Searching for "technology trends education"

online ed enrollment

Digital Learning Compass: The Distance Education Enrollment Report 2017

https://onlinelearningconsortium.org/read/digital-learning-compass-distance-education-enrollment-report-2017

In higher education, 29.7% of all students are taking at least one distance course.
The total distance enrollments are composed of 14.3% of students (2,902,756)
taking exclusively distance courses and 15.4% (3,119,349) who are taking a
combination of distance and non-distance courses. The vast majority (4,999,112,
or 83.0%) of distance students are studying at the undergraduate level.

Almost half of the distance education students are concentrated in just five percent of the institutions, while the top 47 institutions, only 1.0% of the total, enroll 23.0% (1,385,307) of all distance students.

The total number of students studying on campus (those not taking any distance course or taking a combination of distance and non-distance courses) dropped by almost one million (931,317) between 2012 and 2015. The largest declines came at for-profit institutions, which saw a 31.4% drop, followed by 2-year public institutions, which saw a 10.4% decrease.

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2019 Online Education Trends Report

https://www.bestcolleges.com/perspectives/annual-trends-in-online-education/

69% of online students identified employment as their primary goal for entering a program. 17% are grad students.
Seventy percent of administrators said they launch new programs with enrollment growth in mind, while meeting marketing and recruitment goals was their top concern.

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2018 Student Guide to Online Education

https://www.bestcolleges.com/perspectives/annual-student-guide-to-online-education/

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2017 Online Education Trends Report

2017 Online Education Trends Report

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Inside Higher Ed’s Survey of Faculty Attitudes on Technology

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/survey/survey-faculty-attitudes-technology

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more on distance education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=distance+education

mental health discussion

Mental health of college students and Lee’s new book: “Delivering College Mental Health”

Join Bryan Alexander and Lee Keyes, executive director, Counseling Center at the University of Alabama, and author of Delivering Effective College Mental Health Services for an engaging live discussion on the future of mental health in higher education.
Bryan plans to ask Lee about unfolding trends in college student mental health and his thoughts around the rise in anxiety and stress. We will explore how universities are changing their approaches to student mental health and what roles technology may play in harming or helping psychological well-being.
What questions or thoughts do you have? Join and take part in the discussion!
Registration at:
https://nam05.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fr20.rs6.net%2Ftn.jsp%3Ff%3D001wXPq-Mkb9ES5TqzpnbEq_kE8DYDepBVxUtrTbcGYDFbe6_cOIQEoQzKZeib2iwvQo7Y9lihL0XiKmPtaTLRXrr1gre1whAiXvgD2bfQq3o-Jd1T6RzoyzExSt_bI0aj9yC9K9yVr8QInpBWvFenbP1Th9LMZSAqCkX3idDvYBhE%3D%26c%3DOm7NHut1tu3xr83fqUbt5JAnaIqgZKFevlP1Qo_Vjb9lkMuzoNtrGQ%3D%3D%26ch%3DI4n_tILQzz-C9RV93BjCwbBVsCY6gpKj7z26S8u5R0LkVD5ly36v6A%3D%3D&data=01%7C01%7Cpmiltenoff%40stcloudstate.edu%7Cca88694f5230470d577c08d6da07f507%7C5e40e2ed600b4eeaa9851d0c9dcca629%7C0&sdata=yzcl7mA4bjSJrPBm494qlCIFlt8Of3MYolRMoJnWbgE%3D&reserved=0
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My notes from the webinar:
we have to understand stress in America. steadily climbing, even if generations experience it differently. https://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/stress/ 
Lee about “Mobile First” – like First Aid. Often by text and email. after Bryan asked how Adjuncts can deal with such situations, if
Counseling Centers need those additions.
Mobile First apps.
most crisis situations are a form of panic. if addressed quickly, one can prevent growing and turning into a major episode.
mindfulness can be different for the different type of issues of students.
libraries as the campus community center.
can be done on
conflation of immaturity and irresponsibility with stress and panic. Latter might be expressed in a way it is immature, but one has to meet them where they are, not judgement and denial, which will make it worse. Tough love will not help. Upholding classroom expectations and rules, but can be supportive at the same time. When pressed by time
Daniel Stanford De Paul. Cohort fundamentals of good teaching. instead of “fail safely”
https://www.mentalhealthfirstaid.org/ it is expensive. local tailor made concept by local program. put together the same concept.
academic hazing hasn’t changed since medieval time. the trauma instructors starts their career with.

