Searching for "technology learning"

“Learn Google Apps” Site

Google has their own site to help you learn how to use Google Apps, Learn Google Apps.

google

The site has tips on switching from other systems, tutorials, articles, tips and tricks, videos, examples of using Google Apps and much more. You can also learn by each app individually.

There’s even an weekly episode of the “Apps Show” where you can learn about new tips and features.

http://educationaltechnologyguy.blogspot.com/2015/02/googles-own-learn-google-apps-site.html?m=1

Social Homework Platform-

Social Homework Platform Aims to Boost Student Engagement

http://campustechnology.com/articles/2015/02/25/social-homework-platform-aims-to-boost-student-engagement.aspx

Another step ahead/afar from CMS?

Koondis works in traditional large introductory lecture classrooms, blended classes and fully online courses that often are filled with students enrolled from various disciplines who are required to be there for their majors.

Described as a “social homework system,” a “discussion forum that puts students in small groups” and even a replacement for the campus learning management system, Koondis is showing great promise as a pill for student satisfaction.

The idea is that Koondis eliminates the need for teachers to read all of the posts. The program even counts posts for the instructor for grading purposes, and alerts the faculty member to do follow-up when a student isn’t participating.

Horizon Report 2015

2015-nmc-horizon-report-HE-EN

Horizon Report > 2015 Higher Education Edition

Key Trends Accelerating Technology Adoption in Higher Education 6
Long-Term Trends: Driving Ed Tech adoption in higher education for five or more years
> Advancing Cultures of Change and Innovation 8
> Increasing Cross-Institution Collaboration 10
Mid-Term Trends: Driving Ed Tech adoption in higher education for three to five years
> Growing Focus on Measuring Learning 12
> Proliferation of Open Educational Resources 14
Short-Term Trends: Driving Ed Tech adoption in higher education for the next one to two years
> Increasing Use of Blended Learning 16
> Redesigning Learning Spaces 18
Significant Challenges Impeding Technology Adoption in Higher Education 20
Solvable Challenges: Those that we understand and know how to solve
> Blending Formal and Informal Learning 22
> Improving Digital Literacy 24
Difficult Challenges: Those we understand but for which solutions are elusive
> Personalizing Learning 26
> Teaching Complex Thinking 28
Wicked Challenges: Those that are complex to even define, much less address
> Competing Models of Education 30
> Rewarding Teaching 32
Important Developments in Educational Technology for Higher Education 34

The 6 Technologies That Will Change the Face of Education

Will students be wearing their tech in virtual classrooms in five years? Wearable devices, adaptive technologies, and the Internet of Things are just some of the new tech researchers say is shaping the near future of higher education.

In 1 Year or Less: BYOD and the flipped classroom.

“Employers and higher education institutions are finding that when given the opportunity to choose their device, users are saved from the effort and time needed to get accustomed to new devices and can therefore accomplish tasks with more ease and efficiency.”

“Flipped learning is seen as especially suited for higher education because the rearranging of class time gives students in large introductory lecture courses more opportunity to engage and interact with their peers.”

In 2-3 Years: Makerspaces and wearable devices.

Makerspaces have the “benefit of engaging learners in creative, higher-order problem solving through hands-on design, construction and iteration.”

“Wearable technology is poised to see significant growth in the coming years, spurring experimentation in higher education because the demand for wearables is seen to be coming in large part from college-aged students.”

In 4-5 Years: Adaptive technologies and the Internet of Things.

“Adaptive technology is seen as a means to break free of a “one-size-fits-all” approach to education and is suited well for online and hybrid learning environments, “where student activities are conducted virtually and can be monitored by software and tracking applications.”

The Internet of Things pushes information to learners from their surroundings. “For instance, a learner exploring a city with a rich historical past can explore their environment through an architectural, political, or biological lens, depending on how the surroundings are equipped.”

