Searching for "teaching and learning"

Technology Week: Social Media in Teaching and Learning

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/12/04/social-media-explained/
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/11/17/connectivism-and-traditional-learning-theories/
Top 10 Social Media Management Tools: beyond Hootsuite and TweetDeck

SCSU’s First Technology in Teaching and Learning Institute

You are invited to participate in the “First Annual SCSU Technology in Teaching and Learning Summer Institute” co-sponsored by the Center for Continuing Studies, InfoMedia Services and the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning.

When?                                 Monday, May 13 – Tuesday, May 14, 2013

Where?                                Miller Center

Space is limited to 75 participants. Registration is required and can be completed at this link:     http://www.eventbrite.com/org/3606333855

The Institute program is available here: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/informedia/cetl/tech_institute_schedule.docx

Participants are eligible for incentive awards to support their teaching with technology. Please see the attachment, “participant incentives.”

The goal of the SCSU Technology in Teaching and Learning Summer Institute and its follow-up sessions is to provide high quality and effective pedagogical strategies, skills and discussions around the use of technology for teaching and learning in online, face-to-face and blended courses.  This Institute is part of our on-going varied and collaborative efforts to foster a professional peer learning climate around teaching and learning with technology.

 

Participants who attend all sessions on both days including the follow-ups and complete all evaluations will have the opportunity to use their self-assessment of current skills and knowledge of technology and select sessions in order to:

•             Acquire basic and advanced skills in using the current Learning Management System, i.e. D2L

•             Distinguish the appropriate use of pedagogical strategies with technology in online, face-to-face and blended settings

•             Explore opportunities to improve student learning through application of e-conferencing tools (e.g. Adobe Connect), and Web 2.0 tools such as social media, etc.

•             Meet and interact with faculty and staff experts and mentors and learn the processes by which they can get additional and on-going support for each of the above areas.

 

Please register no later than Wednesday May 8.

“Full-time faculty and full-time professional staff with teaching responsibilities who participate in both days of the “Summer Institute” and complete the evaluations will be rewarded with a $300 coupon for a one-time purchase of material that directly supports teaching with technology at the SCSU Computer Store in the Miller Center.  Faculty who participate in one of the two days will receive a $150 coupon for the same purpose. Coupons are not transferable.

 

Please remember that the items purchased remain the property of SCSU but may be used by the purchaser to support their teaching and related academic activities.

 

Upon completion of the “Summer Institute” participants will be contacted by the SCSU Online Office to verify level of participation in the institute and verify eligibility for funds. These funds must be spent by June 15, 2013.”

 

Clarification on Presenters Registration

  1. Presenters do not have to register unless they want to attend both days.
  2. If presenters are not going to participate in sessions other than the one(s) they are presenting but want to eat lunch with us on either day please contact me directly so we can add you to the lunch count and identify any dietary needs

Mobile Devices for Teaching and Learning: A Discussion

For those of you, who missed the discussion on the use of Mobile Devices today, Thursday, Feb. 21, please have links to the presentations of Laurie Crane and Annette Lee.

Here is link to the information presented by Annette Lee: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/aslee/VIDEOPROJECT/home.html

Here is a link to the information presented by Laurie Crane:

http://web.stcloudstate.edu/informedia/mobile/mobile_devices.pptx

Please contact ims@stcloudstate.edu if you need more information  

Follow us on Twitter: @scsutechinstruc #techworkshop

Emergency Remote Teaching and Online Learning

The Difference Between Emergency Remote Teaching and Online Learning

 Published:

https://er.educause.edu/articles/2020/3/the-difference-between-emergency-remote-teaching-and-online-learning

Moving instruction online can enable the flexibility of teaching and learning anywhere, anytime, but the speed with which this move to online instruction is expected to happen is unprecedented and staggering.

“Online learning” will become a politicized term that can take on any number of meanings depending on the argument someone wants to advance.

Online learning carries a stigma of being lower quality than face-to-face learning, despite research showing otherwise. These hurried moves online by so many institutions at once could seal the perception of online learning as a weak option

Researchers in educational technology, specifically in the subdiscipline of online and distance learning, have carefully defined terms over the years to distinguish between the highly variable design solutions that have been developed and implemented: distance learning, distributed learning, blended learning, online learning, mobile learning, and others. Yet an understanding of the important differences has mostly not diffused beyond the insular world of educational technology and instructional design researchers and professionals.