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age for the first smart phone

https://www.kqed.org/mindshift/49742/deciding-at-what-age-to-give-a-kid-a-smartphone

Nov 21, 2017, Claire McInerny

We hear that smartphones can be addictive, that screen time can hurt learning, but can’t these minicomputers also teach kids about responsibility and put educational apps at their tiny fingertips?

safety

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit focused on kids and technology, says rather than considering the age of a child, focus on maturity. Some questions to consider are:

  • Are they responsible with their belongings?
  • Will they follow rules around phone use?
  • Would having easy access to friends benefit them for social reasons?
  • And do kids need to be in touch for safety reasons? If so, will an old-fashioned flip phone (like the one Sydney never charged) do the trick?

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https://www.digitaltrends.com/mobile/right-age-for-smartphone-child/ 2016

While Pew Research from 2015 puts adult smartphone ownership in the U.S. at 72 percent, there’s some debate about smartphone ownership among children. The average age for a child to get their first smartphone is currently 10.3 years according to the recent Influence Central report, Kids & Tech: The Evolution of Today’s Digital Natives.

An average of 65 percent of children aged between 8 and 11 have their own smartphone in the U.K. according to a survey by Internet Matters. That survey also found that the majority of parents would like a minimum age for smartphone ownership in the U.K. to be set at age 10.

However, some kids are using smartphones from a very young age. One study by the American Academy of Pediatrics that focused on children in an urban, low-income, minority community suggested that almost all children (96.6 percent) use mobile devices and that 75 percent have their own mobile device by the age of four.

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peer reviewed

Lauricella, A., Wartella, E., & Rideout, V. (2015). Young children’s screen time: The complex role of parent and child factors. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology36, 11–17. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appdev.2014.12.001

Wood, E., Petkovski, M., De Pasquale, D., Gottardo, A., Evans, M., & Savage, R. (2016). Parent Scaffolding of Young Children When Engaged with Mobile Technology. Frontiers in Psychology. Retrieved from http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/10024286/1/Wood_Parent_Scaffolding_Young_Children.pdf

Rikuya Hosokawa, & Toshiki Katsura. (2018). Association between mobile technology use and child adjustment in early elementary school age. PLoS ONE, 13(7), e0199959. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0199959

Percentage of moms whose children used device by age 2.(THE DATA PAGE)(Statistical data). (2011). Editor & Publisher, 144(10).

PERCENTAGE OF MOMS WHOSE CHILDREN USED DEVICE BY AGE 2

                          Gen Y moms   Gen X moms

Laptop                        34%          29%
Cell Phone                    34%          26%
Smart Phone                   33%          20%
Digital Camera                30%          18%
iPod                          34%          13%
Videogame System              13%           8%
Hand-held gaming device       13%          10%

Source: Frank N. Magid & Associates, Inc./Metacafe

E moms blogher and parenting 8 2, jkc from Elisa Camahort Page

 

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more about the use of mobile devices in the classroom in this IMS blog entry
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/04/03/use-of-laptops-in-the-classroom/

