Searching for "team work"

K12 IT leaders work with people

K-12 IT leaders need to work with people, not just tech

<https://www.educationdive.com/news/k-12-it-leaders-need-to-work-with-people-not-just-tech/555004/

My note: this is the first step toward the conclusion of my dissertation: the CIO in education must wear three hats: computer geek, educator and administrator.

District Administration reports.

Since edtech varies from district to district and state to state, it’s unlikely that an IT candidate will be up-to-speed on the current system in use. Alabama solves this problem by offering the Alabama Chief Technology Officer certification program.

It is critical for those in K-12 IT leadership to understand the unique customer service needs of the education industry. When technology doesn’t work, it throws a wrench into an entire day of learning. Educators need a fast fix and responsive service. Effective tech leaders will delegate by teaming up with tech-savvy teachers who can serve as school tech leaders. This strategy allows for an on-site tech expert to step in to put out fires before the tech expert arrives.

Former teachers can also make strong chief technology officers because they understand both tech and education. This allows them to build trust with the staff, which is a critical component to launching new technology initiatives.

++++++++++++
more on digital literacy for EDAD in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy+edad

Gen Z and the workforce

Gen Z is coming to your office. Get ready to adapt

Janet Adamy, Sept 6, 2018

https://www.wsj.com/graphics/genz-is-coming-to-your-office/

Early signs suggest Gen Z workers are more competitive and pragmatic, but also more anxious and reserved, than millennials, the generation of 72 million born from 1981 to 1996, according to executives, managers, generational consultants and multidecade studies of young people. Gen Zers are also the most racially diverse generation in American histor

With the generation of baby boomers retiring and unemployment at historic lows, Gen Z is filling immense gaps in the workforce. Employers, plagued by worker shortages, are trying to adapt.

LinkedIn Corp. and Intuit Inc. have eased requirements that certain hires hold bachelor’s degrees to reach young adults who couldn’t afford college. At campus recruiting events, EY is raffling off computer tablets because competition for top talent is intense.

Companies are reworking training so it replicates YouTube-style videos that appeal to Gen Z workers reared on smartphones.

“They learn new information much more quickly than their predecessors,”

A few years ago Mr. Stewart noticed that Gen Z hires behaved differently than their predecessors. When the company launched a project to support branch managers, millennials excitedly teamed up and worked together. Gen Z workers wanted individual recognition and extra pay.

diverse age group

 

Much of Gen Z’s socializing takes place via text messages and social media platforms—a shift that has eroded natural interactions and allowed bullying to play out in front of wider audiences.

The flip side of being digital natives is that Gen Z is even more adept with technology than millennials. Natasha Stough, Americas campus recruiting director at EY in Chicago, was wowed by a young hire who created a bot to answer questions on the company’s Facebook careers page.

To lure more Gen Z workers, EY rolled out video technology that allows job candidates to record answers to interview questions and submit them electronically.

LinkedIn, which used to recruit from about a dozen colleges, broadened its efforts to include hundreds of schools and computer coding boot camps to capture a diverse applicant pool that mirrors the changing population.

++++++++++
more on Gen Z in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=gen+z

hi ed leader team

5 SECRETS TO DEVELOPING A HIGH-PERFORMING TEAM IN HIGHER EDUCATION
Patrick Sanaghan & Jillian Lohndorf

https://www.academia.edu/8335887/Ways_to_Improve_Teams_in_Higher_Education

6 POTENTIALLY DESTRUCTIVE MYTHS
#1: THE MYTH ABOUT TALENT
A variety of skills, experiences,and perspectives are necessary,along with high levels of trust, open communication, emotional support, and mutual accountability—all of which arevery hard to establish and maintain. One differentiator of an exceptional team is a high level of curiosity where questions(not hidden criticisms) are prized.

#2: THE MYTH ABOUT FOCUS

stellar teams allocate their time in an unexpected way. They spend two-thirds of their time on thetask at hand (gettin’ ‘er done) and a full one-third on the “process” or relational aspect of the team’s functioning

#3: THE MYTH ABOUT CONFLICT

Exceptional teams see conflict as a resource, not something to be avoided.