Online learning design options (moderating variables)

  • Modality
    • Fully online
    • Blended (over 50% online)
    • Blended (25–50% online)
    • Web-enabled F2F

    Pacing

    • Self-paced (open entry, open exit)
    • Class-paced
    • Class-paced with some self-paced

    Student-Instructor Ratio

    • < 35 to 1
    • 36–99 to 1
    • 100–999 to 1
    • > 1,000 to 1

    Pedagogy

    • Expository
    • Practice
    • Exploratory
    • Collaborative

    Role of Online Assessments

    • Determine if student is ready for new content
    • Tell system how to support the student (adaptive instruction)
    • Provide student or teacher with information about learning state
    • Input to grade
    • Identify students at risk of failure
  • Instructor Role Online
    • Active instruction online
    • Small presence online
    • None

    Student Role Online

    • Listen or read
    • Complete problems or answer questions
    • Explore simulation and resources
    • Collaborate with peers

    Online Communication Synchrony

    • Asynchronous only
    • Synchronous only
    • Some blend of both

    Source of Feedback

    • Automated
    • Teacher
    • Peers
Source: Content adapted from Barbara Means, Marianne Bakia, and Robert Murphy, Learning Online: What Research Tells Us about Whether, When and How (New York: Routledge, 2014).
Typical planning, preparation, and development time for a fully online university course is six to nine months before the course is delivered. Faculty are usually more comfortable teaching online by the second or third iteration of their online courses.
In contrast to experiences that are planned from the beginning and designed to be online, emergency remote teaching (ERT) is a temporary shift of instructional delivery to an alternate delivery mode due to crisis circumstances. It involves the use of fully remote teaching solutions for instruction or education that would otherwise be delivered face-to-face or as blended or hybrid courses and that will return to that format once the crisis or emergency has abated.
A full-course development project can take months when done properly. The need to “just get it online” is in direct contradiction to the time and effort normally dedicated to developing a quality course. Online courses created in this way should not be mistaken for long-term solutions but accepted as a temporary solution to an immediate problem.

+++++++++++++++++
More on online learning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+learning

AI and VR for teaching learning

Egan, K., Foley, J., Nicholson, K., & Sloane, K. (2018, May 22). The Promise and Pitfalls of AI and VR for Teaching and Learning [Virtual]. eXtended Reality (XR): How AR, VR, and MR Are Extending Learning Opportunities. Educause. Retrieved from https://events.educause.edu/eli/focus-sessions/2018/extended-reality-xr-how-ar-vr-and-mr-are-extending-learning-opportunities/agenda/the-promise-and-pitfalls-of-ai-and-vr-for-teaching-and-learning
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1YL5bpAQeDcVUJnEuykl4KHnJMZXIWcis/view
https://events.educause.edu/~/media/files/events/eli/focus-sessions/2018/fs1801/ol03/transcript.doc
+++++++++++
more on AI in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=artificial+intelligence
more on VR in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality

video for learning and teaching

Videos in the classroom: fast and easy.

Feb. 10, 10-10:45PM. MC 205. attendees cap is 5.

List of other instruction sessions available here: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/free-tech-instruction/

++++++++++++++
more on video editing in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=video+editing

International Journal of Web-Based Learning and Teaching Technologies

International Journal of Web-Based Learning and Teaching Technologies,

IJWLTT

http://www.igi-global.com/gateway/issue/131613

ISSN: 1548-1093|EISSN: 1548-1107|DOI: 10.4018/IJWLTT.20161001
Mahesh S. Raisinghani (Texas Woman’s University, USA)

different kind of teaching this fall

https://www.facebook.com/groups/onlinelearningcollective/permalink/576092676354768/

Are Colleges Ready for a Different Kind of Teaching This Fall?

By Beth McMurtrie May 05, 2020

https://www.chronicle.com/article/Are-Colleges-Ready-for-a/248710

Skeptical students and their parents don’t seem willing to pay full price for an experience similar to what they lived through this semester. If virtual learning is mandatory this fall, one survey found, two-thirds of students will expect discounts on tuition and fees. Some may avoid enrolling altogether.

Education experts who have been following higher education’s transition to remote learning say that colleges need to act now if they want to be fully prepared for the fall.

Colleges should start by evaluating what went well, and poorly, this spring, so they can start identifying gaps in training, planning, and technology, he says. They should also assess their campus resources to begin preparing instructors for the fall. They may find that instructional designers, academic-technology experts, and faculty members familiar with online tools and teaching are less effective because they are spread thinly across campus, not centrally deployed.

Effective online teaching, Wade says, depends more on building engagement than on mastering complicated technology.

At the University of Central Florida, Thomas B. Cavanagh, vice provost for digital learning, estimates that more than 80 percent of its 1,600 faculty members had received some form of professional development for teaching online before the coronavirus hit, ranging from self-paced training on how to use the learning-management system to the university’s 10-week online-course-design program. Given the need to rapidly prepare hundreds of instructors, says Cavanagh, the university is in the process of developing a streamlined three-week course, “essentials of online teaching,” through which it expects to train around 200 instructors. About 350 instructors will also take a short course called “teaching through lecture capture — Zoom edition,” he says.

1 2 3 4 40