Searching for "technology learning"

Noam Chomsky on Technology & Learning

Noam Chomsky on Technology & Learning

http://learning-reimagined.com/noam-chomsky-on-technology-learning/

As far as technology itself and education is concerned, technology is basically neutral. It’s like a hammer. The hammer doesn’t care whether you use it to build a house or whether on torture, using it to crush somebody’s skull, the hammer can do either.

How Technology Wires the Learning Brain

How Technology Wires the Learning Brain

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2011/02/how-technology-wires-the-learning-brain/

“It’s a matter of finding balance,” he said. “Upgrade the technology skills of older ‘digital immigrants,’ and help young kids improve social skills.”

On one hand, we’re trained not to think deeply about subjects when we text quick snippets, Tweet short thoughts,
On the other hand, technology trains the brain to be nimble and to process new ideas quickly. We become more open to new ideas, and communicate more freely and frequently.

 

Teachers on Pinterest – A Great Resource for Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Teachers on Pinterest – A Great Resource for Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2013/10/teachers-on-pinterest-great-resource.html

Videos Explaining BYOD for Teachers and Students ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Excellent Videos Explaining BYOD for Teachers and Students ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning:

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2013/11/excellent-videos-explaining-byod-for.html

Bring Your Own Device/Technology is an initiative meant to increase students learning opportunities through technology.

Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/

A Resource of educational web tools and mobile apps for teachers and educators

SCSU’s First Technology in Teaching and Learning Institute

You are invited to participate in the “First Annual SCSU Technology in Teaching and Learning Summer Institute” co-sponsored by the Center for Continuing Studies, InfoMedia Services and the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning.

When?                                 Monday, May 13 – Tuesday, May 14, 2013

Where?                                Miller Center

Space is limited to 75 participants. Registration is required and can be completed at this link:     http://www.eventbrite.com/org/3606333855

The Institute program is available here: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/informedia/cetl/tech_institute_schedule.docx

Participants are eligible for incentive awards to support their teaching with technology. Please see the attachment, “participant incentives.”

The goal of the SCSU Technology in Teaching and Learning Summer Institute and its follow-up sessions is to provide high quality and effective pedagogical strategies, skills and discussions around the use of technology for teaching and learning in online, face-to-face and blended courses.  This Institute is part of our on-going varied and collaborative efforts to foster a professional peer learning climate around teaching and learning with technology.

 

Participants who attend all sessions on both days including the follow-ups and complete all evaluations will have the opportunity to use their self-assessment of current skills and knowledge of technology and select sessions in order to:

•             Acquire basic and advanced skills in using the current Learning Management System, i.e. D2L

•             Distinguish the appropriate use of pedagogical strategies with technology in online, face-to-face and blended settings

•             Explore opportunities to improve student learning through application of e-conferencing tools (e.g. Adobe Connect), and Web 2.0 tools such as social media, etc.

•             Meet and interact with faculty and staff experts and mentors and learn the processes by which they can get additional and on-going support for each of the above areas.

 

Please register no later than Wednesday May 8.

“Full-time faculty and full-time professional staff with teaching responsibilities who participate in both days of the “Summer Institute” and complete the evaluations will be rewarded with a $300 coupon for a one-time purchase of material that directly supports teaching with technology at the SCSU Computer Store in the Miller Center.  Faculty who participate in one of the two days will receive a $150 coupon for the same purpose. Coupons are not transferable.

 

Please remember that the items purchased remain the property of SCSU but may be used by the purchaser to support their teaching and related academic activities.

 

Upon completion of the “Summer Institute” participants will be contacted by the SCSU Online Office to verify level of participation in the institute and verify eligibility for funds. These funds must be spent by June 15, 2013.”

 

Clarification on Presenters Registration

  1. Presenters do not have to register unless they want to attend both days.
  2. If presenters are not going to participate in sessions other than the one(s) they are presenting but want to eat lunch with us on either day please contact me directly so we can add you to the lunch count and identify any dietary needs

mobile technology, badges, flipped classrooms, and learning analytics according to Bryan Alexander

Very short video of Bryan Alexander, senior fellow at the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education, discussing the issues and opportunities facing mobile technology, badges, flipped classrooms, and learning analytics: 

http://online.qmags.com/CPT0113/default.aspx?sessionID=C711175DBEE9188D0D93C2F28&cid=2335187&eid=17730&pg=18&mode=2#pg18&mode1

Tech and Learning Leadership Summit

July 23-24, 2020   11:00am – 2:00pm Eastern

https://www.techlearningevents.com/summit

The Tech & Learning Virtual Leadership Summit is an exclusive, FREE, invitation-only virtual event for top-level executives from school districts around the country with education technology buying responsibilities. Taking the best of Tech & Learning’s in-person Leadership Summits, the Virtual Summit will provide an environment where district leaders can share their successes and challenges in facilitated small group discussions.