Leaders need both the skill and the courage to deal with conflict on their team, as well as the understanding that everyone on the team needs to be involved in its resolution. 

#4: THE MYTH ABOUT OPENNESS

  • the “ seduction of the leader ” syndrome frequently seen in higher education.  Due to the “collegial” and polite nature of most campuses, people simply don’t feel comfortable providing honest feedback,especially if it is negative or critical. 
  • Many people are reluctant to be honest, because it might hurt someone’s feelings. 
  • People don’t want to “lose their seat at the table” and fear that they risk doing so if they are truly honest.
  • People realize that the leader really isn’t open to honest feedback, even as the leader professes to want it

#5: THE MYTH ABOUT SAMENESS

One of the pervasive team dynamics that every team leader needs to be aware of is
“comfortable cloning.”
 This happens when we select people to be on our teams who have similar backgrounds to ours.

#6: THE MYTH ABOUT MOTIVATIONAL METAPHORS

One of the best ways to build a realteam is to have each team membershare their own metaphor for how theywould like the team to operate.

5 STRATEGIES FOR DEVELOPING A STELLAR TEAM

1. Make your team a learning team, by creating an internal article or book club.

2. Define the rules for decision making.

3. Create working agreements or“ground rules” for the functioning and support of the team.

4. Establish a mechanism for regular, anonymous evaluation of team meetings.

5. Conduct a leadership “audit.”

++++++++++++++++++++++
more on leadership in higher ed in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=ed+leader

MinnState Online Strategies Team 3

SCTCC continue from

Tuesday, October 30 from 9:00am-3:00pm at the System Office, Wells Fargo Place (Saint Paul, MN).

Team 3 is charged with developing a process for prioritizing and selecting collaborative curriculum development and course offering projects that require the use of enterprise instructional design and technology services.

Have expertise in online education that you are willing to share?

The Online Strategy Workgroup needs subject matter experts to participate on one of the three teams below.

  • Team 1 (Access) –  Team 1 is charged with reviewing the existing services provided by the Minnesota State Info Hub and aligning the services they provide with the needs outlined in the corresponding action steps of the Online Strategy report.  This team will utilize the existing levels of funding allocated to the Minnesota State Info Hub without seeking additional financial compensation from campuses.  See what subject matter experts are needed for this team.
  • Team 2 (Quality) –  Team 2 is charged with reviewing the existing services provided by the Minnesota Online Quality Initiative (MOQI) and aligning these services with the needs outlined in the corresponding action steps of this report.  In addition to evaluating faculty development programming options available through MOQI, this team will be responsibility for developing the tools intended to support the quality improvement processes used by campuses.   See what subject matter experts are needed for this team.
  • Team 3 (Collaboration) -Team 3 is charged with developing a process for prioritizing and selecting online collaborative curriculum development and  online course offering projects that require the use of enterprise instructional design and technology services.  See what subject matter experts are needed for this team.

https://mnscu.sharepoint.com/teams/ENTPR-Online-Strategy/SitePages/Team-3—Collaboration.aspx  MinnState STAR ID login: STARID@minnstate.edu

+++++++++++++
November 20, 2016

Becky Lindseth, MIchael Olesen, Bob Bilyk, Stephen Kelly, Kim Lynch, Scott Wojtanowski, Wilson Garland, Martin Springborg, Scott W and Kim Lynch

Proposal Request / Background (description of project proposal)

where does CETL fit here.

https://www.grayassociates.com/

https://distanceminnesota.org/

program level course mapping.
course level modules and learning objectives.

RCE reasonable credit equivalency

IAA inter-agency agreement

RFP request for proposal

Collaborate on Curriculum and Course Offerings (Action A)
Adopting Open Educational Resources (OER) (Action A)
Revenue Sharing Model (Action D)
Instructional Design and Technology Services (Action C)

SpringboardVR and Steam in libraries

Springboard Vr and Steam for virtual reality in libraries

A bit more information from SpringboardVR for anyone interested:
Here is a link to their setup guide – https://docs.google.com/document/d/1dYp4-hoHcJD3I8_YdyNh8PI-4CFvkWfVT3HJ-NK6FvY/edit
It is currently built specifically for arcades, but they think there are a lot of features that libraries could still find useful.
They also have a booking system:
https://docs.google.com/document/d/14-HvD-F1Kt7aTrlwiKdq8aXouU5d4l0lszPo6TwlM1w/edit

I heard back from Steam, with exactly the response I expected: Our service model (users reserve our own PC and VR headset, using our Steam software) needs to use their site license program. And even if it’s just on that one PC, we’d still have to run their site license server locally to manage it.