Innovative Pedagogy

Rebecca Ferguson
  • Senior lecturer in the Institute of Educational Technology (IET) at The Open University in the UK
  • Senior fellow of the Higher Education Academy
TODAY, Thursday at 1:00 PM CT
JOIN HERE
This Week:
An interactive discussion on the Innovating Pedagogy 2019 report from The Open University
About the Guest
Rebecca is a senior lecturer in the Institute of Educational Technology (IET) at The Open University in the UK and a senior fellow of the Higher Education Academy. Her primary research interests are educational futures, and how people learn together online and I supervise doctoral students in both these areas.
Rebecca worked for several years as a researcher and educator on the Schome project, which focuses on educational futures, and was also the research lead on the SocialLearn online learning platform, and learning analytics lead on the Open Science Lab (Outstanding ICT Initiative of the Year: THE Awards 2014). She is currently a pedagogic adviser to the FutureLearn MOOC platform, and evaluation lead on The Open University’s FutureLearn MOOCs. She is an active member of the Society for Learning Analytics Research, and have co-chaired many learning analytics events, included several associated with the Learning Analytics Community Exchange (LACE), European Project funded under Framework 7.
Rebecca’s most recent book, Augmented Education, was published by Palgrave in spring 2014.
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My notes
innovative assessment is needed for innovative pedagogy.
Analytics. what is I want to know about my learning (from the learner’s perspective)
Ray Garcelon
How is “stealth assessment” unique compared to formative assessment?
students teaching robots
learning analytics, Rebecca is an authority.
how to assess resources are trustworthy, fake news and social media, navigating post-truth society
how to advance the cause of empathy through technological means
gamification. XR safer environment. digital storytelling and empathy.
poll : learning with robots –
digital literacy and importance for curriculum primary, secondary and post secondary level.
digital literacy is changing every year;
drones
Buckingham Shum, S., & Ferguson, R. (2012). Social Learning Analytics. Educational Technology & Society15(3), 3–26.https://mnpals-scs.primo.exlibrisgroup.com/discovery/fulldisplay?docid=ericEJ992500&context=PC&vid=01MNPALS_SCS:SCS&search_scope=MyInst_and_CI&tab=Everything&lang=en
Mor, Y., Ferguson, R., & Wasson, B. (2015). Editorial: Learning design, teacher inquiry into student learning and learning analytics: A call for action. British Journal of Educational Technology46(2), 221–229. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.12273
Rebecca Ferguson. (2014). Learning Analytics: drivers, developments and challenges. TD Tecnologie Didattiche22(3), 138–147. https://doi.org/10.17471/2499-4324/183
Hansen, C., Emin, V., Wasson, B., Mor, Y., Rodriguez-Triana, M., Dascalu, M., … Pernin, J. (2013). Towards an Integrated Model of Teacher Inquiry into Student Learning, Learning Design and Learning Analytics. Scaling up Learning for Sustained Impact – Proceedings of EC-TEL 20138095, 605–606. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-40814-4_73
how to decolonize educational technology: MOOCs coming from the big colonial powers, not from small countries. Video games: many have very colonial perspective
strategies for innovative pedagogies: only certainly groups or aspects taking into account; rarely focus on support by management, scheduling, time tabling, tech support.

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more on future trends in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=future+trends

OLC Collaborate

OLC Collaborate

https://onlinelearningconsortium.org/attend-2019/innovate/

schedule:

https://onlinelearningconsortium.org/attend-2019/innovate/program/all_sessions/#streamed

Wednesday

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THE NEW PROFESSOR: HOW I PODCASTED MY WAY INTO STUDENTS’ LIVES (AND HOW YOU CAN, TOO)

Concurrent Session 1

https://onlinelearningconsortium.org/olc-innovate-2019-session-page/?session=6734&kwds=

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Creating A Cost-Free Course

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Idea Hose: AI Design For People
Date: Wednesday, April 3rd
Time: 3:30 PM to 4:15 PM
Conference Session: Concurrent Session 3
Streamed session
Lead Presenter: Brian Kane (General Design LLC)
Track: Research: Designs, Methods, and Findings
Location: Juniper A
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:What happens when you apply design thinking to AI? AI presents a fundamental change in the way people interact with machines. By applying design thinking to the way AI is made and used, we can generate an unlimited amount of new ideas for products and experiences that people will love and use.https://onlinelearningconsortium.org/olc-innovate-2019-session-page/?session=6964&kwds=
Notes from the session:
design thinking: get out from old mental models.  new narratives; get out of the sci fi movies.
narrative generators: AI design for people stream
we need machines to make mistakes. Ai even more then traditional software.
Lessons learned: don’t replace people
creativity engines – automated creativity.
trends:
 AI Design for People stream49 PM-us9swehttps://www.androidauthority.com/nvidia-jetson-nano-966609/
https://community.infiniteflight.com/t/virtualhub-ios-and-android-free/142837?u=sudafly
 http://bit.ly/VirtualHub
Thursday
Chatbots, Game Theory, And AI: Adapting Learning For Humans, Or Innovating Humans Out Of The Picture?
Date: Thursday, April 4th
Time: 8:45 AM to 9:30 AM
Conference Session: Concurrent Session 4
Streamed session
Lead Presenter: Matt Crosslin (University of Texas at Arlington LINK Research Lab)
Track: Experiential and Life-Long Learning
Location: Cottonwood 4-5
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:How can teachers utilize chatbots and artificial intelligence in ways that won’t remove humans out of the education picture? Using tools like Twine and Recast.AI chatobts, this session will focus on how to build adaptive content that allows learners to create their own heutagogical educational pathways based on individual needs.++++++++++++++++