CRITICAL PEDAGOGY IN AN AGE OF ONLINE LEARNING

CRITICAL PEDAGOGY IN AN AGE OF ONLINE LEARNING

http://libjournal.uncg.edu/ijcp/article/view/1055/892?fbclid=IwAR3SHDRFlxTbj7lMAuVJ_BsO3wLQaYEcEXEukUPQVXDDOqEnHg_XT9VJ1SE

Paulo Freire and Critical Pedagogy

Freire’s pedagogical concepts, such as problem posing, dialogue, praxis, conscientiazation and the politics of education, were devel-oped in a pre-Internet era. His work in popular education was deeply interpersonal and involved spending significant time in a community becoming familiar with the culture, linguistic patterns, and lifestyle of the people before ever embarking on teaching.

struggles to employ a critical pedagogy in the increasingly assessment-oriented, outcomes-based environment

While designed to make teaching in the online environment more efficient, these systems confront the critical pedagogue with challenges to create a teaching-learning environment that promotes critical reflection not only on the content of a course but on the very way in which content is delivered.

teaching in cyberspace requires a different teaching paradigm altogether

p. 170 Feenberg (2009) developed the Critical Theory of Technology (CTT),

p. 171 As outlined by CTT, technology creates a cyber culture that redefines human identity and the meaning and means of human interaction (Gomez, 2009). When viewed through this lens, online education is not simply another tool for the promotion of learning, but rather an all-encompassing environment managing and controlling access to information, structuring relationships, and redefining individual identities.

p. 171 While masquerading as efforts to enhance student learning, these industries are clearly profit-oriented. Knowledge has become a commodity, students have become consumers, faculty have become content providers, and schools operate as businesses

p. 172 Like Feenberg (2009), Freire would be concerned with the values and principles embedded in the technology of online learning, as well as the cyber culture it has created.

p. 173 Schools did not venture into online learning because they thought it was a better way to teach, but rather because they saw it as a way to reach unreached student populations with the promise of off-site educational offerings. Only later was attention given to developing online pedagogies.

Whereas education in the United States was originally viewed as a way to prepare students for effective citizenship, now it is seen as a way to develop loyal and capable employees of their corporate overlords

p. 174 A second area of concern is the banking nature of the LMSs. One of the underlying assumptions of an LMS like Blackboard™, Moodle™, or Brightspace™ is that the online platform is a repository of resources for teaching and learning.

Freire vehemently rejected this banking approach to education because it did not recognize or encourage the student’s creative, exploratory, and critical abilities. In the banking model the teacher is regarded as the holder and transmitter of knowledge, which is then imparted to the student. The banking model assumes the student is an empty vessel and does not value or recognize the student’s experiential and cultural knowledge

By contrast Freire argued for a problem-posing, constructivist approach that invites students to critically engage their world and one another. In the critical classroom, the student at times takes on the role of teacher and the teacher becomes a learner, inviting a sharing of power and mutual learning. While this approach can be carried out to an extent online, the LMS is set up to be the primary source of information in a course, and the teacher is assigned as the expert designer of the learning experience, thus limiting the constructivist nature and mutuality of the learning process.

p. 175 A third area of concern is the limited access to online learning to large sectors of society. While e-learning advocates tout the greater access to learning provided by online learning (Goral, 2013; Kashi & Conway, 2010), the digital divide is a reality impacting millions of students.

p. 176 A final area of concern is the disembodied nature of the online learning process. One of the major attractions of online learning to potential students is the freedom from having to be in a classroom in a particular time or place.

p. 177 Embodied learning means students must not only engage the cognitive dimension (thinking and reflection), but also partake in concrete action. This action in reflection, and reflection in action, referred to as praxis, involves acting on and in the world as one is seeking to learn about and transform the world.
To limit education to the transmission and reception of text-based knowledge without action undermines the entire learning process (Escobar et al., 1994).
Freire believed dialogue begins not with what the teacher professes to know, but with the student’s experience and knowledge.

p. 179 For Freire, the building of a learning community is essential to creating meaningful dialogue; this is also true for those who seek to teach effectively online. Palloff and Pratt (2007) contend that all online teaching must begin with building community and stress that a carefully constructed online learning community provides a space for students to test ideas, get feedback, and create a collaborative learning experience.
For Freire, learning was a social and democratic event where authoritarianism and control of the learning process are minimized.
“reading the world,” or conscientization, that is, understanding the larger political context in which experience occurs and knowledge is situated. In the current era of Facebook, Twitter, instant message, and other social media, in-depth discussion and analysis is often absent in favor of brief, often innocuous statements and personal opinions.
Through online academic databases, students have easy access to far more sources of information than previous generations. Furthermore, search engines like Google, Yahoo, and the like bring students in contact with remote sources, organizations, and individuals instantly.

p. 180 the challenge is not only the accessing of information, but also encouraging students to become discerning purveyors of information—to develop “critical digital literacy,” the capacity to effectively and critically navigate the databases and myriads of potential sources (Poore, 2011, p. 15)

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more on online teaching in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+teaching

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+learning

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