Searching for "technology learning"

MC218 remodel

According to the Team 5 meeting notes of 9/22/2015, presented to the library administration, under individual updates, e. Pedagogy, Active Learning/Interactivity/Focused Engagement, there are six points, including ‘flipped classroom,’ as proposed by Chris Inkster, but nothing about my proposal, which can be outlined as “changing the pedagogy of library instruction to fit the increased environment of mobile devices.” It makes the absence of my proposal even more bizarre considering that:

– during a meeting of Team 5 on Sept 23, I was questioned about my proposal and i delivered renewed explainations

– the webinar ONLINE GENERATION IS TRANSFORMING LIBRARIES: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/09/22/online-generation-is-transforming-libraries/, as referred by Chris Inkster, is discussing exactly the need of pedagogical changes proposed by me.

Thus, since past proposals submitted by me were cut/ignored in a similar fashion as well as this one, I am formally entering it in a medium, which will bear the time stamp and the seal, so my proposal is not bastardized in the future and everyone can refer to the original idea, shall misunderstandings occur.

 

From: Miltenoff, Plamen
Sent: Monday, September 21, 2015 5:33 PM
To: Inkster, Christine D. <cinkster@stcloudstate.edu>; Gruwell, Cindy A. <cagruwell@stcloudstate.edu>; Gorman, Michael S. <msgorman@stcloudstate.edu>; Hubbs, Susan <shubbs@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: Miller Center 218 – Remodel – TWO Questions

Good evening,

I will pick up from the correspondence below and share my thoughts thereafter.

 

  1. Several weeks ago, Cisco announced a technology, which will allow the institutional IT to assign preference of teaching content over personal usage. In my understanding, the news signals that questions about accessibility need to be accordingly rephrased. It also craves transparency on the SCSU IT.
  2. I have difficulties following Henry May’s ideas because of: 1. Lack of transparency and 2. Lack of didactical understanding.

 

The quintessential disparity (cart in front of the ox) is that from the emails below, it seems that the technology is driving didactic. If I need to prove that pedagogy drives technology, not vice versa, then there is a profound problem. I will assume that everyone agrees with pedagogy being in the center and technology is serving it. In that sense, this team and any other faculty unit trying to line up their curricular process to Henry’s vision, becomes preposterous; Henry is the one who has to be listening to the faculty and serve them.

 

Therefore, trying to adjust [long-term]future plans about pedagogy, by asking technology questions first, is in its best limiting. One needs to come up with a didactic frame and ask the responding questions how to furbish such frame with technology. If one assumes, as it is claimed, that this campus is moving to m-learning (mobile learning), BYOD, BYOx or any other fancy acronym, which de facto reflects the preponderance of mobile devices as main gateway to information used by students, then the pedagogy must be [re]designed for m-learning. In that sense, from a pedagogical point of view, I find perplexing focusing on MC 218 and subduing BYOD/x/mobile learning to the pedagogy, which will be exercised in a room ( MC 218). How is it mobile? Using mobile devices in room full with desktops does not make sense to me. Keep teaching a dynamic content such as library instruction in a confined room, also does not make sense to me.

 

Here is how I see the pedagogical reconsideration of library instruction must be considered.

In April 214, I proposed a plan, adopted from a Chicago librarian:

http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/bi/

the plan reflects one of numerous possibilities to change the pedagogy of lecturing in a room (MC 218) to hands-on, real-life construct of knowledge by students on their own (constructivism). The pedagogical foundation is based on the use of personal mobile devices (BYOx), which renders the issue of MC 218 accessibility by wi fi as non-significant, since the hit on the wi fi network will be evenly distributed across the entire building.

The example above is only one of many on curriculum that needs to be changed by adopting gaming and gamification techniques:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/03/19/recommendations-for-games-and-gaming-at-lrs/

the essence of library instruction needs to change from lecturing to facilitation and consultations of students’ own construct and discovery how the library works and can help them; it needs to be a F2F rehearsal of students-librarian virtual relationship, which later on can guide and help students individually then in groups.

 

In that sense, MC 218 can/should to be considered a hub for activities, which mostly take place across the library. MC 218 can be the center place, where in-depth exercises are performed. Exercises, which require either:  1. Stronger processing power, 2. Intensive typing, or 3. Larger screens. While it needs to be further surveyed, I believe that MC 218 needs to have prevalent presence of dock-type of stations (recharge, dongles to  connect to large screens) and other peripherals which can allow students to connect their laptops, tablets and mobile devices, then desktops.

 

Thank you.

Plamen

 

 

 

social media and critical thinking

Does social media make room for critical thinking?

social media critical thinking

social media critical thinking

Sinprakob, S., & Songkram, N. (2015). A Proposed Model of Problem-based Learning on Social Media in Cooperation with Searching Technique to Enhance Critical Thinking of Undergraduate Students. Procedia – Social And Behavioral Sciences, 174(International Conference on New Horizons in Education, INTE 2014, 25-27 June 2014, Paris, France), 2027-2030. doi:10.1016/j.sbspro.2015.01.871
http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dedselp%26AN%3dS1877042815009234%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

Bailey, A. (2014). Teaching Alice Walker’s The Color Purple: Using Technology and Social Media To Foster Critical Thinking and Reflection. Virginia English Journal, 64(1), 17.
http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dedo%26AN%3d98060385%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

Eales-Reynolds, L., Gillham, D., Grech, C., Clarke, C., & Cornell, J. (2012). A study of the development of critical thinking skills using an innovative web 2.0 tool. Nurse Education Today, 32(7), 752-756. doi:10.1016/j.nedt.2012.05.017

Baldino, S. (2014). The Classroom Blog: Enhancing Critical Thinking, Substantive Discussion, and Appropriate Online Interaction. Voices From The Middle, 22(2), 29.
http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dedo%26AN%3d99913218%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

Ravenscroft, A., Warburton, S., Hatzipanagos, S., & Conole, G. (2012). Designing and evaluating social media for learning: shaping social networking into social learning?. Journal Of Computer Assisted Learning, 28(3), 177-182. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2729.2012.00484.x
http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dkeh%26AN%3d75254126%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

finding ways to capture meaningful informal learning experiences by explicitly linking these to formal structures, and providing frameworks within which informal learning can then be validated and accredited (Cedefop Report 2007).

