provides comprehensive recommendations for parents, teachers, school administrators and tech companies to improve the protection of student privacy. Asking the right questions, negotiating for contracts that limit or ban data collection, offering families the right to opt out, and making digital literacy and privacy part of the school curriculum are just a few of the 70-plus recommendations for protecting student privacy contained in the report.

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more on students and privacy
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=student+privacy
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=privacy+government

https://www.privateinternetaccess.com/blog/2017/03/us-senate-votes-50-48-away-broadband-privacy-rules-let-isps-telecoms-sell-internet-history/

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-switch/wp/2017/03/28/the-house-just-voted-to-wipe-out-the-fccs-landmark-internet-privacy-protections/?utm_term=.34ed3dce7494

 

against government hackers

How to defend against government hackers

By Mark Rockwell Mar 31, 2017

https://fcw.com/articles/2017/03/31/rule41-aclu-defense-cyber.aspx

The 188-page “Challenging Government Hacking In Criminal Cases” report, released by the American Civil Liberties Union on March 30, addresses new amendments to Rule 41 of the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure, which took effect last December.

Under the changes to criminal procedure rules, feds can remotely search computers in multiple jurisdictions with a single warrant. The rules are touted by law enforcement agencies as a way to streamline 100-year-old rules of criminal procedure

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more on surveillance in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=surveillance

CIA hacks

WikiLeaks: Here’s how the CIA hacks your phones, TVs and PCs

The organization released thousands of documents it claims show how the US spy agency can crack open devices from Apple, Samsung, Google and Microsoft.

  https://www.cnet.com/news/wikileaks-cia-hacking-tools-phones-apple-samsung-microsoft-google/

This debate took off when the US Department of Justice sought to require Apple to help it open an encrypted iPhone belonging to one of the San Bernardino shooters. After Apple fought back in court, the FBI said it had obtained another way to access the phone.

Apple, Google and Motorola declined to comment on WikiLeaks’ claims. Samsung didn’t respond to a request for comment.

“The CIA/Wikileaks story today is about getting malware onto phones, none of the exploits are in Signal or break Signal Protocol encryption,” said Moxie Marlinspike, the founder of Signal. “This story isn’t about Signal or WhatsApp, but to the extent that it is, we see it as confirmation that what we’re doing is working.”

Telegram said on its website that the problem lies with operating systems and not encrypted messaging apps and that naming specific encrypted services is “misleading.” WhatsApp declined to comment.

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more on surveillance in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=surveillance

FBI can hack computers

This rule basically gives the FBI power to hack anyone

https://www.facebook.com/NowThisFuture/videos/1249249875165134/

Last-ditch effort to prevent changes to law enforcement hacking rule fails

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surveillance and privacy in this IMS bloghttp://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=surveillance

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