We did an inventory of what it would cost us to purchase a site license for our most popular games: Of our top 25 most played VR games, only 10 have site licenses available at all. Those 10 games would in total cost us slightly more than $3000 per year to license, which strikes me as ridiculous.

But Tara, thanks for pointing out Springboard VR! At a glance it looks really promising. I’m really glad to hear about another option.

-Chad

We ran into the same problem last year with Steam. However, we are now working with Springboard VR. Our head VR specialist says you can test run their interface on a machine for free and that they are putting together an academic package that should be available soon!  https://springboardvr.com/
Tara
Amazing timing, Laura! I was just looking into the site license program this week. I wrote up what I’ve learned so far for someone else this morning, shared below. But to sum up, it’s not very promising either from a financial or practical view of the way we use Steam currently (one PC with Steam titles that we’ve purchased under our account, with an attached HTC Vive).
I originally thought this was just a different kind of license for each game, one which allows public use in a library, cafe, etc. But I got some clarification questions answered by Steam support – it’s actually designed for users to log into one of our computers using their own Steam account. They can then check out a game we’ve purchased a site license for, and play it under their account while they’re on our computer.
 
This also requires running some sort of server locally to handle the checkouts.
 
So I don’t think this is going to work for us. The pricing is also pretty wild. One of our most popular titles is Space Pirate Trainer – currently $10 paid one time to own individually, or $30/month/seat for a site license subscription. And I’ve seen at least one title that’s free for individual ownership, but somehow costs $20/month/seat for site license.
 
Much of their documentation is contradictory and out of date.
 
Even more annoying is that you can’t even see the site license prices until you sign up for a site license account and fill out some legal forms.
 
Last but not least, many titles, even free ones, do not have site licenses available at all.
 
I have one more request into Steam support asking how they prefer we purchase things as a library. I’ll let you know what I hear.
 
Oh, also – you can’t convert an existing Steam account or purchases. You need to create a new one and start from scratch.
 
-Chad
We’d also like to know if any other libraries had set up the Steam/Valve Site license, which we were just starting to look into ourselves:  https://support.steampowered.com/kb_article.php?ref=3303-QWRC-3436  – which sounds like it solves many of these problems. Our general counsel has a few issues with the license terms but are willing to consider especially if I can find examples of other institutions utilizing it!
 
____________________________________________________________________
Laura K. Wiegand
Interim University Librarian
Associate Director Library Information Technology and Digital Strategies
Echoing what Peter said there are no good solutions right now.  It would be great if Steam or HTC or Oculus offered site licenses or group accounts, but they don’t.  We have 2 HTC Vives that share an account.  This causes problems occasionally as it doesn’t like it if two headsets are using the same program.  Going offline usually takes care of it.  Our 4 Oculus Rifts also share an account but the Oculus store is less problematic than Steam since it only contacts the mother ship when doing an update.  If you have the option prepaid cards and individual accounts would be the best way to go but our purchasing department said no.
Edward Iglesias
In our library’s VR Studio, we have a separate library-owned Steam account for each of 7 VR workstation computers. Some have Vives, some have Oculus Rifts at them. We purchase content for each account. We also allow patrons to download free games/tools to those computers.
If a patron owns Steam content that we don’t, they may log in to their personal account and download the game to our computer. So far, this hasn’t posed a problem, except that the added game will show up in that workstation account’s game list, but will not be playable to other patrons. I occasionally delete personal games that are causing confusion to other patrons.  Not too many patrons have downloaded content yet so if it gets to be too troublesome we may disallow it in the future.
For the Oculus Rift stations, there is a Steam account as mentioned above, plus the Oculus library. For Oculus, I’ve been able to use one account for all of the workstations. We purchase content once and it’s usable on all the computers from the one account. This has worked fine so far except for playing multi-player online. The single account will not support multiple instances of online play for the same game.
None of these is a perfect solution but they are mostly working as this is a continuous work in progress. Feel free to get in touch off list if you’d like more specific info, etc.
Thanks,
Pete
Hi all,
I was curious if any of your libraries have Steam from Valve installed on your public workstations to drive PC gaming and an HTC Vive? Any tips on how to set that up? Obviously the licensing issue with purchased programs/games through Steam is a problem when you are providing access for a large user base. There are multiple free games/programs available.
How do you handle providing each user with HDD/SSD space on your machines for downloaded games/programs through Steam?
Thanks,
Alex
Elisandro Cabada
Engineering and Innovation Liaison Librarian
Computer Science, Electrical and Computer Engineering Librarian