Education is clearly a social process but it is probably much closer to an ongoing discussion or debate than an extended celebration with an ever-expanding network of friends (p. 179, Ravenscroft et al.)

the community of inquiry (COI) model developed by Garrison and Anderson (2003) and social network analysis (SNA). European Commission-funded integrated

project called MATURE (Continuous Social Learning in Knowledge Networks), which is investigating how technology-mediated informal learning leads to improved knowledge practices in the digital workplace
Fitzgibbons, M. (2014). Teaching political science students to find and evaluate information in the social media flow. In I. Management Association, STEM education: Concepts, methodologies, tools, and applications. Hershey, PA: IGI Global. Retrieved from http://search.credoreference.com/content/entry/igistem/teaching_political_science_students_to_find_and_evaluate_information_in_the_social_media_flow/0
Cheung, C. (2010). Web 2.0: Challenges and Opportunities for Media Education and Beyond. E-Learning And Digital Media, 7(4), 328-337. http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3deric%26AN%3dEJ916502%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite
Pattison, D. (2012). Participating in the Online Social Culture. Knowledge Quest, 41(1), 70-72. http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dkeh%26AN%3d79921213%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite
Key to using social media is the ability to stand back and evaluate the credibility of a source of information, apart from the actual content. While developing this critical attitude toward traditional media is important, the attitude is even more crucial in the context of using social media because information didn’t go through the vetting process of formal publication. Can the student corroborate the information from multiple sources? How recent is this information? Are the author’s credentials appropriate? In other words, the ability to step back, to become aware of the metatext or metacontext is more important than ever.
Coad, D. T. (2013). Developing Critical Literacy and Critical Thinking through Facebook. Kairos: A Journal Of Rhetoric, Technology, And Pedagogy, 18(1).
http://kairos.technorhetoric.net/praxis/tiki-index.php?page=Developing_Critical_Literacy_and_Critical_Thinking_through_Facebook
Many instructors believe that writing on social networking sites undermines the rhetorical skills students learn in class because of the slang and abbreviations often used on these sites; such instructors may believe that social networks are the end of students’ critical awareness when they communicate. Johndan Johnson-Eilola and Stuart A. Selber (2009) contended that electronic writing forms actually require “sophisticated skills of understanding concrete rhetorical situations, analyzing audiences (and their goals and inclinations), and constructing concise, information-laden texts, as a part of a dynamic, unfolding, social process” (p. 18). It is this dynamic process that makes social networking a perfect match for the composition classroom and for teaching rhetorical skills: It helps students see how communication works in real, live rhetorical situations. Many students do not believe that communication in these media requires any kind of valuable literacy skills because they buy into the myth of how the news media portray social networks as valueless forms of communication that are decaying young people’s minds. This is why I introduced students to the passage from Invisible Man: to get them thinking about what kinds of skills they learn on Facebook. I found the text useful for helping them acknowledge the skills they are building in these writing spaces.
Stuart A. Selber (2004) in Multiliteracies for a Digital Age criticized so-called computer literacy classes for having “focused primarily on data representations, numbering systems, operating systems, file formats, and hardware and software components” rather than on the task of teaching students to be “informed questioners of technology” (p. 74). In a time when, as Sheelah M. Sweeny (2010) noted, “the ability to stay connected with others is constant,” it is increasingly important to engage composition students in critical thinking about the spaces they write in (p. 121). It is becoming clearer, as technology giants such as Google® and Apple® introduce new technologies, that critical literacy and critical thinking about technology are necessary for our students’ futures.
Valentini, C. (2015). Is using social media “good” for the public relations profession? A critical reflection. Public Relations Review, 41(2), 170-177. doi:10.1016/j.pubrev.2014.11.009
http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dkeh%26AN%3d108299204%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0363811114001817
p. 172 there is no doubt that digital technologies and social media have contributed to a major alteration in people’s interpersonal communications and relational practices. Inter- personal communications have substantially altered, at least in Western and developed countries, as a result of the culture of increased connectivity that has emerged from social media’s engineering sociality ( van Dijck, 2013 ), which allows anyone to be online and to connect to others. Physical presence is no longer a precondition for interpersonal communication.
(Jiping) The Pew Research Center ( Smith & Duggan, 2013 , October 21) indicates that one in every ten American adults has used an online dating site or mobile dating app to seek a partner, and that in the last eight years the proportion of Americans who say that they met their current partner online has doubled. Another study conducted by the same organization ( Lenhart & Duggan, 2014 , February 11) shows that 25% of married or partnered adults who text, have texted their partner while they were both home together, that 21% of cell-phone owners or internet users in a committed relationship have felt closer to their spouse or partner because of exchanges they had online or via text message. Another 9% of adults have resolved online or by text message an argument with their partner that they were having difficulty resolving person to person ( Lenhart & Duggan, 2014 , February 11). These results indicate that digital technologies are not simply tools that facilitate communications: they have a substantial impact on the way humans interact and relate to one another. In other words, they affect the dynamics of interpersonal relations

Traditional Texts preferred over E-Books

Survey: Most Students Prefer Traditional Texts over E-Books

http://campustechnology.com/articles/2015/09/01/survey-most-students-prefer-traditional-texts-over-ebooks.aspx

Reasons commonly cited by students for preferring traditional books include:

  • They are easier to read;
  • Students like to physically highlight selections;
  • They’re cheaper;
  • Students prefer the formatting;
  • They’re easier to navigate and bookmark;
  • E-books make students’ eyes hurt;
  • Students find it harder to concentrate on e-books;
  • Traditional books do not require Internet access;
  • Students like to write on the pages;
  • Tablets or laptops are not allowed in class;
  • Availability of e-books is limited; and
  • Students end up printing the pages of e-books anyway.

