Searching for "technology learning"

literature on online teaching

A former SCSU faculty asked me to help her with literature regarding online learning; she is applying to teach complete online somewhere in the South.

Hey Plamen, Do you have any reading suggestions regarding teaching online? I am applying for a job at ?????? and the program is completely online. I want to be current with the literature if I happen to get an interview.

Hey ???,

It is a simple question, with ever growing complex answer. 2013 was announced as the “MOOC” year and that term literally killed the tag “online education.” Most of the literature on online teaching now is subdued one way or another under MOOC.

However, there are still authors, who are widely cited as “foundational.” E.g.: Susan Ko, Paloff and Pratt

Ko, S., & Rossen, S. (2010). Teaching Online: A Practical Guide. Taylor & Francis.

Palloff, R. M., & Pratt, K. (2010). Collaborating Online: Learning Together in Community. John Wiley & Sons.

Palloff, R. M., & Pratt, K. (2009). Assessing the Online Learner: Resources and Strategies for Faculty. John Wiley & Sons.

Moore, M. G., & Kearsley, G. (2005). Distance education: A systems view (2nd ed.). Belmont, CA: Thomson/Wadsworth. http://isites.harvard.edu/fs/docs/icb.topic541040.files/Moore%20Theoretical%20Basis%20for%20Distance%20Education.pdf

Moore, M. G. (2013). Handbook of Distance Education. Routledge.

There is a long list of articles, which I am collecting through the years. You can peruse them and choose any further readings, if you want…

 

Adolphus, M. (2009). USING THE WEB TO teach information literacy. Online, 33(4), 20-25.

Andersen, M. H. (2011). The world is my school: Welcome to the era of personalized learning. Futurist, 45(1), 12-17.

Borja, R. R. (2004). New player in online school market pursues profits. Education Week, 24(15), 8-8.

Brooks-Kirkland, A. (2006). Podcasting for learning. School Libraries in Canada (17108535), 25(4), 44-48.

Ćukušić, M., Alfirević, N., Granić, A., & Garača, Ž. (2010). e-learning process management and the e-learning performance: Results of a european empirical study. Computers & Education, 55(2), 554-565.

Ćukušić, M., Alfirević, N., Granić, A., & Garača, Ž. (2010). e-learning process management and the e-learning performance: Results of a european empirical study. Computers & Education, 55(2), 554-565.

Ćukušić, M., Alfirević, N., Granić, A., & Garača, Ž. (2010). e-learning process management and the e-learning performance: Results of a european empirical study. Computers & Education, 55(2), 554-565.

de Freitas, S., & Veletsianos, G. (2010). Editorial: Crossing boundaries: Learning and teaching in virtual worlds. British Journal of Educational Technology, 41(1), 3-9.

Department of education report: Its importance, one year later. (cover story).(2010). Distance Education Report, 15(12), 1-7.

Falloon, G. (2010). Using avatars and virtual environments in learning: What do they have to offer? British Journal of Educational Technology, 41(1), 108-122.

Hrastinski, S., Keller, C., & Carlsson, S. A. (2010). Design exemplars for synchronous e-learning: A design theory approach. Computers & Education, 55(2), 652-662.

Karagiorgi, Y., & Symeou, L. (2005). Translating constructivism into instructional design: Potential and limitations. Educational Technology & Society, 8(1), 17-27.

Keengwe, J., Schnellert, G., & Miltenoff, P. (2011). Technology and globalization in higher education., 2535-2538.

Ketelhut, D. J., Nelson, B. C., Clarke, J., & Dede, C. (2010). A multi-user virtual environment for building and assessing higher order inquiry skills in science. British Journal of Educational Technology, 41(1), 56-68.

Kim, P., Ng, C. K., & Lim, G. (2010). When cloud computing meets with semantic web: A new design for e-portfolio systems in the social media era. British Journal of Educational Technology,41(6), 1018-1028.

Kolowich, S. (2009). MIT tops world ranking of university web sites. Chronicle of Higher Education, 55(24), A15-A15.

Leach, J. (2008). Do new information and communications technologies have a role to play in the achievement of education for all? British Educational Research Journal, 34(6), 783-805.