This Is Us: Fostering Effective Storytelling Through EdTech & Student’s Influence As Digital Citizens
Date: Thursday, April 4th
Time: 9:45 AM to 10:30 AM
Conference Session: Concurrent Session 5
Streamed session
Lead Presenter: Maikel Alendy (FIU Online)
Co-presenter: Sky V. King (FIU Online – Florida International University)
Track: Teaching and Learning Practice
Location: Cottonwood 4-5
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:“This is Us” demonstrates how leveraging storytelling in learning engages students to effectively communicate their authentic story, transitioning from consumerism to become creators and influencers. Addressing responsibility as a digital citizen, information and digital literacy, online privacy, and strategies with examples using several edtech tools, will be reviewed.++++++++++++++++++

Personalized Learning At Scale: Using Adaptive Tools & Digital Assistants
Date: Thursday, April 4th
Time: 11:15 AM to 12:00 PM
Conference Session: Concurrent Session 6
Streamed session
Lead Presenter: Kristin Bushong (Arizona State University )
Co-presenter: Heather Nebrich (Arizona State University)
Track: Effective Tools, Toys and Technologies
Location: Juniper C
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:Considering today’s overstimulated lifestyle, how do we engage busy learners to stay on task? Join this session to discover current efforts in implementing ubiquitous educational opportunities through customized interests and personalized learning aspirations e.g., adaptive math tools, AI support communities, and memory management systems.+++++++++++++

High-Impact Practices Online: Starting The Conversation
Date: Thursday, April 4th
Time: 1:15 PM to 2:00 PM
Conference Session: Concurrent Session 7
Streamed session
Lead Presenter: Katie Linder (Oregon State University)
Co-presenter: June Griffin (University of Nebraska-Lincoln)
Track: Teaching and Learning Practice
Location: Cottonwood 4-5
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:The concept of High-impact Educational Practices (HIPs) is well-known, but the conversation about transitioning HIPs online is new. In this session, contributors from the edited collection High-Impact Practices in Online Education will share current HIP research, and offer ideas for participants to reflect on regarding implementing HIPs into online environments.https://www.aacu.org/leap/hipshttps://www.aacu.org/sites/default/files/files/LEAP/HIP_tables.pdf+++++++++++++++++++++++

Human Skills For Digital Natives: Expanding Our Definition Of Tech And Media Literacy
Date: Thursday, April 4th
Time: 3:45 PM to 5:00 PM
Streamed session
Lead Presenter: Manoush Zomorodi (Stable Genius Productions)
Track: N/A
Location: Adams Ballroom
Session Duration: 1hr 15min
Brief Abstract:How can we ensure that students and educators thrive in increasingly digital environments, where change is the only constant? In this keynote, author and journalist Manoush Zomorodi shares her pioneering approach to researching the effects of technology on our behavior. Her unique brand of journalism includes deep-dive investigations into such timely topics as personal privacy, information overload, and the Attention Economy. These interactive multi-media experiments with tens of thousands of podcast listeners will inspire you to think creatively about how we use technology to educate and grow communities.Friday

Anger Is An Energy
Date: Friday, April 5th
Time: 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
Streamed session
Lead Presenter: Michael Caulfield (Washington State University-Vancouver)
Track: N/A
Location: Adams Ballroom
Position: 2
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:Years ago, John Lyndon (then Johnny Rotten) sang that “anger is an energy.” And he was right, of course. Anger isn’t an emotion, like happiness or sadness. It’s a reaction, a swelling up of a confused urge. I’m a person profoundly uncomfortable with anger, but yet I’ve found in my professional career that often my most impactful work begins in a place of anger: anger against injustice, inequality, lies, or corruption. And often it is that anger that gives me the energy and endurance to make a difference, to move the mountains that need to be moved. In this talk I want to think through our uneasy relationship with anger; how it can be helpful, and how it can destroy us if we’re not careful.++++++++++++++++