Among the 27 percent of respondents who do prefer e-books, common reasons for the preference include:

  • E-books are cheaper;
  • They are lighter;
  • They don’t have to be returned;
  • They are more environmentally friendly than paper books;
  • They are searchable;
  • Print size and brightness is adjustable;
  • They can convert text to audio; and
  • They can be used with apps.

MN E-Summit 2015 had two speakers on the e-book topic:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/07/29/mn-esummit-2015/

The Balancing Act: Team-Creating an eBook as an Alternative Method for Content Delivery Tom Nechodomu, University of Minnesota

David Wiley. Making Teaching and Learning Awesome with Open: MN Learning Commons

David sited same stats as in this article:

“According to the Student Monitor, 87 percent of textbooks purchased by students in 2014 were print editions (36 percent new, 36 percent used, 15 percent rented). E-books comprised only 9 percent of the market. The remaining 4 percent was made up by file sharing.”

but puts the stress on e-books as an option to cut the greedy publishing houses and bring down the cost (MN Learning Commons)

20 Digital Skills Every 21st Century Teacher should Have

The 20 Digital Skills Every 21st Century Teacher should Have

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2012/06/33-digital-skills-every-21st-century.html

1- Create and edit  digital audio
2- Use Social bookmarking to share resources with and between learners
3- Use blogs and wikis to create online platforms for students
4- Exploit digital images for classroom use
5- Use video content to engage students
6- Use infographics to visually stimulate students
7- Use Social networking sites to connect with colleagues and grow professionally

8- Create and deliver asynchronous presentations and training sessions
9- Compile a digital e-portfolio for their own development
10- be able to detect plagiarized works in students assignments
11- Create screen capture videos and tutorials
12- Curate web content for classroom learning
13- Use and provide students with task management tools to organize their work and plan their learning
14- Use polling software to create a real-time survey in class
15- Understand issues related to copyright and fair use of online materials
16- Use digital assessment tools to create quizzesHere are some tools for teachers to develop this skill
17- Find and evaluate authentic web based content
18- Use digital tools for time management purposes
19- Use note taking tools to share interesting content with your students
20- Use of online sticky notes to capture interesting ideas

future of LMS (D2L)

The Move from Course Management to Course Networking

A Q&A with Ali Jafari

http://campustechnology.com/articles/2015/08/18/the-move-from-course-management-to-course-networking.aspx

We need now to have a totally new type of learning environment, both conceptually and technically, and it will also need to be different from a business perspective.

You might think of CN (Course Networking) as a complete social learning suite combined with comprehensive learning management tools, along with associated elements like ePortfolio, data mining, globalization and collaboration tools, and much more.

Every student on the CN has a “social portfolio”, which will be there for the student to access, life long. This social portfolio is different from a “typical” ePortfolio in several ways, but importantly, it can be created dynamically — for example, a teacher might check a box indicating that each student in the top ten percent of her class will receive a badge. Beyond that checkbox, everything happens automatically, without a need for the student to locate and upload the badge for display, and no need for the teacher to monitor or be further involved with the awarding of badges. As a student I can manage my social portfolio, and determine who will see or not see certain elements of it.

we are building and maintaining really one big network — instead of necessarily supporting many, many independent institutional client implementations.

 

sociology and social media

Plan for presentation on social media impact in a “sociology and family” class.

Zuo, Jiping <jzuo@stcloudstate.edu>

“Media, Technology, Market, and Cosmopolitan Communities”

https://kahoot.it

Valentini, C. (2015). Is using social media “good” for the public relations profession? A critical reflection. Public Relations Review, 41(2), 170-177. doi:10.1016/j.pubrev.2014.11.009

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dkeh%26AN%3d108299204%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0363811114001817

p. 172 there is no doubt that digital technologies and social media have contributed to a major alteration in people’s interpersonal communications and relational practices. Inter- personal communications have substantially altered, at least in Western and developed countries, as a result of the culture of increased connectivity that has emerged from social media’s engineering sociality (van Dijck, 2013 ), which allows anyone to be online and to connect to others. Physical presence is no longer a precondition for interpersonal communication.

The Pew Research Center ( Smith & Duggan, 2013 , October 21) indicates that one in every ten American adults has used an online dating site or mobile dating app to seek a partner, and that in the last eight years the proportion of Americans who say that they met their current partner online has doubled. Another study conducted by the same organization ( Lenhart & Duggan, 2014 , February 11) shows that 25% of married or partnered adults who text, have texted their partner while they were both home together, that 21% of cell-phone owners or internet users in a committed relationship have felt closer to their spouse or partner because of exchanges they had online or via text message. Another 9% of adults have resolved online or by text message an argument with their partner that they were having difficulty resolving person to person ( Lenhart & Duggan, 2014 , February 11). These results indicate that digital technologies are not simply tools that facilitate communications: they have a substantial impact on the way humans interact and relate to one another. In other words, they affect the dynamics of interpersonal relations

the impact of social media on dating patterns (e.g. more like shopping around for a commodity) and dating relations (e.g. more temporary, unstable), along with many positive effects as well

1. Goal: introduce students to” a) social media b) the sociological impact of social media on family and dating issues

2. Learning outcomes: a) at the end of the session, students will have firm grasp of popular versus peer-reviewed (academic resources). b) students will be able allocate sources for information c) students will be able to evaluate [and compile? Zotero] information d) students will be able to discuss the impact of social media in general e) students will be able to discuss and evaluate the impact of social media on family and dating f) at the end of the session, students will understand the concepts of netiquette and privacy (digital citizenship, digital anthropology)

3. Possible q/s for the class:
a) why Tinder, Hinge, etc.?

These are the best pickup lines with the highest success rates, according to dating app Hinge

http://www.businessinsider.com/best-pickup-lines-with-highest-success-rates-according-to-hinge-2015-9

what other social media? Can Instagram, Twitter and FB be counted in this mix?