Levine, A., Levine, A., & Dean, D. R. (2012). Generation on a tightrope : A portrait of today’s college student. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Mangu-Ward, K. (2010). Teachers unions vs. online education. Reason, 42(4), 44-50.

Nistor, N., & Neubauer, K. (2010). From participation to dropout: Quantitative participation patterns in online university courses. Computers & Education, 55(2), 663-672.

Ramig, R. (2009). Social media in the classroom. Multimedia & internet@schools, 16(6), 8-10.

Ramig, R. (2009). Social media in the classroom. Multimedia & internet@schools, 16(6), 8-10.

Schiller, K. (2009). Augmented reality comes to market. (cover story). Information Today, 26(11), 1-46.

Šumak, B., Heričko, M., & Pušnik, M. (2011). A meta-analysis of e-learning technology acceptance: The role of user types and e-learning technology types. Computers in Human Behavior, 27(6), 2067-2077.

Tallent-Runnels, M., Thomas, J. A., Lan, W. Y., Cooper, S., Ahern, T. C., Shaw, S. M., et al. (2006). Teaching courses online: A review of the research. Review of Educational Research, 76(1), 93-135.

Tallent-Runnels, M., Thomas, J. A., Lan, W. Y., Cooper, S., Ahern, T. C., Shaw, S. M., et al. (2006). Teaching courses online: A review of the research. Review of Educational Research, 76(1), 93-135.

Tallent-Runnels, M., Thomas, J. A., Lan, W. Y., Cooper, S., Ahern, T. C., Shaw, S. M., et al. (2006). Teaching courses online: A review of the research. Review of Educational Research, 76(1), 93-135.

Wang, H., & Shao, M. (2008). Desire2Learn for quality matters., 1335-1339.

 

 

Visit to Mankato CETL

1. Green room at cCETL

podcasts, live streaming

3 is the magic number, having 3 students

mavtube on kaltura as YouTube channel

how does it help faculty? hi end lecture capture. Collaboration for two experts, they can use the green screen. Use the background.

How decisions are made.  Is faculty involved. This center is one time deal, money  spent on production. Innovative technology for $40K. It might be more.  No time to survey people what they want. There are other technologies which people can try out and then expand on them.

Bunch of smart boards, but not sure if people are. Using them.  Software and apps only here at the CETL, not on the. Rest of the campus. People will try but get stuck with that technology Only.

staffing snow students.

#pm #techworkshop #LectureCApture http://ow.ly/i/4ex06 http://ow.ly/i/4ex0v

web page and linkedin are the social media they are using

the CETL is housing people with different bosses. Closes collaboration is technology and CETL, not research yet. D2l specialist and hardware people are coming to CETL. StarID conversion is hosted in CETL. Library had to give up spaceto CEyl and like at Scsu problematic.

Assessment certificate. Sustainability and budget.

 

Summer money for class redesign. Cohort of people who can focus on that. flipped classroom study abroad etc as themes.

New provost wants decisions to be data driven. Is there an office like institutional research. Use only quantitative data but thinking about qualitative interviews.

generation on a tightrope

http://www.amazon.com/Generation-Tightrope-Portrait-College-Student/dp/0470376295

working with the librarians took time also. make aware librarians of the lecture capture for instructional purposes.

Focus is student learning.

Curiculum maPiping speaker and CETL is asking how can follow up.

24 Good iPad Math Apps for Elementary Students

24 Good iPad Math Apps for Elementary Students

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2013/12/24-good-ipad-math-apps-for-elementary.html
1- Motion Math

Feed your fish and play with numbers! Practice mental addition and subtraction with Motion Math: Hungry Fish, a delightful learning game that’s fun for children and grownups.

2- Geoboard

The Geoboard is a tool for exploring a variety of mathematical topics introduced in the elementary and middle grades. Learners stretch bands around pegs to form line segments and polygons and make discoveries about perimeter, area, angles, congruence, fractions, and more.

3- Math Vs Zombies

The world is overrun with zombies. You are a part of a squad of highly trained scientists who can save us. Using your math skills and special powers you can treat infected zombies to contain the threat.