++++++++++++
more on Virtual Reality in libraries in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality+library

OER workday librarians

Librarians OER Workday

SCSU ad hoc team on open books from Spring 2015

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/04/06/e-textbook-ad-hoc-team/

Gary Hunter
Creating OER Texbooks using copyright and CC licensed materials.

http://www.minnstate.edu/system/asa/academicaffairs/policy/copyright/index.html

http://www.minnstate.edu/system/asa/academicaffairs/policy/ip/index.html

What can be put on the OER textbooks:

D2L upload: every time, it is called “distribution.”

plays, music, prerecorded files such as DVD, music CD.

sculpture or painting on a Web site,

five rights avoid violating. System procedure 3.27.1 copyright clearance

 

Copyright and OER, GRIT May2017 from Esko Lius

DMCA Digital Millennium Copyright Act

there are certain works which are not protected

Dmc aexemptions2010 from dixieyeager

The difference between Plagiarism and copyright infringement

CI is a violation of a federal law. Plagiarism can turn into CI.

creative commons

Creative Commons License Basics 2010 from Sue Gallaway

NC – no competitor can take our work and use it against us.

faculty can use anything in F2F, which is lawfully obtained. Flickr, photo without violating the regulations, it can be used in a PPT, but only on a F2F classroom. In OER, it needs to be revised.

Gary can share a “media release” form (slid 17).

Open Textbook Institute (Kimberly Johnson)

++++++++++++++++++
Shane Nackerud and Matthew Lee
use of Pressbooks (it is open source). Minitex pays a vendor to host it, but it can be hosted locally, because it is open source

https://mlpp.pressbooks.pub/
Minnesota Library Publishing Project – partner ship between Minitex and public libraries.

authoring tool. Platform to edit and publish.

Building an Ebook Platform from Scratch: Are You Daft?

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/03/07/library-technology-conference-2017/ 

++++++++++++++++++++

Alex Kent, Digital Initiative Librarian

Islandora

Islandora Overview: PASIG May 2013 from Mark Leggott

++++++++++++++++++++

OER stakeholders and critical contacts on your campus: CETL, TLTR

Preparation: as per link above, the libraray (former LRS) met in the spring of 2015

what is the role of the library staff in the OER movement. promote what already exists. Open textbook group https://www.cccoer.org/

+++++++++++++++++++
Stephen Kelly, OER Project Grants Manager

https://www.opened.com/

++++++++++++++++++
more on OER in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=open+source

workforce skills

These are the top 10 workforce skills students will need by 2020

By Laura Ascione, Managing Editor, Content Services, @eSN_Laura
June 20th, 2017
a recent McGraw-Hill Education survey, just 40 percent of college seniors said they felt their college experience was helpful in preparing for a career. Alarmingly, that percentage plummeted to 19 percent for women answering the same question.
data from the nonprofit Institute for the Future, there are 6 drivers of change in today’s workforce:
1. Extreme longevity: People are living longer–by 2025 the number of Americans older than 60 will increase by 70 percent
2. The rise of smart machines and systems: Technology can augment and extend our own capabilities, and workplace automation is killing repetitive jobs
3. Computational world: Increases in sensors and processing makes the world a programmable system; data will give us the ability to see things on a scale that has never been possible
4. New media ecology: New communication tools require media literacies beyond text; visual communication media is becoming a new vernacular
5. Superstructured organizations: Social technologies drive new forms of production and value creation, and social tools are allowing organizations to work at extreme scales
6. Globally connected world: Diversity and adaptability are at the center of operations–the U.S. and Europe no longer hold a monopoly on job creation, innovation, and political power