Is Instagram Flirting Really So Bad?

http://www.askmen.com/dating/dating_advice/social-media-dating-advice.html

b) what is so different in the dating scene? how did social media changed the scene?

If you’re single, these are the 10 best cities to find new love; http://www.businessinsider.com/zillow-best-cities-for-love-2015-9

“I’ve been surprised at what a real impact Facebook has on romantic relationships,” Galena Rhoades, clinical psychologist at the University of Denver, said in Allison McCann’s BuzzFeed article, How Facebook Ruined Dating (And Breaking Up Too). “And I do think Facebook is playing a bigger role in relationship formation and relationship disillusions.” http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2013/05/11/dating-and-the-impact-of-social-media/

c) how do family values change, based on the changes in [online] dating?

d) how does online dating differ across race, gender, sexual orientation, age and cultures

e) privacy, security, surveillance

f) mail brides on steroids? how does online dating apps change dubious practices?

g) does online dating impact marriages? are marriages better or weaker after online dating?

Finkel, et al. (2012).Online Dating: A Critical Analysis From the Perspective of Psychological Science. Psychological Science in the Public Interest. 13(1), pp. 3–66. http://www3.nd.edu/~ghaeffel/OnineDating_Aron.pdf
the authors say “yes” to online dating but “we see substantial opportunities for improving the way online dating is practiced. Some of this improvement can come from closer collaboration between scholars and service providers.”

4. possible collaborations. The topic of online dating, social media in particular, is of interest to specialists from Communication Studies (Usera, Fullick), Anthropology (Bocanete), Nursing (Couch), Gender Studies (Robinson), SCSU Counseling and Psychological Services (Houdet) .
E.g.:
Usera, D. (2014). Online Dating Interactions: A discursive look (Dissertation). Graduate College of The University of Iowa, The University of Iowa. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/13255554/Online_Dating_Interactions_A_discursive_look
Fullick, M. (2013). “Gendering” the Self in Online Dating Discourse. Canadian Journal Of Communication, 38(4). Retrieved from http://www.cjc-online.ca/index.php/journal/article/view/2647
Bocanete, A. C. (2013). All-male Mobile Dating Apps and their Users in London… After the Magic Wears Out (Dissertation). DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY, UNIVERSITY COLLEGE LONDON. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/12884810/All-male_Mobile_Dating_Apps_and_their_Users_in_London…_After_the_Magic_Wears_Out
Couch, D. (2006). Online dating and mating: the use of the internet to meet sexual partners (Master of Public Health). La Trobe University, Victoria, Australia. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/12639192/Online_dating_and_mating_the_use_of_the_internet_to_meet_sexual_partners
Robinson, B. (2015). “Personal Preference” as the New Racism: Gay Desire and Racial Cleansing in Cyberspace. Sociology of Race and Ethnicity, 1(2), 317–330. http://doi.org/10.1177/2332649214546870 http://sre.sagepub.com/content/1/2/317
Houdet, A. (2014, August 11). Online Dating Services and McGill: A Study of Usage and Perception (POLI 311: Techniques of Empirical Rsearch Paper). Mcgill, Montreal, Canada. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/7935047/Online_Dating_Services_and_McGill_A_Study_of_Usage_and_Perception

bibliography:

Right swiping on Tinderellas: Exploring a mobile dating app’s regulation of identity performances from Stefanie Duguay

and http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/09/25/online-dating/

Synopsis
UWire and The Guardian have a long list of reports. Academia.edu has also plenty of serious academic research. While UWire and the Guardian are explicitly centered on the Anglo-Saxon world (with one exception of report on Iran), Academia.edu presents a great choice of cases from around the world (different cultures) in mostly serious academic research

useful definitions and comparisons here:
Digital dating: a week with Kik, Tinder and OkCupid. (2014, July 30). UWIRE Text, p. 1. Retrieved from http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CA376503724&v=2.1&u=stcloud_main&it=r&p=PROF&sw=w&asid=873df6af8e0f1cea1a22a33ca17f2d12
about online dating:
Toma, C. L., Hancock, J. T., & Ellison, N. B. (2008). Separating Fact From Fiction: An Examination of Deceptive Self-Presentation in Online Dating Profiles. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 34(8), 1023–1036. http://doi.org/10.1177/0146167208318067
Wong AnKee, A., & Yazdanifard, R. (2015). The Review of the Ugly Truth and Negative Aspects of Online Dating. Global Journal of Management and Business Research, 15(14). Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/12317015/The_Review_of_the_Ugly_Truth_and_Negative_Aspects_of_Online_Dating
Fact Sheet 37:  The Perils and Pitfalls of Online Dating: How to Protect Yourself. (2015). Privacy Rights Clearninghouse. Retrieved from https://www.privacyrights.org/perils-and-pitfalls-online-dating-how-protect-yourself
sociology peer-reviewed paper on online dating:
Rosenfeld, M., & Thomas, R. (2012). Searching for a Mate: The Rise of the Internet as a Social Intermediary. American Sociological Review, 77(4), 523–547.

http://web.stanford.edu/~mrosenfe/Rosenfeld_How_Couples_Meet_Working_Paper.pdf

The Tinder-Is-Satan Arms Race Heats Up Further http://nymag.com/scienceofus/2015/08/tinder-is-satan-arms-race-heats-up-further.html

The History of Digital Desire, vol. 1: An Introduction  http://saq.dukejournals.org/content/110/3/583.short

Stampler, L. (2014). The New Dating Game. Time, 183(6), 40.  http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3daph%26AN%3d94317888%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

Kite, M. (2015). Click and flick: romance is being killed off by the brutal marketplace of dating apps such as Tinder. Spectator, (9729). 12.  http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dedsgao%26AN%3dedsgcl.401492069%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