From the NMC Horizon Report 2015: Higher Education Edition

http://campustechnology.com/Articles/2015/02/11/The-6-Technologies-That-Will-Change-the-Face-of-Education.aspx?Page=1

GIS and GeoWeb Technologies

https://www.libraryjuiceacademy.com/moodle/login/index.php

Eva Dodsworth

Since the emergence of easily accessible dynamic online mapping tools, there has been a drastic increase in geographic interest and awareness. Whether for personal, social, professional or academic uses, people are using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to communicate information in a map format. Whether it’s using Google Earth to study urban change, or creating Google Map Mashups to deliver library resources, more and more members of society are turning to mapping programs for their visualization needs. With so many using GIS technology in their daily lives, library staff are now more than ever assisting library clients with their mapping queries.

This course will introduce students to a variety of mapping tools and GIS technologies such Google Earth and the creation of dynamic KML files; ArcGIS Online and webmap publishing; Google Fusion Tables and geocoding; and GIS fundamentals with geospatial data creation. Students will be able to apply their GIS skills in their reference work, in digitization projects, in webpages, in library instruction, and more.  Through hands-on exercises, pre-recorded demonstrations and lectures, students will receive a thorough overview of mapping resources that will enhance and expose their library’s resources.

http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/WeekOne_2014.wmv

 

http://www.placingliterature.com/map?modal=1

http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/WeekTwo.wmv

http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/WeekThree_Part_One.mov

http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/WeekThree_Part2.mov

http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/WeekFour.mov

 

– How to enable offline maps in your Google Maps app – http://www.huffingtonpost.com/map-happy/how-to-enable-offline-maps_b_6525832.html

– Huge news – Google Earth Pro, which used to cost the public $400 is now free! What does that mean for you? Extra features! You can import GIS files, tables, and export animated movie files!  http://google-latlong.blogspot.com.es/2015/01/google-earth-pro-is-now-free.html

– Don’t live in Canada?  Too bad! Google Maps plots best tobagonning hills in Canada!http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/google-map-plots-canada-s-best-tobogganing-hills-1.2218207

– a map of 19 countries that were named after specific people – http://www.vox.com/2015/2/1/7954179/map-countries-pe

 

Maps that shaped the world

http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-30840318

 

 

Content for Week Two – February 9th – February 15th

Week Two:

Podcast includes:

  • Citizen Mapping
  • OpenStreetMap – crowdsourcing
    more heads are better then one
    NYPL geomapping volunteers.

http://www.openstreetmap.org/

citizen crime reporting app for NYPD http://www.nyc.gov/html/nypd/html/crime_mapping/nyc_crime_map_introduction.shtml

when the jet disappeared, crowdsourcing for parts on the satellite maps of the ocean

potholes map

maps of the threes. emerald bug in Mnpls

http://www.fuf.net/

how does foursquare and checkins in FB and Google +fit it

  • Google Earth
  • Assignment

Podcast and Powerpoint can be accessed from:http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/JuicyLibrarianMaterial.html

Tutorials: Google Earth

Assignments:

1.       Discussion question:

Discover some citizen mapping projects that you are interested in OR

Contribute your local knowledge to Google Map Maker AND Share with the class online

2.       Google Earth Map

Please complete the tutorial and then create a map in Google Earth with the following components:

  • A title
  • A written introduction to your project
  • At least five placemarks, embedded with html tags, and images, if possible.
  • Imported KML file(s) file format by GEarth, but other apps is using it. using notepad or MS Word, one can create KML file.
    screen overlay, can be text, image, anything. legend. HTML code.
  • A screen overlay  (i.e. a legend)

areal photography.

history.
images from the library, Google is willing to buy them. citizen mapping. scanning and uploading.

geographical and societal awareness.

Gallery: 360Cities.

google street view – historical views

Google Earth Mapping

Submit online as a KML/KMZ file

I had the opportunity to experience a gizmo that can be used to display a variety of mapping projects, including citizen mapping: Science on a Sphere. It is a sphere on which you can project static maps or animations. The one I saw, in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s facility on Ford Island in Honolulu, displayed animations showing the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and the 2011 tsunami in Japan, as well as airline flight paths, ocean currents, polar ice cap change over time, and many other types of geospatial data.