4- Mystery Math Town

It’s part math drills, part seek and find game and totally engaging. Kids ages five and up should find this both fun and challenging. Parents should rejoice that finally there is a way to get kids to want to do more math. – Smart Apps for Kids

5- Montessori Numbers

Montessori Numbers offers a sequence of guided activities that gradually help children reinforce their skills. Each activity offers several levels of increasing complexity

6- Free Kids Counting Game

FREE and fun picture math games for kids designed by the iKidsPad team. This free iPad math app dynamically generates thousand of beginning counting games with different themes and number levels. Great interactive and challenging games helps young children build up basic counting skills and number recognition.

7- Math Puppy

Math Puppy will take you on a journey of educational fun like never before!
From toddlers to grade school, for Children of all ages – Math Puppy is the perfect way to build up your math skills. Your child will be able to enjoy a constructive, supportive, interactive fun filled environment while mastering the arts of basic math.

8- Mathmateer

While your rocket is floating weightlessly in space, the real fun begins! Play one of the many fun math missions. Each mission has touchable objects floating in space, including stars, coins, 3D shapes and more! Earn a bronze, silver or gold medal and also try to beat your high score. Missions range in difficulty from even/odd numbers all the way to square roots, so kids and their parents will enjoy hours of fun while learning math.

9- Math Ninja

Use your math skills to defend your treehouse against a hungry tomato and his robotic army in this fun action packed game! Choose between ninja stars, smoke bombs, or ninja magic – and choose your upgrades wisely!

10- Everyday Mathematics

The Equivalent Fractions game by McGraw Hill offers a quick and easy way to practice and reinforce fraction concepts and relationships. This game runs on the iPad, iPhone, and iPod Touch.

11- Elementary School Math

Based on the classroom hit Middle School Math HD, Elementary School Math HD is a stunningly beautiful and powerfully engaging application built for today’s technology-driven elementary school classroom. Emphasizing game-playing and skill development, the eight modules in Elementary School Math HD have been carefully designed by classroom teachers to provide the perfect balance between fun and the practice of fundamental skills

12- Math Tappers

MathTappers: Multiples is a simple game designed first to help learners to make sense of multiplication and division with whole numbers, and then to support them in developing fluency while maintaining
accuracy.

13- Ordered Fractions

Two Player Bluetooth Math Game! You can use two devices and play competitively or cooperatively with your classmates or parents. Ordered Fractions provides a comprehensive tool that offers an innovative method of learning about comparing and ordering fractions.

14- SlateMath

SlateMath is an iPad app that develops mathematical intuition and skills through playful interaction. The app’s 38 activities prepare children for kindergarten and first grade math.  SlateMath forms the foundation of numbers, digit writing, counting, addition, order relation, patterns, parity and problem solving.

15- NumberStax

Number Stax is a puzzle game to test your number skills! Drop numbers and operators in the correct places to match the number or expression shown at the top of the screen to score. You can’t remove tiles but you can swap them around. You can freeze the game at any time, but remember to watch the clock! Eliminate tiles, score points, and earn bonuses and achievements for as long as possible until your grid is full! Remember, the longer you play the faster it gets. Share with your family and friends to see who can get the highest score.

16- Grid Drawing

With a sheet of paper, a grid and a template, your children will be able to draw 32 drawings on iPad, 16 on the iPhone in the Lite version, more than 120 (60 on iPhone) in the full version.

17- Motion Math

Developed at the Stanford School of Education, Motion Math HD follows a star that has fallen from space, and must bound back up, up, up to its home in the stars. Moving fractions to their correct place on the number line is the only way to return. By playing Motion Math, learners improve their ability to perceive and estimate fractions in multiple forms.

18- 5th Grade Math

Splash Math is a fun and innovative way to practice math. With 9 chapters covering an endless supply of problems, it is by far the most comprehensive math workbook in the app store.

19- Sushi Monster

Meet Sushi Monster! Scholastic’s new game to practice, reinforce, and extend math fact fluency is completely engaging and appropriately challenging.