Hobson, T. (2015). Tinder feelings: Can mobile dating apps move beyond the promise of a one-night stand?. Spectator, (9740). 22. http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dedsgao%26AN%3dedsgcl.411742748%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

(2015). My Tinder date wants to be friends with benefits. I want to be serious. What now? Swipe Right is our advice column that tackles the tricky world of online dating. This week: weighing the benefits of casual liaisonsGet help making your profile work: forward screenshots to askevaguardian@gmail.com for a personal critique and upgrade; Swipe Right is our advice column that tackles the tricky world of online dating. This week: weighing the benefits of casual liaisonsGet help making your profile work: forward screenshots to askevaguardian@gmail.com for a personal critique and upgrade. theguardian.com. http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dedsgao%26AN%3dedsgcl.409945005%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite
http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2015/apr/16/swipe-right-online-dating-friends-with-benefits-relationships

Wood, M. (2015). Led by Tinder, the Mobile Dating Game Surges. The New York Times. p. 8. http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dedsgao%26AN%3dedsgcl.400230809%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

http://www.lexisnexis.com/lnacui2api/api/version1/getDocCui?lni=5F7B-R7N1-DXY4-X3K7&csi=6742&hl=t&hv=t&hnsd=f&hns=t&hgn=t&oc=00240&perma=true   http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/05/technology/personaltech/led-by-tinder-the-mobile-dating-game-surges.html

(2015). Tinder hooks up with Instagram to woo new users to the dating app; Dating app overhauls its user profiles with photo app integration, and extended information pulled from Facebook. theguardian.com. http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dedsgao%26AN%3dedsgcl.409944725%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

(2015). Brand love in the time of Tinder; Thanks to dating apps such as Tinder, relationships are changing, but does that include the ones we form with brands too?. theguardian.com. http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dedsgao%26AN%3dedsgcl.409800099%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

(2015). A look at modern day dating – Tinder and Match.com. UWIRE Text. http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CA401448144&v=2.1&u=stcloud_main&it=r&p=PROF&sw=w&asid=4b52e991d97812282b4651b5c2276ca9

Right swipe on Tinder proves lucky for Bruin. (2015, February 13). UWIRE Text, p. 1. Retrieved from http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CA401365769&v=2.1&u=stcloud_main&it=r&p=PROF&sw=w&asid=50627eab0b22cfef4795c03ff71f9872
Tinder isn’t just for dating — it’s also a game. (2015, February 8). UWIRE Text, p. 1. Retrieved from http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CA400682488&v=2.1&u=stcloud_main&it=r&p=PROF&sw=w&asid=dfde7717895bda12f4d3337a0785d31c
Tinder: Matchmaker or dating disaster? (2015, March 14). UWIRE Text, p. 1. Retrieved from http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CA405561590&v=2.1&u=stcloud_main&it=r&p=PROF&sw=w&asid=53e7a3eeae14aa02f237e1b38a7877c8
Dating app Tinder craze on campus. (2015, April 29). UWIRE Text, p. 1. Retrieved from http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CA411697728&v=2.1&u=stcloud_main&it=r&p=PROF&sw=w&asid=c00d190c4790e2ec0b35016e676d6727
Tinder is comparable to traditional dating. (2014, September 29). UWIRE Text, p. 1. Retrieved from http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CA383934895&v=2.1&u=stcloud_main&it=r&p=PROF&sw=w&asid=0690ccb6861c5fd27b457cbfcc221169
(2015). 42% of people using dating app Tinder already have a partner, claims report; Research firm GlobalWebIndex also claims that 62% of the app’s users are men, while hinting that Tinder’s new premium tier could catch on. theguardian.com. http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2015/may/07/dating-app-tinder-married-relationship
Curington, C. V., Lin, K.-H., & Lundquist, J. H. (2015). Positioning multiraciality in cyberspace: treatment of multiracial daters in an online dating website. American Sociological Review, 80(4), 764+. Retrieved from http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CA425674423&v=2.1&u=stcloud_main&it=r&p=PROF&sw=w&asid=7fdadb5f53a7acc0219b8a37c986a8f5
PotarcA, G., Mills, M., & Neberich, W. (2015). Relationship Preferences Among Gay and Lesbian Online Daters: Individual and Contextual Influences. Journal of Marriage and Family, 77(2), 523+. Retrieved from http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CA403937092&v=2.1&u=stcloud_main&it=r&p=PROF&sw=w&asid=73d2386ffbd902de46bf3f081854fce3
(2014). Scissr dating app: the new Tinder for lesbians; It’s the latest dating app for women seeking women, but what’s the app, named after a lesbian sex position, all about?. theguardian.com.
Constructing identities on a Japanese gay dating site: Hunkiness, cuteness and the desire for heteronormative masculinity. (n.d.). Retrieved August 18, 2015, from https://www.academia.edu/12807514/Constructing_identities_on_a_Japanese_gay_dating_site_Hunkiness_cuteness_and_the_desire_for_heteronormative_masculinity
Sinclair, H. C., Felmlee, D., Sprecher, S., & Wright, B. L. (2015). Don’t tell me who I can’t love: a multimethod investigation of social network and reactance effects on romantic relationships. Social Psychology Quarterly, 78(1), 77+. Retrieved from http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CA408508799&v=2.1&u=stcloud_main&it=r&p=PROF&sw=w&asid=d06ca248fc000a2c7bc55a868815b93e
Berlin, R. (2014). The professional ethics of online dating: need for guidance. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 53(9), 935+. Retrieved from http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CA382846474&v=2.1&u=stcloud_main&it=r&p=PROF&sw=w&asid=c9ef33658f8c48557c2db8e5bd91a7e4
“4 ways Asian dating apps are anti-Tinder.” CNN Wire. (March 23, 2015 Monday 1:29 AM GMT ): 679 words. LexisNexis Academic. Web. Date Accessed: 2015/08/18. http://www.lexisnexis.com/lnacui2api/api/version1/getDocCui?oc=00240&hnsd=f&hgn=t&lni=5FK4-K601-JBSS-S0M1&hns=t&perma=true&hv=t&hl=t&csi=385157&secondRedirectIndicator=true

ROBBINS, A. (2015). Sex and the (Newly!) Single Girl. Washingtonian Magazine, 50(8), 68.