The Great Backyard Bird Count actually starts today and runs through Monday, February 16th. At a minimum, it only requires 15 minutes of observation on any or all the days:  http://gbbc.birdcount.org/

Happy Cow is a site well-known to many vegetarians/vegans for finding restaurants which I’ve used when travelling. Users can submit reviews and/or restaurants that they’d like profiled (although the site reserves the right to approve or not the listing). http://www.happycow.net/search.html 

———————————–

wq and leaflet – a framework that could catch on
by Timothy Clarke – Thursday, February 12, 2015, 2:21 PM

One of the impediments to citizen mapping is the line-of-sight cell tower limitations of mobile phones, or the wifi requirements for other mobile devices.  Citizen mapping in urban and suburban environments is well-served by mobile devices, but what about natural areas, dense leaf cover, or extreme topography?  Even if obtaining absolute mapping coordinates isn’t the issue, much crowdsourcing assumes an ability to connect back to a central data repository (e.g., a web database, ‘the cloud’).  Equipment that can interact with GPS satellites and support data capture is typically expensive and generally requires proprietary software.

wq (https://wq.io/) is a framework that is ‘device first’ and ‘offline-enabled’.  It attempts to leverage several open source technologies to build an entire mobile solution that can support citizen science data collection work, and then synchronize with a central repository once the device (and operator) return to an area served by cellular or wifi networks.

I’m stretching here, so if I get stuff wrong, please don’t yell.  Still, I’ll take a pass at generally describing the framework and its related technology stack.

wq relies upon python, and a web framework called django for building offline-capable web apps that can run on iOS and Android devices.  These web apps, then, rely very heavily upon javascript, particularly requirejs (http://requirejs.org/) and mustache (https://mustache.github.io/), for the templates that permit quick and (somewhat) painless web application development.  Data visualization relies upon d3.js (http://d3js.org/), and geography makes heavy use of Leaflet (http://leafletjs.com/) — maybe the most pertinent layer of the stack for those of us in this course.  If you’re not familiar withLeaflet.js, check it out!

Finally, wq extends several other open source technologies to enable synchronizing between a central data repository and multiple mobile devices in the hands of citizen mappers.  Lastly, wq employs a set of tools to more easily build and distribute customized mapping apps that can be served from Apple’s app store, Google Play, etc.

What wq intends is to allow highly specialized citizen science/citizen mapping apps to be more easily and quickly built, based upon a solid collection of aligned F/OSS tools.  Ideally, an app can spin up quickly to respond to a particular need (e.g., a pipeline spill), or a specialized audience (the run up to a public comment period for a development project), or even something like a high school field trip or higher ed service learning project.

Some examples of citizen mapping projects already built upon wq are here:

https://wq.io/examples/

—————–

Creating a walking tour map with Google Earth_2014

————-

Week 3

Podcast includes:

  • Geocoding
  • Georeferencing
  • Spatial Data Formats
  • Geospatial Data Online
  • Discussion Question

Podcast and Powerpoint available from: http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/JuicyLibrarianMaterial.html

Tutorials: BatchGeo (optional); Google Fusion (optional)

https://en.batchgeo.com/

enter Xcel data, and export KLM file ready for google map and/or google earth

https://support.google.com/fusiontables/answer/2571232
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Google_Fusion_Tables

store maps online, no latitude needed.
visualize geospatial data by map
spatial analysis by mapping different layers together
showing data by map, graph or chart
e.g. how many cars cross specific point
crowdsourcing: spotting butterflies, using fusion tables to map the spices and sightings
http://www.theguardian.com/news/datablog/2011/mar/31/deprivation-map-indices-multiple

students: journalism, history, geography.