Improving Online Teaching Practice, Creating Community And Sharing Resources
Date: Friday, April 5th
Time: 10:45 AM to 11:30 AM
Conference Session: Concurrent Session 10
Streamed session
Lead Presenter: Laurie Daily (Augustana University)
Co-presenter: Sharon Gray (Augustana University)
Track: Problems, Processes, and Practices
Location: Juniper A
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:The purpose of this session is to explore the implementation of a Community of Practice to support professional development, enhance online course and program development efforts, and to foster community and engagement between and among full and part time faculty.+++++++++++++++

It’s Not What You Teach, It’s HOW You Teach: A Story-Driven Approach To Course Design
Date: Friday, April 5th
Time: 11:45 AM to 12:30 PM
Conference Session: Concurrent Session 11
Streamed session
Lead Presenter: Katrina Rainer (Strayer University)
Co-presenter: Jennifer M McVay-Dyche (Strayer University)
Track: Teaching and Learning Practice
Location: Cottonwood 2-3
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:Learning is more effective and organic when we teach through the art of storytelling. At Strayer University, we are blending the principles story-driven learning with research-based instructional design practices to create engaging learning experiences. This session will provide you with strategies to strategically infuse stories into any lesson, course, or curriculum.

game based learning

How Game-Based Learning Empowers Students for the Future

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2019-01-22-its-2019-so-why-do-21st-century-skills-still-matter

educators’ guide to game-based learning, packed with resources for gaming gurus and greenhorns alike.

How are schools and districts preparing students for future opportunities? What is the impact of game-based learning?

It’s 2019. So Why Do 21st-Century Skills Still Matter?

By Suzie Boss     Jan 22, 2019

21st-century trends such as makerspaces, flipped learning, genius hour, gamification, and more.

EdLeader21, a national network of Battelle for Kids.has developed a toolkit to guide districts and independent schools in developing their own “portrait of a graduate” as a visioning exercise. In some communities, global citizenship rises to the top of the wish list of desired outcomes. Others emphasize entrepreneurship, civic engagement, or traits like persistence or self-management.

ISTE Standards for Students highlight digital citizenship and computational thinking as key skills that will enable students to thrive as empowered learners. The U.S. Department of Education describes a globally competent student as one who can investigate the world, weigh perspectives, communicate effectively with diverse audiences, and take action.

Frameworks provide mental models, but “don’t usually help educators know what to do differently,” argues technology leadership expert Scott McLeod in his latest book, Harnessing Technology for Deeper Learning. He and co-author Julie Graber outline deliberate shifts that help teachers redesign traditional lessons to emphasize goals such as critical thinking, authenticity, and conceptual understanding.

1. Wondering how to teach and assess 21st-century competencies? The Buck Institute for Education offers a wide range of resources, including the book, PBL for 21st Century Success: Teaching Critical Thinking, Collaboration, Communication, and Creativity (Boss, 2013), and downloadable rubrics for each of the 4Cs.

2. For more strategies about harnessing technology for deeper learning,listen to the EdSurge podcast featuring edtech expert and author Scott McLeod.

3. Eager to see 21st-century learning in action? Getting Smart offers suggestions for using school visits as a springboard for professional learning, including a list of recommended sites. Bob Pearlman, a leader in 21st century learning, offers more recommendations.

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more on game- based learning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=game+based

Microcredentials and Digital Badges in Higher Ed

Microcredentials and Digital Badges in Higher Education

November 27 – 29, 2018  Savannah, GA

https://www.academicimpressions.com/microcredentials-and-digital-badges-in-higher-education

Badging programs are rapidly gaining momentum in higher education – join us to learn how to get your badging efforts off the ground.