Serjoie, K. A. (2015). Iranian ‘Tinder’ Seeks to Encourage Marriage But Not Dating. Time.Com, N.PAG. http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dmih%26AN%3d108327379%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

Rhodan, M. (2015). Meet Willow, the Dating App That Won’t Judge You By Your Looks. Time.Com, N.PAG. http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3df5h%26AN%3d100947723%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

Rutkin, A. (2015). Hackers can see your dating pics and chat. New Scientist, 226(3022), 20. http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dulh%26AN%3d102818153%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

Grigoriadis, V. (2014). Inside the Hookup Factory. Rolling Stone, (1221), 24-26. http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3daph%26AN%3d98976542%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

Jamie, N. (2015, July 9). London launch for US dating app that rivals Tinder. Evening Standard. p. 55. http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dkeh%26AN%3d103711119%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

Internet and the Male Homosexual Identity: A Critical Reading of the Online Dating Space for Homosexual Men in Bengaluru. (n.d.). Retrieved August 18, 2015, from https://www.academia.edu/14656772/Internet_and_the_Male_Homosexual_Identity_A_Critical_Reading_of_the_Online_Dating_Space_for_Homosexual_Men_in_Bengaluru
Going Offline: An Exploratory Cultural Artifact Analysis of An Internet Dating Site’s Development Trajectories. (n.d.). Retrieved August 18, 2015, from https://www.academia.edu/14184813/Going_Offline_An_Exploratory_Cultural_Artifact_Analysis_of_An_Internet_Dating_Site_s_Development_Trajectories
Five Tips for Dating Online. (n.d.). Retrieved August 18, 2015, from https://www.academia.edu/14078925/Five_Tips_for_Dating_Online
Old and New Methods for Online Research: The Case of Online Dating. (n.d.). Retrieved August 18, 2015, from https://www.academia.edu/13924873/Old_and_New_Methods_for_Online_Research_The_Case_of_Online_Dating
Remediating the Matchmaker: Arranging Marriage Online in the South Asian Diaspora in America. (n.d.). Retrieved August 18, 2015, from https://www.academia.edu/13897347/Remediating_the_Matchmaker_Arranging_Marriage_Online_in_the_South_Asian_Diaspora_in_America
Stranger Stranger or Lonely Lonely? Young Chinese and dating apps between the locational, the mobile and the social. (n.d.). Retrieved August 18, 2015, from https://www.academia.edu/13895551/Stranger_Stranger_or_Lonely_Lonely_Young_Chinese_and_dating_apps_between_the_locational_the_mobile_and_the_social
Roeffen, C. (2014). Mobile dating: Romance is just a swipe away Tinders’ Romantic and sexual interactions (Bachellor’s Degree). Urbane Technologieen, Netherlands. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/8899473/Mobile_dating_Romance_is_just_a_swipe_away_Tinders_Romantic_and_sexual_interactions
Lemke, R. (2014). Sexual Liberation on the Internet? Sexual Internet Use of MSM in 50 Different Countries. Mainz: Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/8662454/Sexual_Liberation_on_the_Internet_Sexual_Internet_Use_of_MSM_in_50_Different_Countries
Kogovsek, T., Svab, A., & Kuhar, R. (2011). Intimacy Transformed? : Perceptions of Love, Intimacy and Partnership Among On-line Daters in Slovenia. Annales, 21(1), 177–186. https://www.academia.edu/7988186/Intimacy_Transformed_Perceptions_of_Love_Intimacy_and_Partnership_Among_On-line_Daters_in_Slovenia
Cacioppo, J. T., Cacioppo, S., Gonzaga, G. C., Ogburn, E. L., & VanderWeele, T. J. (2013). Marital satisfaction and break-ups differ across on-line and off-line meeting venues. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 110(25), 10135–10140. http://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1222447110
Fullick, M. (2013). “Gendering” the Self in Online Dating Discourse. Canadian Journal Of Communication, 38(4). Retrieved from http://www.cjc-online.ca/index.php/journal/article/view/2647
Phillips, J. (n.d.). Online Dating: How Culture Affects Self-Presentation of Match.com Users. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/3845104/Online_Dating_How_Culture_Affects_Self-Presentation_of_Match.com_Users
Chow, E., Coulombe, D., Garcia, V., Vuu, D., & Wade, J. (2009, May 23). Culture, Power, Cyberspace: Age and Gender in Online Dating Websites: An Analysis of User Profiles on Mingles.com. Retrieved from http://anthrocyber.blogspot.com/2009/05/age-and-gender-in-online-dating.html
Masden, C., & Edwards, W. K. (n.d.). Understanding the Role of Community in Online Dating. In Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (pp. 535–544). Seoul, Korea. http://doi.org/10.1145/2702123.2702417

digital storytelling

Stories are for sorting and storing
http://homes.chass.utoronto.ca/~lachance/S6D.HTM

> Willard,

>

> The post 29.126 has been niggling at me for days. I originally want to

> reply with a simple observation that the appeal to storytelling is

> cast in such a way to avoid the complications of narration’s relation

> to narrative (the telling and the told; shown and said). But it was

> the theme of “borrowing” from one domain by another that leads me to

> recall a counter-narrative where there is no need to borrow between

> domains since the military-industrial-entertainment complex is one entity.

>

> I contend that fundamental to human interaction is narration:

> attentiveness to how stories are related. Stories are for sorting and

> storing. *Sometimes this soothes paranoia induced by too much

> linearity.*

>

> A while ago (1996), I explored recursivity and narrativity. My

> starting point was the ability to ask questions (and learn from one’s

> bodily reactions). The musings may or may not have military relevance.