Georeferencing (geocoding – data, geo referencing – image)
historical air maps or photos are much more useful when they are georeferenced.
Photos from different year is difficult to lay over one another without referencing. the only reference might be the river. usually reference the four corners, but sometimes river. Using GIS program to determine the longitute/latitude for each corner. sometimes only farmland and it is impossible

 

social media and libraries

Use of social media by the library current practices and future opportunities (White Paper)

http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/access/white-paper-social-media.pdf

#tfsocialmedia

Social media objectives:

  •  promotion
  •  collection management tool
  • Outreach
  •  teaching and learning

Opportunities and challenges

  • opportunity to build a sense of community between the library and its users
  • the variability of skills across library staff for using social media effectively, striking the right tone between professional and personal, coordinating activities across the institution to avoid duplication
  • maintaining visibility for the library brand and copyright issues relating to hosting library resources on social media sites

Policies and management:

  • Librarians are divided on the benefits of introducing formalized social media policies and plans. About a third of libraries responding to the Taylor & Francis survey had a policy in place, but over 40% had no plans to introduce one
  • Some believe that representing the library as a professional function with a
    consistent tone is the priority, while others believe that a more human approach is important, with individual staff free to bring their own ideas and personalities to social media activities.

Effectiveness and assessment:

  • difficult to prove return on effort and that the time required to do this was a major barrier to more comprehensive analysis of impact
  • framework for evaluation, so it is likely that assessment against commonly agreed metrics will become an increasingly important part of social media activity within the library in the near future

Current Social Media Practices:

  • In a study from the mid 2000s (Cantrell and Havens1 ), most library directors in the US when questioned about social media said they did not think that libraries had a role in social networking
  • A more recent study from 2012 (Kai-Wah Chu and Du4) shows how use of social media by the library has now become mainstream. In this survey of libraries in Asia, North America and Europe, 71% were found to be using social media tools with a further 13% saying they planned to use them

Advantages of using social media

n Financially the costs of using social media are perceived to be low;
n It requires little training;
n It promotes library services and disseminates news quickly, delivering this information more directly to library users;
n It increases engagement and interactions with library users;
n It helps gather feedback to enhance user services;
n The promotion of library holdings via social media can help increase usage of content;
n It enhances communication both within the library and with other departments;
n It can be used for outreach activities through onward sharing, well beyond the institution itself, helping build connections and reputation more broadly

Social Media Objectives: graph on page 8 of the PDF document:

A To promote events
B To promote library services
C To promote resources/collections at the library
D To update on library refurbishments
E To promote new acquisitions
F To promote library guides, exhibition guides
G To connect with new students joining the university
H To engage with the academic community
I To connect with the wider community beyond the university e.g. the town in which the institution is based
J To connect with distance learners
K As a customer services tool- complaints, suggestions, enquiries, feedback

L To highlight subject specific information
M To connect with potential students
N As a teaching tool to promote information literacy, technology and writing tips (not library based)
O To promote courses
P As a research tool to locate official documents and studies

From UK-based focus group: “The library is a programme, not just a building.

Channel preferences: Graph on page 10 of the PDF document

SOCIAL MEDIA USES Table on p 13 of the PDF document
Twitter n Distribute library news and information
n Provide customer service
n Build connections with researchers
n Build connections with other librarians and institutions
Facebook n Distribute library news and information
n More social and less formal than Twitter – share photographs and run competitions
n Arrange events including tracking RSVPs and sending event updates
n Engagement with students
Pinterest n Promote general library collections, digital and archive special collections and information literacy
n Set up of online repositories for students to pin researched references as part of
collaborative group work
n Display book titles to save time browsing and promote new titles
n Provide an arena for students and course leaders to pin reviewed and recommended reading
for a particular topic
n Develop communities with other online libraries
YouTube n Streaming film collections
n Instructional ‘how to’ videos teaching information literacy skills and how to use library
services and resources
There are also a number of other social media products that are being used by librarians that reflect regional
preferences and the need for the specific functions offered by niche applications.

Collection usage and discovery: Graph on p. 15

Teaching and learning

From US-based librarian interview: “The trend in education now is to create environments that foster collaborative learning. Faculty have ditched textbooks and course management systems in exchange for a Facebook page for their class, or a wiki, or a blog. These online environments are fun; students already know how to use them and are more motivated to comment, discuss and share in these environments than a dry CMS.”

Social media policies and management, p. 18

73% of respondents stating that they believed more roles dedicated to social media would appear in the library in the future.