The top 10 workforce skills of 2020 include:

1. Sense making: The ability to determine the deeper meaning or significance of what is being expressed. The Drivers: Rise of smart machines and systems

2. Social intelligence: The ability to connect to others in a deep and direct way, to sense and stimulate reactions and desired interactions. The Drivers: Rise of smart machines and systems, globally connected world

3. Novel and adaptive thinking: Proficiency at thinking and coming up with solutions and responses beyond that which is rote or rule-based. The Drivers: Rise of smart machines and systems, globally connected world

4. Cross cultural competency: The ability to operate in different cultural settings. The Drivers: Superstructured organizations, globally connected world

5. Computational thinking: The ability to translate vast amounts of data into abstract concepts and to understand data based reasoning. The Drivers: New media ecology, computational world

6. New media literacy: The ability to critically assess and develop content that uses new media forms, and to leverage these media for persuasive communication. The Drivers: Extreme longevity, new media ecology, Superstructured organizations

7. Transdisciplinary: Literacy in and ability to understand concepts across multiple disciplines. The Drivers: Extreme longevity, computational world

8. Design mindset: The ability to represent and develop tasks and work processes for desired outcomes. The Drivers: Superstructured organizations, computational world

9. Cognitive load management: The ability to discriminate and filter information for importance, and to understand how to maximize cognitive functions. The Drivers: Superstructured organizations, computational world, new media ecology

10. Virtual collaboration: The ability to work productively, drive engagement, and demonstrate presence as a member of a virtual team. The Drivers: Superstructured organizations, globally connected world

++++++++++++++++++++
more on skills in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=skills

working with a toxic colleague

Three tips for working with a toxic colleague

https://fcw.com/blogs/lectern/2016/10/kelman-working-with-toxic-colleagues.aspx

long-time squabbles over promotions, resources and power create embittered workplace foes who would rather walk across the street than share a sidewalk with each other.” This is probably even more the case in government organizations than private ones, since in the private sector it is easier to get rid of problems by firing or reassigning people in dysfunctional relationships.

The first has the enormous virtue of being straightforward rather than devious or wily, tactics that always run the risk of backfiring, but even more so when relationships are already hostile. “Attempt to reconcile,” Perry urges. Try “the old-fashioned approach and sit down and propose a fresh restart,” he writes. “Bring your humility and focus on describing why a thaw is best for the team and firm. Once a détente is agreed upon, make certain to find ample opportunities to display good faith.”

seek to “partner with the adversary to navigate a crisis” as a way to repair a bad relationship.

overcoming this hostility was to put the boys in a situation where they could not deal with a problem with only the people in one group, but work by both groups was necessary. (so it is a management’s failure, what we have here, since the management does not even want to recognize that there is a problem)

The third piece of advice is to engage a broker. “Particularly for situations involving warring… senior executives,” Perry notes, “the temporary use of a broker or intermediary can facilitate progress on issues.”

Social network platforms for HigherEd

Social network platforms for HigherEd

Excellent discussion on the blend-online listserv on :

Can anyone recommend a good social network platform, preferably Cloud-based, that could be used to facilitate substantive organic communication and collaboration among past, present and future students on a handful of online and blended learning programs?

From: The EDUCAUSE Blended and Online Learning Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Robert Tousignant
Sent: Wednesday, January 21, 2015 11:50 AM
To: BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [BLEND-ONLINE] Social network platforms for HigherEd

 

Also, as mentioned in my previous post, Schoology (http://www.schoology.com) offers an LMS with a modern social media interface and integrations with Facebook, Microsoft OneDrive, etc… you might want to add it to the list as well.

Bes,

Bob

From: Victoria Cardullo <vmc0004@AUBURN.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE Blended and Online Learning Constituent Group Listserv <BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Wednesday, January 21, 2015 at 12:37 PM
To: BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU” <BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [BLEND-ONLINE] Social network platforms for HigherEd

I added both thanks for the update and clarification.