Key Considerations: Assessment of Competencies

During this session, you will learn how to ask the right questions and evaluate if badges are a good fit within your unique institutional context, including determining ROI on badging efforts. You’ll also learn how to assess the competencies behind digital badges.


 

Key Technology Considerations

This session will allow for greater understanding of Open Badges standards, the variety of technology software and platforms, and the portability of badges. We will also explore emerging trends in the digital badging space and discuss campus considerations.

Key Financial Considerations

During this hour, we will take a closer look at answering key financial questions surrounding badges:

  • What does the business model look like behind existing institutional badging initiatives?
  • Are these money-makers for an institution? Is there revenue potential?
  • Where does funding for these efforts come from?
Partnering with Industry

Badging can be a catalyst for partnerships between higher education and industry. In this session, you will have the opportunity to learn more about strategies for collaborating with industry in the development of badges and how badges align with employer expectations.

Branding and Marketing Badges

Now that we have a better idea of the “why” and “what” of badges, how do we market their value to external and internal stakeholders? You’ll see examples of how other institutions are designing and marketing their badges.

Consultation Time

Alongside your peers and our expert instructors, you will have the opportunity to brainstorm ideas, get feedback, ask questions, and get answers.

Next Steps and the Road Ahead: Where Badging in Higher Ed is Going

Most institutions are getting into the badging game, and we’ll talk about the far-reaching considerations in the world of badging. We’ll use this time to engage in forward-thinking and discuss the future of badging and what future trends in badging might be.

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more on microcredentialing in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=microcredentialing

ELI 2018 Key Issues Teaching Learning

Key Issues in Teaching and Learning

https://www.educause.edu/eli/initiatives/key-issues-in-teaching-and-learning

A roster of results since 2011 is here.

ELI 2018 key issues

1. Academic Transformation

2. Accessibility and UDL

3. Faculty Development

4. Privacy and Security

5. Digital and Information Literacies

https://cdn.nmc.org/media/2017-nmc-strategic-brief-digital-literacy-in-higher-education-II.pdf
Three Models of Digital Literacy: Universal, Creative, Literacy Across Disciplines

United States digital literacy frameworks tend to focus on educational policy details and personal empowerment, the latter encouraging learners to become more effective students, better creators, smarter information consumers, and more influential members of their community.

National policies are vitally important in European digital literacy work, unsurprising for a continent well populated with nation-states and struggling to redefine itself, while still trying to grow economies in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis and subsequent financial pressures

African digital literacy is more business-oriented.

Middle Eastern nations offer yet another variation, with a strong focus on media literacy. As with other regions, this can be a response to countries with strong state influence or control over local media. It can also represent a drive to produce more locally-sourced content, as opposed to consuming material from abroad, which may elicit criticism of neocolonialism or religious challenges.

p. 14 Digital literacy for Humanities: What does it mean to be digitally literate in history, literature, or philosophy? Creativity in these disciplines often involves textuality, given the large role writing plays in them, as, for example, in the Folger Shakespeare Library’s instructor’s guide. In the digital realm, this can include web-based writing through social media, along with the creation of multimedia projects through posters, presentations, and video. Information literacy remains a key part of digital literacy in the humanities. The digital humanities movement has not seen much connection with digital literacy, unfortunately, but their alignment seems likely, given the turn toward using digital technologies to explore humanities questions. That development could then foster a spread of other technologies and approaches to the rest of the humanities, including mapping, data visualization, text mining, web-based digital archives, and “distant reading” (working with very large bodies of texts). The digital humanities’ emphasis on making projects may also increase

Digital Literacy for Business: Digital literacy in this world is focused on manipulation of data, from spreadsheets to more advanced modeling software, leading up to degrees in management information systems. Management classes unsurprisingly focus on how to organize people working on and with digital tools.

Digital Literacy for Computer Science: Naturally, coding appears as a central competency within this discipline. Other aspects of the digital world feature prominently, including hardware and network architecture. Some courses housed within the computer science discipline offer a deeper examination of the impact of computing on society and politics, along with how to use digital tools. Media production plays a minor role here, beyond publications (posters, videos), as many institutions assign multimedia to other departments. Looking forward to a future when automation has become both more widespread and powerful, developing artificial intelligence projects will potentially play a role in computer science literacy.