Effectiveness of social media

From UK focus group: “We keep track of something particularly successful, then we redo the campaign 6 months later.”

From US focus group: “We have very few interactions with anyone on our Twitter feed.”
“Twitter is definitely the best platform, because we hashtag all of our posts with the keyword
of the publication, and so for the academic audience, once they click it’s going to pull up all
of the similar publications under that topic.

Promoting library social media channels

From UK focus group:
“We retweet each other to encourage new followers.” My note: Suggested by me regarding SCSU_Library for Twitter and Pinterest and SCSUTechinstruct but “considered” (in local lingo, slow death of the idea)

electronic portfolio: resources

ePortfolio for the Assessment of Learning 

http://www.futured.com/documents/FuturEdePortfolioforAssessmentWhitePaper.pdf

http://www.myefolio.com/
http://chalkandwire.com/index.php/product

A Survey of the Electronic Portfolio Market Sector: Analysis and Surprising Trends

http://campustechnology.com/articles/2011/10/12/a-survey-of-the-electronic-portfolio-market-sector.aspx

FolioTek, Columbia, Missouri, ePortfolio launch in 2001. Sells in U.S. with interest in expanding globally.

Livetext, LaGrange, IL, founded in 1998. New product: Field Experience Module. Smart phone app: iPad, iPhone, Android. Mostly U.S., but expanding in South America and the Middle East. Easy tie-in to accreditation agencies and their standards. Individual accounts. New release start of 2012. Started in K-12, moved focus to higher education, now exploring K-12 once again, starting with teacher education.

RCampus, produced by Reazon Systems, Santa Ana, CA. Software development started in 1999,

Desire2Learn, Kitchener, Ontario also Baltimore, MD, with offices around the world, founded in 1999. Sells worldwide, latest release for the electronic portfolio (ver. 3.5) was in August 2011. Electronic portfolio and the D2L LMS are bundled; each leverages functionalities from the other. ePortfolio moving to hosting service and individual accounts soon.

Digication, Providence, RI and Palo Alto, CA, founded 2002. Is in partnership with Google Apps. Individual accounts; institution keeps assessment data; individual keeps ePortfolio functionality. Through Google Apps: free digital accounts with Digication (no assessment management functions with these accounts). “Three or four clicks and Digication is enabled.” Almost daily updates. Smart phone app: IOS and Android. Contact jyan@digication.com.

Learning Objects, producers of Campus Pack, in Washington, DC, with employees around the world, founded in 2003.

TaskStream, New York City, organized 1998, founded 2000, markets internationally, versions available in a variety of languages. Offers separate platforms, AMS (Accountability Management System) and LAT (Learning Achievement Tools); each is multi-component.

Longsight, based in Ohio with offices in NY, IN, OH, WI, and CA, founded in 1978, a service provider for open source solutions. Supports both the Open Source Portfolio (OSP) and Sakai, within which OSP is embedded.

Chalk & Wire, Ridgeway, Ontario, Canada;

NobleHour, produced by TreeTop Software, in Lakeland, FL, founded in 2011

Sherston, Tag Developments, the assessment division of Sherston Software, Ltd., providers of Red Pen Tool: http://www.maps-ict.com/redpentool.mov, of LiveAssess: http://www.maps-ict.com/liveassess.mov, and of MAPS 3: http://www.maps-ict.com/maps3.mov.

PebblePad from PebbleLearning, in Telford, UK, with office in Australia, founded in 2003. Most popular ePortfolio in the U.K. and Australia,

Symplicity, in Arlington, VA, offers an electronic portfolio (http://www.symplicity.com/reflection) but it is only one among dozens of products that Symplicity offers–all of them are management tools for higher education (see http://www.symplicity.com/products). Good example of separating products to support a single function.

Blackboard

eFolioWorld, technology from Avenet, the Minnesota Colleges and Universities portfolio system,

iWebFolio, from Nuventive. Also known for TracDat, marketed since the 1990s, Nuventive founded 2000.