20- Math Monsters

Math Monsters Bingo is a new, fun way to master math on your iPhone, iPad and iPod touch. The game lets you practice math anytime and anywhere using a fun Bingo styled game play.

21- Grid Lines

Grid Lines is a Battleship-style math game used to teach students the coordinate plane by plotting points in all four quadrants.

22- Marble Math

Teacher’s Guide to Socrative 2.o

Teacher’s Guide to Socrative 2.o

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2013/12/teachers-guide-to-socrative-2o.html

Socrative is a smart student response system that empowers teachers to engage their classrooms through a series of educational exercises and games via smartphones, laptops, and tablets. Socrative is designed in such a way to help teachers make classes more engaging and interactive.It also helps teachers initiate activities and prompt students with questions to which students can respond using their laptops or smartphones. The good thing about ScSocratives that it can run on any kind of device with internet connection: iPads, iPods, laptops, smartphones so students will never miss out on any learning acidity.

twitter resources for its use in education

A Quick Guide To Twitter Hashtags For Professional Development

http://www.edudemic.com/twitter-hashtags-for-professional-developement/

Why It’s Time For Teachers To Embrace Twitter

http://www.edudemic.com/teachers-on-twitter/

How (And Why) Teachers Should Have Multiple Twitter Accounts

http://www.edudemic.com/teachers-multiple-twitter-accounts/

 

Twitter Aligned with Bloom’s Taxonomy for Your Students ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning
http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2013/12/twitter-aligned-with-blooms-taxonomy.html 

Translating Constructivism into Instructional Design: Potential and Limitations.

Karagiorgi, Y., & Symeou, L. (2005). Translating Constructivism into Instructional Design: Potential and Limitations. Journal of Educational Technology & Society, 8(1), 17–27.
http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=ip&db=aph&AN=85866335 PDF available
p. 18 Knowledge for constructivism cannot be imposed or transferred intact from the mind of one knower to the mind of another. Therefore, learning and teaching cannot be synonymous: we can teach, even well, without having students learn
p. 19 In the traditional approach, the instructional designer analyses the conditions – such as the content, the learner, and the instructional setting – which bear on the instructional system, in preparation for the specification of intended learning outcomes. In the constructivist approach, the instructional content cannot be pre-specified. Constructivist designers avoid the breaking down of context into component parts as traditional instructional designers do, but are in favour of environments in which knowledge, skills, and complexity exist naturally.
The goal, for instance, is not to teach a particular version of history, but to teach someone how to think like a historian.
p. 19 In traditional instruction, this phase involves the design of a sequence to achieve specified performance objectives.
Yiasemina Karagiorgi

Integrating Web 2.0 Across the Curriculum

Integrating Web 2.0 Across the Curriculum

Oliver, K. (2010). Integrating Web 2.0 Across the Curriculum. Techtrends: Linking Research & Practice To Improve Learning54(2), 50-60.

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=ip&db=aph&AN=48574971  PDF available.

Blogs and wikis are among the most frequently cited Web 2.0 tools, but they are just the tip of an integration iceberg

many titles, including Web 2.0, the “read-write Web” (Richardson, 2005-2006), browser-based applications (Descy, 2007) and school 2.0 or classroom 2.0 (Lankshear & Knobel, 2007; Lehmann, 2007).

http://preezo.com/

http://quizlet.com/ see blog entry http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/11/27/language-and-technology-learn-easy-and-funny/

Educators Weigh iPad’s Dominance of Tablet Market

Educators Weigh iPad’s Dominance of Tablet Market

http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2013/11/22/13ipad_ep.h33.html?tkn=LUCCCAu94sJXhXwoBrDRG%2BmCJBT04YYozBRQ&cmp=clp-sb-ascd

Susan Einhorn, the executive director of the Anytime Anywhere Learning Foundation, a Bellevue, Wash.-based organization that supports schools in developing and improving 1-to-1 computing programs, disagrees.

She said that “iPads are a consumer device; I don’t feel they’re really designed for education.” Ms. Einhorn favors tablets with what she calls “greater functionality,” such as Microsoft’s Surface tablet.