6. Integrated Planning and Advising Systems for Student Success (iPASS)

7. Instructional Design

8. Online and Blended Learning

In traditional instruction, students’ first contact with new ideas happens in class, usually through direct instruction from the professor; after exposure to the basics, students are turned out of the classroom to tackle the most difficult tasks in learning — those that involve application, analysis, synthesis, and creativity — in their individual spaces. Flipped learning reverses this, by moving first contact with new concepts to the individual space and using the newly-expanded time in class for students to pursue difficult, higher-level tasks together, with the instructor as a guide.

Let’s take a look at some of the myths about flipped learning and try to find the facts.

Myth: Flipped learning is predicated on recording videos for students to watch before class.

Fact: Flipped learning does not require video. Although many real-life implementations of flipped learning use video, there’s nothing that says video must be used. In fact, one of the earliest instances of flipped learning — Eric Mazur’s peer instruction concept, used in Harvard physics classes — uses no video but rather an online text outfitted with social annotation software. And one of the most successful public instances of flipped learning, an edX course on numerical methods designed by Lorena Barba of George Washington University, uses precisely one video. Video is simply not necessary for flipped learning, and many alternatives to video can lead to effective flipped learning environments [http://rtalbert.org/flipped-learning-without-video/].

Myth: Flipped learning replaces face-to-face teaching.

Fact: Flipped learning optimizes face-to-face teaching. Flipped learning may (but does not always) replace lectures in class, but this is not to say that it replaces teaching. Teaching and “telling” are not the same thing.

Myth: Flipped learning has no evidence to back up its effectiveness.

Fact: Flipped learning research is growing at an exponential pace and has been since at least 2014. That research — 131 peer-reviewed articles in the first half of 2017 alone — includes results from primary, secondary, and postsecondary education in nearly every discipline, most showing significant improvements in student learning, motivation, and critical thinking skills.

Myth: Flipped learning is a fad.

Fact: Flipped learning has been with us in the form defined here for nearly 20 years.

Myth: People have been doing flipped learning for centuries.

Fact: Flipped learning is not just a rebranding of old techniques. The basic concept of students doing individually active work to encounter new ideas that are then built upon in class is almost as old as the university itself. So flipped learning is, in a real sense, a modern means of returning higher education to its roots. Even so, flipped learning is different from these time-honored techniques.

Myth: Students and professors prefer lecture over flipped learning.

Fact: Students and professors embrace flipped learning once they understand the benefits. It’s true that professors often enjoy their lectures, and students often enjoy being lectured to. But the question is not who “enjoys” what, but rather what helps students learn the best.They know what the research says about the effectiveness of active learning

Assertion: Flipped learning provides a platform for implementing active learning in a way that works powerfully for students.

9. Evaluating Technology-based Instructional Innovations

Transitioning to an ROI lens requires three fundamental shifts
What is the total cost of my innovation, including both new spending and the use of existing resources?

What’s the unit I should measure that connects cost with a change in performance?

How might the expected change in student performance also support a more sustainable financial model?

The Exposure Approach: we don’t provide a way for participants to determine if they learned anything new or now have the confidence or competence to apply what they learned.

The Exemplar Approach: from ‘show and tell’ for adults to show, tell, do and learn.

The Tutorial Approach: Getting a group that can meet at the same time and place can be challenging. That is why many faculty report a preference for self-paced professional development.build in simple self-assessment checks. We can add prompts that invite people to engage in some sort of follow up activity with a colleague. We can also add an elective option for faculty in a tutorial to actually create or do something with what they learned and then submit it for direct or narrative feedback.

The Course Approach: a non-credit format, these have the benefits of a more structured and lengthy learning experience, even if they are just three to five-week short courses that meet online or in-person once every week or two.involve badges, portfolios, peer assessment, self-assessment, or one-on-one feedback from a facilitator

The Academy Approach: like the course approach, is one that tends to be a deeper and more extended experience. People might gather in a cohort over a year or longer.Assessment through coaching and mentoring, the use of portfolios, peer feedback and much more can be easily incorporated to add a rich assessment element to such longer-term professional development programs.