> Judge for

> yourselves:

>

> <quote>

>

> Pedagogical situations are sensory. They are also interpersonal.

> Because they are sensory this makes even learning by oneself interpersonal.

> Egocentric speech is like a dialogue between the senses. In

> Vygotsky’s and Luria’s experiments, children placed in problem-solving

> situations that were slightly too difficult for them displayed egocentric speech.

> One could consider these as self-induced metadiscursive moments. The

> self in crisis will disassociate and one’s questionning becomes the

> object of a question.

>

> Not only is the human self as a metabeing both fracturable and

> affiliable in itself, it is also prone to narrativity. That is, the

> human self will project its self-making onto the world in order to

> generate stories from sequences and to break stories into recombinant

> sequences. Its operations on signs are material practices with consequences for world-making.

>

> The fracturable affiliable self calls for reproductive models suitable

> to the interactions of multi-sensate beings, models that render dyads

> dialectical, questionable, answerable. Narrativity understood

> dialectically does not merely mean making sequences or strings of

> events into stories but also stories into things, strung together for

> more stories. From such an understanding, emerge non-dyadic

> narratives of reproduction, narratives where a thing-born transforms

> itself into an event, comes to understand itself as a process.

>

> </quote>

>

> http://homes.chass.utoronto.ca/~lachance/S6D.HTM

>

> Funny to consider that those remarks were based in a consideration of

> language and feedback mechanisms. Make me think that the storytelling

> as “potent form of emotional cueing” may be directed to undesired

> responses such as greater self-reflexivity. And depending on how they

> are parsed, Hollywood films can contribute to undesired responses

> including escape. 🙂

>

> Francois Lachance, Scholar-at-large

> http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~lachance

>

> to think is often to sort, to store and to shuffle: humble, embodied

> tasks

>

> On Mon, 29 Jun 2015, Humanist Discussion Group wrote:

>

>>

>>

>>

>>

>> Sharon Ghamari-Tabrizi, in “The Convergence of the Pentagon and

>> Hollywood” (Memory Bytes: History, Technology, and Digital Culture, ed.

>> Rabinovitz and Geil, 2004), describes in some detail the adoption by

>> the U.S. military of the entertainment industry’s storytelling

>> techniques implemented by means of simulation. This chapter follows

>> on from her excellent “Simulating the Unthinkable: Gaming Future War

>> in the 1950s and 1960s”, Social Studies of Science 30.2 (2000). In

>> the 2004 piece she describes a U.S. National Research Council

>> workshop in October 1996 at which representatives from film, video

>> game, entertainment and theme-parks came together with those from the

>> Department of Defense, academia and the defense industries. There is

>> much about this convergence that we might productively take an

>> interest in. Let me, however, highlight storytelling in particular.

>>

>> In a military context, Ghamari-Tabrizi points out, skilled

>> storytelling techniques are used to help participants in a VR

>> environment sense that they are in a real environment and behave

>> accordingly. Storytelling functions as a potent form of emotional

>> cueing that would seem to elicit the desired responses. But

>> especially interesting, I think, is the fact that “many conference

>> participants argued that the preferred mode of experiential immersion

>> in electronic media is not the unframed chaos of hypertext, but

>> old-fashioned storytelling.” She quotes Alex Seiden of Industrial

>> Light and Magic (note the date — 1996): “I’ve never seen a CD-ROM

>> that moved me the way a powerful film has. I’ve never visited a Web

>> page with great emotional impact. I contend that linear narrative is

>> the fundamental art form of humankind: the novel, the play, the film… these are the forms that define our cultural experience.”

>>

>> Comments?

>>

>> Yours,

>> WM

>> —

>> Willard McCarty (http://www.mccarty.org.uk/), Professor, Department of

>> Digital Humanities, King’s College London, and Digital Humanities

>> Research Group, University of Western Sydney

Turning Technophobia through Digital Storytelling

http://www.nmc.org/blog/turning-technophobia-through-digital-storytelling/

 

Enabling BYOD

Enabling Bring Your Own Device

white paper by the Cisco

To help improve understanding of BYOD and its impacts on modern network environments, this white paper will further explore the many differences that exist between corporate and educational approaches to the technology.

In the education space, dealing with non-standard, user-managed devices has been and still remains the norm. Unfortunately, the variety of devices means a multitude of operating systems and software are encountered, with many “standards” being defined. As a result there is little consistency in the device type or the software being installed. Since the device is owned by the student and is a personal resource, it is often difficult or impossible to enforce a policy that prevents users from installing software. In addition, due to the nature of learning as opposed to a corporate environment, it is also difficult to put a restriction on certain classes of software since all may provide a worthwhile educational purpose.

providing a solution that unifies management and deployment polices across both wired and wireless devices is very desirable.

The Internet of Everything (IoE) has spurred a revolution in mobility. Collaboration anywhere, anytime and with any device is quickly becoming the rule instead of the exception. As a result it is now common for students to bring mobile devices such as smartphones, tablets and e-readers into the academic environment to support their educational endeavors.

The infrastructure supporting BYOD no longer has the sole purpose of providing a wireless radio signal within a given area. The focus is now about providing the appropriate bandwidth and quality to accommodate the ever-growing number of devices and ensure that an application provides a good end-user experience. In a sense, applications are now the major driving force behind the continuing evolution of BYOD. For example, a teacher accessing video in the classroom for educational purposes during class hours should have greater priority than a student in the same area accessing a gaming site for recreation.

A state-of-the-art BYOD infrastructure should now be capable of providing more than just generic, general-purpose wireless connectivity. In the classroom environment, the notion of “differentiated access” often resonates with faculty and staff. Once this has been determined, a policy can be applied to the user and their activity on the network.

Granular security can also be intelligently delivered.
Quality of Service (QoS) rate limiting has been available for some time, but now there are newer QoS techniques available.