As a “technology-agnostic” organization, the International Society for Technology in Education does not take a position on specific devices, but CEO Brian C. Lewis observed that, “within a short period of time, tablets have become almost ubiquitous. What we forget is that, in another three to five years, another new thing will transform not only our world, but what’s happening in the classroom.”

Mr. Lewis said he has heard too many stories of schools and districts that purchased technology before planning how to use it to drive learning.

My two issues:
– why is an educational media such as “Education Week” outright advertising commerical products?

– why is “Educational Media” not bursting the bubble of such reckless purchasing of products without plan and idea?

virtual worlds, simulation, gamification

From: Miltenoff, Plamen
Sent: Wednesday, November 20, 2013 4:09 PM
To: ‘technology@lists.mnscu.edu’; ‘edgamesandsims@lists.mnscu.edu’
Cc: Oyedele, Adesegun
Subject: virtual worlds and simulations

Good afternoon

Apologies for any cross posting…

Following a request from fellow faculty at SCSU, I am interested in learning more about any possibilities for using virtual worlds and simulations opportunities [in the MnSCU system] for teaching and learning purposes.

The last I remember was a rather messy divorce between academia and Second Life (the latter accusing an educational institution of harboring SL hackers). Around that time, MnSCU dropped their SL support.

Does anybody have an idea where faculty can get low-cost if not free access to virtual worlds? Any alternatives for other simulation exercises?

Any info/feedback will be deeply appreciated.

Plamen

 

After Frustrations in Second Life, Colleges Look to New Virtual Worlds. February 14, 2010

http://chronicle.com/article/After-Frustrations-in-Second/64137/

—–Original Message—–
From: Weber, James E.
Sent: Wednesday, November 20, 2013 5:41 PM
To: Miltenoff, Plamen Subject: RE: virtual worlds and simulations

Hi Plamen:

I don’t use virtual worlds, but I do use a couple of simulations…

I use http://www.glo-bus.com/ extensively in my strategy class.  It is a primary integrating mechanism for this capstone class.

I also use http://erpsim.hec.ca/en because it uses and illustrates SAP and process management.

http://www.goventure.net/ is one I have been looking into.  Seems more flexible…

Best,

Jim

From: brock.dubbels@gmail.com [mailto:brock.dubbels@gmail.com] On Behalf Of Brock Dubbels
Sent: Wednesday, November 20, 2013 4:29 PM
To: Oyedele, Adesegun
Cc: Miltenoff, Plamen; Gaming and Simulations
Subject: Re: virtual worlds and simulations

That is fairly general

what constitutes programming skill is not just coding, but learning icon-driven actions and logic in a menu

for example, Sketch Up is free. You still have to learn how to use the interface.

there is drag and drop game software, but this is not necessarily a share simulation

From: Kalyvaki, Maria [mailto:Maria.Kalyvaki2@smsu.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, November 20, 2013 4:26 PM
To: Miltenoff, Plamen
Subject: RE: virtual worlds and simulations

Hi,

I received this email today and I am happy that someone is interested on Second Life. The second life platform and some other virtual worlds are free to use. Depends what are your expectations there that may increase the cost of using the virtual world. I am using some of those virtual worlds and my previous school Texas Tech University was using SL for a course.

Let me know how could I help you with the virtual worlds.

With appreciation,

Maria

 

From: Jane McKinley [mailto:Jane.McKinley@riverland.edu]
Sent: Thursday, November 21, 2013 11:09 AM
To: Miltenoff, Plamen
Cc: Jone Tiffany; Pamm Tranby; Dan Harber
Subject: Virtual worlds

Hi Plamen,

To introduce myself I am the coordinator/ specialist for our real life allied health simulation center at Riverland Community College. Dan Harber passed your message on to me. I have been actively working in SL since 2008.  My goal in SL was to do simulation for nursing education. I remember when MnSCU had the island. I tried contacting the lead person at St. Paul College about building a hospital on the island for nursing that would be open to all MN programs, but never could get a response back.

Yes, SL did take the education fees away for a while but they are now back. Second Life is free in of itself, it is finding islands with educational simulations that takes time to explore, but many are free and open to the public. I do have a list of islands that may be of interest to you. They are all health related, but there are science islands such as Genome Island. Matter of  fact there is a talk that will be out there tonight about how to do research and conduct fair experiments at 7:00 our time.