The Mentoring Approach: The mentors often don’t set specific learning goals with the mentee. Instead, it is often a set of structured meetings, but also someone to whom mentees can turn with questions and tips along the way.

The Coaching Approach: A mentor tends to be a broader type of relationship with a person.A coaching relationship tends to be more focused upon specific goals, tasks or outcomes.

The Peer Approach:This can be done on a 1:1 basis or in small groups, where those who are teaching the same courses are able to compare notes on curricula and teaching models. They might give each other feedback on how to teach certain concepts, how to write syllabi, how to handle certain teaching and learning challenges, and much more. Faculty might sit in on each other’s courses, observe, and give feedback afterward.

The Self-Directed Approach:a self-assessment strategy such as setting goals and creating simple checklists and rubrics to monitor our progress. Or, we invite feedback from colleagues, often in a narrative and/or informal format. We might also create a portfolio of our work, or engage in some sort of learning journal that documents our thoughts, experiments, experiences, and learning along the way.

The Buffet Approach:

10. Open Education

Figure 1. A Model for Networked Education (Credit: Image by Catherine Cronin, building on
Interpretations of
Balancing Privacy and Openness (Credit: Image by Catherine Cronin. CC BY-SA)

11. Learning Analytics

12. Adaptive Teaching and Learning

13. Working with Emerging Technology

In 2014, administrators at Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC) in Charlotte, North Carolina, began talks with members of the North Carolina State Board of Community Colleges and North Carolina Community College System (NCCCS) leadership about starting a CBE program.

Building on an existing project at CPCC for identifying the elements of a digital learning environment (DLE), which was itself influenced by the EDUCAUSE publication The Next Generation Digital Learning Environment: A Report on Research,1 the committee reached consensus on a DLE concept and a shared lexicon: the “Digital Learning Environment Operational Definitions,

Figure 1. NC-CBE Digital Learning Environment

MOOC and online learning discussion

Bryan Alexander’s Future Trends Forum

Thursday, October 4th, at 2:00 PM ET
Special Guest:
Anant Agarwal, CEO and founder of edX as well as Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT
This Week’s Topic:
An interactive discussion on MOOCs, online learning, and the goal of 100 million learners by 2022
The Future Trends Forum welcomes
Anant Agarwal , the founder and CEO of edX, a non-profit venture created by Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, focused on transforming online and on-campus learning through groundbreaking methodologies.
He aims to help bring quality education to everyone, everywhere. Anant has also been a Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT for 30 years.

register: https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fr20.rs6.net%2Ftn.jsp%3Ff%3D001PgetuutFAOolFnliDMeMmErN-enK2gL_yjiPr06Xh7efV0AVvMGKlpU8dfbBxJhBP_uc98IVJgJlsZDRjzWS9b4vPEEtrEhlBX281rdxsV-7fespDLmne7JWfR3n1iFffb-CEy9EvixERnOfzEfixk7rn6G3bwuvzCtRtyyHU-h0woglE1tLOQ%3D%3D%26c%3D3Q4OLdux-1PVXXKEZKF8fyf8cwMV8MUcmStG2pRDxgswHEo2OG9aVQ%3D%3D%26ch%3DA7IVs0tirxv4LKmg8KVx05x70YdR0QKXYu9MnQHCYyOu-vwaHIJWKQ%3D%3D&data=01%7C01%7Cpmiltenoff%40stcloudstate.edu%7C1baa122241b0415403d508d628723d79%7C5e40e2ed600b4eeaa9851d0c9dcca629%7C0&sdata=LjOA9M76larAmw%2BYg0vPn69CvQB2fC91hLOXkDW43XQ%3D&reserved=0

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more on MOOC in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mooc

media, digital literacy and fake news

An interactive discussion on media, digital literacy and fake news

Bryan Alexander’s Future Trends Forum w/ Special Guest Jennifer Sparrow

https://shindig.com/login/event/ftf-sparrow

On this week’s Future Trends Forum, Bryan Alexander and Jennifer Sparrow, the Senior Director of Teaching and Learning with Technology at Penn State University, will explore the significance of media and digital literacy, especially in the era of fake news.

Jennifer and Bryan will further dissect how digital literacy and fluency differ, and why this difference is important.

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more on digital literacy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy+education

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