Searching for "technology learning"

2020 Immersive Learning Technology

2020 Immersive Learning Technology

https://www.jff.org/what-we-do/impact-stories/jfflabs-acceleration/2020-immersive-learning-technology/

2020-Immersion-012420 per Mark Gill’s finding

Technology is rapidly changing how we learn and grow. More and more, tools and platforms that make use of virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR), and extended reality (ER)—collectively known as immersive learning technology—are moving from the niche world of Silicon Valley into retail stores, warehouses, factory floors, classrooms as well as corporate education and training programs. The value is clear: these immersive learning tools help companies, training providers, and educators train workers better, faster, and more efficiently. Of course, the impact doesn’t stop at the bottom line. Immersive learning presents an opportunity to reliably train employees for situations that are expensive to support, challenging to replicate, and even dangerous. And it can be done efficiently, safely, and with better learning outcomes.

1 in every 3 small and mid-size businesses in the U.S. is expected to be piloting a VR employee training program by 2021, seeing their new hires reach full productivity 50% faster as a result.1

The worldwide AR and VR market size is forecast to grow nearly 7.7 times between 2018 and 2022.

14 million AR and VR devices are expected to be sold in 2019

By 2023, enterprise VR hardware and software revenue is expected to jump 587% to $5.5 billion, up from an estimated $800 million in 2018.

Virtual Reality VR  A computer-generated experience that simulates reality. VR may include visual, auditory, or tactile experiences.

Augmented Reality AR A live experience of a physical space, where computer-enhanced visualizations, sounds, or tactile experiences overlay the real-world environment.

Mixed Reality MR A blend of virtual experiences and the real world where virtual and augmented experiences are presented simultaneously

Extended Reality ER  An immersive experience involving interactions with the real world, virtual reality, augmented reality, as well as other machines or computers adding content to the experience.

Soft Skills Technical Skills Immersive learning technologies can help people develop human skills, such as empathy, customer service, improving diversity and inclusion, and other areas

Technical Skills.  Immersive learning technologies enable workers to learn through simulated experiences, providing the opportunity for risk-free repetition of complex or dangerous technical tasks.

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more on immersive learning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=immersive+learning

MN summit on learning and technology 2019

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/oer/2019/07/29/oer-collaboration/

Open Community: OER Collaboration and Support

Open Community: OER Collaboration and Support, 8/1/19, MN Summit on Learning and Technology

Thursday, August 1, 11:30 AM Central Time. We stream our discussion live on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/InforMediaServices/

Rachel Wexelbaum, Assoc Prof, University Library, St Cloud State University  email@stcloudstate.edu
Plamen Miltenoff, Professor, InforMedia Services, St Cloud State University pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu
Aura Lippincott, Instructional Designer, Western Connecticut State University lippincotta@wcsu.edu

learning and educational technology

Modern​ ​Learning:​ ​Re-Discovering​ ​the Transformative​ ​Promise​ ​of Educational​ ​Technology

By​ ​Steve​ ​Hargadon​ ​(​@stevehargadon​) Survey​ ​and​ ​Report:​ ​​modernlearning.com​​ ​|​

http://www.modernlearning.com/the-report.html

  • When do you believe technology enhances learning, and when do you believe
    it does not?
  • How has technology impacted your own learning?
  • Does your school, library, or organization have a specific learning philosophy that guides ed-tech purchases and implementation? If yes, what is that philosophy?
    More than 450 responses were received (those that agreed for their answers to be
    shared publicly can be seen at http://www.modernlearning.com).

For the purposes of this report, “educational technology” (often abbreviated as “ed tech”) is assumed to refer principally to the use of modern electronic computing and other high-tech, mostly Internet-enabled, devices and services in education.

Observation​ ​1​:​ ​There​ ​is​ ​general​ ​agreement​ ​that there​ ​are​ ​good​ ​and​ ​pedagogically-sound​ ​arguments  or​ ​the​ ​implementation​ ​and​ ​active​ ​use​ ​of​ ​ed​ ​tech; and​ ​that​ ​technology​ ​is​ ​changing,​ ​and​ ​will​ ​change, education​ ​for​ ​the​ ​better.

Observation​ ​2​:​ ​There​ ​is​ ​general​ ​agreement​ ​that technology​ ​is​ ​not​ ​always​ ​beneficial​ ​to​ ​teaching​ ​and learning.

When it becomes a distraction.
● When there is little or no preparation for it.
● When just used for testing / score tracking.
● When used for consuming and not creating, or just for rote learning.
● When “following the education trends: everyone else is doing it.”
● When the tech is “an end rather than means” (also stated as, ”when I don’t have a plan or learning goal…”). We found this very significant, and it is the focus of Observation 6.
● When there is a lack of guidance in how to effectively use new ed tech tools (“when there is no PD”). This is the focus of Observation 4.
● Finally, when it “gets in the way of real time talk / sharing.” Forgetting that the tech “cannot mentor, motivate, show beauty, interact fully, give quality attention, [or] contextualize.” Also: ”outcomes related to acquiring the skills and attitudes cannot be enhanced by technology.” As mentioned in the introduction, this would be missing the “human factor.” One respondent
captured this as follows: “3 reasons tech innovation fails: Misunderstanding Human Motivation, Human Learning, or Human Systems.”