I have been lucky to find someone with the same goals as I have. Her name is Jone Tiffany. She is a professor at Bethel University in the nursing program. In the last 4 years we have built an island for nursing education. This consists of a hospital, clinic, office building, classrooms and a library. We also built a simulation center. (Although I accidently removed the floor and some walls in it. Our builder is getting it back together.) There is such a shortage of real mental health and public health sites that a second island is being purchased to meet this request. On that island we are going to build an inner city, urban and rural communities. This will be geared towards meeting those requests. Our law enforcement program at Riverland has voiced an interest in SL with being able to set up virtual crime scenes which could be staged anywhere on the two islands. With the catastrophic natural events and terrorist activities that have occurred recently we will replicate these same communities on the other side of the island only it will be the aftermath of a hurricane and tornado, or flooding. On the other side we could stage the aftermath of a bombing such as what happened in Boston. Victims could transported  to the hospital ED. Law enforcement could do an investigation.

We have also been working with the University of Wisconsin, Osh Kosh. They have a plane crash simulation and what we call a grunge house that students go into to see what the living conditions are like for those who live in poverty and what could be done about it.

Since I am not faculty I cannot take our students out to SL, but Jone has had well over 100 of her students in there doing various assignments. She is taking more out this semester. They have done such things as family health assessments and diabetes assessment and have to create a plan of care. She has done lectures out there. So the students come out with their avatars and sit in a classroom. This is a way distant learning can be done but yet be engaged with the students. The beauty of SL is that you can be creative. Since the island is called Nightingale Isle, some of the builds are designed with that theme in mind. Such as the classrooms, they are tiered up a mountain and look like the remains of a bombed out church from the Crimean War, it is one of our favorite spots. We also have an area open on the island for support groups to meet. About 5 years ago Riverland did do a congestive heart failure simulation with another hospital in SL. That faculty person unfortunately has left so we have not been able to continue it, but the students loved it. We did the same scenario with Jones students in the sim center we have and again the students loved it.

The island is private but anyone is welcome to use it. We do this so that we know and can control who is on the island. All that is needed is to let Jone or I know who you are, where are you from (institution), and what is your avatar name. We will friend you in SL and invite you to join the group, then you have access to the island. Both Jone and I are always eager to share what all goes on out there (as you can tell by this e-mail). There is so much potential of what can be done. We have been lucky to be able to hire the builder who builds for the Mayo Clinic. Their islands are next to ours. She replicated the Gonda Building including the million dollar plus chandeliers.

I can send you the list of the health care related islands, there are about 40 of them. I also copied  Jone, she can give you more information on what goes into owning an island. We have had our ups and downs with this endeavor but believe in it so much that we have persevered and have a beautiful island to show for it.

Let me if you want to talk more.

Jane  (aka Tessa Finesmith-avatar name)

Jane McKinley, RN

College Lab Specialist -Riverland Center for Simulation Learning

Riverland Community College

Austin, MN 55912

jane.mckinley@riverland.edu

507-433-0551 (office)

From: Jeremy Nienow [mailto:JNienow@inverhills.mnscu.edu]
Sent: Thursday, November 21, 2013 10:11 AM
To: Miltenoff, Plamen
Cc: Sue Dion
Subject: Teaching in virtual worlds

Hello,

A friend here at IHCC sent me your request for information on teaching in low-cost virtual environments.

I like to think of myself on the cusp of gamification and I have a strong background in gaming in general (being a white male in my 30s).

Anyway – almost every MMORPG (Massive Multi-online role playing game) today is set up on a Free to Play platform for its inhabitance.

There are maybe a dozen of these out there right now from Dungeon and Dragons online, to Tera, to Neverwinter Nights…etc.

Its free to download, no subscription fee (like there used to be) and its free to play – how they get the money is they make game items and cool aspects of the game cost money…people pay for the privilege of leveling faster.

So – you could easily have all your students download the game (provided they all have a suitable system and internet access), make an avatar, start in the same place – and teach right from there.