Epsilen,

Mahara,

eLumen,

A survey of e-pdp and e-portfolio practice in UK Higher Education

http://www.islamicstudiesnetwork.ac.uk/assets/documents/pdp/survey_of_epdp_and_eportfolio_practice_in_uk_higher_education.pdf

p. 10 and p. 18 offer questionnaires for assessment

Exploring Faculty Perceptions of ePortfolio Use and Its Relationship to Faculty Teaching Beliefs

http://ncepr.org/finalreports/WSUfinalreport.pdf

p. 3 questionnaire  p. 5

online course design

From the LinkedIn discussion group Higher Education Teaching and Learning

STUCK IN THE 90S: ONLINE COURSE DESIGN IN TRADITIONAL HIGHER EDUCATION

http://higheredmanagement.net/2014/10/22/stuck-in-the-90s-online-course-design-in-traditional-higher-education/

Of course, not all aspects of online course design require a team of specialists, a longer development time, and more funding. Some things can be done quickly, cheaply and by individuals with focused skill sets.

But technology can, when built with a deep understanding of how students learn, meet both of these needs. We can build online courses that provide students with hundreds of opportunities to test their knowledge. Using scientifically-based learning analytics, we can provide each learner with immediate, context-specific feedback. We can build software that constantly responds to each student’s cognitive and educational differences and serves up activities that address these differences.

  • Michael Berta, Ed.D.Michael

    Michael Berta, Ed.D.

    Educator, technologist, researcher, and innovator in edtech, distance education, and faculty development

    “Placing the burden on lone educators with minuscule (or non-existent) funding and who are not hired for their strengths in instructional media development is neither logical, nor fair. But more to the point, it’s a lost opportunity to leverage high-quality course design to drive improvements in learning outcomes.”

    I could not agree more with this statement and the remainder of the article. I’ve long supported an instructional design partnership model where faculty occupy a leading role along with other professionals capable of making the interactions, activities, and rich-media meet the quality needs of an increasingly complex learning environment (and world).

  • Judith

    Judith Killion

    Editor at Individual Basis

    We need to start imagining new models for building, acquiring and sharing instructional media.

    This has always been an issue. My students love activities that provide them with immediate feedback. I spend extra hours building a wide variety of different activities into each Learning module. It takes time and effort and if I am going to address different learning styles that is an entirely different issue. To create effective interactive learning tools that will not waste my students time and will challenge their skill level consumes more time than planning for a face to face class with different activities. I would love to talk to someone-be able to explain what I want my students to learn, suggest a few interactive choices, and come back later to find age related learning activities that fit different learning styles.

  • Alex TolleyAlex

    Alex Tolley

    Owner, MyMeemz

    There is going to be a fight because this model is more like a business product that educators contribute to, rather than own. Perhaps this is the true industrialization of education, replacing the craft model of individual teaching with standardized, high quality product?

  • Maria LaverghettaMaria

    Maria Laverghetta

    Enrollment Advisor – Pearson Embanet

    I have forwarded this article on to members of the course development team within Pearson for their feedback. I am curious to see their impression of the article versus mine, considering I predominantly am a part of recruitment services for Pearson specifically. Within our academic partnerships platform, we do contend with faculty, should they employ our course development team, to this vein because the ownership usually rests with the instructor solely. Editing course content or abridging related material so that it could be received potentially as more either user-friendly or technologically savvy can be a source of major contention with faculty members. I do agree that this is an industrialization of education to an extent, but it also pushes the ownership of traditional education past the instructor, a predominantly sole proprietorship environment, to an completely different team effort. The natural technological growing pains coupled with role expansion and differentiation are also issues needing to be addressed as well.

  • Alex TolleyAlex

    Alex Tolley

    Owner, MyMeemz

    Suppose one was to take this seriously. What might such a course look like – for a subject like Biology? Could it be built on existing LMS platforms, or is a new platform required?