 Facebook Group “Groups for Schools” feature today which will allow American colleges to create Group pages accessible only within the school community.
 LinkedIn LinkedIn is a business-oriented social networking service. Founded in December 2002 and launched on May 5, 2003, it is mainly used for professional networking.
 K-12 Edmodo Edmodo is a social networking site for teachers and students where over 46 million teachers, students, and parents are connecting to collaborate on assignments, discover new resources. Edmodo is a web 2.0 social networking tool for educators to use to communicate with students and parents.
 Microsoft OneDrive  A file hosting service that allows users to upload and sync files to a cloud storage and then access them from a Web browser or their local device.
 12manage.com A free management education and business education platform for management and organization of business or education.
 Yammer Yammer a private social network collaboration software and business applications that allows the user to connect to the right people, share information across teams and organize around projects.
Celly Celly is a platform for ad-hoc social networks that is accessible via iPhone, Android, Web, SMS text and even email. Networks connect individuals and communities for instant and easy communication.
Jive Jive is a communication and collaboration platform solution for business. Jive enables employees, partners and customers to work together.
 Twitter Twitter is a powerhouse for marketing, communication, business, and even education, letting people from around the world work together, share ideas, and gain exposure to concepts.
 Google+ Communities Google+ is a place to connect with friends and family, and explore interests. Google+ allows the user to share photos, send messages, and stay in touch with the people globally.
Hive Social Hive Social is a specialist Social Media consultancy, that helps businesses and brands find, connect, build and engage with their online audience through Social Media and Digital Marketing.
Enterprise Hive HiveSocial for higher education is an enterprise social software, communication and collaboration platform with embedded game mechanics
Socialtext Socialtext applies Web 2.0 technologies such as enterprise microblogging, enterprise social networking and wikis to the critical challenges facing businesses. Socialtext’s platform allows employees to share expertise, speed workflows, and get their jobs done faster.
 Elgg  Elgg an open source social networking software that provides individuals and organizations with the components needed to create an online social environment. It offers blogging, microblogging, file sharing, networking, and groups

Dr. Victoria Cardullo

Auburn University

Assistant Reading Professor

Curriculum and Teaching

vmc0004@auburn.edu

334-844-6882

“Learning is finding out what you already know, Doing is demonstrating that you know it, Teaching is reminding others that they know it as well as you do. We are all learners, doers, and teachers.”

—  Richard David Bach

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Blended and Online Learning Constituent Group Listserv [BLEND-ONLINE@listserv.educause.edu] on behalf of Kampmann, David L [David.Kampmann@SOUTHEASTTECH.EDU]
Sent: Tuesday, January 20, 2015 3:02 PM
To: BLEND-ONLINE@listserv.educause.edu
Subject: Re: [BLEND-ONLINE] Social network platforms for HigherEd

A Facebook group is probably the quickest, easiest, and will give you the best engagement. Data shows that in the under 25 age group, Facebook groups is still popular.

If you were trying to reach mainly current and future, I would shift to LinkedIn.

All of those other social networks and white label networks require people to remember another log in, site, and place to check and update. You might get good engagement up front, but it will deteriorate.

David Kampmann, M.S. in Ed, CFD | Southeast Technical Institute

Instructional Facilitator | p: (605) 367-5531 | @mrkampmann

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Blended and Online Learning Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Ed Garay
Sent: Tuesday, January 20, 2015 11:07 AM
To: BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: [BLEND-ONLINE] Social network platforms for HigherEd

 

Can anyone recommend a good social network platform, preferably Cloud-based, that could be used to facilitate substantive organic communication and collaboration among past, present and future students on a handful of online and blended learning programs?

 

I am familiar with Google+ Communities, Yammer, Jive and Socialtext, but I am wondering if there are other solutions worth investigating. Facebook at Work might be a possibility, but it is too early to tell. Elgg is also a viable option, especially, a hosted Elgg instance, but identifying a fully functional, customizable and super easy to use and administrate Cloud-first solution is most desirable.

 

Thank you very much.

— Ed Garay

University of Illinois at Chicago

http://www.twitter.com/garay

google.com/+EdGaray

IPad.

 

1 2 3 16

Skip to toolbar