Location-based services can provide their first interaction with the university. By delivering campus maps and directional information, location-enabled services can enhance the experience of these visitors and provide a positive image to them as well. As a visitor enters a particular building location, information could automatically be provided. In the case of a visiting student, information about the history of a building, departments contained within the building, or other resources could be presented to enhance a guided tour, or provide the perspective student the ability to have a self-directed tour of the campus facilities.

802.11ac Technology (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.11ac)

Software Defined Networking (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Software-defined_networking)

 

grants for games

Jumpstarting Innovation in Education Technology through SBIR

http://ies.ed.gov/blogs/research/post/Jumpstarting-Innovation

The U.S. Department of Education’s Small Business Innovation Research program, operated out of the Institute of Education Sciences (IES), funds projects to develop education technology products designed to support student learning and teacher practice in general or special education.

Recently, ED/IES SBIR announced its 2015 awards. There are 21 awards in all, covering a range of topics and forms of technology. For example, Zaption is designing a mobile app to help teachers integrate video into science instruction; Speak Agent is building an app to help students with speech disabilities to communicate; and Lingo Jingo is developing a platform to help teachers guide English learners. (To view short video demos of the eight new Phase II projects, see this playlist.)

The 2015 awards highlight two trends that have emerged in the ED/IES SBIR portfolio in recent years –games for learning and bridging the research-to-practice gap in education.

Trend #1: Games for Learning

  • Strange Loop Games to build a virtual world to engage students in learning about ecosystems,
  • Kiko Labs to develop mini games to strengthen young children’s thinking and memory skills, and
  • Schell Games to create a futuristic “ball and stick” molecular modeling kit and app to augment chemistry learning.

For a playlist including videos of these games and 19 others out of the ED/IES SBIR program, see here.

The games for learning trend echoes the movement surrounding games in the field, and is highlighted by recent ED sponsored events including ED Games Week in Washington, DC, last September and the Games for Learning Summit in New York City, in April. Both events convened stakeholders to showcase games and discuss the potential barriers and opportunities for collaboration necessary to accelerate the creation of highly effective games for learning. Stay tuned for more information and initiatives on games for learning out of ED’s Office of Technology.

Trend #2: Bridging the Research-to-Practice Gap

  • Mindset Works, which built on results from prior research including a 2002 IES research grant, to successfully propose a 2010 ED/IES SBIR project to develop SchoolKit. This multimedia platform enables broad distribution of the growth mindset intervention which teaches students to understand that intelligence can be developed through effort and learning. SchoolKit is now in use in more than 500 schools across the country, including half the middle schools in Washington, DC.
  • Teachley, which received a 2013 ED/IES SBIR award to develop math game apps and a teacher implementation dashboard building on findings from prior research including a 2010 IES research grant. The intervention is now used in hundreds of schools around the country, and the apps have been downloaded more than 500,000 times.
  • Learning Ovations is building on two prior IES research grants in their 2014 ED/IES SBIR project. The prior IES funding supported the research team as they developed and evaluated an intervention to improve children’s reading outcomes,. This award is supporting the development of an implementation platform to enable large-scale use of this evidence-based intervention across settings. The project is scheduled to end in 2016, after which the platform will be launched.

The new ED/IES SBIR 2015 awards continue the research-to-practice trend. An award to Foundations in Learning furthers basic research from a 2013 National Science Foundation grant (NSF); an award to SimInsights builds on 2005 and 2008 IES research projects and a 2011 Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) research project; and an award to Apprendris advances a prior 2012 IES research project and  prior 2010 and 2013 NSF research projects.

More on Zaption in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=zaption

More on games and gamification in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=games

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=gamification

alternatives to lecturing

50 Alternatives To Lecturing

Learning Models

1. Self-directed learning

2. Learning through play

3. Scenario-based learning

4. Game-based learning (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=gaming)

5. Project-based learning (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=project+based)

6. Peer-to-Peer instruction

7. School-to-school instruction (using Skype in the classroom, for example)

8. Learning through projects

9. Problem-based learning

10. Challenge-based learning

11. Inquiry-based learning

12. Mobile learning

13. Gamified learning (gamification)

14. Cross-curricular projects (teaching by topic: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/03/24/education-reform-finland/)

15. Reciprocal Teaching

16. “Flipped-class” learning

17. Face-to-Face Driver blended learning

18. Rotation blended learning

19. Flex Blended Learning

20. “Online Lab” blended learning

21. Sync Teaching

23. HyFlex Learning

24. Self-guided MOOC

25. Traditional MOOC

26. Competency-Based Learning

27. Question-based learning

Literacy Strategies

28. Write-Around

29. Four Corners

30. Accountable Talk

31. RAFT Assignments

32. Fishbowl

33. Debate

34. Gallery Walk

35. Text Reduction

36. Concentric Circles

37. Traditional Concept-Mapping (teacher-given strategy–“fishbone” cause-effect analysis, for example)

38. Didactic, Personalized Concept Mapping (student designed and personalized for their knowledge-level and thinking patterns)

39. Mock Trial

40. Non-academic video + “academic” questioning

41. Paideia Seminar (http://www.paideia.org/, http://www.learnnc.org/lp/editions/paideia/, http://www.mtlsd.org/jefferson_middle/stuff/paideia%20seminar%20guidelines.pdf)

42. Symposium

43. Socratic Seminar (https://www.nwabr.org/sites/default/files/SocSem.pdf)

44. QFT Strategy

45. Concept Attainment

46. Directed Reading Thinking Activity

47. Paragraph Shrinking

48. FRAME Routine

49. Jigsaw Strategy

Other 

50. Content-Based Team-Building Activities

51. Learning Simulation

52. Role-Playing

53. Bloom’s Spiral

54. Virtual Field Trip (http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/scw/)

55. Physical Field Trip

56. Digital Scavenger Hunt  (http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/bi/)

57. Physical Scavenger Hunt

http://www.teachthought.com/teaching/50-alternatives-to-lecturing/

 

 

1 46 47 48 49 50 55