  • Judith

    Judith Killion

    Editor at Individual Basis

    I think that both individual ownership and team collaboration are important to the development of successful online learning. We (hopefully) use the concepts of group and team learning in our classroom environments. We should not be afraid to open ourselves up to some of the positive opportunities that could develop from participating in these practices. It does not mean giving up our ownership of content and presentation. I see it as a marketplace of choice where instructors can decide what kinds of activities, helps, prompts, extra materials, and resources they want to add to their class content. The choices could be categorized by learning styles or how they fit into learning paradigms. I think we must face the reality that some parts of education will have to be more industrialized than others just because of the delivery method. This does not have to be a negative issue if there are enough choices to help instructors develop the rigorous content they want to deliver without sacrificing their entire life to the project.

Teaching Professor Conference

The 2015 Teaching Professor Conference is the place to hear about the latest pedagogical strategies.

The cut-off date for submitting a proposal to the
2015 Teaching Professor Conference is approaching fast!
All proposals must be submitted by October 31, 2014.

The Teaching Professor Conference is known for attracting a roster of high-quality, engaging presenters; that’s why we’re asking you to be a part of next year’s event. If you have previously submitted a proposal for past conferences, we sincerely ask you to submit again. And if you have never submitted a proposal for a session or poster session, we ask that you seriously consider this opportunity to share your expertise at the conference.

The 12th annual Teaching Professor Conference will be held May 29-31, 2015 at the Sheraton Atlanta Hotel, Atlanta, GA.

Featured topical areas are:

Topical Area 1: Instructional Design
Topical Area 2: Activities that Engage Students
Topical Area 3: Teaching Specific Types of Students
Topical Area 4: Instructional Vitality: Ways to Keep Teaching Fresh and Invigorated
Topical Area 5: Teaching and Learning with Technology
Topical Area 6: Creating Climates for Learning
Topical Area 7: Faculty Development

For more information about the proposal process and how to submit your proposal, please click here: http://www.teachingprofessor.com/conference/proposals.

The Teaching Professor Conference is three intensive days of plenary sessions, preconference workshops, sessions, poster sessions, and more. Here is your chance to be a part of it in 2015.

Deadline for proposal submissions is Friday, October 31st, 2014.

disruptive technologies: from swarming to mesh networking

How Hong Kong Protesters Are Connecting, Without Cell Or Wi-Fi Networks

http://www.npr.org/blogs/alltechconsidered/2014/09/29/352476454/how-hong-kong-protesters-are-connecting-without-cell-or-wi-fi-networks

messaging one another through a network that doesn’t require cell towers or Wi-Fi nodes. They’re using an app called FireChat that launched in March and is underpinned by mesh networking, which lets phones unite to form a temporary Internet.

My note: seems that civil disobedience provides excellent innovations in using technology; examples are-

  1. the 1999 World Trade Organization Protests in Seattle, where the “swarming” idea was implemented and later transformed by Bryan Alexander into “swarming for education” (http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/going-nomadic-mobile-learning-higher-education)  and depicted on this blog in September 2013
    http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/tag/bryan-alexander/
    to be continued by Britt in Learning Swarms? (http://bwatwood.edublogs.org/2010/08/05/learning-swarms/) and Howard Rheingold in his interview with Bryn Alexander in 2004 (http://www.thefeaturearchives.com/topic/Culture/M-Learning_4_Generation_Txt_.html and as Howard calls it “moblogging” and lately is becoming finally popular (at least in K12 if not in higher ed) as “backchanneling.”
  2. In a very similar scenario as the 1999 Seattle unrest, people in Venezuela (#venezuelalibre – Zello)  and Ukraine (Ukrainian roots shine through at WhatsApp) are turning to mobile apps to organize themselves and defy governments blocking of traditional social media (Protesters in Venezuela, Ukraine turn to peer-to  – CNN.com)The ideas using Zello and WhatsApp in education poured in:WhatsApp for education?, How to use Whatsapp Chat Messenger for Education

Mesh networking is still only an IT term. Internet and dbase search has no returns on mesh networking as a tool for education and/or civil disobedience. Will it be the continuation of moblogging, backchanneling and swarming?

related IMS blog post: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/09/19/mobile-elearning/

FireChat

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