Observation​ ​3​:​ ​The​ ​benefits​ ​of​ ​ed​ ​tech​ ​to​ ​educator learning​ ​are​ ​described​ ​much​ ​more​ ​positively,​ ​and much​ ​less​ ​ambiguously,​ ​than​ ​are​ ​the​ ​benefits​ ​to student​ ​learning.

  • reduced their isolation by helping them to connect with their peers;
    ● allowed them to feel part of larger educational movements;
    ● afforded them opportunities to become contributors.

Observation​ ​4​:​ ​There​ ​is​ ​a​ ​lack​ ​of​ ​good​ ​professional development​ ​for​ ​educational​ ​technology.

Observation​ ​5​:​ ​Educational​ ​technology​ ​is​ ​prone​ ​to grandiose​ ​promises.

Observation​ ​6​:​ ​Some​ ​significant​ ​percentage​ ​of educational​ ​technology​ ​purchases​ ​do​ ​not​ ​appear​ ​to have​ ​a​ ​pedagogical​ ​basis.

conclusions:

Networked information technology has rendered the words “teacher” and “student” more ambiguous. YouTube tutorials and social-media discussions, just to cite a couple of obvious examples, have made it abundantly clear that at any given moment anyone—regardless of age or background—can be a learner or a teacher, or even both at once.

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more on educational technology in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=education+technology

learning educational technology

Three lessons from rigorous research on education technology

Hope seen in “personalized” software for math

http://hechingerreport.org/three-lessons-rigorous-research-education-technology/

an August 2017 working paper, “Education Technology: An Evidence-Based Review,” published by the National Bureau of Economic Research with clear tables on which technology improves learning and which doesn’t.

1. Computers and internet access alone don’t boost learning

Handing out laptops, providing high-speed internet access or buying most other kinds of hardware doesn’t on its own boost academic outcomes. The research shows that student achievement doesn’t rise when kids are using computers more, and it sometimes decreases.

2. Some math software shows promise

math programs such as SimCalc and ASSISTments. One popular program, DreamBox, showed small gains for students, as well. Only one piece of software that taught reading, Intelligent Tutoring for the Structure Strategy (ITSS), showed promise, suggesting that it is possible to create good educational software outside of math, but it’s a lot harder.

One commonality of the software that seems to work is that it somehow “personalizes” instruction. Sometimes students start with a pre-test so the computer can determine what they don’t know and then sends each student the right lessons, or a series of worksheet problems, to help fill in the gaps. Other times, the computer ascertains a student’s gaps as he works through problems and makes mistakes, giving personalized feedback. Teachers also get data reports to help pinpoint where students are struggling.

3. Cheap can be effective 

a study in San Francisco where texts reminded mothers to read to their preschoolers. That boosted children’s literacy scores.

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more on educational technology in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=education+technology

Flipped Classrooms, Blended Learning, and Integrating Technology

PLANNING MEETING – Flipped Classrooms, Blended Learning, and Integrating Technology

Date: Thursday, May 26, 2016
Time: 3:00 – 4:00 PM ET
Presenters: Steve Gilbert  and many more

Description

In this session we will finalize the design of the May 27th & June 24th events. Link to planning document.

Here is a history of our work on this topic:

  • During our March 11th FridayLive! event, Irene Knokh helped us explore the flipped classroom.  There was interest expressed in building a flipped classroom toolkit.
  • On March 17th TLT Members were invited to start this work.
  • On March 24th TLT Members met and decided to create a Flipped/Blended Learning Series.
  • On March 31st the planning continued and the 3 part series has begun to take shape.
  • In April we decided to focus on 2 events.
  • On April 27th we finalized the dates (May 27 and June 24th) and began to design the first session.
  • On May 5th the design work continued
  • On May 11th the design work continued
  • On May 19th the design work continued

Learning Spaces and Instructional Technology

Special Interest Group: Learning Spaces and Instructional Technology (SIG) webinars are FREE and open to anyone. Please feel free to share this with others at your institution.

Dynamic Discussion Artifacts: Moving Beyond Threaded Discussion

Description

This session will describe an approach to online discussions that moves beyond the threaded message boards of D2L Brightspace, yet still maintained an asynchronous online delivery. Using teams, discussions were differentiated by product to allow students to turn in an artifact that represented their shared understanding during specific online course modules.  Strategies, Technology guides, rubrics, and student feedback will be shared.

Presenter: Michael Manderfeld
Senior Instructional Designer
Minnesota State University Mankato

When
Where
https://moqi.zoom.us/j/672493176 (link to virtual room)

 

 

Notes from the previous session available here:

Active Learning Classrooms

Prioritize Learning When Using Technology

8 Ways to Prioritize Learning When Using Technology in the Classroom

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/09/8-ways-to-prioritize-learning-when-using-technology-in-the-classroom

“Use technology to nudge students away from looking for confirmation for what they already know. Instead, challenge them — encourage risk and confusion that can’t be solved with a few clicks. Find learning technologies that identify and push against a student’s cognitive gap, that space between what a student knows and doesn’t know.

http://ideas.ted.com/

Technology Week: Social Media in Teaching and Learning

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/12/04/social-media-explained/
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/11/17/connectivism-and-traditional-learning-theories/
Top 10 Social Media Management Tools: beyond Hootsuite and TweetDeck

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