I have thought of doing this for an all online class before, but wanted to wait till I was tenured.

Best,

Jeremy L. Nienow, PhD., RPA
Anthropology Faculty

Inver Hills Community College

P.S. Landon Pirius (sp?) who was once at IHCC and now I believe is at North Hennepin maybe… wrote his PhD on teaching in online environments and used World of Warcraft.

From: Gary Abernethy [mailto:Gary.Abernethy@minneapolis.edu]
Sent: Thursday, November 21, 2013 8:46 AM
To: Miltenoff, Plamen
Subject: Re: [technology] virtual worlds and simulations

Plamen,

The  below are  current options I am aware of for  VW  and SIM . You may also want to  take a look at  Kuda, in Google  code, I worked  at  SRI  when we developed this tool. I am interested in collaboration in this area.

Hope the info helps

https://www.activeworlds.com/index.html

http://www.opencobalt.org/

http://opensimulator.org/wiki/Main_Page

http://metaverse.sourceforge.net/

http://stable.kuda.googlecode.com

Gary Abernethy

Director of  eLearning

Academic Affairs

Minneapolis Community and Technical College  |  1501 Hennepin Avenue S.  |  Minneapolis, MN 55403

Phone 612-200-5579

Gary.Abernethy@minneapolis.edu | http://www.minneapolis.edu

From: John OBrien [mailto:John.OBrien@so.mnscu.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, November 20, 2013 11:37 PM
To: Miltenoff, Plamen
Subject: RE: virtual worlds and simulations

I doubt this is so helpful, but maybe:  http://wiki.secondlife.com/wiki/SLED

A Quick Start Guide to Participating in Twitter Chats

A Quick Start Guide to Participating in Twitter Chats

http://www.guide2digitallearning.com/blog_tom_murray/quick_start_guide_twitter_chats

This past week, I had the privilege of introducing US Secretary of Education, Arne Duncan, as a guest moderator for #edtechchat, an educational Twitter chat that I founded with four members of my personal learning network (PLN).  Over the course of 60 minutes, almost 2,000 people from around the world, shared about 10,000 tweets in response to the Secretary’s six questions related to being a Connected Educator.  Secretary Duncan (@arneduncan) and his Office of Educational Technology (@officeofedtech) deemed October “Connected Educator’s Month” for the second straight year.  To close #ce13, Secretary Duncan used the #edtechchat forum to engage in conversation with educators from all over the world.

In reflecting on the chat, many people asked how to get started, and how to possibly follow such a quick flow of information. For one, 10,000 tweets in an hour is by no means typical; but then again, neither is the opportunity to interact with the US Secretary of Education. Although this particular chat with the Secretary may be an extreme example of what possibilities can arise when connecting with others online, each week there are over 160 chats that occur.  Virtually all topics are covered in some fashion. Whether you’re a 4th grade teacher (#4thchat) in Maryland (#mdedchat), a principal (#cpchat) in Arkansas (#arkedchat), a new teacher (#ntchat) in Rhode Island (#edchatri), or a parent (#ptchat) connecting on a Saturday (#satchat), there’s something for you.

This Quick Start Guide to Participating in Twitter Chats was created as part of the Digital Learning Transition MOOC (#dltmooc), an online “Massive Open Online Course”, developed by The Alliance for Education (@All4Ed) and the Friday Institute (@FridayInstitute) as part of Project 24 (@all4edproject24).  Feel free to download and share the Quick Start resource to help educators get started.

Furthermore, the Official Chat List was created by Chad Evans (@cevans5095) and me (@thomascmurray), with help from our good friend Jerry Blumengarten (@cybraryman1). This resource (shortcut: bit.ly/officialchatlist) is a comprehensive list of the educational Twitter chats that take place each week.

Start small. Choose a chat that peaks your interest. Lurk, listen, and learn. When you’re ready, jump in head first.  Grow your PLN and get connected through a Twitter chat this week!  Your students will benefit.

– See more at: http://www.guide2digitallearning.com/blog_tom_murray/quick_start_guide_twitter_chats#sthash.W1DPfmY1.dpuf

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